Author Topic: Proof that software as service/cloud based, will never work for long term ...  (Read 3087 times)

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Offline james_s

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It is a real awakening to try out some old 90's and 00's applications on a modern computer -  they work SOO fast.  Sadly, all the hardware goodness that we have today has been totally taken over and mostly wasted by a lot of modern software.

The same effect is true with monitors...   today's GUI designers are not able to get more information on a 4K, 48 inch monitor than what was common on a VGA monitor in the 80's (i.e. 25 lines of text.   Try looking at an eBay search today, you get 3 or 4 search results per page...  compared to the 25 you would have seen in the 80's (if eBay had existed!) ).

So much this!!

It is a huge pet peeve of mine the way there is this arms race where monitor resolutions increase so UI designers just make everything bigger and add tons of white space and separation. I don't recall offhand what resolution the screen is on my employer issued Macbook Pro but we use Slack and with it shrunk as small as it will go it takes up a whopping 1/4 or so of the total screen real estate, it's absurd! I remember 15 years ago I could fit Windows Messenger in a little window down in the corner of a 1280x1024 display and it was completely usable. Low information density drives me nuts! The whole point of having a high resolution display is to fit lots of stuff on it.

The old software thing too, I still have Office 2003 which I still have installed on one machine, I find it much nicer than the more recent versions with that stupid ribbon interface, after years of being stuck with that on work computers I still have never grown to like it. I don't recall ever finding a feature I use that is not present in the 2003 version. It's no wonder they had to try to make Office subscription, there is less reason to upgrade software than ever, especially basic productivity tools.
 

Offline SilverSolder

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[...]  It's no wonder they had to try to make Office subscription, there is less reason to upgrade software than ever, especially basic productivity tools.

Now they've resorted to trying to scare people into upgrading for "Security" reasons...

IT is becoming / has become a commodity product.  The "IT fan boys" that experiment and learn lots of applications, graphic arts, programming, etc., are now a tiny minority. 

The mass adoption of IT by everyone and their grandmother means they just want to be able to  to do their everyday shopping and other errands online with as little confusion and hassle as possible.   So, we end up with massive whiteout on the whole monitor, with a single checkbox in the middle:  "Would you like fries with that?"

 

Offline Mr. Scram

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Now they've resorted to trying to scare people into upgrading for "Security" reasons...

IT is becoming / has become a commodity product.  The "IT fan boys" that experiment and learn lots of applications, graphic arts, programming, etc., are now a tiny minority. 

The mass adoption of IT by everyone and their grandmother means they just want to be able to  to do their everyday shopping and other errands online with as little confusion and hassle as possible.   So, we end up with massive whiteout on the whole monitor, with a single checkbox in the middle:  "Would you like fries with that?"
As there are veritable and independently discovered vulnerabilities in the software it's not "scaring".
 
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Offline Rick Law

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Well, at least we own our terminals, a nice shinny glass back smart phone... and, we no longer need an acoustic coupler to use the phone line for data.

How many of us actually own even that...   how many are on some kind of monthly paid plan?

You are right, I stand corrected.

Perhaps too many do not have the math skill to determine the cost of that "free" phone, and too many do not have the patience to save up for a phone and save some money.  I suppose that is the live-long punishment for not learning math.


Most people.

And regular cash flow is what subscriptions and monthly payments are all about.
...

I came across an article about a month ago that more and more sneakers and sweaters are purchased using installment payment.  There are so many that a simple search come up with "12 buy now and pay later shoes stores"  (I am not putting a link here to prove my assertion- I don't like the idea and I don't want to give them free advertisement.  If you don't believe me, do the search yourself.)

I suppose the idea of Personal Computer that one owns running software that one owns is indeed thing of the past.



 

Online BravoV

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I suppose the idea of Personal Computer that one owns running software that one owns is indeed thing of the past.

And in the future or even already happening (not sure), these so called Smart Medical Implants or IOT Body Implants thingy and similar stuffs, that are hooked up to the net/cloud, made me cringe and had goosebumps every time I think about it.

Offline Karel

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I suppose the idea of Personal Computer that one owns running software that one owns is indeed thing of the past.

Fortunately there's GNU/Linux and most commodity software has an opensource version...
The difference between theory and practice is less in theory than
the difference between theory and practice in practice.
Expensive tools cannot compensate for lack of experience.
 

Offline dferyance

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Keep in mind too, there is plenty of "vintage" software that is perfectly fine. If you have a Mac you probably are SOL as Apple doesn't care about backwards compatibility, but wintel has been quite good on backwards compatibility. Probably the most difficult problem is the x64 mode not supporting 16 bit software issue. But dosbox is pretty good in most of these cases. I'm still amazed that today's PCs still essentially have an ISA bus. It's not a bunch of card slots like before but it is there.

I still run and use "vintage" software. For much of it, the original developer isn't even in business anymore. Just this week I was playing the game Spiritual Warfare that came out in 1992. It's great fun and doesn't matter that it is old.

The sad thing is that in 10-20 years people won't be running much of today's software as vintage software. Everything has a cloud connection that won't be supported or exist anymore. There is far less emphasis on backwards compatibility than what existed in the early days of PCs. And forget about phone apps, they won't be able to download their ads / send spying data on you or run much past a few years.
 

Offline Rick Law

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I suppose the idea of Personal Computer that one owns running software that one owns is indeed thing of the past.

And in the future or even already happening (not sure), these so called Smart Medical Implants or IOT Body Implants thingy and similar stuffs, that are hooked up to the net/cloud, made me cringe and had goosebumps every time I think about it.

(USA Federal) Food & Drug Administration Safety Communication June 27, 2019
Certain Medtronic MiniMed Insulin Pumps Have Potential Cybersecurity Risks: FDA Safety Communication
"The FDA is warning patients and health care providers that certain Medtronic MiniMedâ„¢ insulin pumps have potential cybersecurity risks. Patients with diabetes using these models should switch their insulin pump to models that are better equipped to protect against these potential risks.

Medtronic is recalling the following affected MiniMed pumps and providing alternative insulin pumps to patients.
...
..."
Link to article: https://www.fda.gov/medical-devices/safety-communications/certain-medtronic-minimed-insulin-pumps-have-potential-cybersecurity-risks-fda-safety-communication 

That is one of the many reasons I am a strong believer that IoT is not advisable except in limited cases.  Oh, by the way, FDA recommends "do not share the Serial Number... ...".
« Last Edit: Yesterday at 07:25:28 pm by Rick Law »
 

Offline SilverSolder

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Now they've resorted to trying to scare people into upgrading for "Security" reasons...

[...]
As there are veritable and independently discovered vulnerabilities in the software it's not "scaring".

Fair point, but are there any products, systems, services, or beings with no vulnerabilities?

We know our cars or front door locks are not 100% invulnerable to theft.  Yet we still use them - we accept a degree of imperfection.

Is it totally wrong to take the same approach with software, in the right circumstances?
 

Offline Rick Law

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Now they've resorted to trying to scare people into upgrading for "Security" reasons...

[...]
As there are veritable and independently discovered vulnerabilities in the software it's not "scaring".

Fair point, but are there any products, systems, services, or beings with no vulnerabilities?

We know our cars or front door locks are not 100% invulnerable to theft.  Yet we still use them - we accept a degree of imperfection.

Is it totally wrong to take the same approach with software, in the right circumstances?

Yes, because a thief has to be physically where your car or your front door is to try out different ways of picking your lock.  Being physically there exposed, the thief is taking a much higher risk of being caught.  With software thief (on any network connected machine), he/she can do that in the privacy of his/her home or somewhere with unsecured WiFi open to welcome or unwelcome guest.

The scale is also different.  Capital One, Sony, etc, the hecker just had to break into a database once, and she got millions of credit card and personal information records.
 


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