Author Topic: This explains my search results, How Scammers in China Manipulate Amazon.  (Read 856 times)

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Offline BrianHG

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Online blueskull

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Re: This explains my search results, How Scammers in China Manipulate Amazon.
« Reply #1 on: December 18, 2018, 05:09:18 am »
Similar story recently enraged iTunes community. A Canadian-Chinese singer used his Chinese fans to flash buy and flash rate his songs to hit iTunes No. 1, while he is never a famous singer worldwide. His songs and ratings are taken down then, though.
 

Offline Bud

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Re: This explains my search results, How Scammers in China Manipulate Amazon.
« Reply #2 on: December 18, 2018, 05:37:35 am »
"Only a small number of Amazon users are doing that" - really? fake reviews are everywhere on Amazon and are more of a rule rather than exception.
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Offline ataradov

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Re: This explains my search results, How Scammers in China Manipulate Amazon.
« Reply #3 on: December 18, 2018, 05:59:27 am »
Sure, let's single out China, it is so trendy now. Sellers from all over the world do this. Sure, in absolute numbers Chinese sellers are dominant. What can they do? China manufactures the product, obviously there will be more sellers there.

Amazon reviews are mostly useless. The only ones I pay attention to are the ones that include pictures of the broken or defective product and even then only to confirm my suspicions that it will break that way.
« Last Edit: December 18, 2018, 06:02:04 am by ataradov »
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Offline Rick Law

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Re: This explains my search results, How Scammers in China Manipulate Amazon.
« Reply #4 on: December 18, 2018, 02:34:28 pm »
This is one of the problem of a big monopoly.  You just manipulate one and you've done it world wide.  This really doesn't serve the customers nor the sellers.

Personally, I think Facebook, Tweeter, Amazon, and Google/youtube should all be broken up.  Given their political donation budget which appears to me as unlimited, and their close relationships with a particular (USA) political party1,  I doubt that would happen any time soon in the USA.

References:

[1] 
According to this September 2018 ZeroHedge Magazine article titled: Google Was "Working To Get Hillary Clinton Elected" With "Silent Donation" According To Leaked Internal Email
https://www.zerohedge.com/news/2018-09-10/google-was-working-get-hillary-clinton-elected-silent-donation-according-leaked
According to this March 2015 Fortune Magazine article titled: Google averages a meeting with the White House every week
http://fortune.com/2015/03/25/google-white-house/
 
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Online blueskull

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Re: This explains my search results, How Scammers in China Manipulate Amazon.
« Reply #5 on: December 18, 2018, 02:38:35 pm »
Personally, I think Facebook, Tweeter, Amazon, and Google/youtube should all be broken up.  Given their political donation budget which appears to me as unlimited, and their close relationships with a particular (USA) political party1,  I doubt that would happen any time soon in the USA.

Say, YT is broken, and each piece is not powerful enough to completely trump, say, DailyMotion, then the world will have more video sites competing with YT, in other countries. That hits GDP, thus tax income, of US government. How will it like that?

Democracy vs GDP. Constant dilemma for politicians.

Same for every other big players.
 

Offline Rick Law

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Re: This explains my search results, How Scammers in China Manipulate Amazon.
« Reply #6 on: December 18, 2018, 03:01:57 pm »
...
Democracy vs GDP. Constant dilemma for politicians.
...

More like "serving my pocket book" or "serving my constituency"...   Bad part is, the constituency seem less and less important to them except a few weeks before reelection, and even then it is just mostly lip-service.

I judge a politician by the growth of their net-worth.  Most have their net worth growing in rates that us mortals can only dream of, and that spoke loudly about their loyalty. 
 


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