Author Topic: The water is on fire  (Read 754 times)

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Online blueskull

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The water is on fire
« on: September 07, 2019, 09:35:07 pm »


Jump to 6:05.

I know it's just basic physics -- you have abrasive suspension to carry and use the energy, and you have pump to provide the energy, so with enough energy everything glows.

But still, it's amazing to see water on fire, and more amazing, it's a friction fire.
 
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Offline amyk

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Re: The water is on fire
« Reply #1 on: September 08, 2019, 01:34:53 am »
No fire, just a lot of heat --- more heat than the water can carry away fast enough to stop the temperature from rising.
 

Online Rerouter

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Re: The water is on fire
« Reply #2 on: September 08, 2019, 02:04:06 am »
The other fun fact with these devices is when cutting very hard materials, they risk cutting through the bottom of the tank.
 

Online blueskull

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Re: The water is on fire
« Reply #3 on: September 08, 2019, 02:07:57 am »
The other fun fact with these devices is when cutting very hard materials, they risk cutting through the bottom of the tank.

How is that possible? The water jet should have a beam divergence, even just for safety reasons. Also, the water in the tank should stop and dilute the jetting water pretty quickly, just like what happens when you shoot into water.
 

Online Rerouter

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Re: The water is on fire
« Reply #4 on: September 08, 2019, 02:12:16 am »
The metal piece re-focuses the jet into a line, if its recently been cleaned, the downdraft from the jet, coupled with the high pressure source means the abrasive hits the bottom with some velocity at an angle, and starts carving along that line. not very much, but over the machines life leaves thin areas that eventually break through.
 
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Offline windsmurf

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Re: The water is on fire
« Reply #5 on: September 08, 2019, 02:17:07 am »
Reminds me of this experiment... the process by which this happens is still not well understood and debated by scientists


 

Offline chickenHeadKnob

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Re: The water is on fire
« Reply #6 on: September 08, 2019, 12:29:13 pm »
I watched that sono-luminescence video yesterday and immediately wanted to obtain some of those weird-bad-ass shrimp, and then a memory from my youth emerged . I was about 7 years old and had collected a selection of live crayfish from a lake. My intention was to keep them in an aquarium and start my own crayfish fight club. This was ultimately in pursuit of the end goal of entertaining my friends, gaining status and perhaps charging admission.

For some reason my crayfish aquarium was inadequate for their life support needs and they all died in about two days. I kept them for an additional week as dead crayfish are still interesting to a boy until the emitted smell was too great to endure and my parents noticed.
 

Offline Zero999

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Re: The water is on fire
« Reply #7 on: September 08, 2019, 02:25:31 pm »
I watched that sono-luminescence video yesterday and immediately wanted to obtain some of those weird-bad-ass shrimp, and then a memory from my youth emerged . I was about 7 years old and had collected a selection of live crayfish from a lake. My intention was to keep them in an aquarium and start my own crayfish fight club. This was ultimately in pursuit of the end goal of entertaining my friends, gaining status and perhaps charging admission.

For some reason my crayfish aquarium was inadequate for their life support needs and they all died in about two days. I kept them for an additional week as dead crayfish are still interesting to a boy until the emitted smell was too great to endure and my parents noticed.
My nephew did a similar thing. He caught some American signal crayfish from a local stream. They're considered an invasive species in Europe and it's illegal to release them, once caught. The general advice is to kill on sight. Anyway, he didn't know or care about this, so put them in a bucket and took them home. Of course they died within a couple of days. I noticed the smell when I was at his house a week or so later. I had to put them in the bin and clear up the putrid water, which he'd spilled over the drive.

By the way, crayfish taste very good. I went crayfishing with my nephew a few weeks ago. This time I slaughtered and gutted them, as soon as we got back. I cooked one for him, but he didn't like it (they do have a strong fishy flavour) so I took the rest home with me and froze them. I've just got round to cooking them today and they taste really good. The freezing didn't affect the texture or flavour.
 

Offline Mr. Scram

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Re: The water is on fire
« Reply #8 on: September 08, 2019, 02:33:12 pm »
The metal piece re-focuses the jet into a line, if its recently been cleaned, the downdraft from the jet, coupled with the high pressure source means the abrasive hits the bottom with some velocity at an angle, and starts carving along that line. not very much, but over the machines life leaves thin areas that eventually break through.
Considering a modicum of fluid can stop rather large caliber bullets the direct impact should be very modest.
 

Offline Kilrah

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Re: The water is on fire
« Reply #9 on: September 08, 2019, 06:07:21 pm »
Applied Science has a great video about the sonoluminescence thing where he did several experiments with various liquids that tend to confirm a particular theory.
Oh and he has videos about a DIY waterjet cutter too.
 
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Offline T3sl4co1l

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Re: The water is on fire
« Reply #10 on: September 08, 2019, 07:24:32 pm »
Well, not "fire".

The particles suspended in the water hit with sufficient force to release light.  It might be incandescent (heat) or plasma or triboluminescence from fracturing the particles.

Tim
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Offline coppice

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Re: The water is on fire
« Reply #11 on: September 08, 2019, 07:49:06 pm »
By the way, crayfish taste very good. I went crayfishing with my nephew a few weeks ago. This time I slaughtered and gutted them, as soon as we got back. I cooked one for him, but he didn't like it (they do have a strong fishy flavour) so I took the rest home with me and froze them. I've just got round to cooking them today and they taste really good. The freezing didn't affect the texture or flavour.
Crayfish are basically little lobsters, and taste just like lobsters - i.e. wonderful, if you know how to cook them well. They shouldn't taste fishy. Are you sure they were alive up to the point when you cooked them? The moment they die they start going rapidly down hill.
 
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Offline Red Squirrel

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Re: The water is on fire
« Reply #12 on: September 08, 2019, 08:21:11 pm »
That's pretty skookum.  Replace the water with acid and dial back the pressure and you can etch PCBs. :P

The other fun fact with these devices is when cutting very hard materials, they risk cutting through the bottom of the tank.

Not surprising, I always wondered how they stop that from happening in first place.  Considering the jet is powerful enough to cut through granite and other tough materials it's surprising a foot or so of water is enough to slow it down.
 

Offline T3sl4co1l

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Re: The water is on fire
« Reply #13 on: September 08, 2019, 09:39:17 pm »
It's hard to damage that which has no form. :P

Tim
Seven Transistor Labs, LLC
Electronic design, from concept to prototype.
Bringing a project to life?  Send me a message!
 

Offline Zero999

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Re: The water is on fire
« Reply #14 on: September 09, 2019, 08:17:03 am »
By the way, crayfish taste very good. I went crayfishing with my nephew a few weeks ago. This time I slaughtered and gutted them, as soon as we got back. I cooked one for him, but he didn't like it (they do have a strong fishy flavour) so I took the rest home with me and froze them. I've just got round to cooking them today and they taste really good. The freezing didn't affect the texture or flavour.
Crayfish are basically little lobsters, and taste just like lobsters - i.e. wonderful, if you know how to cook them well. They shouldn't taste fishy. Are you sure they were alive up to the point when you cooked them? The moment they die they start going rapidly down hill.
I did kill and gut them before cooking them on this occasion. This is because I didn't have the means to purge them. They should be left in a tank of clean water for 24 hours, to empty their intestines before cooking, otherwise it's not good. I killed it by cutting the spinal cord and brain with a sharp knife behind the head, broke the anal fin and pulled it to remove the intestines. Then I cooked them immediately. I also took some home and froze them an hour later.

Taste is subjective. I agree crayfish taste similar to lobster, which I would describe as fishy, but you may have a different opinion.

In the past, I have purged them before cooking, but the flavour wasn't any different to this and it didn't seem to be any different to the ones I froze an hour after slaughter and gutting.

Actually the most humane way to kill a crayfish/lobster/crab is to freeze, rather than boil it, that way the nervous system shuts down, before death. It's also convenient as it can be later cooked from frozen, without affecting the flavour.
« Last Edit: September 09, 2019, 08:18:47 am by Zero999 »
 


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