General > General Technical Chat

UK to attempt to ban the sale of halogen bulbs.

(1/14) > >>

paulca:
https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-57407233

Now, correct me if I am wrong, a halogen bulb is only inefficient if the heat output is waste.  In many applications you do indeed want the heat from the bulb.

I'm going to hope that this will mean that supermarkets will not stock halogen alternatives in their light bulb shelf, but products designed to use halogen or incandescent bulbs for specific reasons .... you should still be able to buy new bulbs?

Also they want to ban fluorescents too.  I don't see that happening.

Zero999:

--- Quote from: paulca on June 09, 2021, 10:42:19 am ---https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-57407233

Now, correct me if I am wrong, a halogen bulb is only inefficient if the heat output is waste.  In many applications you do indeed want the heat from the bulb.

I'm going to hope that this will mean that supermarkets will not stock halogen alternatives in their light bulb shelf, but products designed to use halogen or incandescent bulbs for specific reasons .... you should still be able to buy new bulbs?

Also they want to ban fluorescents too.  I don't see that happening.

--- End quote ---
In what applications do you want the heat from the bulb? A lava lamp?

When it's cold, it's better to use a heat pump to warm your house, rather than resistive heating in light bulbs.

I hope they clamp down on some of the crappy LED lamps which don't last as long, as they should.

paulca:
There are many use cases for where you need light and mild heat or just mild, sub 100W of heat.

Pet enclosures for reptiles.
Some aquatics / aquariums.
Some hydroponics.
Some horticulture.
Chemistry such as brewing/fermenting things.
Halogen cookers.
Preheating circuit boards for soldering.

Sure some of those could be replaced with a £4000 HVAC system!

Also.  HVAC systems are not the be all and end all of home heating systems.  They only really work in modern homes built in the last few decades and in places where summer is hot enough for the air con function to be needed.

On environmental terms, while an HVAC unit might claim a GOP of 4 or 5, they very often don't run anywhere near that, especially in colder climes in winter.  They have to hit a GOP of 3 to be as efficient as a direct heat from burning the fossil fuel in the home instead of the power plant.

Alti:
There are many applications where the heat is what you need but this ban targets the lighting applications I think. So, this won't affect the niche, special purpose applications directly. Indirectly, incandescent/halogen/IR bulbs are going to be less popular so expect their retail price to raise.

It is also true that incandescent type bulbs are 100% efficient when you consider that no energy is wasted but instead emitted by radiation, convection and transmission. In residential applications when you heat a house anyway then this works just like a 98% efficient heater with 2% efficient light source in one package. Leds go closer to 90%/10% proportions. So at any given light flux required, you can use 2%/10% = 20% of energy and emit 20% of 90%/98% = 18.4% of heat of incandescent. Of course if this is illuminating solar freakin roadways application in the middle of the winter and you melt snow with resistive heater anyway then this saving does not make any sense.

Gyro:
I'm sure they just mean ordinary Halogen lamps , the lower energy replacements ordinary filament lamps. You can still legally buy special purpose filament lamps (eg.Oven ones).

Halogen cookers don't count as lamps, they're heating elements - as much IR as possible. Likewise industrial IR heaters.

It's about time they got rid of Halogen downlighters anyway, they consume vast amounts of power for very little overall room brightness and older, non intumescent sealed ones are a fire risk in ceiling cavities.

Navigation

[0] Message Index

[#] Next page

There was an error while thanking
Thanking...
Go to full version