Author Topic: [SOLVED]Youtube - Apparently unblockable and long/multiple adverts, New policy  (Read 8727 times)

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Online tggzzz

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When I was young, information was scarce abd it took day/weeks to access it - so the skill was to take time extracting as much information as possible from the few available sources.

Now the problem is exactly the reverse: information is so common that the necessary skill is quickly determining what not to look at. Video is very effective at preventing that.


Two other real disadvantages of video:
  • video isn't searchable for keywords; if you can't find something it might as well not exist
  • I speed read text to quickly determine whether an article is worth reading in detail; since searches are imperfect, most aren't relevant. You can't speedview videos, so it takes at least 10* more of my little remaining life to determine that it isn't interesting. Bad tradeoff, but I wouldn't expect a youngster to have that perspective!

In fairness, to an extent, you are right. But with a change of methods and acceptance that it is not as easily or reliably searched through, as a decent text article, you can do those things with videos. To a degree, but not to 100% effectiveness, as with text.

Nothing, including text, is 100% effective :(

I'll ignore searches with specific answers such as "what are the microwave x-band frequencies?", since the first result is probably sufficient - even without clicking the link.

Many of my searches are for topics that are sufficiently complex or abstruse that there is often only, say, one potentially useful result per page. 

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The alternative to speed reading, is to read the title and speed read the descriptive text (if filled in), just below the video on youtube and/or to jump at various time positions and watch a few seconds of the video at 5 mins, 10 mins, 15 mins etc (use common sense to determine where to click on the time line).

Yebbut that takes 10* as long. You have to wait for the video to load, then figure out the context at that point in the video, then guess what night or might not be in the gaps...

OTOH, I'm a fast reader.

As an exercise, take one of the EEVBlog videos and deliberately ignore the table of contents - because most vloggers aren't that considerate of their audience. Pretend that you have stumbled upon  "EEVblog #1013 – Mailbag" because you were searching for "2DW233 Voltage Reference Zener".

How long does it take to find that part of the video, and to determine whether or not it helps you?

Text is an order of magnitude faster.

EDIT: I've just tried it. It took ~4 mins to find the start of that segment, then ~3 mins watching it (which is much shorter than most videos). That's ~7 minutes of my remaining life I'll never get back.

If it had been text then it would have take 30s to find out that it is marginally interesting. Bad tradeoff.

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You can still partially text search or keyword search on it, by hoping that someone, somewhere has commented on it, in a blog or similar.

Ah, the AltaVista/Yahoo! model of curated directories of links. Not scalable, as was obvious back in 1995 before google was even a .edu.

One acceptable, workable alternative is the "table of contents" with times below the video in the EEVBlog videos. But that is very rare :(
« Last Edit: August 10, 2017, 04:35:49 pm by tggzzz »
There are lies, damned lies, statistics - and ADC/DAC specs.
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Offline MK14

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When I was young, information was scarce abd it took day/weeks to access it - so the skill was to take time extracting as much information as possible from the few available sources.

Now the problem is exactly the reverse: information is so common that the necessary skill is quickly determining what not to look at. Video is very effective at preventing that.
-----cut-----

I agree with your post.

In the old days (when some of us were younger), there were both good and bad things, compared to old and new.

In the distant past, there were lots of books available in libraries (effectively free) or to purchase (at reasonable cost for most people). These generally created trustworthy, high quality sources of information (within Electronics). But were not so good for computers, because a book was outdated (usually/often), almost before it was first available.

There were also less trustworthy, lower quality sources, such as Electronics magazines.

So for example, if a book gave you a power supply circuit. You could probably build it and it would work first time (not always), and perform as stated.

But if you built a similar power supply from a circuit in a magazine, it might work first time. But may need some messing about (even if built perfectly to the magazine circuit), just to get it to work well.
But that did probably help with the learning Electronics part of the exercise.

These days, (as you have already started to explain), there is a crazily large amount of information. Available 24/7/365, often for free, mostly available anywhere in the world (ignoring North Korea, and to some extent some other countries).
But the quality and accuracy of much of the information, is not necessarily 100%.
So you really have to be careful.

For myself (because I miss the old days), I think I (we) have to accept that the old days are gone now. Times have moved on, and things work somewhat differently now.

Although text is a very good and precise information medium. Video, can actually give you much more perspective (short of having the experience yourself), on how things really are.

E.g. My text might say that the ASR33 terminals were somewhat big, noisy, but fun to watch while they print from a paper tape. But by watching a video of an ASR33 doing that, it gives you a better perspective of it. To actually see one, these days (ignoring the odd museum, here end there), would otherwise be VERY difficult.

Watching such videos, brings back memories of what it was like, for me.

 

Online RoGeorge

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IMO, text is still better than video for technical/scientific information and learning.

The biggest trap with video is that it makes you think that you learnt/understood, when in fact you didn't. You just get the feeling of learning, instead of getting the actual learning.

It's easy to watch at somebody else and think "aha, got it!". But when you try to actually reproduce what you just saw, you realize that you didn't "got it" very well.

This problem doesn't happen when using written material instead of video, I don't know why.

Online bd139

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1. Read a little bit.
2. Do a little bit.
3. Goto 1

It's the only way.

I gave up going to lectures at university as per videos now. I rarely watch any.  Total waste of time. Low information density.  We found out pretty rapidly that the lecturers didn't necessarily know the topic either and the whole damn thing was box ticking to get to the exams and projects.
« Last Edit: August 10, 2017, 06:42:47 pm by bd139 »
 

Online tggzzz

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IMO, text is still better than video for technical/scientific information and learning.

The biggest trap with video is that it makes you think that you learnt/understood, when in fact you didn't. You just get the feeling of learning, instead of getting the actual learning.

It's easy to watch at somebody else and think "aha, got it!". But when you try to actually reproduce what you just saw, you realize that you didn't "got it" very well.

I don't disagree, but I find those problems occur with both text (textbooks) and video (lectures).

When I was at university, I scribbled the lectures down as the lecturer spoke. Then, within a couple of hours before I had forgotten it, I re-wrote the scribbles in a coherent form and added the bits that were missing from the scribbles and my understanding.

That recapitulation and addition was vital to getting the knowledge into my brain, and it formed a great basis for revision.
There are lies, damned lies, statistics - and ADC/DAC specs.
Glider pilot's aphorism: "there is no substitute for span". Retort: "There is a substitute: skill+imagination. But you can buy span".
Having fun doing more, with less
 

Offline Zero999

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I use AdBlock Ulitimate and NoScript.

I saw one add when I first loaded Youtube this evening, then none afterwards. I've been listening to random music, for the last four and a half hours without a single advert.

It's interesting that I saw the add at the start. I wonder why that is?
« Last Edit: August 10, 2017, 09:03:19 pm by Hero999 »
 
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Online rdl

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I don't see ads on youtube, or anywhere really, and haven't for many years. All I use is NoScript and a hosts file that's pushing 29,000 entries. I started using uBlock Origin when Ghostery became "no longer supported" on Pale Moon, but that's only been since about a year or so. I didn't really install it to block ads.

Some people claim a hosts file is the wrong way to block ads because it slows things down, but from what I've seen, it's not as slow as displaying the ads.
 
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Offline MK14

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The following article from a very recent register page. Explains about new trends, where there is stuff, especially designed to defeat ad blocking schemes.

https://www.theregister.co.uk/2017/08/11/ad_blocker_bypass_code/
 


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