Author Topic: US Student Seeking Education Advice  (Read 7822 times)

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Offline sunnyhighway

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Re: US Student Seeking Education Advice
« Reply #25 on: September 21, 2014, 10:43:50 am »
The only way around this is to get some, any, experience of a workplace doing something roughly relevant to your field near to people that are working in your chosen profession (i.e. not bar staff, although a bit of that does give some useful "life skills" too!).

A reminder - anyone who puts their primary or high school and/or non-engineering related jobs or hobbies on their Resume gets marked down!

I disagree on the hobby part.
It often gives a good lead towards demonstrating your soft skills. How you handle dangerous situations, concerns, stress, mistakes and potential embarrassing situations. But also your learning and teaching capabilities in general. Especially people from HR and teamleaders like to talk with you about that during interviews. They do that in order to figure out if your personality would fit in their team/company.
 

Online tggzzz

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Re: US Student Seeking Education Advice
« Reply #26 on: September 21, 2014, 09:51:35 pm »
The exchange below plus followups is a good illustration that there is no single definition of a good CV/resume.

The corollary is that it may be useful to cast your CV in several different styles, and to see which work.

There's nothing stopping you from supplying different styles to the same company, provided you allow sufficient time for the HR-droids to have forgotten about the previous submission ;}

BTW, while I've previously indicated that I think hobbies may have a very minor place in a CV, a primary school is unlikely to be useful, and a secondary school is only likely to be useful if it is known by the reader as being significantly above average.

The only way around this is to get some, any, experience of a workplace doing something roughly relevant to your field near to people that are working in your chosen profession (i.e. not bar staff, although a bit of that does give some useful "life skills" too!).

A reminder - anyone who puts their primary or high school and/or non-engineering related jobs or hobbies on their Resume gets marked down!

I disagree on the hobby part.
It often gives a good lead towards demonstrating your soft skills. How you handle dangerous situations, concerns, stress, mistakes and potential embarrassing situations. But also your learning and teaching capabilities in general. Especially people from HR and teamleaders like to talk with you about that during interviews. They do that in order to figure out if your personality would fit in their team/company.
There are lies, damned lies, statistics - and ADC/DAC specs.
Glider pilot's aphorism: "there is no substitute for span". Retort: "There is a substitute: skill+imagination. But you can buy span".
Having fun doing more, with less
 

Offline EEVblog

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Re: US Student Seeking Education Advice
« Reply #27 on: September 21, 2014, 10:59:17 pm »
Oh, that's a little simplistic! There can be relevant non-technical "life skills" learned in non-engineering hobbies, and HR-droids love those (partly because they can talk about them).
Example: one of my daughter's hobbies allowed her to demonstrate teamwork in dangerous environments, and that she could competently handle unexpected problems (that caused other people to visibly blanch) on her own.

Of course. And in which case you have to explain that on the resume.
I'm talking about the typical Hobbies sections people put:
Quote
I like sports, jazz music, and playing the saxaphone.
  ::)

I might actually ask about their hobbies in the interview, but I don't really care, it's just a way to suss out their personality and get them talking.
 

Online tggzzz

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Re: US Student Seeking Education Advice
« Reply #28 on: September 21, 2014, 11:22:28 pm »
Oh, that's a little simplistic! There can be relevant non-technical "life skills" learned in non-engineering hobbies, and HR-droids love those (partly because they can talk about them).
Example: one of my daughter's hobbies allowed her to demonstrate teamwork in dangerous environments, and that she could competently handle unexpected problems (that caused other people to visibly blanch) on her own.

Of course. And in which case you have to explain that on the resume.
Ah! Now there's an interesting dilemma. Should you explain on the resume/CV or merely tantallse? Explanation opens the possibility of of rejection whereas being tantalised might get you invited to an interview - which is, after all, the sole purpose of a CV!

Tomorrow, of course, I'll argue the opposite point :)
Quote
I'm talking about the typical Hobbies sections people put:
Quote
I like sports, jazz music, and playing the saxaphone.
  ::)

I might actually ask about their hobbies in the interview, but I don't really care, it's just a way to suss out their personality and get them talking.
If that's all they said then it is easily ignorable. But if they said "sax to international grand master level", then it might be interesting.
There are lies, damned lies, statistics - and ADC/DAC specs.
Glider pilot's aphorism: "there is no substitute for span". Retort: "There is a substitute: skill+imagination. But you can buy span".
Having fun doing more, with less
 


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