Author Topic: The Hyperloop: BUSTED  (Read 77176 times)

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Online technix

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Re: The Hyperloop: BUSTED
« Reply #450 on: August 28, 2019, 05:57:43 pm »
I'm not naming cities, I'm naming stations; and I've used the correct spelling (other than ie vs ei in one post) for each of these train stations.  By correct I mean the name posted in large letters outside the station, the name used by the rail operator, the name displayed in and outside of the train etc etc.

A city having an 'official name' vs a common name is not something unusual in the world, and if you'd like to go fight other battles on incorrectly named stations, perhaps your next one is getting NS to rename "Den Haag Centraal" to "s Gravenhage Centraal".

But for the purpose of this discussion, your pedantic rants are inappropriate and in this case wrong as I was talking about the station, not the city
There are even public transport stations with names that are totally irrelevant to the location it is in or the location it serves.
 

Offline boffin

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Re: The Hyperloop: BUSTED
« Reply #451 on: August 28, 2019, 06:13:36 pm »
I'm not naming cities, I'm naming stations; and I've used the correct spelling (other than ie vs ei in one post) for each of these train stations.  By correct I mean the name posted in large letters outside the station, the name used by the rail operator, the name displayed in and outside of the train etc etc.

A city having an 'official name' vs a common name is not something unusual in the world, and if you'd like to go fight other battles on incorrectly named stations, perhaps your next one is getting NS to rename "Den Haag Centraal" to "s Gravenhage Centraal".

But for the purpose of this discussion, your pedantic rants are inappropriate and in this case wrong as I was talking about the station, not the city
There are even public transport stations with names that are totally irrelevant to the location it is in or the location it serves.

Or places have been renamed but some transport names still reference an older name.  Case in point PEK and YFB airports
 

Offline nctnico

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Re: The Hyperloop: BUSTED
« Reply #452 on: August 28, 2019, 07:05:21 pm »
There are even public transport stations with names that are totally irrelevant to the location it is in or the location it serves.
'Bir Hakeim' in Paris comes to mind.
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Online technix

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Re: The Hyperloop: BUSTED
« Reply #453 on: August 29, 2019, 03:46:11 am »
Or places have been renamed but some transport names still reference an older name.  Case in point PEK and YFB airports
The name PEK referring to actually didn't change, however since the local name is in a different script than Latin, Romanization changed. PEK is based on the older Wade-Giles transliteration Peking, while the modern spelling Beijing is based on Hanyu Pinyin transliteration. Pinyin was introduced just a month before PEK opened, by when it is too late to change the codes.
 

Offline coppice

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Re: The Hyperloop: BUSTED
« Reply #454 on: August 29, 2019, 02:26:30 pm »
Or places have been renamed but some transport names still reference an older name.  Case in point PEK and YFB airports
The name PEK referring to actually didn't change, however since the local name is in a different script than Latin, Romanization changed. PEK is based on the older Wade-Giles transliteration Peking, while the modern spelling Beijing is based on Hanyu Pinyin transliteration. Pinyin was introduced just a month before PEK opened, by when it is too late to change the codes.
Wade-Giles dates from the middle of the 19th century. Spellings like Peking are much older. The first European settlement in East Asia was Macau. Europeans learned a lot about East Asia from the people of Macau, who speak Cantonese. So, a lot of western spellings for things in China, Korea and Japan are far from how they sound in Mandarin, Korean or Japanese, but not far from how they sound in Cantonese. For example, in Cantonese Beijing is pronounced something like bak-ging, a lot closer to Peking that many munging of Mandarin gets. The Japanese pronounce their nation ni-hon, which is nothing like Japan. However, in Cantonese its something like yat-boon, which is a lot closer to Japan. Add a few centuries of pronounciation drift, and you can see where the western names for many East Asian places originate.
« Last Edit: August 29, 2019, 02:28:02 pm by coppice »
 

Offline GeorgeOfTheJungle

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Re: The Hyperloop: BUSTED
« Reply #455 on: August 29, 2019, 03:06:32 pm »
But for the purpose of this discussion, your pedantic rants are inappropriate and in this case wrong as I was talking about the station, not the city

The name of the station is Pirineos, the other station there is Vilanoveta, now not used, both are in Lérida, and there's no reason to put in the same sentence some city names in a language and some in another. City-name-Station-name: Madrid-Atocha, Madrid-Chamartín, Lérida-Pirineos, do you get it?
« Last Edit: August 29, 2019, 03:11:22 pm by GeorgeOfTheJungle »
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Offline emece67

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Re: The Hyperloop: BUSTED
« Reply #456 on: August 29, 2019, 09:04:29 pm »
Exactly. And you wrote:

Quote
Ave Madrid - Barcelona stops in Zaragoza for just one minute, and Llieda Lleida for 2.

In that sentence there's four spanish cities, three spelled in spanish and one for no good reason in catalán instead. Mind you, Renfe does that wrong too. It would be the same as saying London, Bristol and Dùn Èideann instead of London, Bristol and Edinburgh. I hope you get it now. Cheers.

In fact there's a reason, the official (in Spain) name for the city of Lleida is, well, Lleida, despite the fact that such city is called Lérida in spanish. Lleida is inside Catalonia, where Spanish and Catalan are co-official languages and, in Spain, the official toponyms are always in spanish except if such place has another official language, then the official toponyms are in such other language. Same happens to, say Fisterra (in galician, in spanish it is Finisterre) or Gipuzkoa (in basque, in spanish it is Guipúzcoa).

The law does not enforce the use of these official toponyms to particulars, media, etc., so you can see Lérida wrote in many places, but definitely, Renfe will use Lleida instead. Road signs also use official names:
« Last Edit: August 29, 2019, 09:47:19 pm by emece67 »
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Offline BrianHG

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Re: The Hyperloop: BUSTED
« Reply #457 on: September 13, 2019, 02:35:45 am »
 :palm: Could be within a decade.......  :palm:  What are they smoking?


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Online technix

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Re: The Hyperloop: BUSTED
« Reply #458 on: September 13, 2019, 03:03:08 am »
:palm: Could be within a decade.......  :palm:  What are they smoking?
Building HSR like this, regardless of technique used, requires a lot of coordination. If the government can secure funds and gain political support like in China, it is doable like in China. If not...
 

Offline BrianHG

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Re: The Hyperloop: BUSTED
« Reply #459 on: September 13, 2019, 03:11:13 am »
:palm: Could be within a decade.......  :palm:  What are they smoking?
Building HSR like this, regardless of technique used, requires a lot of coordination. If the government can secure funds and gain political support like in China, it is doable like in China. If not...
AND I REPEAT:

:palm:  What are they smoking?
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Offline EEVblog

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Re: The Hyperloop: BUSTED
« Reply #460 on: November 03, 2019, 03:57:50 am »
The Hyperloop problem has been solved!, by a 13yo
 ::)
I'll give her an A for effort and imagination though.
https://edition.cnn.com/travel/article/hyperloop-design-teenager/index.html
 

Offline coppice

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Re: The Hyperloop: BUSTED
« Reply #461 on: November 03, 2019, 04:04:43 am »
The Hyperloop problem has been solved!, by a 13yo
 ::)
I'll give her an A for effort and imagination though.
https://edition.cnn.com/travel/article/hyperloop-design-teenager/index.html
Is that article explaining the idea badly, or does it make no sense at all?
 

Online Cyberdragon

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Re: The Hyperloop: BUSTED
« Reply #462 on: November 03, 2019, 04:30:13 am »
The Hyperloop problem has been solved!, by a 13yo
 ::)
I'll give her an A for effort and imagination though.
https://edition.cnn.com/travel/article/hyperloop-design-teenager/index.html
Is that article explaining the idea badly, or does it make no sense at all?

You can quite rubbing your eyes, I see the same thing, a regular high speed train somehow attached to the side of a redundant pnuematic tube system. :palm:

What the hell are they teaching those kids about physics? |O
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Offline ludzinc

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Re: The Hyperloop: BUSTED
« Reply #463 on: November 03, 2019, 10:14:50 am »
The idea - build a second tunnel next to the first and drag the train in the vacuum tunnel with the first train by magnetic coupling.

Oh! And make it use 100% renewable energy.

Who’d a thunk it - all we need to do is specify that something uses 100% renewable energy and poof, Job ldone!!
 

Offline dunkemhigh

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Re: The Hyperloop: BUSTED
« Reply #464 on: November 03, 2019, 10:57:29 am »
Quote
and drag the train in the vacuum tunnel with the first train by magnetic coupling

I am failing to grasp the problem which this solves.
 

Offline tom66

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Re: The Hyperloop: BUSTED
« Reply #465 on: November 03, 2019, 11:00:07 am »
The problem with high speed rail isn't getting up to speed, it's keeping the damn train from derailing.

You could make a 600 mph train with "relative" ease, but the chance of derailment is fairly high, especially given the near-mm tolerances that high speed rail operates on.
 

Offline nctnico

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Re: The Hyperloop: BUSTED
« Reply #466 on: November 03, 2019, 11:02:27 am »
The Hyperloop problem has been solved!, by a 13yo
 ::)
I'll give her an A for effort and imagination though.
https://edition.cnn.com/travel/article/hyperloop-design-teenager/index.html
Is that article explaining the idea badly, or does it make no sense at all?
It makes no sense. It just proves that they don't teach basic physics to 13 year olds. Besides that the idea with a magnet in a secondary tube to tow a train along is over 100 years old.
There are small lies, big lies and then there is what is on the screen of your oscilloscope.
 

Offline EEVblog

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Re: The Hyperloop: BUSTED
« Reply #467 on: November 03, 2019, 11:15:41 am »
Quote
and drag the train in the vacuum tunnel with the first train by magnetic coupling
I am failing to grasp the problem which this solves.

It attempts to solves the death trap that is Elon Musk's humans in a vacuum hyperloop. Which in itself didn't solve anything. it's turtles all the way down.
 

Offline soldar

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Re: The Hyperloop: BUSTED
« Reply #468 on: November 03, 2019, 11:21:28 am »
H. L. Mencken wrote that for every complex human problem, there is a solution that is neat, simple and wrong. A thirteen year old has found the solution that is neat, simple and wrong.

I am not too concerned about a teenager being ignorant. That is what being a teenager is about. What is more concerning is that reporters and media have such a degree of ignorance and incompetence that they would publish such drivel. That is a serious issue.

I remember decades ago every few years we would have the news that someone had invented a car that ran on water.
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Offline KronotonKid

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Re: The Hyperloop: BUSTED
« Reply #469 on: November 03, 2019, 12:02:24 pm »
H. L. Mencken wrote that for every complex human problem, there is a solution that is neat, simple and wrong...
If we totally strip Earth of its atmosphere then all electric trains and cars could operate more efficiently without all that drag. And, as a bonus, with no more CO2 we've eliminated global warming.
Quote
I remember decades ago every few years we would have the news that someone had invented a car that ran on water.
I have one. But I haven't been out fishing for the longest time and the outboard could probably use some looking after.
« Last Edit: November 03, 2019, 12:07:49 pm by KronotonKid »
 

Offline 0xdeadbeef

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Re: The Hyperloop: BUSTED
« Reply #470 on: November 03, 2019, 12:08:29 pm »
Media loves the tale of the solitary genius who is smarter than the whole (inherently malevolent) industry - even more so if it's a child. Plus, the problem with the representation of science in media is that the people who write about it don't even fathom how little they actually know.
Nothing new though. Back in the eighties, newspapers here reported how students easily found a fraction that represent Pi exactly , somewhere in the 2000s, there was a report about a school girl who invented a breakthrough cryptography that would revolutionize the internet.
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Offline GeorgeOfTheJungle

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Re: The Hyperloop: BUSTED
« Reply #471 on: November 03, 2019, 12:11:15 pm »
Most trains ran and all nuclears run on water. That girl surely is a cousin of Greta Thunberg.
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Offline StillTrying

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Re: The Hyperloop: BUSTED
« Reply #472 on: November 03, 2019, 01:47:13 pm »
It makes no sense. It just proves that they don't teach basic physics to 13 year olds. Besides that the idea with a magnet in a secondary tube to tow a train along is over 100 years old.

What about the judges, there's a form of collective stupidity.
The judges are all very clever people, none of them wants to be the first to say "Hang on, I don't understand this, it makes no 'king sense to me", so it all gets passed as a brilliant idea, with each judge individually thinking it's just him/her that doesn't have a clue, until it's too late. :)
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Offline dunkemhigh

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Re: The Hyperloop: BUSTED
« Reply #473 on: November 03, 2019, 01:59:25 pm »
Quote
It attempts to solves the death trap that is Elon Musk's humans in a vacuum hyperloop.

Sure,  but the hyperloop at least had a problem to resolve: going faster than is practical using rails in open air. This 'solution' for the hyperloop issue appears to be to not go faster than a normal train. The only thing it seems to add is complexity, a huge cost to add a tube which will suffer all the failure modes of Musk's tubes, and completely blocking access to one side of the train and tracks.
 

Offline soldar

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Re: The Hyperloop: BUSTED
« Reply #474 on: November 03, 2019, 02:24:11 pm »
What about the judges, there's a form of collective stupidity.
The judges are all very clever people, none of them wants to be the first to say "Hang on, I don't understand this, it makes no 'king sense to me", so it all gets passed as a brilliant idea, with each judge individually thinking it's just him/her that doesn't have a clue, until it's too late. :)

Well, it could be that this was indeed the best idea presented and all other entries were worse.
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