Author Topic: The uBeam FAQ  (Read 545308 times)

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Offline SiliconWizard

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Re: The uBeam FAQ
« Reply #1950 on: January 30, 2022, 01:55:24 am »
If we could find a way of harvesting energy from stupidity, we would definitely own the world!
Thinking of a good domain name, "idionergy.com" appears to be currently available! ;D
 

Online EEVblog

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Re: The uBeam FAQ
« Reply #1951 on: January 30, 2022, 08:36:24 am »
Woah, the current bid on GoDaddy for sonicenergy.com was sitting at $101 yesterday, and today it is $4,010!

I wasn't sure if that was USD or AUD, as I get directed to the au.godaddy.com site but no currency is shown on that page and it didn't matter much when it was sitting at $14.  When clicking through on "Place Bid" it says $2,550 USD which is roughly $3,646 AUD, or $4,010 AUD when adding 10% GST.

Bid history shows 9 bidders and 19 bids as of right now, with the first low ball bid on 26th Jan, and significant activity yesterday.  Bidder 5 has an automatic bid placed on 27th Jan which is winning so far.

https://godaddy.com/domain-auctions/sonicenergy-com-408187121

No idea why I care  :-DD

I was out once it hit triple digits.
 
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Offline The_Next_Theranos

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Re: The uBeam FAQ
« Reply #1952 on: February 09, 2022, 02:04:55 pm »
Interesting article about two famous female grifters (Elizabeth Holmes and Anna Sorokin) here: https://www.independent.ie/life/faking-it-until-they-make-it-the-rise-of-the-female-fraudster-41236886.html . A lot of what is written seems to apply to uBeam as well. The grifters in that article had TV shows and/or movies made about them. Maybe there's also enough material to make a uBeam movie?
 

Online EEVblog

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Re: The uBeam FAQ
« Reply #1953 on: February 10, 2022, 03:52:07 am »
Maybe there's also enough material to make a uBeam movie?

From what I've heard, it would be a B grade movie that goes straight to PrimeVideo.
 

Offline rdl

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Offline The_Next_Theranos

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Re: The uBeam FAQ
« Reply #1955 on: February 10, 2022, 02:04:12 pm »
Looks like Meredith is hiring again. Any takers? Expensive developers need not apply.

https://twitter.com/meredithperry/status/1482128540397043713
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Looking for an inexpensive, fast moving contract software dev team to help with server side & app development for a wearable device.

DM me your recs plz. USA based dev teams are probably too much $$$.

It seems she's working on some medical device now.
https://twitter.com/meredithperry/status/1470856350540333059
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Do you have essential tremor and live in the Boston area? 

DM me or email research@elemindtech.com if you’re interested in participating in paid research.
« Last Edit: February 10, 2022, 02:10:06 pm by The_Next_Theranos »
 

Online madires

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Re: The uBeam FAQ
« Reply #1956 on: February 10, 2022, 02:51:44 pm »
Medical devices require a lot of paperwork, approvals and money. I don't know the regulations of medical devices in the US, but I'd be surprised if beta testing doesn't also require an approval and medical assistance during the tests.
 

Offline Gregg

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Re: The uBeam FAQ
« Reply #1957 on: February 10, 2022, 07:14:29 pm »
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“Do you have essential tremor”

WTF is an essential tremor?

Would anyone with half a brain really want to reply to this and allow Meredith to experiment on them?  How is a tremor essential?  So many questions unanswered.

Maybe she is looking for people with adverse reactions (tremors) from her failed uBeam…
 

Offline Cerebus

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Re: The uBeam FAQ
« Reply #1958 on: February 10, 2022, 08:11:55 pm »
You might want to try using Google before being so dismissive of "an (sic) essential tremor". Essential tremor is a neurological medical condition that ranges from "inconvenient" to "has life changing consequences" in the worst case. I wouldn't want li'l old Meredith anywhere near it, or any other medical condition, but her involvement is hardly an excuse for you to parade your ignorance (and inability to use Google) of a real medical condition that makes some people's lives miserable.
Anybody got a syringe I can use to squeeze the magic smoke back into this?
 

Online langwadt

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Re: The uBeam FAQ
« Reply #1959 on: February 11, 2022, 01:30:47 am »
Medical devices require a lot of paperwork, approvals and money. I don't know the regulations of medical devices in the US, but I'd be surprised if beta testing doesn't also require an approval and medical assistance during the tests.

there's a reason why so many Nobel laureates in medicine did experiments on themselves, it doesn't require going through the process of getting medical and ethical approval to do experiments on people
 

Online EEVblog

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Re: The uBeam FAQ
« Reply #1960 on: February 11, 2022, 07:39:55 am »
there's a reason why so many Nobel laureates in medicine did experiments on themselves, it doesn't require going through the process of getting medical and ethical approval to do experiments on people

Mate of mine did it:
 

Offline JimRemington

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Re: The uBeam FAQ
« Reply #1961 on: February 15, 2022, 07:30:53 pm »
Wonder what happened to UBeam, most recently "Sonicenergy".
 

Online EEVblog

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Re: The uBeam FAQ
« Reply #1962 on: February 15, 2022, 10:59:04 pm »
Wonder what happened to UBeam, most recently "Sonicenergy".

Someone still owns ubeam I guess as it redirects to sonicenergy
 

Offline sdpkom

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Offline MrMobodies

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Re: The uBeam FAQ
« Reply #1964 on: April 25, 2022, 06:33:19 pm »
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"But how does the new charging technology actually work? As with any other technology, there is a transmitter (the charger) and a receiver (such as a pacemaker)"

Looks to me like a poor quality article/very vague (hardly any detail) with a stock looking photo.

I did look and it looks like it is real from an article I found from a reverse image lookup with the "stock looking photo" and see attached screenshot (translated)
https://www.kist.re.kr/kist_web/?sub_num=4080&state=view&idx=4492
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Latest research results
State-of-the-art research institute
Electronic devices in the human body and in the sea that are charged with ultrasonic waves

Registration Date: 2022-03-22

Dr. Hyun-cheol Song's team at the Electronic Materials Research Center

Views: 881

File Attachment: 220323 [KIST Press Release] Electronic devices in the human body and under the sea that are charged with ultrasound_KIST Senior Researcher Hyun-cheol Song.hwp 

- Using friction power generation, ultrasonic wireless energy transmission efficiency↑
- Expected to be used for wireless charging of batteries in underwater or human implantable electronic devices

The number of patients using implantable electronic devices such as artificial pacemakers and defibrillators is increasing worldwide due to advances in medical technology and an aging population . Currently, incisional surgery is required to replace the battery of implantable electronic devices, and complications may occur during this process . Accordingly, the need for a technology that wirelessly transmits power to the inside of the human body to charge the battery is emerging . Wireless power transfer technology is also required for devices that need to charge batteries in an underwater environment, such as sensors that diagnose the condition of submarine cables .

The Korea Institute of Science and Technology (KIST, President Seokjin Yoon ) announced that the research team led by Dr. Hyuncheol Song of the Electronic Materials Research Center has developed an ultrasonic wireless power transmission technology that can solve this problem .

Representative wireless power transmission technologies include electromagnetic induction and magnetic resonance . Electromagnetic induction is a technology already used in smartphones and wireless earphones, but it does not pass through conductors such as water or metal, and the charging distance is very short . In addition, there is a disadvantage that can harm the body due to heat problem during charging . In the magnetic resonance method, the resonant frequencies of the magnetic field generating device and the transmitting device must exactly match, so there is a risk of interference with wireless communication frequencies such as Wi-Fi or Bluetooth .

Instead of electromagnetic waves or magnetic fields, the researchers employed ultrasonic waves as an energy transmission medium . Sonar equipment using ultrasound is already common in the sea, and the stability of the human body has been guaranteed to the extent that ultrasound is commonly used in the medical world to diagnose organ or fetal conditions . However, the conventional energy transfer technology using ultrasound has low energy efficiency, making it difficult to commercialize .

The research team has developed a device that receives ultrasonic waves and converts them into electrical energy using the triboelectric power principle that can convert very small mechanical vibrations into electrical energy . By adding a ferroelectric material to the triboelectric generator, the research team greatly increased the conventional ultrasonic energy transmission efficiency of less than 1 % to more than 4% . Through this , it succeeded in charging more than 8mW of power at a distance of 6cm , which is enough to transmit data by turning on 200 LEDs at the same time or by operating a Bluetooth sensor under water . In addition, the device developed by the research team produced almost no heat due to its high energy conversion efficiency .

Dr. Song Hyeon-cheol said, “ In this study, it was shown that electronic devices can be driven by wireless power charging through ultrasound, so if the stability and efficiency of the device are further improved in the future, power will be wirelessly supplied to implantable sensors or deep-sea sensors, which are cumbersome to replace batteries. It is expected to be applied to technology that

The results of this research were carried out by the Ministry of Science and ICT ( Minister Hye -sook Lim ) , the Creative Convergence Research Project of the National Research Council for Science and Technology , the New R&D Project of the National Research Foundation, and the Energy Technology Development Project of the Ministry of Trade, Industry and Energy ( Minister Seung - wook Moon ) . The results were published in the latest issue of 'Energy & Environmental Science' (IF: 38.5, top 0.182% in JCR) , an international academic journal in the field of energy .
 
* ( Title ) Ferroelectrically augmented contact electrification enables efficient acoustic energy transfer through liquid and solid media

- ( Co- first author ) Hyunsoo Kim Student Researcher, Korea Institute of Science and Technology

- ( Co- first author ) Korea Research Institute of Science and Technology Heo Seong-Hoon Commissioned Researcher

- ( Co-corresponding author )  Professor Jong-Hoon Jeong, Inha University

- ( Co-corresponding author )  Hyun- Chul Song Senior Researcher, Korea Institute of Science and Technology

 
Figure 1. Conceptual diagram of driving an unmanned submersible or a sensor by transmitting ultrasonic waves in the sea to generate electric power wirelessly
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Figure 2. Conceptual diagram of the idea of ​​wirelessly charging electric power for driving electronic devices implanted in the body using an ultrasonic probe
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Figure 3. Photo of wireless energy transfer through pig skin and flesh on behalf of the human body


Figure 4. A photo of 200 LED lights lit by wirelessly transmitting energy from underwater to ultrasonic waves and real-time driving of wireless sensors


Figure 5.  The research team led by Dr. Hyun-cheol Song ( Principal Researcher ) at the KIST Electronic Materials Research Center has developed an electronic device system that uses ultrasonic waves to transmit wireless energy in water and in the human body . ( From left ) Electronic Materials Research Center Hyunsoo Kim, Student Researcher , Dr. Hyuncheol Song ( Principal Researcher ), Dr. Seonghoon Huh ( Commissioned Researcher )[/img]


Figure 6. The first author of the study, Dr. Heo Seong-hoon ( left ) and student researcher Kim Hyeon-soo ( right ) of the KIST Electronic Materials Research Center , installed an electronic device in water to receive ultrasonic waves and convert them into electrical energy to turn on LED lights. I'm experimenting with clarification

 

Offline helius

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Re: The uBeam FAQ
« Reply #1965 on: May 02, 2022, 04:21:02 pm »
Looking forward to a riveting study by the South Korean Ministry of Science on the phenomenon of fan death.

Sorry, that was perhaps too snarky. But this is still very silly.

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In addition, the device developed by the research team produced almost no heat due to its high energy conversion efficiency .
I'm sure that's of great comfort when your cells are being disrupted by a sonic horn of the type shown in the pictures. It's trivial to calculate the ultrasound dose required for the reported 4% energy transmission for a typical implanted device, but note that no such calculation is reported in the press release.
« Last Edit: May 02, 2022, 04:28:16 pm by helius »
 


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