Author Topic: What's this please? (Component Advice)  (Read 384481 times)

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Offline Richard Crowley

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Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
« Reply #1150 on: March 23, 2017, 06:34:34 pm »
Thank you.  So it is probably an MX1508. 
Now if I can only find some information about it that is not in Chinese.
It appears to have a max of 10V, but I'm not even sure what is the current rating?
 

Offline gamalot

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Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
« Reply #1151 on: March 24, 2017, 01:12:05 am »
Thank you.  So it is probably an MX1508. 
Now if I can only find some information about it that is not in Chinese.
It appears to have a max of 10V, but I'm not even sure what is the current rating?

Peak Current:

2A

Continuous Current?

 1.35A (One channel  only)

or

0.6A (channel 1) + 1.3A (channel 2)

or

0.8A (channle 1) + 1.2A (channel 2)
 
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Offline tsmith35

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Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
« Reply #1152 on: March 24, 2017, 03:38:26 pm »
I found more information here...

Google automatic translation of the text:

MX1508 SOP-16 Four-Channel Dual Brushless DC Motor Driver IC
Overview
The product provides an integrated brushless DC motor drive solution for battery-powered toys, low-voltage or battery-powered motion control applications
case. The circuit integrates two channels of N-channel and P-channel power MOSFET design of the H-bridge drive circuit, suitable for driving electric toy car steering
Wheel and rear drive, (drive brushless DC motor or drive two stepping motors). The circuit has a wide operating voltage range (from
2V to 9.6V), the maximum continuous output current of the steering wheel reaches 0.8A, and the maximum peak output current reaches 1.5A. Rear wheel drive maximum continuous output power
Flow reaches 1.5A, the maximum peak output current reaches 2A.
The drive circuit built-in thermal protection circuit. Through the drive circuit load current is much greater than the maximum circuit current, by the package cooling capacity
Limit, the internal chip chip temperature will rise rapidly, once more than the set value (typical 150 °C), the internal circuit will immediately turn off the output power
Rate, cut off the load current, to avoid the temperature continued to rise caused by plastic packaging smoke, fire and other security risks. Built-in temperature hysteresis circuit, indeed
After the circuit is restored to a safe temperature, the circuit is allowed to be re-controlled.
The
Features:
a. Low standby current (less than 0.1uA);
b. Low static operating current;
c. Integrated H bridge drive circuit;
d. Built-in anti-common conduction circuit;
e low conduction resistance of the power MOSFET;
F. Built-in overheat protection circuit (TSD) with hysteresis effect;
g. Antistatic rating: 3KV (HBM).
Typical applications
a. 2-6 AA / AAA battery powered motor drive;
b. 2-6 nickel-hydrogen / nickel-cadmium rechargeable battery-powered toy motor drive;
c. 1-2 lithium battery-powered motor drive
« Last Edit: March 24, 2017, 03:39:57 pm by tsmith35 »
 
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Offline kostasb

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Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
« Reply #1153 on: March 29, 2017, 02:56:08 pm »
Hello,

Any ideas on this IC?




It is in a USB charge & communication board.
Pin-2 is connecting to USB data-
Pin-3 is connecting to USB data+
Pin-6 is connecting to USB +5V
Pins 1, 4, 5 can be connected at ground or/and one an other.
It is in parallel with USB data pins.
It is not connecting as USB data filter.
The signals don't pass through IC.
 

Offline chicken

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Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
« Reply #1154 on: March 29, 2017, 04:59:07 pm »
ESD protection? E.g. AOZ8881.
 
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Offline gamalot

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Online OiD

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Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
« Reply #1156 on: March 29, 2017, 05:40:22 pm »
Hi all,

Any idea what this part from STMicroelectronics could be? "ST L6401ES" in a Multiwatt-11 package

Thanks!
 

Offline tsmith35

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Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
« Reply #1157 on: April 05, 2017, 01:29:54 pm »
Where did you get the part number? What is this device used for?
 

Offline frozenfrogz

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Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
« Reply #1158 on: April 07, 2017, 08:21:28 am »
Any idea what this part from STMicroelectronics could be? "ST L6401ES" in a Multiwatt-11 package

Found you something: http://www.jotrin.com/product/parts/L6401. There seems to be a datasheet downloadable, but you need a login to do so.
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Offline tsmith35

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Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
« Reply #1159 on: April 09, 2017, 01:21:40 am »
Clicking the datasheet download link on that page (with an account) takes you to a search on the ST site for L6401. With no results...
 
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Offline frozenfrogz

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Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
« Reply #1160 on: April 09, 2017, 09:42:43 am »
That’s unfortunate :/
Maybe contact ST directly?
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Online PA0PBZ

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Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
« Reply #1161 on: April 15, 2017, 01:02:43 pm »
This doide'ish thing, what is it? It is used in an induction stove, I guess to monitor the temperature of the plate. It has a voltage drop of 3V both ways so what part does that? The drop slightly decreases when I warm it up by hand.
First picture is how it sits in the stove against the bottom of the glass plate (separated by some kind of isolating plate), the 'diode' legs are downwards into the red rubber, the aluminium (?) 'flag' is touching the diode.

« Last Edit: April 15, 2017, 01:05:53 pm by PA0PBZ »
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Offline oPossum

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Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
« Reply #1162 on: April 15, 2017, 01:14:50 pm »
Looks like a thermistor. What is the resistance? Probably 10k or 100k.
 

Online PA0PBZ

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Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
« Reply #1163 on: April 15, 2017, 01:25:05 pm »
Looks like a thermistor. What is the resistance? Probably 10k or 100k.

You are probably right, if I measure the resistance it is around 100K but not stable at all, but the voltage drop is as stable as 2.995V, so that made me wonder.
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Offline Mr.B

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Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
« Reply #1164 on: April 16, 2017, 06:29:35 am »
Looks like a silicon thermistor.

Picture has a basic match to this:
http://www.amwei.com/views.asp?hw_id=65
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Online OiD

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Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
« Reply #1165 on: April 17, 2017, 08:16:14 pm »
Where did you get the part number? What is this device used for?

I have a bag full of them along with other motor control IC's (three phase, Stepper, DC...) so it might be a control IC or similar.

That’s unfortunate :/
Maybe contact ST directly?

Elusive component! Guess I'll have to. Strange not to find any reference whatsoever...
 

Offline daveshah

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Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
« Reply #1166 on: April 18, 2017, 10:02:56 am »
I have a bag full of them along with other motor control IC's (three phase, Stepper, DC...) so it might be a control IC or similar.

Seems very probable - the L prefix seems to be used by ST for motor control stuff (as well as a few other oddities), there are even some other L64xx devices such as the L6470 microstepping driver. Perhaps ES indicates engineering sample, and the part never made it to market?
 

Offline tsmith35

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Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
« Reply #1167 on: April 18, 2017, 08:58:56 pm »
That makes sense... from an ST datasheet:

"Parts marked as "ES", "E" or accompanied by an Engineering Sample notification letter, are not yet qualified and therefore not yet ready to be used in production and any consequences deriving from such usage will not be at ST charge. In no event, ST will be liable for any customer usage of these engineering samples in production. ST Quality has to be contacted prior to any decision to use these Engineering Samples to run qualification activity."
 

Offline thomastheo

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Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
« Reply #1168 on: April 20, 2017, 11:16:46 am »
I found these old relays, 12 individual silver-contact glass reed relays to one coil, which looks to be 12v nominal. They are marked as Elliott Brothers 'Sealed Contact Reed Relay' Type ERP. PT No. A. with the number 31262 on the outside, and '32232/105' on the side of the coil itself. According to wikipedia this company was in business in the fifties and sixties as a computer manufacturer. I am wondering whether anyone knows more about these 12 pole reed relays, and what they might have been used for, as google has not been very helpful. The picture shows two assembled units, and one that has been taken to bits.

Edit: It's hard to tell from the photo I posted, but the reed switches are quite large. The glass envelope is 5cm long, with a diameter of about 5mm.

Thanks!
« Last Edit: April 20, 2017, 11:25:07 am by thomastheo »
 

Offline dexters_lab

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Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
« Reply #1169 on: May 02, 2017, 04:48:13 pm »
i found this the other day, it looked unusual...

it's a 30 pin sealed metal can with a ceramic hybrid inside containing 32 dies and the usual laser etched resistors and SMD caps

marked as ITT 5C1/137848 AAWJ 80/10B ISSB

any ideas? no purpose for knowing other than curiosity...
« Last Edit: May 02, 2017, 04:51:09 pm by dexters_lab »
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Offline frozenfrogz

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Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
« Reply #1170 on: May 02, 2017, 09:12:56 pm »
That hybrid circuit is a piece of art!
I do not know what its purpose is, but it looks kind of military. To my knowledge ITT industries (International Telephone & Telegraphs Corporation) did have and still has an aerospace and avionics department.
You could send a request via itt.com, or ittaerospace.com.

Here is a short article on hybrid circuits, featuring something in a similar package.

Thanks for the photos, it’s mesmerizing :)
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Offline TerraHertz

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Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
« Reply #1171 on: May 03, 2017, 09:07:02 am »
Can anyone make out these hieroglyphics? (pic 1)

The IC is an 8 pin low-side regulator in a small charger for laptops.
The high-side controller markings are clear, and the data was easy to find. (pic 2, SG5842JASZ  http://datasheet.elcodis.com/pdf2/81/67/816778/sg5842ja.pdf )

The charger is 20V 2A output, and I hope to change it to 12V. And a bit more current. Hacking it because I need a physically SMALL power supply for this (pic 3).  Yes, I know I will have to rewind the transformer.
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Online PA0PBZ

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Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
« Reply #1172 on: May 03, 2017, 09:17:42 am »
Can anyone make out these hieroglyphics? (pic 1)


L03AIW
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Offline TerraHertz

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Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
« Reply #1173 on: May 03, 2017, 09:56:05 am »
Maybe "103AIW" ?
http://www.badcaps.net/forum/showthread.php?t=30723

From its function-by-location it would be a comparator/op-amp and reference. But I'm not finding data yet.

Edit: Got it!  ST  TSM103. Dual op amp and voltage reference.

  http://pdf1.alldatasheet.com/datasheet-pdf/view/517784/STMICROELECTRONICS/TSM103AIDT.html

Edit 2: Now to see if I can dissolve the epoxy holding the transformer ferrite halves together.
Anyone recognize the make from the part number printed on it? Source? (assuming I break it.)
« Last Edit: May 03, 2017, 03:30:52 pm by TerraHertz »
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Offline TerraHertz

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Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
« Reply #1174 on: May 03, 2017, 10:04:56 am »
I found these old relays, 12 individual silver-contact glass reed relays to one coil, which looks to be 12v nominal. They are marked as Elliott Brothers 'Sealed Contact Reed Relay' Type ERP. PT No. A. with the number 31262 on the outside, and '32232/105' on the side of the coil itself. According to wikipedia this company was in business in the fifties and sixties as a computer manufacturer. I am wondering whether anyone knows more about these 12 pole reed relays, and what they might have been used for, as google has not been very helpful. The picture shows two assembled units, and one that has been taken to bits.

Edit: It's hard to tell from the photo I posted, but the reed switches are quite large. The glass envelope is 5cm long, with a diameter of about 5mm.

Thanks!

I've pulled apart old boards that had multi-reed relays like that in the past. I think they were used to select between several different cables, where a cable would have that many wires. Say 4 cables, use 4 of those blocks. Energise only one.
They were from the days when interfaces tended to have a lot of separate wires. So that was the only way to do it.

Anyway, now you have enough reed relays to put sensors on every door in a large house.
Collecting old scopes, logic analyzers, and unfinished projects. http://everist.org
 
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