Author Topic: Resistors and organization  (Read 12293 times)

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Offline Six_Shooter

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Resistors and organization
« on: December 05, 2013, 06:43:10 pm »
How do you organize your resistors, and related, diodes?

Currently in my school kit I have a small box that is divided into 6 sections and each decade series of E12 resistor values in each compartment, separated into 3 bags in each. (http://www.eio.com/p-32483-elenco-rk-365-resistor-kit-five-5-each-of-73-standard-values.aspx) It works, because it's compact, but can be annoying to use.

I'm looking for a solution for my home lab, so far I have organized the resistors I have into their respective values in some small bags. I bought a small storage container  that has dividers (http://www.planomolding.com/product.php?PID=946) thinking that the resistors in packages would fit nicely, but not as nice as I would like. I have plenty of E24 values as well, that I would like to incorporate into the same organized container/solution if I can.


I'm contemplating re-purposing one of my small drawer organizers for this purpose, but I would like something that could be portable at the same time, without fear of losing anything or spilling.

I've been struggling with this for years, and haven't found anything I like yet.

So what's your solution?
 

Offline c4757p

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Re: Resistors and organization
« Reply #1 on: December 05, 2013, 06:53:25 pm »
How do you organize your resistors, and related, diodes?

Diodes? How many different kinds do you have? I have a plastic case with sections: signal P-N, power P-N, signal Schottky, power Schottky, Zener, "special". Both Zener and "special" go in small paper pouches with a description written on them.

I use one of those parts organizers that you can buy at a hardware store (with many small drawers) for resistors. Twelve drawers on the left organize by E12 and E24 value: 10/11, 12/13, 15/16, 18/20, etc. Twelve drawers on the right organize by E12, above 1 watt (I don't have any E24 power resistors). The remaining drawers in the middle hold trimmers, thermistors, etc.

SMD parts are done separately, sorted into paper pouches which go into one of a few boxes (resistors, reactives, simple semiconductors, ICs).

Quote
I'm contemplating re-purposing one of my small drawer organizers for this purpose, but I would like something that could be portable at the same time, without fear of losing anything or spilling.

I have found "portable" and "easily accessible" to be somewhat mutually exclusive with small parts.
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Offline Neilm

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Re: Resistors and organization
« Reply #2 on: December 05, 2013, 07:06:29 pm »
Quote
I'm contemplating re-purposing one of my small drawer organizers for this purpose, but I would like something that could be portable at the same time, without fear of losing anything or spilling.

I have found "portable" and "easily accessible" to be somewhat mutually exclusive with small parts.

I have a small box that I believe used to hold contact lenses. It now contains 0603 resistors with all the E12 value resistors up to about 330k.
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Offline c4757p

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Re: Resistors and organization
« Reply #3 on: December 05, 2013, 07:12:40 pm »
Small, not tiny. SMD organizers are great, but organizers for PTH resistors and such are not.
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Offline John Coloccia

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Re: Resistors and organization
« Reply #4 on: December 05, 2013, 11:37:48 pm »
This isn't what I personally do, but you said you wanted it portable.  I'd seriously consider getting a binder and a bunch of 9 pocket baseball card protectors.  You can fit an awful lot of components in a binder this way.
 

Offline deth502

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Re: Resistors and organization
« Reply #5 on: December 06, 2013, 12:30:47 am »
i use 2 of these.

 

Offline Six_Shooter

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Re: Resistors and organization
« Reply #6 on: December 06, 2013, 01:25:39 am »
It doesn't NEED to be portable, it would have just been nice to be.

How many diodes? Not sure, but I have at least 10 different numbers separated right now and probably about the same number to sort through.

It seems like there's no ideas yet that I haven't thought of, or tried or have seen, yet. I'm hoping to see a suggestion that I have seen or thought of yet, that will be what I want.

I'd also be interested in how people are organizing their ICs and transistors. My idea here is to get a sheet of ESD foam, cutting it into small enough pieces to stack inside a shoe box size box, and stack many of these ontop of each other organized into families of ICs, as in all TTL type devices in one box, OP-amps in another, etc.

Thanks for the suggestions so far.
 

Online nctnico

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Re: Resistors and organization
« Reply #7 on: December 06, 2013, 01:37:24 am »
I have small SMT boxes for SMT components. I keep thru-holes components in the bags they came in and put those in a drawer sorted by value. Bags are the best way to store a lot of components in a small space.
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Offline pickle9000

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Re: Resistors and organization
« Reply #8 on: December 06, 2013, 01:47:42 am »
I'm using hockey card or business card binder pages for small quantity stuff. Reels and large items are a never-ending pain.
 

Offline strangelovemd12

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Re: Resistors and organization
« Reply #9 on: December 06, 2013, 01:48:43 am »
Anything and everything by Sortimo, as long as you're made of money.  Elsewise see the above posts.

Also, Dave goes over this a bit in one or two of the vBlogs.  It's at least in the one where he walks you through the lab (before he moved to the new one) as I recall.

Edit:  Searchable browser history to the rescue.  This reminds me, I should really clear out my browser history...

 http://youtu.be/LXIoZBCr3Xk?t=8m

« Last Edit: December 06, 2013, 01:53:45 am by strangelovemd12 »
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Offline John Coloccia

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Re: Resistors and organization
« Reply #10 on: December 06, 2013, 04:32:20 am »

It seems like there's no ideas yet that I haven't thought of, or tried or have seen, yet. I'm hoping to see a suggestion that I have seen or thought of yet, that will be what I want.


It might be helpful if you explain why you don't like any of the ideas here.  I mean, nearly every way of organizing something is represented here, so there must be something special you have in mind.  If you can find a way to articulate that, that would be helpful because it's easier to solve a specific problem than to randomly toss out ideas.

For example, in my case I needed quick access to the E12 series resistors.  I ended up with one of these:

http://www.grainger.com/product/AKRO-MILS-Cabinet-3AJ39?s_pp=false

and organized the resistors like this:
100  150  220 330  470 680
120  180  270 390  560 820
1.0k 1.5k 2.2k 3.3k 4.7k 6.8k
1.2k 1.8k 2.7k 3.9k 5.6k 8.2k

etc, etc.  Down the right side (in the unused two columns) go resistors from 10 to 82, and also some of the oddball ones...1M, 1.5M, etc....basically, unused crap except for special circumstances.  Pretty much, 99.9% of what I need for resistors are in that box, and they're intelligently organized so I can very quickly find what I need...like values are near each other as opposed and periodic, as opposed to just putting everything in order, which actually makes a jumbled mess and makes no sense to me.

Anyhow, this scheme works very well for my specific need, trading speed for storage efficiency, and works especially well when mixing regular carbon resistors with higher precision metal film.  When you do that, storing by decade gets a little error prone as the multiplier will obviously be different because three digits are necessary instead of only two.  When I'm in a rush, the last thing I want to be doing is mental gymnastics trying to remember what color is what.  I'm pretty good at it, in fact, but I STILL make stupid mistakes.
 

Online all_repair

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Re: Resistors and organization
« Reply #11 on: December 06, 2013, 05:22:22 am »
Use small bags inside bigger bag.  And bigger bags inside box or a even bigger bag.  And boxes and bigger bags inside file drawers.  Box and bag should be transparent.  And label, consolidate and  label, consolidate and label.  Leave the SMT resistors or cap in their strips, sorted, labeled, and just tied together and put them into a box, or a bag.  For higher usage parts then I just create a project specific bag, just for the parts involved, and with a big A4 paper listing all the parts inside. 
It is less about box.  It is more about labeling, categorising and sorting them, IMHO.
« Last Edit: December 06, 2013, 05:35:36 am by all_repair »
 

Offline chibiace

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Re: Resistors and organization
« Reply #12 on: December 06, 2013, 05:38:09 am »
Resistors? Usually all through the carpet.
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Offline andtfoot

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Re: Resistors and organization
« Reply #13 on: December 06, 2013, 05:43:38 am »
I've got A5 size ring binder folders with zip-lock bags attached. I'll see if I can grab a photo when I get home.
 

Offline Six_Shooter

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Re: Resistors and organization
« Reply #14 on: December 06, 2013, 06:35:21 am »

It seems like there's no ideas yet that I haven't thought of, or tried or have seen, yet. I'm hoping to see a suggestion that I have seen or thought of yet, that will be what I want.


It might be helpful if you explain why you don't like any of the ideas here.  I mean, nearly every way of organizing something is represented here, so there must be something special you have in mind.  If you can find a way to articulate that, that would be helpful because it's easier to solve a specific problem than to randomly toss out ideas.

That's just it, there's nothing wrong with these ideas, many people use the same suggested ideas successfully. There's part of me that just thinks there has to be a better way, takes up little space, ease or organization and keeping them organized, possibly portable. The closest thing that comes to that is the seal-able divided containers that I have used in the past. 

For example, in my case I needed quick access to the E12 series resistors.  I ended up with one of these:

http://www.grainger.com/product/AKRO-MILS-Cabinet-3AJ39?s_pp=false[/quote]

I have one of these that is currently filled with crap (mostly) in my garage that I'm thinking about using for this, at least for the time being.
 

Offline andtfoot

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Re: Resistors and organization
« Reply #15 on: December 06, 2013, 07:42:06 am »
I've got A5 size ring binder folders with zip-lock bags attached. I'll see if I can grab a photo when I get home.

Here we are:




I'm thinking of splitting it into 4 folders; with 3 it's just a bit too full for my liking.
 

Offline Marc M.

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Re: Resistors and organization
« Reply #16 on: December 06, 2013, 09:06:40 am »
Here's an idea I rarely see posted.  For storing thru-hole resistors, you really can't beat a purpose built cabinet.  I've been using Ohmite 'Little Devils' resistor cabinets since the 70's.  I currently have 4: Resistors, Ceramic Capacitors, IC's, and Diodes (power, switch, zener, signal, LED's).  You can fit an awful lot of components in a relatively small space. 
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Offline Marc M.

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Re: Resistors and organization
« Reply #17 on: December 06, 2013, 09:07:37 am »
A great and inexpensive alternative for any SMD components is carbide insert packages used in the machining industry.  They come in a variety of sizes and configurations with 10 partitions the most common. The covers fit flush with the tops of the dividers so components can't get mixed up no matter how much you shake them.  Also, the packages of any given size/manufacturer are designed to nest in nice stacks, while some even lock into each other.  I also use them when disassembling equipment to keep all the different size/types of screws separate and in order of removal.  If the project gets shelved, I just slide the cover on and toss it inside the equipment so nothing gets lost.  They get tossed in the trash so a few beers offered to your local machine shop should net plenty of them for the cost of the suds 8).
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Online krish2487

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Re: Resistors and organization
« Reply #18 on: December 06, 2013, 09:49:04 am »
I do not have pictures presently but i ll upload once I get home.

I use these transparent playing card boxes for storing a single value of resistance, and stack different values horizontally and vertically.
I printed the values I use onto a "sticker sheet"  cut it to size and pasted to the side of the boxes and stacked them such that the labels are facing me.

The boxes are long enough to upto 1 watt resistances in moderate quantity. and the boxes are easy to stack.
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Offline Stonent

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Re: Resistors and organization
« Reply #19 on: December 06, 2013, 10:12:24 am »
I'm keepng mine in the original Tayda bags sorted by 1's, 2.2's, 3.3's, 4.7's etc.
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Offline electronics man

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Re: Resistors and organization
« Reply #20 on: December 12, 2013, 09:59:59 pm »
I just bourght 3 sectioned boxes for about £1.50 from amazon they are split into 5X3 sections i got them to organise my resistors because i bourgt a big multi pack or resistors from rapid and NOT ENOUGH BLOODY SECTIONS GRRRRR!!!!! organising resistors is a pain i have had to thow away resistors before because i had no were to put them and they were coming away from there strips its so anoying i supose i will need more boxes aaagh  :--
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Offline edavid

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Re: Resistors and organization
« Reply #21 on: December 12, 2013, 11:41:04 pm »
Another classic method is to put the resistors in labeled coin envelopes, and then put the envelopes in your favorite kind of shelf bin or box, so you can flip through them easily.  The only problem with this is that coin envelopes have become weirdly expensive.
 

Offline jolshefsky

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Re: Resistors and organization
« Reply #22 on: December 13, 2013, 12:00:11 am »
I did up drawers by color-code of the multiplier band. There weren't enough drawers, really, but I made it fit.

Most of the resistors are pulls from junk, but I often have weird values that fit my theoretical designs which I can then tinker back to normal values.
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Offline Kryoclasm

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Re: Resistors and organization
« Reply #23 on: December 13, 2013, 02:01:37 am »
I organize my parts into 2 categories,

The ones I have but don't need, and the ones I need but don't have.
I have plenty of the first and none of the latter.  :scared:
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Offline Kohanbash

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Re: Resistors and organization
« Reply #24 on: December 13, 2013, 02:56:33 am »
I also use the plastic compartmentalized bins that people showed before. The important thing is to get one that if you drop it the resistors dont move around to other compartments.

One of them is for thru-hole resistors. Each hole is divided by range. 0-1.8, 2.2-3.9, etc... I then have a paper in the lid that acts as a legend for each box. I have found this to be very effective and have used this method for over 10 years now.

I also have another box that has caps and inductors together.
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