Author Topic: Goodbye Windows, Hello Linux [advice needed for a Linux workstation at home]  (Read 14367 times)

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Offline HoracioDos

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Re: Goodbye Windows, Hello Linux [advice needed for a Linux workstation at home]
« Reply #225 on: February 01, 2019, 11:47:02 am »
You can install timeshift to make system snapshots before upgrading. If something goes wrong you can easily revert changes. That's why I like Mint. It is already there and it works like a charm
 

Online Nominal Animal

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Re: Goodbye Windows, Hello Linux [advice needed for a Linux workstation at home]
« Reply #226 on: February 01, 2019, 05:19:25 pm »
- Grub decided to chain other independent Grub installations from other disks, disks that have their independent Grubs, and that were never chained before.  Of course, it did a complete mess.  This won't be easy to untangle.
Why Grub, why?  :palm:
Because the update authors are trying to cater to users who are not in control of their own tools.

Why is it so hard for Gnome to remember icons' position relative to each monitor, and not relative to "X screen 0"? :horse:
Gnome developers believe user access to tunables is evil, and that Gnome should behave the exact way the developers designed.  It bit you, because none of them have the same configuration as you do.

(This is intended as a honest description, and not as snarky.  Me just fail English, though.)
 

Online RoGeorge

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Re: Goodbye Windows, Hello Linux [advice needed for a Linux workstation at home]
« Reply #227 on: February 01, 2019, 05:53:46 pm »
OK, then.  No hard feelings.
It's time to get KDE Plasma a try, I guess
 ^-^

Online Nominal Animal

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Re: Goodbye Windows, Hello Linux [advice needed for a Linux workstation at home]
« Reply #228 on: February 01, 2019, 08:02:07 pm »
It's time to get KDE Plasma a try, I guess
Go for it :-+ Before you try, you won't know if it works for you or not.

I personally like XFCE and LXDE, and will simply switch between Gnome/XFCE/KDE at login time, by selecting the session type, depending on what I do.  Although I don't like Gnome much, I keep using it to keep my experience fresh so I can help students having issues with it on the exact same hardware.

If you can afford the time and effort in experimenting a bit -- as in, using the different ones when trying to accomplish actual tasks, but recognizing that the UI being unfamiliar means it will feel odd and clunky at first --, I do definitely recommend testing the different ones; even up to seeing how hard/easy they would be to customize to your own needs.  In practice, that means that at random, when you have a task to accomplish, but extra time to do it in, use a different Desktop Environment to see how you would accomplish the task there.  The best test cases are the dull ones, like creating backups, examining your archived emails, connecting to network shares or your own NAS box, and so on.

(The first thing I do when I create my own user account in any Gnome variants, is adding my own Oblivion-derived theme to the terminal and text editors.  I need fully black backgrounds, as I use them full screen and switch between them, and dark background seems more comfortable to my eyes than light backgrounds.  I don't even bother keeping the XML theme file around; I just edit it on the fly.  Not everything needs to be optimized; it is always a balance, and it will change in time.)

I must admit that in my particular case -- I deal with a lot of tabulated data in text form, PDF versions of published articles, and so on -- knowing bash, find, sed, and awk (and related command-line conversion utility toolkits, like NetPBM tools and GhostScript/Poppler scriptlets) makes a much bigger difference than any of the desktop environments.  You don't need to remember their syntax offhand, except for POSIX basic and/or extended regular expression syntax, which you should consider a mathematical form for expressing matchable character sequences, but being familiar with their use means that rather than looking for GUI or DE tools to find/catalog/index something, you write a single-use stanza on the command line to accomplish the task in one go.  I keep a browser tab open to bash, awk, and make user guides (single-page versions), plus man pages open to sed, find, stat, xargs, or whatever tools I think I might use, because I do not bother to remember the details; I only remember how they work in the conceptual level.  Works just fine.  Even stuff I've never done before feels easy, as long as I have the necessary information on the file formats, problem at hand, and what it is that one wishes to accomplish.  (This also means I find "tests" where someone asks what option X does for command Y ridiculous: why would you bother remembering such details, when you can trivially check?  My brain is limited, and I'd rather use it to solve problems than store facts and details that I can in any case look up faster than I can speak them out loud.) 

Usually, the bottleneck is my brain, trying to figure out whether I am looking at the problem at the right level of abstraction.  I don't know how many times my subconscious pipes up five minutes later or the next morning, pointing out how to solve the undiscussed underlying problem with a small fraction of the effort.  If I did a :palm: every time, I'd have a dent in my forehead.  So, I've learned that to accomplish things efficiently, I must think at them quite a bit first, rather than dive in head first.  But I like doing that, too.
 

Online RoGeorge

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Re: Ditching Windows at home [Linux advice needed]
« Reply #229 on: April 01, 2020, 03:47:19 pm »
24 FPS is the movie frame-rate (23.976).  My monitors are all 60Hz.  Vsync also works at 60Hz, I guess.

This needs a framerate conversion from 24.976Hz to 60Hz.  What I noticed is, when only one monitor is active and video is full screen, then the BLIT changes to FLIP.  BLIT means a bitmap image is copied at a certain location in the video screen RAM (asynchronous, I guess), while FLIP means a full image is built in a buffer, and the buffer is flipped to display during a vertical sync, synchronous with the monitor's frame rate.

BLIP or FLIP, a framerate conversion is still required from 24 to 60fps.

When properly implemented, the frame-rate conversion must be done (on the fly), and with frame interpolation.  Without frame interpolation, the image will stutter here and there, because 60Hz is not a multiple of 23.976Hz.

I don't know who's job the frame rate conversion is, the GPU driver, the movie player/decoder, or maybe some other window composer.

That stutter in movies haunted me for years, both in Windows and in Linux.  It's now gone!   :phew:

The only player (I know) that can take into account not only the movie frame rate, but the monitor's refresh rate, too.  The player is MPV, and the feature is called display-resample.  Looking for this feature for a long, long time.  To enable it, in the "mpv.conf" file (mine is in the "~/.config/mpv/" directory), uncomment the "video-sync=display-resample" line, like this:
Quote from: file://~/.config/mpv/mpv.conf
...
# Specify high quality video rendering preset (for --vo=gpu only)
# Can cause performance problems with some drivers and GPUs.
profile=gpu-hq

# Force video to lock on the display's refresh rate, and change video and audio
# speed to some degree to ensure synchronous playback - can cause problems
# with some drivers and desktop environments.
video-sync=display-resample

# Enable hardware decoding if available. Often, this does not work with all
# video outputs, but should work well with default settings on most systems.
# If performance or energy usage is an issue, forcing the vdpau or vaapi VOs
# may or may not help.
hwdec=auto
...

For more configuration details, see this MPV brief from the Arch Linux wiki (or, the full MPV docs).

MPV with display-resample gives perfectly fluid movies!  :-+ :-+ :-+


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