Author Topic: what is the name of this mains power connector and where to get one  (Read 7252 times)

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Offline SeanB

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Re: what is the name of this mains power connector and where to get one
« Reply #25 on: June 23, 2013, 09:26:48 am »
I have about 40 or so carbon filament lamps dating from before 1939, they are very nice.

http://www.lighting-gallery.net/gallery/displayimage.php?album=301&pos=69&pid=9721

 

Offline DRT

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Re: what is the name of this mains power connector and where to get one
« Reply #26 on: June 23, 2013, 09:44:54 am »
Here's some 'live' mains voltage data (location Cambridge, UK). Even more off topic: There's clearly a daily cycle that follows the overall load, but I also often see large drops caused by local heavy loads (for example a neighbour's electric shower will drop the voltage by around 8V, indicating a source impedance of about 0.2 Ohm)

 

Offline G7PSK

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Re: what is the name of this mains power connector and where to get one
« Reply #27 on: June 23, 2013, 09:48:54 am »
The oldest working light bulb is in a fire station in Livermore USA. I notice that it runs as an orange glow rather than a bright light, which probably explains its long life.

http://www.centennialbulb.org/
 

Offline vk6zgo

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Re: what is the name of this mains power connector and where to get one
« Reply #28 on: June 23, 2013, 11:28:06 am »
Isn't there negligible difference in light bulb lifespan based on voltage? I thought because of the PTC of the filament they'd use about the same amount of power anyway, and it was only the inrush from being turned on and off that would damage them?

On the contrary, there is an exponentially severe relationship between incandescent lifetime and operating voltage. Small increases in voltage cause a dramatic reduction in bulb life. A typical bulb is balanced on a knife edge between giving sufficient light output and failing prematurely.

You can sometimes see this by comparing projector bulbs with area lighting bulbs. The area lighting bulb may have an estimated lifetime of 2000 hours, whereas the projector bulb my be only 20 hours. The projector bulb is driven very hot to give an intense white light, the area lighting bulb is driven gently to give a soft, mellow light.

Old style lamps were designed with considerably more leeway,so that a "240V" globe was OK to around 260V.
My feeling is that the only difference between 220V & 240V "El Cheapo"mported  lamps is the labelling. ;D
 


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