Author Topic: SpaceX, If you don't watch this then you have no right to call yourself a nerd !  (Read 1677 times)

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Offline GreggD

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SpaceX NROL-76 Launch, Monday, May 1, at 7:00 a.m. EDT, or 11:00 UTC

Launch happens at 12:40 mark.

A ground camera follows the launch/landing without interruption.
Booster/2nd stage separation,
Booster turning around to go back to launch site,
Nitrogen thrusters showing fantastic gas acceleration,
Steering paddle deployment and use (same as on MOAB)

I thought this was a solid 10 until I realized how much better this was than past video.
Better video in the future. We want to see.
 
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Offline German_EE

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I've always wondered what the large white box is on the left side of the launch pad, it's a damn ugly piece of engineering but I suppose that it's there for a reason.
Should you find yourself in a chronically leaking boat, energy devoted to changing vessels is likely to be more productive than energy devoted to patching leaks.

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Offline rob77

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I've always wondered what the large white box is on the left side of the launch pad, it's a damn ugly piece of engineering but I suppose that it's there for a reason.

i guess that reason would be "it's a left-over from space shuttle era" ;)
 

Offline rollatorwieltje

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I've always wondered what the large white box is on the left side of the launch pad, it's a damn ugly piece of engineering but I suppose that it's there for a reason.

It was used to put the payload in the Space Shuttle. It rotated over the cargo bay.

 

Offline German_EE

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Obvious now that I've seen the video but it seems a strange way of doing things. The shuttle started off horizontal and that would have been an ideal time to load any cargo before it was lifted vertical inside the VAB and mated to the fuel tank and SRBs.

I still can't get used to seeing all those lightning towers around the pad. They never bothered with stuff like that in the Apollo era and I remember that one of the Saturn 5 rockets was actually struck and it just carried on flying.
Should you find yourself in a chronically leaking boat, energy devoted to changing vessels is likely to be more productive than energy devoted to patching leaks.

Warren Buffett
 

Offline Gyro

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Quote
Obvious now that I've seen the video but it seems a strange way of doing things. The shuttle started off horizontal and that would have been an ideal time to load any cargo before it was lifted vertical inside the VAB and mated to the fuel tank and SRBs.

It's just a guess but I suspect that, because all the thrust is in the vertical direction, the shuttle cargo bay was a lot stronger in that axis. Maybe the whole thing would sag if loaded with cargo horizontally under gravity. I remember in the early days they had teething problems with getting the bay doors to shut.

Edit: A lot of the payloads are long too and possibly wouldn't appreciate being rotated through 90' on the ground.
« Last Edit: May 12, 2017, 07:06:11 pm by Gyro »
Chris

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Offline SeanB

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Thrust vector of the shuttle was mostly vertical, and thus loading vertical was a cheaper design for any payload, as it did not have to be designed to support itself fully built in 2 different axes, instead you only needed a single strong direction to handle launch thrust.
 


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