Author Topic: The Shed of Dread. Or my new workshop.  (Read 8521 times)

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Offline SeanB

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Re: The Shed of Dread. Or my new workshop.
« Reply #25 on: July 23, 2017, 10:52:24 am »
Good lock, though probably easier to go through the side of a typical shed. Most DIY sheds are flat packed, and are thus easy to pry apart when assembled if you want to be a tealeaf. The container idea would be better if you have the space for the concrete pillars for the corners, and the room to get the side lift truck in and out of the yard to place it. Want to move just disconnect the power ( cut in a caravan socket inlet for the weatherproof inlet) and put a seal in the door, with the insides packed up in some wrapping and away you go.
 

Offline fcb

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Re: The Shed of Dread. Or my new workshop.
« Reply #26 on: July 23, 2017, 12:21:12 pm »
My lab for a number of years was an 8' x 10' in my back garden.  To make it secure I built an inside 'porch', with a reinforced wooden and steel door, with two 5 lever mortices at the top and bottom, all painted black and covered in hazard tape with a radiation warning triangle on the inner door.  All the basic gardening stuff was stored in the first 2', and I kept the basic flimsy shed door.

The theory was that they could get into the outer zone without wrecking the door too much, but then they were faced with a surprising and unknown scenario...  The PIR detected them and they had 30 seconds to disarm the remote panel before being deafened.

So the lab ended up 8'x8' usable with a door that swung in - but it was super-warm (insulated walls lined with plywood).

A couple of years later I built a second shed 8'x12' in-line with the first.  I went for a taller one and reduced the depth of the porch to about 3".
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Offline vodka

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Re: The Shed of Dread. Or my new workshop.
« Reply #27 on: July 23, 2017, 06:44:46 pm »
My lab for a number of years was an 8' x 10' in my back garden.  To make it secure I built an inside 'porch', with a reinforced wooden and steel door, with two 5 lever mortices at the top and bottom, all painted black and covered in hazard tape with a radiation warning triangle on the inner door.  All the basic gardening stuff was stored in the first 2', and I kept the basic flimsy shed door.
.

"Radiation label" there are many thieves that have robbed suitcases with the radiation triangle quite big. I think that is better the lab would  seem the house of a cannibal. With a doll of a victim's cannibal what moans when someone is closed , a pair bucket  with remains the blood and the human  member  and sausages hung for drying  :-DD :-DD :-DD.
There are many crazy people on a city who seem good and polite  than people who store  radiactive substances on their home.
 

Offline Towger

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Re: The Shed of Dread. Or my new workshop.
« Reply #28 on: July 23, 2017, 10:37:22 pm »
Radiation means nothing if they can't read.  A year or two ago they robbed several old radioactive lighting conductors, which were stored in properly marked boxes in a shed.  They just see metal = cash.

Boss were just looking. Do you want that taken away...
 

Offline CJay

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Re: The Shed of Dread. Or my new workshop.
« Reply #29 on: July 24, 2017, 10:46:39 am »
Some good ideas here, I like the porch idea a lot and that'd be easy to do but as I don't have to make allowances for garden tools a second inner door would be very easy to do, it'd remove the problem of insulating the outer door as well  :D

The interior of the shed is to be lined with 0.5" plywood over the insulation so levering the panels apart would only get them so far in before being faced with a chunk of interior wall plus the walls and roof will have a loop of wire such that breaking it will trip the alarm.

Corners and roof joints will be made much stronger than factory with coach bolts and metal bracing.

Sadly it's not possible to get a shipping container (it would be perfect) into the space plus the neighbours would *not* be happy unless I could make it look like a shed, this is a neighbourhood where there was a complaint made because someone built a half brick kennel for their dogs in the back garden |O

Voltsandjolts, nice locks, I will consider those.

 

Offline onesixright

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Re: The Shed of Dread. Or my new workshop.
« Reply #30 on: July 24, 2017, 10:50:24 am »
Nice!

How about a nice underground basement? Dexters lab? :-)

Get yourself one of those attack-dogs. That will keep them out!  >:D
 

Offline CJay

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Re: The Shed of Dread. Or my new workshop.
« Reply #31 on: July 24, 2017, 11:26:11 am »
Nice!

How about a nice underground basement? Dexters lab? :-)

Get yourself one of those attack-dogs. That will keep them out!  >:D

If I thought it was possible, something like this:

 

Offline fcb

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Re: The Shed of Dread. Or my new workshop.
« Reply #32 on: July 24, 2017, 06:56:38 pm »
On the first shed (known by my long suffering wife as "Shed One") the porch area wasn't full height as such, it matched the height of the outer door. There was storage above it on the inside, I used to keep tubes of IC's in the corners (in the useless triangular bit if you think about it).

As far as radiation stickers etc... the aim was to surprise any local villains, sadly (or gladly) no one ever tried to break in. So it's an unproven theory.

Good luck with the build!
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Offline Red Squirrel

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Re: The Shed of Dread. Or my new workshop.
« Reply #33 on: July 26, 2017, 05:55:41 am »
Loudspeaker hooked up to mains so it produces a 60hz hum when you're near the shed, and a big high voltage sign.

I also would not bother with windows on a shed.  Have a nice big solid door with deadbolt and it will be hard enough to get in.  If they REALLY want in they'll eventually get in but the harder you make it, the better.
 

Offline Towger

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Re: The Shed of Dread. Or my new workshop.
« Reply #34 on: July 26, 2017, 07:08:00 am »
Loudspeaker hooked up to mains so it produces a 60hz hum when you're near the shed, and a big high voltage sign.

That would attract them in this part of the world. Electricity = Copper = Money.

Have a look at this IKS Exploration video. They are a mile down a fire damage tunnel, down small access hatch, the place is swimming in crude oil and had already been stripped of copper.
https://youtu.be/L67pyt63OQQ
 

Offline donkey77

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Re: The Shed of Dread. Or my new workshop.
« Reply #35 on: July 26, 2017, 07:36:14 am »
Re security, a friend recently had his shed/workshop broken into and model making lathes, still etc stolen. His was ply lined with good locks etc. They just cut a square hole out of the back with and alligator saw. He's now planning and threading re bar through the uprights, inbetween the inner and outer cladding.
 

Offline CJay

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Re: The Shed of Dread. Or my new workshop.
« Reply #36 on: July 26, 2017, 11:28:07 am »
Yeah, they will get in no matter what you do but I intend it to be as noisy and bright as possible while they're trying, I realise there's not an awful lot I can do to make it impenetrable.

Fortunately it's not a bad area and there are few if any break ins I know of. 
 

Offline G7PSK

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Re: The Shed of Dread. Or my new workshop.
« Reply #37 on: July 26, 2017, 04:08:55 pm »
Use an anti poachers trip alarm the type that takes a 12GG shot shell. They are supposed to take a yachting blank but I knew someone who put live shells in his, the only person he caught was himself when one day in a hurry he forgot to dis arm it on the way in, the thing went off and bird shot bounced around his workshop and hit him in the legs leaving a nasty rash. :-DD
 

Offline TerraHertz

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Re: The Shed of Dread. Or my new workshop.
« Reply #38 on: July 26, 2017, 10:39:34 pm »
A minor point, and nothing like an underground bunker, but if you want to put up a 'garden shed' with a roof height that is lower than the local ordinance for requiring planning approval, and yet still have decent headroom inside, here's how:
http://everist.org/NobLog/20100716_Storage_Shed.htm
The only requirement is that you have a bit of land slope, so you can  have simple drainage of the below-ground part.
How much extra headroom you can have, depends on how much land slope you have.
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Offline CJay

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Re: The Shed of Dread. Or my new workshop.
« Reply #39 on: July 27, 2017, 08:56:01 am »
We're reasonably well treated in England, we're allowed a maximum eaves height of 2.5 metres if we get within 2 metres of boundaries, 4.5 if we stay further away so height isn't a problem, nor is size (for me) as the rules say 'no more than half the area of the land surrounding the original building' so I could, in theory, have an outbuilding the same floor size as the house and not need planning permission.

But an underground bunker would be cool :)

Nice summary of English planning regs here:

https://www.planningportal.co.uk/info/200130/common_projects/43/outbuildings
 

Offline Red Squirrel

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Re: The Shed of Dread. Or my new workshop.
« Reply #40 on: July 28, 2017, 06:23:52 am »
It's crossed my mind to build a basement for my shed when I build it, just for the coolness factor and extra storage.  Could just tie to the house weeping tile system.   Would cost a lot more than the shed itself though. 

I'm on an easement and my water valve is in my back yard, so it makes it very limited as to where I can build a shed.  It's crossed my mind to build it on a trailer bed, that way it's not considered a building anymore and I could put it where I want.   I would just need to make sure it's actually properly locked in place or someone could hook it to a truck and run off with the whole thing.  :-DD
 

Offline Urs42

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Re: The Shed of Dread. Or my new workshop.
« Reply #41 on: July 28, 2017, 09:10:57 am »
You can install a fog system in your shed:



We had some Fun with a similar system here...
 

Offline Fungus

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Re: The Shed of Dread. Or my new workshop.
« Reply #42 on: July 28, 2017, 10:10:32 am »
I use these locks on my shed up&over door and side door. They are sturdy.

www.ebay.co.uk/itm/221174375033

Burglars don't pick/break locks, they come along with big tools and use brute force. If the shed's made of wood then it might be better to use something weak for the door just so they don't rip the entire side off just to get inside.

It's probably better to pay for good insurance than imagine you can make a burglar-proof shed. With the right insurance a fancy DSO or expensive multimeter has no intrinsic value and can be replaced in a couple of days. Be sure to ask the insurance company what you can do to reduce the premium (alarms, lights, cameras, etc.)

Also remember that most burglars want to be in/out as fast as possible, especially if there's a loud alarm going off right in their faces. Leave a few easily-grabbed-but-worthless things in plain view, eg. old laptops, old cellphones, dead iPads, $5 eBay multimeters...

 

Offline Ampera

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Re: The Shed of Dread. Or my new workshop.
« Reply #43 on: July 28, 2017, 01:37:49 pm »
While it's true that most crims don't go after the locks, it's not excuse to be stupid with locks.

Beefy != good.

In the US we have a company called Master Lock. They are used almost everywhere, with everybody going to them for a padlock, yet they are probably the most insecure lock company in the US.

Bosnianbill has a good youtube series on how to get into them, but even I, with my plebian lockpicking skills could pop one open in a few moments.

I suggest looking at Bosnianbill's channel for his video on good lock suggestion. It just needs to be something that will make a crim give up open trying it. Alien technology is often deterrent, even if it's easily bypassed.

Insurance is probably the best idea. In the US, most people would install a good window with nice access to your gun cabinet to show that you aren't going to take shit sitting down. That is the US, however.
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Offline grumpydoc

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Re: The Shed of Dread. Or my new workshop.
« Reply #44 on: July 28, 2017, 02:09:59 pm »
Also remember that most burglars want to be in/out as fast as possible, especially if there's a loud alarm going off right in their faces. Leave a few easily-grabbed-but-worthless things in plain view, eg. old laptops, old cellphones, dead iPads, $5 eBay multimeters...
This is true and why decent locks will deter much casual theft.

I recall a documentary "on't telly" where they asked some low-life petty criminal what would stop him robbing a house and he basically said "Chubb locks".

Certainly the more determined and less opportunistic thieves don't bother picking locks (bumping might still be popular) if they can crowbar them off or the door open. However, it doesn't hurt to make things difficult for them, and, if you must be broken into, it helps to keep the loss adjusters on your side.
 

Offline TerraHertz

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Re: The Shed of Dread. Or my new workshop.
« Reply #45 on: July 30, 2017, 10:54:56 am »
You can install a fog system in your shed:

Hey, I like that! Combined with auto-opening punji-stake pits it could be highly effective.
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Offline ludzinc

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Re: The Shed of Dread. Or my new workshop.
« Reply #46 on: July 30, 2017, 11:06:22 am »
If someone wants to get in, they will get in. Just make it harder to steal your stuff then the neighbour's flat screen.

*than
 

Offline CJay

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Re: The Shed of Dread. Or my new workshop.
« Reply #47 on: October 12, 2017, 06:15:56 am »
Finally, I have a space to build my workshop, a brand new 10'x8' insulated and solid wooden garden building (shed) has been ordered and will be installed in the next couple of weeks (I hope)

'Next couple of weeks' was rather optimistic, it was finally installed yesterday, hopefully the installers will come back soon and finish the interior bracing for the roof because the wrong part was supplied.

A few evenings to insulate and board it then the storage and workbench(es) can be started
 

Online bd139

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Re: The Shed of Dread. Or my new workshop.
« Reply #48 on: October 12, 2017, 07:16:00 am »
I find this blog post inspirational when dealing with shed security:

https://paulinthelab.blogspot.co.uk/2012/05/in-lab-part.html

 :-+
 


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