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General => General Chat => Topic started by: orbiter on March 06, 2011, 12:21:48 pm

Title: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: orbiter on March 06, 2011, 12:21:48 pm
Hi fellas,

First off... Anybody think it might be a good thing to have a 'What's This Please..' as a sticky thread, and if so, could we have one please? Only because I've seen a few people (including myself) needing to know what particular parts are.

Ok now to my question.. What's This please.. :) I'm assuming it's some sort of photodiode or something, but I've had a quick search on around on the datasheet sites looking for the displayed numbers, but I can't see anything that matches.

(http://img546.imageshack.us/img546/1346/37140753.jpg)

(http://img195.imageshack.us/img195/9344/76918181.jpg)

Thanks guys
Title: Re: What's this please?
Post by: cybergibbons on March 06, 2011, 12:32:30 pm
Looks like an IR remote receiver.
Title: Re: What's this please?
Post by: mikeselectricstuff on March 06, 2011, 12:32:51 pm
It's an infra-red receiver for remote controls, by Sharp I think. It demodulates the 36-ish khz carrier to give an easily decoded datastream. There are many simiular devices (e.g. Vishay TSOP range), sho shouldn;t be hard to find data
Title: Re: What's this please?
Post by: orbiter on March 06, 2011, 12:39:45 pm
Ah ok, thanks guys. That gives me something to go on.

Cheers

orb
Title: Re: What's this please?
Post by: Sionyn on March 06, 2011, 03:58:53 pm
IR
Title: Re: What's this please?
Post by: Mechatrommer on March 06, 2011, 03:59:14 pm
First off... Anybody think it might be a good thing to have a 'What's This..' thread, and if so, could we have one please?
i agree, and it should be made sticky. how about this thread? just suggestion.
Title: Re: What's this please?
Post by: armandas on March 06, 2011, 11:16:38 pm
Oh! Oh! May I?

The hand drawn part is the rough copy of the silk screen that was under the component. Basically a zigzag in a rectangle. Probably some power component, but I have never seen the symbol, so no idea.

EDIT: added a picture with a ruler. It's about 10mm wide.
Title: Re: What's this please?
Post by: dengorius on March 07, 2011, 02:09:00 am
It looks like some kind of thermistor to me, maybe a NTC? Have you tried to measure its resistance
Title: Re: What's this please?
Post by: Hypernova on March 07, 2011, 06:20:11 am
At that size probably a NTC thermister for inrush current protection.
Title: Re: What's this please?
Post by: ElektroQuark on March 07, 2011, 07:52:19 am
Semitec 10D210 Thermistor, NTC, 10 Ohm, 3A
Title: Re: What's this please?
Post by: armandas on March 07, 2011, 08:50:33 am
Nice one, guys. It is indeed an NTC, measures about 12R when cold. Thanks!
Title: Re: What's this please?
Post by: orbiter on March 09, 2011, 05:00:34 pm
Any chance of the 'What's this please?' sticky thread.. please mods?
Title: Re: What's this please?
Post by: Simon on March 09, 2011, 07:32:29 pm
There you go it is now a sticky. It will eventually become a very long topic though but I expect something to trwl through when you have an "unknown" and "some time"
Title: Re: What's this please?
Post by: orbiter on March 09, 2011, 07:55:36 pm
Great. Thanks Simon :)
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: NiHaoMike on March 10, 2011, 08:31:28 pm
In every CRT monitor or TV I have taken apart, there was this odd inductor that has a permanent magnet glued to it. Is that to offset the magnetic field generated by a DC bias current so a cheaper core can be used?
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Time on March 10, 2011, 10:38:32 pm
In every CRT monitor or TV I have taken apart, there was this odd inductor that has a permanent magnet glued to it. Is that to offset the magnetic field generated by a DC bias current so a cheaper core can be used?

My guess would be to minimize the overall field of the inductor since a CRT is sensitive to B fields.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: david77 on March 10, 2011, 10:59:22 pm
I've also got something I'm seeking information on. I'm pretty sure I know what they are but I'd be interested in some more info on these op amps.

(http://dplinks.ath.cx/pics/elektro/oldopamps.jpg)

Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: jahonen on March 11, 2011, 08:05:01 am
In every CRT monitor or TV I have taken apart, there was this odd inductor that has a permanent magnet glued to it. Is that to offset the magnetic field generated by a DC bias current so a cheaper core can be used?

My guess would be to minimize the overall field of the inductor since a CRT is sensitive to B fields.

I think it is horizontal linearity or "s-correction" coil.

Regards,
Janne
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: apex on March 12, 2011, 01:21:59 pm
@david77:
They look like early operational amplifiers.
The function on the pins is printed on it, so why don't give it a try and see if it works?
Don't expect too much amplification factor!

apex
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Zero999 on March 12, 2011, 05:27:23 pm
In every CRT monitor or TV I have taken apart, there was this odd inductor that has a permanent magnet glued to it. Is that to offset the magnetic field generated by a DC bias current so a cheaper core can be used?
Yes, that's what it's for, the permanent magnet biases the inductor to oppose the DC current so a smaller, cheaper core can be used.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Mechatrommer on March 15, 2011, 04:44:08 pm
pls help!

1) white (ceramic like) rectangle with 5W0.1ohmJ on it?
2) yellow (plastic like) rectangle with .1uF (K) X2 etc etc on it? if its capacitor, what type and why its yellow plastic rectangle?
3) the green round coin shape with DN R, 20 D471K on it, polyswitch right? the NTC?
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: NiHaoMike on March 15, 2011, 05:02:51 pm
First one is a resistor.
Second one is indeed a capacitor.
Third one is a NTC.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Mechatrommer on March 15, 2011, 05:09:49 pm
thanx. but why the unit is ohmJ? and my question about the yellow rectangle plastic?
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Simon on March 15, 2011, 05:24:05 pm
I think "J" is an abreviation of tolerance, 5% I think
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Fryguy on March 15, 2011, 05:51:08 pm
1) it's a simple 0,1 ohm 5W resistor - just ignore the J - i always do  ;)

2) is a X2-class 0,1µF mains filter capacitor - a flat foil capacitor in a yellow plastic block body - that's just the way it is - an X2 is designed to withstand a voltage peak of 2500V and it won't burn in case of an overload .

Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Mechatrommer on March 15, 2011, 05:59:07 pm
thanx guys! i thought the J is Joule :D
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Time on March 15, 2011, 08:52:18 pm
j means jiggawatt
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: NiHaoMike on March 16, 2011, 04:11:58 am
In every CRT monitor or TV I have taken apart, there was this odd inductor that has a permanent magnet glued to it. Is that to offset the magnetic field generated by a DC bias current so a cheaper core can be used?
Yes, that's what it's for, the permanent magnet biases the inductor to oppose the DC current so a smaller, cheaper core can be used.
So why isn't that technique used in a lot more applications where there is a significant DC bias current?
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Zero999 on March 16, 2011, 09:16:33 pm
Good point, the only place I've seen it is inside CRTs. I would think it would also be handy for inductors used in SMPSes which also have a high DC current.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Mechatrommer on March 26, 2011, 07:28:47 pm
what is this? A78374 HP 8555A Spectrum Analyzer-RF Section .01-18 Ghz (http://cgi.ebay.com.my/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=390300754963&ssPageName=ADME:B:SS:MY:1123). i know the name alright, what it does? i'm serious, i'm not joking.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: oPossum on March 26, 2011, 07:49:09 pm
That is one of the two modules that can be installed in a 141T frame to make a spectrum analyzer.

It converts the high frequency RF to a lower frequency that is fed to the lower module. Sort of a tuner.

Late 60s vintage.


Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: tekfan on March 30, 2011, 07:13:00 pm
Anyone know what the FET labelled E401 is (second schematic). It's in the peak detector circuit and it looks like the drain and source are shorted together.
Is it maybe used as a variable resistance device? Anyone know a substitute or part number?

BTW This is a very nice voltmeter with plenty of rectification options and bandpass filter selections. Perfect for audio work really (or anything to 500 KHz).

(http://www.chinaicmart.com/uploadfile/ic-circuit/200962422510387.gif)

(http://www.chinaicmart.com/uploadfile/ic-circuit/20096242260761.gif)

Though it's built with standard components, this ac voltmeter contains many features not typi-cally found in commercial meters; the most unusual is a selection of rectification modes. The meter responses available include true RMS ('fRMS), average, RMS-calibrated average responding, positive peak, negative peak, positive-peak hold, and negative-peak hold.

 High- and low-pass filters (S1 and S6, respectively) allow the -3-dB-passband to be varied from as little as 10 Hz to 200 Hz, to as wide as dc to 500 kHz. The low-pass filter also is effective in the 100x amplifier mode, where the input equivalent noise level is only 0.3 pV, with 10-kHz roll-off.

(NOT WRITTEN BY ME)
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Time on March 30, 2011, 08:06:59 pm
Thats a strange symbol for a fet.  might not even be one.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Zero999 on March 30, 2011, 08:15:15 pm
The symbol is standard, the configuration is not.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: VIPR on March 31, 2011, 01:45:17 am
Looks like a standard N-channel JFET being used as a diode for clip detection. If you tie the drain and source together the JFET also works similar to a diode, except you have one P-region and two N-regions.

What I find interesting is that the part number is not called out while every other part on both schematics is clearly labeled as to what the specific part number is or at least the value. Instead, for that part they apparently used the PCB part identifier label. That seems rather odd and possible a clue as well.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Zad on April 02, 2011, 01:59:17 am
I have never seen a JFET used like that before. I wonder if they are using it as a Schottky diode.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Rufus on April 14, 2011, 08:40:52 pm
Anyone know what the FET labelled E401 is (second schematic).

Well I guess it is an E401. Maybe at the time it was a good choice for use as a low leakage diode, maybe it or a similar JFET still is.

I found LS841 listed as an equivalent. Searching will turn up a datasheet for that, strangely it is a dual n-channel JFET.

If you are trying to re-create this circuit you just need a low leakage diode or JFET used as one. The LS841 gate leakage is specified at 50pA max, 25C and 20v so that's a target to match.

Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: tekfan on April 21, 2011, 07:42:31 pm
Anyone know what the FET labelled E401 is (second schematic).

Well I guess it is an E401. Maybe at the time it was a good choice for use as a low leakage diode, maybe it or a similar JFET still is.

I found LS841 listed as an equivalent. Searching will turn up a datasheet for that, strangely it is a dual n-channel JFET.

If you are trying to re-create this circuit you just need a low leakage diode or JFET used as one. The LS841 gate leakage is specified at 50pA max, 25C and 20v so that's a target to match.



Thanks very much for the explanation
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Psi on May 03, 2011, 11:54:28 am
Anyone have any idea what part number this diode is?

I've tried searching on SGS / E1274 / 525 and cant find any info
edit: Its actually E 1271

The DMM says it's forward voltage is 0.5v
(http://psi.abcom.co.nz/unknowndiode.jpg)

Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: tekfan on May 03, 2011, 12:36:10 pm
I've seen many older (from 70's and 80's) varicap diodes packaged in black. Exactly like that one. It may also be a zener diode. Try measuring the voltage drop in both ways.

Where did you get it? How old do you think it is?
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Psi on May 03, 2011, 03:06:49 pm
i've tired one up to 40v, it's not a zener, well,  not unless it's over 40v

It could be old, i was just given a whole bunch of electronics and i have bag of those diodes.
I'm trying to decide if i should keep or throw away.

Unless i can find a datasheet there not really of any use to me.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: tekfan on May 03, 2011, 04:22:11 pm
I would guess the 1274 is the date code. It seems to be about right since SGS (Italy) was formed in 1972. So 525 must be the part number.

You say you've got more? Do all of them have 1274 written?

If you want to check if it's a varicap you caan build this simple circuit. http://www.hanssummers.com/varicap/varicaporig.html (http://www.hanssummers.com/varicap/varicaporig.html)
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Psi on May 04, 2011, 12:29:47 pm
Just noticed its E 1271 not E 1274
Still no luck finding any info though

The SGS and E 1271 is always the same.
The 525 part varies a little 424 / 510 / 525 with lots of duplicates
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: vk6zgo on May 09, 2011, 03:03:01 am
I think it's just an ordinary silicon signal diode like a 1N914 or the like.

I seem to remember them in various boards I either fixed or stripped for parts,& yes, they are quite old.

Why not keep them & use them in non-critical applications?

VK6ZGO

Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Psi on May 09, 2011, 07:53:12 am
Why not keep them & use them in non-critical applications?

I think id rather solder in a diode which i know the specs of.

Without knowing the max voltage and current of that diode i wouldn't want to use it.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: vk6zgo on May 09, 2011, 08:49:47 am

I did say "non-critical"!

In "hobby" type low power applications there are many circuits where the actual specs of the diode are

fairly unimportant----just a "signal diode".

In fact,you could build up a simple circuit,using a known spec diode,then substitute the E1271 & see

what the effect is.

If the circuit operates in the same manner,it gives you a clue to the characteristics of the  E1271.

You could even measure the characteristics using a fairly simple test setup,which you could find on the Internet.

Then again,diodes are dirt cheap,so you could throw them away,but you wouldn't learn anything.

VK6ZGO
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Psi on May 09, 2011, 12:34:44 pm
normally when ya build stuff, even for hobby use, enough things go wrong that you dont really want to be adding to problem by using components of unknown specs  :)

i was mainly interested in finding info about the diode incase it turned out to be something special that might be of use. Like ultra fast etc.
I've got a few 100 normal signal diodes and about the same quantity of 1n4007's already.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Excavatoree on May 12, 2011, 02:47:01 am
Just a quick ID question - can anyone identify:

Diode:  Marked 62T02 and GI9774 (both on one diode, two lines)  Google is no help.  About the size of a 1N4002

unknown device in TO-220 package:  IR9502  International Rectifier's website doesn't recognize it.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: vk6zgo on May 12, 2011, 06:36:47 am
Just a quick ID question - can anyone identify:

Diode:  Marked 62T02 and GI9774 (both on one diode, two lines)  Google is no help.  About the size of a 1N4002

unknown device in TO-220 package:  IR9502  International Rectifier's website doesn't recognize it.

Are they just loose components,or are they in a piece of equipment?

If the latter,you can probably work out what they do,& find something similar to compare

with.

VK6ZGO
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Excavatoree on May 12, 2011, 04:19:24 pm
That's the problem - these are "grab bag" components.    I suspect the diodes are house-numbered, but I can't explain why I can find no info about the IR parts.

I did a bit of testing on the diode - I reverse biased it up to about 200 V  (limit of my curve tracer) with no breakdown.

It must be a garden variety rectifier with a house number or a number from some defunct manufacturer or something.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Rufus on May 17, 2011, 01:20:11 am
Diode:  Marked 62T02 and GI9774 (both on one diode, two lines)  Google is no help.  About the size of a 1N4002

unknown device in TO-220 package:  IR9502  International Rectifier's website doesn't recognize it.

GI9774 will be General Instruments and a date code. 62T02 is possibly a complete part number but if so it seems to be an obscure part.

IR9502 will be IRF9502.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: hannobisschoff on June 14, 2011, 01:04:56 pm
this should definitely be made a sticky thread. Or is it one already? :-\
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: topcat on July 31, 2011, 02:59:05 pm
Hi all,

I am working on a little project which needs a display, and I managed to salvage this 128x64 which I would like to use.
Can Anyone know what kind it is or suggest where I may find a spec for it?

Thanks.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: ThePranksta on October 13, 2011, 10:05:16 am
My guess from a bit of Googling is it is an unit from the JHD group, quite possibly a custom unit. Nearest I could find was the following:
http://download.maritex.com.pl/pdfs/op/JCG12864A0305.pdf (http://download.maritex.com.pl/pdfs/op/JCG12864A0305.pdf)

As far as I know most of these units use the same Samsung LCD driver so you might want to give it a shot.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: oliver602 on October 16, 2011, 04:37:29 pm
I have an old power mac powersupply that died. I don't know how the supply works but I have found a suspect looking component with burn marks on it. I've tried googleing and searching the big electronics suppliers but can't find anything.

It's in a 3 pin TO-220 marked H530 TOP200YAI PB0779. I don't recognise the logo either.

It fits on the small heat sink in the bottom left. I removed R4 and the TO220 package before taking that photo.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Rufus on October 16, 2011, 05:05:39 pm
It's in a 3 pin TO-220 marked H530 TOP200YAI PB0779. I don't recognise the logo either.

http://www.powerint.com/sites/default/files/product-docs/top200-204214.pdf (http://www.powerint.com/sites/default/files/product-docs/top200-204214.pdf)
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: oliver602 on October 18, 2011, 04:44:28 pm
Thanks Rufus
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: BravoV on October 27, 2011, 05:45:33 am
I'm going to do a major recap at my tek 2465B scope and found these, question is what is so special about this cap compared to ordinary good quality electrolytic type ?

Also it looks like its non polar type, can't find any marking.

(https://www.eevblog.com/forum/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=5258.0;attach=16492;image)

(https://www.eevblog.com/forum/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=5258.0;attach=16494;image)


These are at the switching ps section, they also used normal electrolytic type as the one below with 100uF 50 V marking underneath these metallic looks cap, they're encapsulated with clear plastic though.

(https://www.eevblog.com/forum/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=5258.0;attach=16496;image)
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: requim on October 28, 2011, 11:09:38 pm
I found this on eBay and am wondering what probe this is.  I thought it might be for an LCR meter but looking at it more I'm thinking probably not.. Ideas?

http://www.ebay.com/itm/120766582589?ssPageName=STRK:MEWAX:IT&_trksid=p3984.m1423.l2649#ht_499wt_1185 (http://www.ebay.com/itm/120766582589?ssPageName=STRK:MEWAX:IT&_trksid=p3984.m1423.l2649#ht_499wt_1185)
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: alm on October 28, 2011, 11:41:00 pm
I don't recognize it. The four SMB connectors don't scream LCR meter to me though, since these are typically used for high(ish) frequencies. The coaxial construction of the probe also indicates RF. I would also expect at least two, if not four, connections to the DUT for an LCR meter.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: mikeselectricstuff on October 28, 2011, 11:50:32 pm
Ultrasonic probe perhaps ? Listing mentions aerospace, so maybe for ultrasonic inspection.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: amspire on October 29, 2011, 01:34:59 am
I will vote for a Hall sensor to measure magnetic flux strength.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: tekfan on October 30, 2011, 12:42:31 am
What about a current probe with the missing current transformer on the front where the thread is? DC current probes need hall sensors too.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: amspire on October 30, 2011, 01:26:43 am
What about a current probe with the missing current transformer on the front where the thread is? DC current probes need hall sensors too.

The sensor for a current transformer is extremely thin and is built into the transformer core - it cannot be in a tube. Definitely if we could see the missing half of the probe, the purpose would probably be obvious.

It is also very likely that without the missing half, it is probably enormously useless.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Rufus on October 30, 2011, 04:47:26 pm
I found this on eBay and am wondering what probe this is.

It is more like a spare part for a probe. Closest thing I see is http://www.home.agilent.com/agilent/product.jspx?nid=-34051.536880742.00 (http://www.home.agilent.com/agilent/product.jspx?nid=-34051.536880742.00) but is doesn't look exactly the same.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: requim on October 31, 2011, 08:52:19 am
@Rufus - Yeah I saw that too and thought perhaps that was what it was for.  An older obsolete version perhaps.  Who knows.. Still has me stumped and I'd just like to know purely out of curiosity.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: requim on November 07, 2011, 08:22:43 am
Well it looks like I stumped you guys on the last one.  Hopefully not so much on this one.  I'm looking for the female companion to the following male connector found on the HP 204C Sine Oscillator - Board A1.  The two units I received are missing the power supply / battery adapter boards so I'm planning on constructing a makeshift connector so I can power it through my DC power supplies to test / verify functionality and then I plan on selling them because they're not much use to me without the power adapter and making one from scratch following their schematics doesn't seem to be worthwhile.  I think the parts would be prohibitively expensive, not to mention trying to create a PCB. 

But I digress.  Can anyone tell me what the name of this part would be? I've searched around Digi-key and google a bit and came up empty.  I searched using the HP Part number (1521-1631) as well as the manufacturer's part #, and came up empty.  I imagine I can still find that type of connector, but I haven't the faintest idea what they're called.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: amspire on November 07, 2011, 12:04:51 pm
First of all, all that is needed for a power supply is +/- 13V. Should be easy with a transformer, rectifier, capacitors and a couple of IC regulators.

You do need to work out the current consumption.

If you are talking about the PCB edge connector, it looks like a standard 0.156" PCB edge connector. Check the pad spacing to confirm if it is 0.156 inches.

http://search.digikey.com/us/en/products/306-010-500-102/EDC306100-ND/107635 (http://search.digikey.com/us/en/products/306-010-500-102/EDC306100-ND/107635)

Richard

Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: requim on November 07, 2011, 12:59:57 pm
@amspire - right you are.  That was obviously an easy one.  I've attached an image of what the power supply board is supposed to look like.  The details from the manual are lacking on the transformer.  The manual seems to provide enough detail regarding the other parts. 

Aside from the transformer issue, I'm still left with the PCB issue as well as a way to mount it since both enclosures are missing their covers.  It appears these units could be mounted inside a chassis and I assume based on the parts that I have that one was and the other wasn't.  Unfortunately the one that wasn't chassis mounted is missing it's exterior case as well.

If you have any suggestions regarding the transformer and PCB I'm all ears.  I saw someone posting something yesterday about doing some sort of pcb transfer/etching with a laser printer.  I have a laser printer so that might be worth investigating I'll have to google around for more details on that.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: amspire on November 07, 2011, 01:43:35 pm
I have attached a very rough circuit for a power supply. I will leave you to look up the data sheets and calculate the resistors for 13V. The negative regulator needs a minimum load to work, so if the oscillator can at times draw very little current, you may need to add an extra resistor across the -13V.

This circuit needs a transformer with a single winding 15V to 20V. If you have an old 12v DC power pack (the heavy ones with a transformer), the transformer inside would probably be fine. The oscillator does not use much current, so possibly anything you can scrounge will be OK.

For the board, it is not the strongest, but you could just get some veroboard-type prototyping board (the one with the parallel copper strips). Cut a hole for the edge connector leads and solder on the back. Build the power supply board on it. Cut away lots of the spare tracks on the primary.

I wouldn't worry to much about the battery option. For one thing, the Mercury batteries thy did use do not exist any more - they are banned.

If  it is only the power supply boards missing, that is good as it is the one thing that is easy to replace.

Now this is no frequency synthesizer, but for work below 1MHz, what you get is the great vernier dial that none of the synthesizers have. For general testing, this is much faster to use then any synthesizer.

Richard
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: requim on November 07, 2011, 03:48:01 pm
Looks like this will be a good little project to learn a bit more about electronics since I have no idea how to do the calculations.  Guess I'll be doing a fair amount of reading and work through MIT's opencourseware.

Out of curiosity, what's the primary difference between your schematic and the one in the manual for the power supply I showed?  I notice some parts are missing from yours however knowing that you used to design power supplies, I'm sure you know what you're doing.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: firewalker on November 07, 2011, 03:54:39 pm
Any hints?

(http://i.imgur.com/OUYTUs.jpg) (http://i.imgur.com/OUYTU.jpg)

It is placed in a small board of the antenna input of a Philips mini Hi-Fi. In the board's header output you can see pins labeled as SDA and SCL so it has an I2C interface.

A decoder for something perhaps? An input level meter? Could it use the AM ferrite coil antenna and act as a radio clock?

Alexander.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: requim on November 07, 2011, 07:47:19 pm
Would this transformer work for the sine oscillator?  The manual states it uses 400mA so this seems like it would work just fine.

http://search.digikey.com/us/en/products/ST-4-16/595-1166-ND/953036 (http://search.digikey.com/us/en/products/ST-4-16/595-1166-ND/953036)

I'm still unclear on the whole voltage thing though.  i thought I had to match voltages so why can I do a 16V transformer when I need 13V?
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: metalphreak on November 07, 2011, 08:19:59 pm
Any hints?

(http://i.imgur.com/OUYTUs.jpg) (http://i.imgur.com/OUYTU.jpg)

It is placed in a small board of the antenna input of a Philips mini Hi-Fi. In the board's header output you can see pins labeled as SDA and SCL so it has an I2C interface.

A decoder for something perhaps? An input level meter? Could it use the AM ferrite coil antenna and act as a radio clock?

Alexander.

AMETEK AF3020 AM FM Dual Band Radio Receiver Module

http://www.ienk.com/am-fm-dual-band-radio-receiver-module-p-331.html (http://www.ienk.com/am-fm-dual-band-radio-receiver-module-p-331.html)

Not much info on the net for it.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: alm on November 07, 2011, 09:57:17 pm
I would be very careful to observe proper clearance when running mains over veroboard, and probably try to avoid it all together, since it's exposed and easy to accidentally touch.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: requim on November 07, 2011, 10:06:59 pm
I think if i attempt this I'll try doing the laser printer transfer method to create the circuit board.  If nothing else it will be a nice experiment.  Still debating whether the $$ in parts is worth it.  Unlike many people on these forums I don't have a spare part bin to pull from so things like the transformer, banana jacks, connector board, circuit board, and female power jack are all things I'll have to purchase, in addition to the proper caps and resistors. And I'll have to find some steel to mount it onto so I can attach it to the oscillator.

Really I have to ask myself whether I want to spend the money as a learning experience or am I spending it purely to test the oscillators.  Because if it's the former, then it may be worth it, but if it's the latter, then I should just buy the connector, figure out the wiring and hook it up to my dc power source and be done with it.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: amspire on November 08, 2011, 03:07:37 am
Would this transformer work for the sine oscillator?  The manual states it uses 400mA so this seems like it would work just fine.

http://search.digikey.com/us/en/products/ST-4-16/595-1166-ND/953036 (http://search.digikey.com/us/en/products/ST-4-16/595-1166-ND/953036)

I'm still unclear on the whole voltage thing though.  I thought I had to match voltages so why can I do a 16V transformer when I need 13V?

There is nothing wrong with the HP design, but the regulator IC's work better, they are just an easier solution. They are fully current and temperature protected whereas the HP design had no current protection at all. The HP design probably needs specific parts that can be expensive. Since the oscillator uses so little power, a power supply is the kind of thing you can make from scrap parts. Do you have any scrap electronics with an old mains transformer in it? If it is a lower voltage, there are ways to make it work. The Digikey one is fine, but it means spending $10 + postage.

Transformers used to be everywhere until the switching AC/DC converters took over in all the power adapters. If someone has an old printer from the 90's or an old dial-up modem, it probably came with a transformer based power adapter and there is probably a way to use it.  Sometimes the adapters outputted AC, and if so, you could just leave the adapter as is.

As far as voltage is concerned, you have to rectify the AC to DC, and then the regulators need at least a 2V drop (unless you get low dropout regulators).

So 16V RMS rectified produces about +/- 19V rectified (allowing for diode drops, capacitor ripple, etc). At low load, it will be more like 24V but that is fine.  The good thing about having more volts then you need is that it will work over a wide range of mains voltages.

Richard.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: requim on November 08, 2011, 08:00:18 am
@amspire - I think I'll go down to the local thrift store and see if I can find an old power adapter to pull a transformer out of.  Should only cost me a buck or two assuming I can find the right part.  I'lll still need to purchase the rest of it. 

Another question I had -- though maybe I should create a new thread on this - is what do I do about the other pins on the connector?  Some are used to supply inputs on the back, which i can safely ignore if I'm not interested, others are Bias Test and AGC Test, which I have no idea what to do with.  And then another is listed as Power Supply R4 which I have no idea about what to do with that as well.

I think what I'll do in the meantime is hookup the oscillator directly to my power supply.  The clips/wires just arrived today so I should be able to hookup +/- 13 volts w/o any problem. Though now that I think about it I'll need a third wire to connect ground to the power supply. Drats.. I'll have to order another cable.

Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: firewalker on November 08, 2011, 10:27:20 am
Thanks m8!

Alexander.

AMETEK AF3020 AM FM Dual Band Radio Receiver Module

http://www.ienk.com/am-fm-dual-band-radio-receiver-module-p-331.html (http://www.ienk.com/am-fm-dual-band-radio-receiver-module-p-331.html)

Not much info on the net for it.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: BravoV on November 27, 2011, 12:29:36 pm
What are the power rating for these old classic 10 turns pots ?

The resistance values from the top one are 20 ohm, 250 ohm and 1.15 ohm. Included at the right the cheap common pot as size comparison.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Mechatrommer on November 27, 2011, 08:30:51 pm
i'm searching datasheet for this 2.4GHz RF Transceiver. no luck, please help search for me. you maybe have another better link. i tried datasheet datasheet thread no luck, found nRF2402, pin not compatible. sigh.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: vk6zgo on November 28, 2011, 12:40:07 am
What are the power rating for these old classic 10 turns pots ?

The resistance values from the top one are 20 ohm, 250 ohm and 1.15 ohm. Included at the right the cheap common pot as size comparison.

At a very rough guess,I'd say 1-2 watts.

VK6ZGO
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: amspire on November 28, 2011, 01:14:21 am
i'm searching datasheet for this 2.4GHz RF Transceiver. no luck, please help search for me. you maybe have another better link. i tried datasheet datasheet thread no luck, found nRF2402, pin not compatible. sigh.
P2402 is probably not the part number - it may be an option on the end of a part number as 2.402GHz is the first frequency in the 2.4GHz band.

The other two lines I am not sure if I can read accurately. The second line looks like "1112G" but the first two "1"'s look a bit curved, and the "G" could be a "C" or a "6" I guess.

The in the bottom line, it is hard to read the two characters after the "A". They could be combinations of "M", "N", "W" and "H".

Richard
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: BravoV on November 28, 2011, 03:45:55 am
At a very rough guess,I'd say 1-2 watts.

VK6ZGO
Thanks, found it by browsing those old tech surplus store, apparently they're rated at 5 W.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: requim on November 30, 2011, 02:16:31 am
Any chance you can post a better picture or if not a better picture then an accurate reading of the characters on the chip?
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Mechatrommer on November 30, 2011, 01:21:54 pm
its very hard to see even with my best available (cheapo) loupe. this is my best shoot.

P2402
1112RG RK
AMN42095

the M could W or H. but i searched 42095 and 2402, something else came out. the product is China made RF Flash Remote Trigger. so i think the chip source maybe will come from China.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: requim on November 30, 2011, 02:28:53 pm
Did you see this datasheet?

http://mdfly.com/newmdfly/products/RF2.4G/nRF24L01/nRF24L01.pdf (http://mdfly.com/newmdfly/products/RF2.4G/nRF24L01/nRF24L01.pdf)

The chip appears to be related to the 2402 chip.  The package is the same, though you'd have to verify the pin compatibility. Not sure whether the specs are close enough for your purposes but worth a shot if you haven't already seen it.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: ThePranksta on December 01, 2011, 06:11:57 am
I will also throw my money in that it is a Nordic RF chip; maybe an obsolete component.

They make a whole range of flavors of these chips; what is the application of the board? Audio, toy, remote ... ?
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Mechatrommer on December 01, 2011, 06:35:38 am
no its not nRF24L01 compatible. nRF24L01 is compatible with nRF2402. (nRF24L01 arduino kit is on the way). most datasheet i got have the clock on the right side of antenna, where this chip's clock in on the left. its a rf remote control thing.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: firewalker on December 15, 2011, 12:01:06 pm
What is that device? For teletext or something?

Alexander.

(http://i.imgur.com/V6xgws.jpg) (http://imgur.com/V6xgw)

(http://i.imgur.com/pd39gs.jpg) (http://imgur.com/pd39g)

(http://i.imgur.com/yXvhPs.jpg) (http://imgur.com/yXvhP)

(http://i.imgur.com/hz4o1s.jpg) (http://imgur.com/hz4o1)
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: GrumpyDave on December 15, 2011, 02:05:04 pm
What is that device? For teletext or something?

Alexander.

Its for data over the TV transmission for a PC.

http://www.wirelesscommunication.nl/reference/chaptr01/brdcsyst/datacast.htm (http://www.wirelesscommunication.nl/reference/chaptr01/brdcsyst/datacast.htm)
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: firewalker on December 15, 2011, 04:02:19 pm
Thanks you.

Alexander.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: firewalker on December 22, 2011, 04:31:51 pm
Any info on the following (Matsushita?) (humidity?) sensor?

(http://i.imgur.com/lKfaVs.jpg) (http://i.imgur.com/lKfaV.jpg) (http://i.imgur.com/9MVBls.jpg) (http://i.imgur.com/9MVBl.jpg) (http://i.imgur.com/ld4DQs.jpg)

 (http://i.imgur.com/ld4DQ.jpg) (http://i.imgur.com/f15CIs.jpg) (http://i.imgur.com/f15CI.jpg) (http://i.imgur.com/4H9Uhs.jpg) (http://i.imgur.com/4H9Uh.jpg) (http://i.imgur.com/2MIYws.jpg) (http://i.imgur.com/2MIYw.jpg)

Alexander.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: steff on December 22, 2011, 06:34:08 pm
A web search gives http://detail.china.alibaba.com/buyer/offerdetail/440409632.html (http://detail.china.alibaba.com/buyer/offerdetail/440409632.html) as a result, which lists "?????  KPC-K-4894V-0". The Google translation for that line if you do the whole page is "Computer pressure plate", so I guess some sort of (barometric?) pressure sensor.

Sticking the Chinese phrase into Google Translate on its own gives "High-voltage board computer" though, so my confidence in the machine translation is lower even than usual. That said, it does look as if it could plausibly be a pressure sensor - it'd explain the holes in the case at least.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice) - from color scanner
Post by: Dad on January 18, 2012, 07:28:42 pm
Hi,
    Took apart a couple of old SCSI color scanners and found these interesting components at the business end of the scanner after all the mirrors.  Lot of pins along each side. I'm wondering if we could use these somehow for a robotics project or some such?  Problem is, I don't even know their name so can't google around looking for specs or what not.

Thanks in advance,

-Dad
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice) - from color scanner
Post by: Rufus on January 18, 2012, 07:46:50 pm
Problem is, I don't even know their name so can't google around looking for specs or what not.

This http://www.toshiba.com/taec/Catalog/Line.do?lineid=900041&familyid=900039 (http://www.toshiba.com/taec/Catalog/Line.do?lineid=900041&familyid=900039) or something similar.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: siliconmix on January 20, 2012, 08:57:52 pm
it's   256 bit  incryption  over infra red transmission decoder  :D
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: G7PSK on January 21, 2012, 04:37:28 pm
This is not so much as what is it, more does any one have some data on it. It is marked as an Oxygen probe the BNC has the legend probe master on it. I have contacted probe master but all they can tell me is that it was made for another company some years ago and they no longer have any data on it. It would appear to be a 10X probe with a gold plated banana plug on the end which has a spring loaded retracting sheath. I purchased it on ebay for a small price with the idea that it might be useful as the basis for a high voltage probe or such like at some point. 
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: requim on January 22, 2012, 06:55:16 am
I'm sure this will be dead easy for virtually everyone on here.  Is this a diode? fuse?  I've tested it for both resistance and in diode mode and all I get is 0L so I assume it's blown.  Is that correct? If so, is there some way I can identify the specs on it so I can replace it?
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Psi on January 22, 2012, 06:59:25 am
Glass signal diode

Does it have a line printed on it anywhere?
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: requim on January 22, 2012, 07:49:19 am
Black in the middle assuming you mean along the axis. It's really hard to see using a 10X loupe. I may be wrong on the color.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: amspire on January 22, 2012, 12:57:51 pm
My guess is it is not a small signal diode.

If you can work out some of the circuit around the diode, we could then make a more educated guess.

If you look carefully, is there a gap inside the glass between the two electrodes, or is there definitely a thin slice of some silver looking metal between them?

If there is a gap, it is fine and it can go back in the circuit.

Richard
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Rufus on January 22, 2012, 02:37:16 pm
I'm sure this will be dead easy for virtually everyone on here.  Is this a diode? fuse?  I've tested it for both resistance and in diode mode and all I get is 0L so I assume it's blown.  Is that correct? If so, is there some way I can identify the specs on it so I can replace it?

KitchenAidPart.jpg ? Are you trying to make us guess?

I'll guess it is from a variable speed motor control circuit and it is a diac.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: requim on January 22, 2012, 02:50:19 pm
@Rufus - no this isn't a game I just don't know what it is.  It's from a KitchenAid mixer on a small PCB (the only PCB) that has about 7 resistors, two caps (~100 uF and 23uF) and this part.  The other parts seem to be fine so I'd like to make sure this one is too before I starting looking elsewhere for a problem.  The mixer was used 2 - 3 times before it broke.  Unfortunately we didn't open the box and use the mixer until long past the warranty period.

@amspire - I don't see a gap or silver.  All I see is black in the middle. Without a microscope I don't know that I can give a better description of what I'm seeing in the middle. I've tried it under a 10X hastings triple and that's the best I can come up with.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: G7PSK on January 22, 2012, 03:04:23 pm
Is it a thermal fuse?
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: amspire on January 22, 2012, 03:13:34 pm
Can you draw the circuit? A photo of the board and the mixer internals would help.  Rufus's suggestion of a diac is a good one, but that would mean there has to be a triac or thyristor.

I was thinking it may be a spark gap surge arrestor which may be directly across the motor. If it is, it will look like an open circuit, and it will be fine as long as the glass is not broken, and it can go either way - it would not be polarized.

I assume the mixer somehow can vary the motor speed. It could use different resistors, or capacitors to affect the speed, or it could be there is more circuitry you cannot see - perhaps built into the actual speed control switch or knob.

Also, how has it failed?

Richard
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: SeanB on January 22, 2012, 03:41:08 pm
This is not so much as what is it, more does any one have some data on it. It is marked as an Oxygen probe the BNC has the legend probe master on it. I have contacted probe master but all they can tell me is that it was made for another company some years ago and they no longer have any data on it. It would appear to be a 10X probe with a gold plated banana plug on the end which has a spring loaded retracting sheath. I purchased it on ebay for a small price with the idea that it might be useful as the basis for a high voltage probe or such like at some point.

That is an oxygen sensor, used to measure the concentration of oxygen in the air supplied to the sensor. Different to the oxygen sensor in your car in that this one generates a millivolt signal ( into a really high impedance, thus the 10x probe to use with a 1M input voltmeter) at ambient temperature, and giving an absolute reading of concentration. If it has been opened for a while it will have aged to near uselessness. It is basically a metal air battery, with some added temperature compensation built in to it that works at the correct load resistance.

Using the connector end to make a high voltage probe is good, just make sure the resistors you use to make the high voltage divider input side are rated for the voltage you will apply to them, and are mounted on a board that is totally clean, no solder residue at all. Preferable is to solder them together and clean before sliding them into a PTFE tube and filling it with an insulating epoxy to provide insulation.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: G7PSK on January 22, 2012, 04:06:40 pm
Thanks for that SeanB. I had sort of guessed that it could be something like that But when I put the meter on it I just got a 9.13mohm reading from the gold plug to the center pin of the bnc it appears as OC from the gold plug to the bnc outer. The intention is to make a  thousand times probe with an attenuation network. But before I do that I will see if it will respond to pure oxygen from my cutting torch cylinder.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: SeanB on January 22, 2012, 05:01:53 pm
It should generate a few millivolts if it is working, if exposed to atmosphere. T%hey are really expensive sensors when new, but have a very limited life once opened. 3 to 6 months is typical, and they cost upwards of $ 100 each. I did use one once, second hand, but did not buy a spare probe once I found out the price. Luckily the probe it came with was still hermetically sealed in a packet. See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Electro-galvanic_fuel_cell (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Electro-galvanic_fuel_cell) for more about the cell construction.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: requim on January 22, 2012, 05:09:15 pm
@amspire - What program can I use to make the schematic? Preferably simple and for the Mac, otherwise Linux or Windows is fine.

And yes I forgot the board does have a triac.  I removed it a while ago and forgot all about it when I made my original post.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: SeanB on January 22, 2012, 05:24:04 pm
If it has a triac it most likely is a diac. Open circuit ( or pretty close to it) until you reach the breakdown voltage of around 30-40V when it switches on and has a low forward drop of a few volts across it, until the current drops below the holding current. Used as a trigger to do phase control for AC applications like motor speed controls or light dimmers.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: G7PSK on January 22, 2012, 05:41:47 pm
Hi seanB I tried the probe on a meter it reads 1 to 1.4 mV and 1mV on the scope with a lot of noise from the mains etc, i guess the end is not screened, I will see what happens with pure oxygen. I only paid a few pence for it.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: SeanB on January 22, 2012, 05:52:13 pm
Probably still working, the meter normally has a low pass filter on the input, as the time constant on these sensors is in the minute range. Try using a 1uF polypropylene or mylar unit across the unit when testing it to remove mains hum. Might take a few seconds for readings to stabilise  after a step change.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: G7PSK on January 22, 2012, 05:56:06 pm
Thanks SeanB I will try that, Not sure what I will do with an oxygen probe at the end of the day though I am not into diving much to claustrophobic for me.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: requim on January 22, 2012, 06:07:26 pm
@SeanB - How would I test the triac and diac?
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: requim on January 22, 2012, 06:08:44 pm
@amspire - The mixer will not turn on.  Dead as a doornail.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: SeanB on January 22, 2012, 06:15:29 pm
Thanks SeanB I will try that, Not sure what I will do with an oxygen probe at the end of the day though I am not into diving much to claustrophobic for me.

Looking again, if it does not have anything under the heatshrink other than a connection or a resistor then it probably is an adapter for a probe, not the actual probe itself. Most would give a few hundred millivolts when working, so probably it is just the adaptor kit, so cut up for parts.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: SeanB on January 22, 2012, 06:21:57 pm
@SeanB - How would I test the triac and diac?

Simplest test is by substitution. Before that check if the motor actually works, easy to do by shorting across the 3 pins of the triac, as you have removed the diac. If the motor runs at full speed you need a new triac and diac, the triac does need to be the same type, but the diac is pretty much interchangeable with any other diac, as they generally only have a single application. See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/DIAC (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/DIAC) for a little more.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: requim on January 23, 2012, 05:07:46 am
Here's the schematic.  I tried running the motor and either I didn't hook things back up right or the motor doesn't appear to be working.  I'm in the process of taking it apart to dig a little deeper.

Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: amspire on January 23, 2012, 05:36:58 am
Your schematic does have a Triac, so that mystery part is probably a diac. The diac will look like an open circuit till you put its breakdown voltage across it. Could be something like 30V. It will then turn on and drop down to less then a volt until you disconnect it from the current.

There is a good chance it is OK. I would replace it in the circuit for now.

First thing is if you have the model with the circuit breaker, check that the circuit breaker is not open circuit. If it is, there should be a way to reset it.

Check the Triac for shorts or a cracked case. If it is not shorted, then there is a pretty good chance it is OK.

See if you can get any resistance in the motor winding as you turn the shaft. It could have a faulty brush or the winding has gone open circuit.

If you replace the motor with an old incandescent light bulb (40W or 60W would be good), you should be able to vary the brightness with the speed controller. If that works, then the problem is the motor. If it doesn't work, then the problem is on the PCB or the speed control.

Richard.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: requim on January 23, 2012, 08:28:55 am
Problem solved.  No idea what I did that actually fixed it but it runs again.  Only idea I have is that the brushes were in wrong. Need to adjust it so it runs at the right speeds but it does turn on.  Thanks for all the help.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: requim on February 02, 2012, 07:00:38 am
I pulled this IC from a Sony PlayStation 3 Slim power supply (EADP-200DP).  I've googled around and checked Octopart and can't find anything of note for it.

Here are the markings:

F --- Fairchild Semiconductor??
YAABE --- pretty sure this is a manufacturing code of some sort since the same chip on another power supply is YAPAA
DNP011 --- Figured this was the part number but can't find anything.  I've tried DNPO11, DNP011, and DNPQ11 (I tried Q before I looked at it under magnification.
NYE -- Manufacturer?

I figured this would be a common part, since it's just a basic SMPS, but I guess not, or I don't know how to look for it properly. Any help would be appreciated. 
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: vk6hdx on February 02, 2012, 07:44:43 am
I can't seem to find a datasheet for it either :-\ however it seems to come from Fairchild as I stumbled across this certificate of compliance for it.

http://www.fairchildsemi.com/coc/DN/DNP011.pdf (http://www.fairchildsemi.com/coc/DN/DNP011.pdf)
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: requim on February 02, 2012, 07:52:50 am
Well that's a start.  Maybe my best bet is to email Fairchild Semiconductor and ask them where I can buy them from.

Edit:  It looks as if the part has been EOL'd and is being replaced by DNP013.  Doesn't really matter much because I can't find anything regarding that chip either.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: amspire on February 02, 2012, 01:40:52 pm
I think it is one of two things, and you can probably work out which one it is from the circuit.

As a guess, it is either an optocoupler device, or a MOSFET in a 8 pin DIP package. I don't think it is a regulator IC.

If it is an optocoupler then the two leads to the LED part will go to the secondary side of the transformer. Two or 3 wires from the other side of the optocoupler will go to the circuitry connected to the primary/mains side of the transformer.

If it is a mosfet, it will probably have pins shorted, and one pin will be connected to an output of the regulator IC. Another pin may go directly to a transformer winding.

Richard
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: alm on February 02, 2012, 09:01:08 pm
My first guess would be opto-coupler, too. These are usually easy to recognize because the circuit around it is usually isolated (no copper going from one side of the opto to the other). I wouldn't discard the regulator option either. That, and the MOSFET, is about all the 'ICs' you would expect in a cheap SMPS. Probably no active PFC at this power level. I guess the power supply could have an EEPROM to prevent you from using third-party power supplies, but a dead EEPROM shouldn't prevent the power supply from working.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: requim on February 02, 2012, 10:28:23 pm
I assume if I posted some high resolution photos of both sides of the PCB one of you may be able to deduce the type of IC? (ie MOSFET or Optocoupler)

I'll see if I can figure it out based on the description by amspire, but some validation might be nice.

edit:  Here are the photos:
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: requim on February 02, 2012, 11:08:31 pm
And the last photo:
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: alm on February 03, 2012, 01:51:12 am
Someone actually providing useful, sharp pictures when requested, that's a welcome change ;). Looks like I was wrong about it not having active PFC, but this component is not involved in that circuit.

My guess is that it's indeed a MOSFET, probably responsible for generating the pulses for the standby circuit (small transformer). Most of the pins appear to be connected together, and it's on the primary side. Definitely no opto, these are in DIP-4 packages placed across the isolation barrier (thick white line on bottom silkscreen).
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: amspire on February 03, 2012, 01:25:59 pm
With the white paint, it is hard to see how the pins are connected on the bottom of the 8 pin chip. If 4 are shorted together on one side, and three on the other side with one pin that is on its own, then it looks like a mosfet.  The 4 shorted pins will be the drain, the 3 shorted pins the source, and the single pin the gate.

Definitely not an optocoupler - all the 4 pin chips are the optocouplers.

Richard
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Short Circuit on February 03, 2012, 05:23:57 pm
My guess it's a single-chip regulator for the standby power supply (together with the small transformer).
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: requim on February 03, 2012, 06:20:18 pm
I ohmed out the leads on the chips and found the following.  The top 4 pins are all independent.  The 3 on the bottom left are all tied together and the one on the bottom right is independent.  I'll try to post a photo later indicating where the pins connect to.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: siliconmix on February 05, 2012, 07:47:35 pm
anyone got an idea what these are for ?
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Jad.z on February 05, 2012, 08:11:06 pm
Hi siliconmix  :)

I think this are fiber optic cables with ST-style connectors.
They are used to connect gadgets to fiber optic network (Duplex style maybe).
They go into something like this

(http://www.cablesdirect.com/prodimages/C5B-2ST_LR.jpg)
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: siliconmix on February 05, 2012, 08:41:53 pm
thank you jad.i bought them mixed lot in an auction didn't have a clue what they where for .are they expensive ?
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Jad.z on February 05, 2012, 09:23:20 pm
You can search digi-key for "CABLE ASSEM FIBER ST-ST".
That should give you an idea about their cost.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: NeTSuRfEr on February 06, 2012, 02:24:24 am
Hello Guys i have this 3 components in the TO-220 package that i can’t find and don’t know what they are for so i can’t find equivalent parts maybe there is someone that can help me with this.
I will right down the numbers and letters in the parts in the order that they appear here it goes…

This one I know that is the brand “International Rectifier”

9732
IR 250k
31 49

Next One

014
M27AB
31045

Last One

ON
7446
CQ236
AKA

They all are in the TO-220 package

Hope there is some one that can help me with this.

Kind Regards
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Majorstrain on February 14, 2012, 06:43:32 am
Can anyone identify this Analog Devices chip.  It is possibly a regulator or amplifier.
I've had no joy searching the data sheets.
Cheers,
Phil
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: amspire on February 14, 2012, 06:54:22 am
http://www.analog.com/static/imported-files/data_sheets/ADP3333.pdf (http://www.analog.com/static/imported-files/data_sheets/ADP3333.pdf)

It is a low drop-out 3.15V 300mA regulator. The exact part number is ADP3333ARMZ-3.15R7
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Majorstrain on February 14, 2012, 11:11:07 am
Cheers Amspire,
Many thanks.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: jasonh on February 20, 2012, 09:14:33 am
This is kind of a reverse 'whats this' question.  More like a what is.

   I am looking for a toggle switch like an on-off or on-off-on that can be reset electronically.

   E.g. if left in an on position it can be reset remotely so it would have some internal mechanism to flip the switch.  It may be something I have to devise myself but not sure at this stage.

   Anyone come across something like it?

Thanks,
JAson
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: steve_w on February 20, 2012, 09:34:14 am
I have seen these types of switch in military avionics when I was in the airforce.  I couldn't hazard a guess at what one would cost (think thousands). You might be able to knock something up with relays? consider using a bistable relay?
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: jasonh on February 20, 2012, 10:04:41 am
I do have the feeling that if I found them available for purchase I would be thinking of making them myself :)   I am just worried about the size of something I could do vs something that is manufactured. 

    There could be a few side by side.    It is a 'very' nice to have rather than mandatory but I would like to get it going, depending on the cost of course!
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: amspire on February 20, 2012, 12:16:48 pm
There are things like breakers with a shunt trip coil that allows the breaker to be turned off with a signal through the coil.

Breakers come in all sizes, so I would guess there are some small, switch-like breakers with the shunt trip feature. RCD (Earth leakage protection breakers) are shunt trip breakers with the extra current leakage detector that trips the shunt coil.

Not sure how you find very small ones though. The industry calls the large devices that can fit on a DIN rail "Miniature circuit breakers", so I hate to think what they would call something much smaller.

Richard.

Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: SeanB on February 25, 2012, 06:50:42 am
You want a momentary action switch and a bistable relay with 2 coils. One coil is powered by the switch, and the other coil is pulsed to switch the relay off. The contacts of the relay then are used as you need.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Randall W. Lott on February 28, 2012, 07:49:01 am
(http://sphotos.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ash4/431768_10150703120822534_639807533_11637464_1692273066_n.jpg)

What the hell is this?  It's about the size of a flash drive.

I think the logo is "Harris".

The bottom side of the PCB is not populated.  It has text in copper that reads:
1989 15-100001 C
CM1


My guess is that it's some sort of ID tag with a code stored on this mystery IC.  It was my father's, but he passed away so I can't ask him.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: G7PSK on March 04, 2012, 06:42:30 pm
I found this Diode in a load of parts that I purchased many years ago it is some form of Diode but I cannot find any data on it.
The legend reads. CV7038 KB/SB
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: SeanB on March 04, 2012, 07:50:45 pm
Point contact diode, germanium. Normally used as a signal diode. This is a GTE replacement part, but I no longer have a GTE catalogue. I would guess 30PIV at 10mA, common for most of the germanium diodes.

Google suggests it is a stud rectifier of around 400mA at 200PIV, but in this case i think it is wrong.

5961-99-037-2038   5961990372038   990372038   3005-20330 300520330 B32461 B32461 CV7038 CV7038 CV7038/GJ3M CV7038GJ3M GJ3M GJ3M K1007-CV7038 K1007CV7038 N84253A1 N84253A1

Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Rufus on March 04, 2012, 08:08:00 pm
Point contact diode, germanium. Normally used as a signal diode. This is a GTE replacement part, but I no longer have a GTE catalogue. I would guess 30PIV at 10mA, common for most of the germanium diodes.

I doubt 10mA point contact diodes were packaged in something with threaded studs for terminals.

I see CV7038 described as rectifier with GJ3M given as a substitute. I also found a 1972 catalogue page listing GJ3M as a 200v 400mA (800mA when heatsinked) germanium junction stud mounted half wave rectifier. 
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: SeanB on March 05, 2012, 03:53:26 pm
Part number is not consistent with the picture in post. Thus i went on the signal diode route, most likely a Ge one ( age) and most of these were rated for a pretty low voltage and low current. Some were used as multipliers, and some had an impressive ( for the time) frequency range and power output.

I still have a collection of Ge PNP transistors, they have come in handy at times.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: SgtRock on March 11, 2012, 05:22:06 am
Greetings EEVBees:

--In this case we have no device, only the ghost of a departed device. Please see attached picture(s) of the FSC121SOF Fan Speed Control for a Vornado fan, I am trying to fix for a friend. The solder side of the board had only one SMD component, which apparently exploded. An honorary Deerstalker hat will be awarded to anyone who can solve this one

"It is quite a three pipe problem, and I beg that you won't speak to me for fifty minutes."
Sherlock Holmes 1854 -

Best Regards
Clear Ether
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Rufus on March 11, 2012, 05:29:05 am
--In this case we have no device, only the ghost of a departed device.

Looks like it was just a necked down track designed to act as a fuse.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: amspire on March 11, 2012, 12:41:51 pm
--In this case we have no device, only the ghost of a departed device.

Looks like it was just a necked down track designed to act as a fuse.

Agreed. Probably the triac (or whatever it is) has shorted. The marks on the PCB track side are the ghost of the way the track blew, not the ghost of a SMD device.

Richard.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: SeanB on March 11, 2012, 01:56:35 pm
Seeing as the board only has 2 wires the only reason for the track to flash and burn is if the motor has developed a short circuit in the windings. You will probably find on removing the triac that it is split into 2 parts, one being the plastic top with 2 leads and the other being the tab. Check the motor for that crispy beyond belief smell, or use a 100W incandescent light bulb to do power limiting and power it up.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: SgtRock on March 11, 2012, 08:06:41 pm
--Dear All:

--Thanks for all your advice. I checked the motor. Indeed, it is burned up. Next time I will know to check, before worrying about the small stuff.

"When people thought the Earth was flat, they were wrong. When people thought the Earth was spherical they were wrong. But if you think that thinking the Earth is spherical is just as wrong as thinking the Earth is flat, then your view is wronger than both of them put together."
Isaac Asimov 1920 - 1992
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: SeanB on March 11, 2012, 08:34:18 pm
I am doing some repairs of similar speed controllers, but these are DC motors, that run on 200VDC. Same simple triac control but with a very failure prone bridge rectifier on the output side. New Triacs where needed, new bridge rectifiers ( 8A 600V instead of the 4 cheap and seriously overrun 1N4004 diodes it had) and new VDR's on input and output side. Hope they hold up better, even with the crappy PCB's it has. I just have to repair them cheaper than a new board from China costs. i am hoping to repair to better than original so they will not fail. I might make retrofit modules from light dimmers and a separate bridge rectifier if needed, as they will definitely last longer then. Room enough to fit in the case anyway.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: SgtRock on March 11, 2012, 08:58:24 pm
Greetings EEVBees:

--I got such good help for dummies on the last one, that I have decided to try one more. See the attached picture of the end of my new Panasonic Lumix DMC-FX37 Camera. The jack at the left is for 5 Volt DC power. I already have a good power supply, but I need the plug to fit that jack. Does anybody happen to know what the name of the jack is, and/or where I can get one. Honorary Calabash pipe to be awarded. Rufus was awarded the Honorary Deerstalker hat in our last contest.

“Horse sense is the thing a horse has which keeps it from betting on people."
W. C. Fields (William Claude Dunkenfield) 1880 - 1946

Best Regards
Clear Ether
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: SeanB on March 18, 2012, 04:58:56 pm
It is what could be laughingly called "Propietary" designed by Painosonic plug. If you can find a Panasonic dealer who actually repairs these things you probably will be able to order the cable as a spare part through them ( likely to be expensive though, nice equipment, spares are somewhat available but pricey) with the plug moulded on the end.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: metalphreak on March 19, 2012, 10:02:20 am
Point and shoot cameras are THE WORST. Every manufacturer has to have their own dicky proprietary cable for everything. What's wrong with mini or micro USB? "Oh we want to put video out in the same jack". Fine, you know HTC managed to make a proprietary port for their smartphones that had audio in/out as well as USB, yet you could still plug in a normal mini-usb cable! Genius!

Your best bet is to just buy an adapter off ebay, and steal the cable if the supply is rubbish.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: SeanB on March 21, 2012, 11:11:01 am
I have a Canon camera with a power input using a tiny coaxial plug. Canon wants an arm and a leg ( and assorted other body parts as well) for the power adaptor. Went down to One Hung Low Mall ( actually Wan Dong Wholesalers) and bought a $2 USB multipart charger. Has a mains to 5V charger ( real cheap n nasty, but works well enough to supply 5V rail up to 100mA), a 12V car adaptor and a plug with 10 different sockets on it. One fits camera, and the car adaptor was modified ( shunted a resistor in feedback loop to chip inside) to give 3.3V for the camera. Now I can use the camera for long periods, without the hassle of replacing the batteries every few minutes.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: CampKohler on April 06, 2012, 11:27:38 pm
Maybe he wants to know what a spectrum analyzer is? The latter is an oscilloscope that displays across the screen all the frequencies within its design range. It shows which radio signals are present at what place in the spectrum (hence the name) and at what strength. Usually they can be tuned and narrowed down in width (frequency) so as to pick out and magnify one signal to see what the output of a device looks like and whether it is putting out garbage, etc.

They work by having an oscillator that sweeps across the range in the manner of a radio receiver whose tuning knob is being whirled back and forth so quickly that, through the persistance of the 'scope tube and your eyes*, you can see everything in the range covered. They are expensive and the higher they go, the more costly they are. There have been some reasonable 'scope probes made that, with a 'scope give a miniature poorman's version.

Basically it's for radio work, but it could also apply to audio (it used to be hard to build an audio receiver, but probably not now). Usually you just look at the screen and see what there is to be seen, but I imagine nowadays there is all kinds of calculating power available to be applied to the signals and the prices would be astronomical.

Of course if you really want to know the truth of the matter, you would just read where else? (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spectrum_analyzer).

----
*I suppose they could digitize and store it all so that persistance is not a factor. The 'scope would just play it back and wouldn't have to be very fast.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: CampKohler on April 06, 2012, 11:41:03 pm
Anyone have any idea what this E1271 diode is?
If you have a lot of these diodes, I wouldn't toss them. They might become your general-purpose diode. I got a similar bunch years ago.

I put a microammeter in series with a power supply hooked up in the reverse direction and ran the voltage up until the needle started to rise (not too much; if the diode shorts, the meter is toast!). That (minus a little safety factor) became the PIV. Then I ran some current through it until it got hot to the touch and that became the max current. No matter what they were originally designed for, they should work OK for low-level power supplies, etc.   
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: G7PSK on April 24, 2012, 05:15:33 pm
Can any one tell me please what the blue rectangle item is on this RS brand 100X oscilloscope probe whatever it is I cannot get any sort of reading on my dvm.  The probe will not work with any scope so I disassembled it after finding no continuity  on it and this item that is paralleled with a capacitor formed by inserting a wire into a  brass tube with a Teflon sleeve.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: SeanB on April 24, 2012, 08:45:00 pm
Probably a 10M resistor, and it is open circuit, so that is why you get no reading. The capacitor is a shunt to compensate for the cable capacitance. You will probably find if you look at it with a magnifier that either it is cracked at one end or one lead is broken. Broken lead can be repaired, but if it is cracked you need a new resistor. Likely to be cheaper to replace the probe, or use a regular 0.3W metal film unit and accept the probe will be less accurate and will only be usable up to 100V peak.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: G7PSK on April 25, 2012, 07:15:19 am
Thank you SeanB for that I sort of figured it must be a resistor as that is the only way it would work but it has no markings and it is in series with a 1 meg resistor at the tip of the probe and tere is another net work in the BNC end along with the trimmer. I cannot see any cracks but there could be one under the blue film at the end I can see the metal film comeing out from under the blue one.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: amspire on April 25, 2012, 07:49:08 am
The picture is too blurry to see properly. If it is a 100x probe and the 1meg resistor is across the scope input, the blue film resistor may be up around 40 to 50 megohm and this is beyond some multimeters ability to measure. That could easily be a 2.5KV resistor, and around 40meg  to 100meg would be about right for that voltage. 

To check, put a multimeter across the 1meg resistor and apply 10V or so from the tip to the far end of the 1meg resistor. Are you getting a voltage on the multimeter? Keep in mind that the multimeter input resistance will change the voltage a little.

Richard.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: G7PSK on April 25, 2012, 08:45:47 am
I decided to check it with my insulation tester and at 100 volts it measures 98 Meg ohms so I guess this probe will not work on my signal generator which out puts less than a volt. I need to find a high voltage 1Khz square wave signal to set it up, any one any ideas.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: vk6zgo on April 25, 2012, 10:34:05 am
I used a 100x probe at work for quite some time,years ago,but I can't remember how I adjusted it.

I was almost certainly using a 2 channel analog Tek which probably gave access to the output of one of the vertical channels,so I might have used both amps in cascade to get enough gain.
The display would still have been "furry",but it would have done the job.

Another idea would be to make a valve (tube) multivibrator using a couple of 12AT7s,run off a 100V dc supply.
If I remember correctly,the ones I made when first playing around with a 'scope supplied fairly reasonable waveforms.

The old 545 'scopes had a calibration signal which could be switched as high as 100V,so if you could find a 545
enthusiast,you'd be good to go!
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: G7PSK on April 25, 2012, 10:56:22 am
I have a circuit for a valve square wave generator I guess its time to build it, the test probe came with a National scope I got off Ebay the test signal on the scope only outputs at 0.1 volt square wave   which is its design voltage. Most likely why it was sold was the person could not get the scope to work with that probe, the strange thing about the scope is it's has tree traces all select-able on the switches.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: bilko on April 26, 2012, 02:12:35 pm
Trying to identify a part, couldn't find it using Google. It is marked 1S15, could be IS15, TO-92 type package. It could be quite old, probably 1980's, any clues anybody ?
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: PA0PBZ on April 26, 2012, 02:40:39 pm
1S Smells like diode, does it have 2 or 3 pins (connected)?
Any clue about manufacturer?
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: vk6zgo on April 26, 2012, 02:41:01 pm
1S15 could be a Sony part.
I vaguely remember the number from the time I was fixing a lot of stuff from that manufacturer.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: bilko on April 26, 2012, 03:10:38 pm
 I checked Google, it lists a 1S15 device but it is an axial packaged diode with two leads.
The 1S15 part I have has three legs, the Sony reference may be interesting.
There are no other markings on the device

Edit:
It measures like an NPN transistor so I'll proceed from there and run some more tests.
Thanks everyone for your help
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: vk6zgo on May 02, 2012, 09:36:54 am
I know it's a long way down the track since the last posting,but it occurs to me that the "S" may be an incomplete "8",in which case,your device may be a 2SC1815,which is a common type in a lot of Japanese equipment.
JEDEC  markings often leave the "2SC" part off.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Psi on June 09, 2012, 02:32:32 am
anyone know whats this is?

Mislabeled digikey packet, was supposed to be a DO-15 package TVS diode.

It does look kinda like a diode, and has a metal top.
I don't really want to remove it from the pack until i know if digikey want it back

(https://www.eevblog.com/forum/general-chat/what%27s-this-please-(component-advice)/?action=dlattach;attach=25375)

Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Rufus on June 09, 2012, 03:21:00 am
anyone know whats this is?

Looks like a Schurter PTC fuse.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Psi on June 09, 2012, 07:01:02 am
i think you might be right.  Digikey said they dont want it back so i took it out and had a look.

It's 1.5ohms in either direction, which fits your idea of a PTC fuse.

(http://psi.abcom.co.nz/unknown.jpg)
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Architect_1077 on June 09, 2012, 12:18:31 pm
Hi!
Please... does anyone know what this little piece is? It's part of a 230v -> 120v stepdown tx circuit. The part is circled in red in the following pics:
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: SeanB on June 09, 2012, 01:17:32 pm
I would guess it is a NTC thermistor, probably there to shut down the unit when the triac gets too hot.

Basically it is a near open circuit until it reaches a preset temperature, where it then drops to around 100R or so in resistance, and then the voltage across the diac is too low for it to trigger the triac into conduction.

At least is is self resetting, unlike a thermal fuse, though operating the device in the region where this protection is operating is not good.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Architect_1077 on June 09, 2012, 03:43:35 pm
Thanks!
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: nitro2k01 on June 28, 2012, 07:31:36 am
SeanB is right.
(Not so) useless trivia: Another use for NTC resistors is for ring core transformers. You put them in series with the primary side as a cheap way to limit the current spike that these transformers will draw when powered on. This current spike can otherwise make the circuit breaker trip.
NTC means negative temperature coefficient, so the resistance will go down as the resistor gets hotter. When used with a ring core transformer, the resistor value is chosen so that the resistor heats up and goes down to near zero resistance within a second.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: SeanB on June 28, 2012, 03:33:12 pm
NTC's are used in SMPS input stages as well, to reduce inrush current. I have used them on incandescent lamps as a life extender, as the lamp will generally last thousands of hours, as the most stress occurs during switch on, and the added resistance reduces this until the filament is so weak that it blows during use. I had to do this on an old plate maker that used 40 40W golfball lamps as a light source, that had a switch on surge that would trip the 30A mains breaker 50m away down the corridor. I could not find a NTC that would handle the load ( and this was in the 1970's when I was a teenager) so used a slow start circuit which had a triac controlled by a unijunction transistor (now near impossible to get) and a few other components to provide a slow charge ( 1 second from zero to full brightness) and a non isolated supply for the circuit.

I did a similar thing for my variac, it has a very large core and a correspondingly annoying switch on surge.
Title: Is this just a 1M ohm resistor?
Post by: icon on July 21, 2012, 06:45:25 pm
Hi

This resistor is across the mains input of a device. Looks like a 1M to me, but I'd like to be sure - not familiar with the red band.

(https://www.eevblog.com/forum/general-chat/what's-this-please-(component-advice)/?action=dlattach;attach=27577)

I'm going to replace it along with the dodgy looking cap...

Cheers
John
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: amspire on July 22, 2012, 12:27:19 am
It looks like a 1M 1% resistor. The red band means 50ppm/C stability.

If you replace the capacitor, make sure it is a 250V AC rated Class Y2 capacitor.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: SeanB on July 22, 2012, 06:56:55 am
Note that if the resistor is ok do not replace it, as you need to use a 1W metal film resistor to get a voltage rating that will handle mains voltage. Those RIFA capacitors do craze as they get old, but it is mostly cosmetic. Stress from the different expansion rates of the housing and the epoxy encapulant. It just shows that they did bond really well, otherwise there would be a non visible shear along the bond line.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Jad.z on July 24, 2012, 01:12:05 pm
Hi,

What are this stuff??? I searched all over the internet and couldn't find a thing about them, not even a picture!
I got them from the local store, the owner gave me a bunch of them for free.
He said he didn't know what they are (nobody was buying them  ;D) so he was giving them away with every order.

My best guess would be colour sensors. Could they simply be LEDs ?
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: amspire on July 24, 2012, 01:28:31 pm
They are two LED bar graph displays.

The LED connections are Pins 6(anode) to 1, and pins 3(anode) to 4. The middle pin is not used. Pin 1 will have a little chamfer on the corner of the case.

About 2.5mCd brightness at 10mA forward current.

Richard
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Jad.z on July 24, 2012, 02:36:07 pm
Thank you Richard
Title: Bridge Rectifiers (Component Advice)
Post by: hydroman1976 on July 27, 2012, 11:32:46 pm
Bridge rectifiers. Can I take 2 and put them in parallel or series for better results? What if I make one that has 2 diodes per leg or side? (8 total) Would this be better. I know about using a capacitor in parallel with bc. I have a setup with no cap with input voltage of 120vac but 70vdc out. Does this mean the bc are bad or do you need the caps to make them work?
Thanks in advance for your help.
hydroman1976@gmail.com
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: rowant on July 31, 2012, 11:58:40 pm
If you put two bridge rectifiers in parallel you can double the current, in series you won't do anything but lose voltage drop over two of the diodes (since it's already DC the other two won't do anything anyway).
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: vk6zgo on August 01, 2012, 03:03:45 am
Bit of a waste of time,though,it your original  AC source can't provide double the current.
In any case,it would be better just to buy a higher rated bridge.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: nitro2k01 on August 02, 2012, 05:50:21 pm
If you put two rectifiers in parallel, won't the load be lopsided between the two because of a slight voltage drop variation?
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: whonline on August 02, 2012, 08:33:40 pm
Nitro is right.  The forward voltage drop of a diode has a negative temperature coefficient.  Slight differences in paralleled diodes will cause more current to flow in one vs the other.  The increase in current in that diode with higher current accelerates it's temperature rise which diverts even more current.  In the end most of the current will be flowing through one diode.  Paralleling diodes won't buy you anything.

Walt 
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: orbiter on August 09, 2012, 08:10:07 pm
Next up fellas..

I found these in the loft today, can't seem to find out what they are from the numbers on them, any ideas please?

Numbers around the top rim of one of them are 771139 and SGS87305

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v146/orbiter/IMAG0322-1.jpg)

Thank you

orb
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: free_electron on August 09, 2012, 08:50:48 pm
SGS Sociedad Generale Semiconduttori ... Successor to ATES ( Aquila Tubi e Semiconduttori )
now better known as STmicroelectronics

this is a very old part. i couldn't find anything in the archives. probably a custom job.... or could be a prototype .
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: orbiter on August 09, 2012, 09:08:32 pm
SGS Sociedad Generale Semiconduttori ... Successor to ATES ( Aquila Tubi e Semiconduttori )
now better known as STmicroelectronics

this is a very old part. i couldn't find anything in the archives. probably a custom job.... or could be a prototype .

Ok thanks mate. I can confirm that it's really old, its been stuck up in the loft for at least 20 years :o

These were in a box of parts I'd bought from a place called Greenweld electronics. I think the same company still exists actually (greenweld.co.uk) however their components range has almost disappeared compared to what I seem to remember them having.

Cheers

orb
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: bilko on August 09, 2012, 09:33:51 pm
It could be equivalent to a LM305 regulator. If you have a few it might be worth running some checks and comparing with this data sheet
http://www.ti.com/general/docs/lit/getliterature.tsp?genericPartNumber=lm305&fileType=pdf (http://www.ti.com/general/docs/lit/getliterature.tsp?genericPartNumber=lm305&fileType=pdf)

First number is probably date code for 1977
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: orbiter on August 09, 2012, 10:49:11 pm
It could be equivalent to a LM305 regulator. If you have a few it might be worth running some checks and comparing with this data sheet
http://www.ti.com/general/docs/lit/getliterature.tsp?genericPartNumber=lm305&fileType=pdf (http://www.ti.com/general/docs/lit/getliterature.tsp?genericPartNumber=lm305&fileType=pdf)

First number is probably date code for 1977

Ah ok, that gives me something to go on. I'll run a few tests on them and see how they compare.

Thanks mate

orb
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: free_electron on August 09, 2012, 10:50:02 pm
mmm. don't think so. many chips were available in to-100 package in that timeperiod.
SGS never made LMxxx style parts. apart from the LM741. they didn't do 709 and no regulators. they had their own stuff : L4905 L200 etc ... and those came later.

it may even be a matched pair or simply the long-tail of an opamp ...
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: amspire on August 10, 2012, 02:03:19 am
It is the SGS equivalent of the Fairchild uA711 Dual  40nS comparator. Made in 1973 from the date stamp, but from memory, the design dates back to the 60's.

This is a very dated component, and you probably wouldn't want to use it in a new design. Unlike modern comparators, it requires a positive supply (usually 12V), a negative supply (usually -6V) and a ground rail. The three rail opamps and comparators tended to be very easy to accidentally blow.

Richard
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: baoshi on August 12, 2012, 01:10:19 am
Can anyone enlight me what is this DIP device?
I guess it is a solar cell. I can measure 200mV from the bottom-left pin vs any opposite pin, but why a solar cell need so many leads?
Thanks
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Rerouter on August 12, 2012, 01:12:57 am
i would imagine to keep the esr nice and low, those puny panels generally have esr's higher than alkalines on there own, so a number of them in parrellel would drastically help lower that,
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: SeanB on August 12, 2012, 05:43:23 am
Linear photodiode array. Multiple photodiodes so that you can focus an image on them and use in a line scanner. Probably used in an older shape sensing detector. or as a detector for a low light diffraction grating
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: baoshi on August 12, 2012, 04:08:28 pm
Linear photodiode array. Multiple photodiodes so that you can focus an image on them and use in a line scanner. Probably used in an older shape sensing detector. or as a detector for a low light diffraction grating

Looks interesting, Thanks.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Entropia on August 16, 2012, 10:00:28 am
Can anyone shed any light on this monochrome imaging sensor? It's Hitachi HE98268, from the 1980s. A datasheet would be awesome to find! 8)
Title: 128x64 LCD screen.
Post by: firewalker on August 29, 2012, 12:33:32 pm
I have couple of 128x64 chip on glass LCD screens. It uses a 30x0.5mm FFC/FPC connector. My first guess was something like the SPLC501C COGs.

e.g. http://www.newhavendisplay.com/nhdc12864mznswbtw-p-664.html (http://www.newhavendisplay.com/nhdc12864mznswbtw-p-664.html)

The pinout differs.

The only markings:
WD-G1206VC-7WNNa
02064611AD
14C23/03


It's probably something custom and I won;t find anything, but I had to ask.

(http://i.imgur.com/108cRs.jpg[img][/url]

[url=http://i.imgur.com/eezav.jpg][img]http://i.imgur.com/eezavs.jpg) (http://i.imgur.com/108cR.jpg)

Alexander.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: sigxcpu on August 29, 2012, 07:19:31 pm
Hi,

Today while trying to clone my navigation HDD to a SSD from NTG2.5 Mercedes COMAND unit, I've managed to break the connector that goes to the motherboard when I've removed the original drive.
Does anybody have a clue on what type of connector is this?

I've searched the web for hours and didn't find anything. I've found something that looks almost the same but they have non-symmetric keys to match the male-female, but this one does not have any key. The key is that you can mount the whole device in a single way.

I've attached pictures with it broken and "mounted".
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: wj3v on September 01, 2012, 02:12:14 am
Please help me identify this component.  Thanks.............
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: mariush on September 01, 2012, 03:43:51 am
Please help me identify this component.  Thanks.............

Looks to me like an inductor ... 47mH perhaps.  Grab a multimeter and test it and you'll know for sure.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Chet T16 on September 10, 2012, 08:35:13 pm
Can anyone identify the smd components in the middle here. They're in parallel with a solenoid (one per solenoid) and have short circuited.

Also what is that package called?
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: SeanB on September 11, 2012, 04:54:18 am
Diodes, the package is MELF. You can use any 1A diode like a 1N4004 in replacement, or a surface mount one rated at least for 1A and with a reverse voltage at least double the voltage of the power rail.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: G7PSK on September 13, 2012, 02:13:30 pm
Any one have an idea as to what this is, it's rated as 50 ohms and looks like a BNC but it is much larger than a standard BNC socket.
It is slightly smaller than the C connector oat only 13.6 mm dia. It is silver plated, I have looked on line and cant find anything like it.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: tld on September 13, 2012, 07:33:22 pm
Any one have an idea as to what this is, it's rated as 50 ohms and looks like a BNC but it is much larger than a standard BNC socket.
It is slightly smaller than the C connector oat only 13.6 mm dia. It is silver plated, I have looked on line and cant find anything like it.

It looks a lot like it is to an N connector, what BNC is to TNC.

That is, similar, but quick-connect instead of threaded.

I know there are some quick-connect versions of the N connector, but my google-fuu isn't with me today, so couldn't find anything that matches exactly.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Chet T16 on September 13, 2012, 08:16:40 pm
Diodes, the package is MELF. You can use any 1A diode like a 1N4004 in replacement, or a surface mount one rated at least for 1A and with a reverse voltage at least double the voltage of the power rail.

It turns out they were MOV's but serving the same purpose. I replaced them all with diodes. I've since found out people replace them with 1N4148's but they're surely under spec'd?

Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Isaac Newton on September 14, 2012, 01:21:58 am
My turn!

Looks like a fuse holder (notice the amp's labeling), since it is part of a mains extension, but the thing that i thought were the screw to open the compartment is glued and doesn't comes off  ??? ... Also it has some kind of button that doesn't do anything when pressed. This "button" thing don't latches, it's more like a tactile switch. 

Is it some sort of circuit breaker?

Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: TriodeTiger on September 14, 2012, 01:36:47 am
My turn!

Looks like a fuse holder (notice the amp's labeling), since it is part of a mains extension, but the thing that i thought were the screw to open the compartment is glued and doesn't comes off  ??? ... Also it has some kind of button that doesn't do anything when pressed. This "button" thing don't latches, it's more like a tactile switch. 

Is it some sort of circuit breaker?

I'd be surprised if it was not a circuit breaker. The over current condition will trip a latching relay, interrupting connection until reset. I'd imagine it should be put in as a module and not soldered on to as such, but I haven't a clue what electrical codes are anywhere.

Alexander.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Isaac Newton on September 14, 2012, 01:45:47 am

I'd be surprised if it was not a circuit breaker. The over current condition will trip a latching relay, interrupting connection until reset. I'd imagine it should be put in as a module and not soldered on to as such, but I haven't a clue what electrical codes are anywhere.

Alexander.

It's a chinese mains extension... No surprises it's mounted like that, but I think this circuit breaker is a nice touch to a mains extension.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: SeanB on September 14, 2012, 04:53:58 am
Thermal circuit breaker. Inside is a bimetal strip that carries the current, and when it gets hot from current it eventually moves enough to overcome the latch holding it closed on the other contact, and moves to the open position. When it cools it stays open until the button is pressed which pushes it back past the latch to closed again. If they are used a lot ( or with time and many near trip cycles) they have a nasty tendency to arc at the contacts when loaded.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: G7PSK on September 14, 2012, 07:11:11 am
Thermal trip. The button feels like it does nothing most of the time but when it trips it pops out further, you will then find when you push it that it has some resistance and  most likely feel or hear a click when pushed all the way in.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: perfect_disturbance on September 14, 2012, 10:26:19 pm
What is the little black device? I originally thought a cap but I'm not sure.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: TriodeTiger on September 14, 2012, 11:06:42 pm
What is the little black device? I originally thought a cap but I'm not sure.
... A theme!

A quick search for AUPO A4-F lead me to the following:
(http://imgen.b2b.makepolo.com/images/en/formal/product/product-pic-2/product-4/pic-64/big_4642464.jpg#S23SSmTB)

(cached result linked as main page seems to not load:)
http://webcache.googleusercontent.com/search?q=cache:http://www.aupo.com.hk/egproduct/af.htm&hl=en&prmd=imvns&strip=1 (http://webcache.googleusercontent.com/search?q=cache:http://www.aupo.com.hk/egproduct/af.htm&hl=en&prmd=imvns&strip=1)


It appears to be a thermal cutoff protection device (aka thermal fuse?) @ 126±2C fusing off, 107C holding temp
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: sotos on September 15, 2012, 06:12:51 am
Help getting some data for this chip ATMLU020-16B. The supplier told me that’s an ATMEL 24c16, is this ok?

Thanks in advance.

Sotiris.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Skippy on October 02, 2012, 11:39:51 am
An easy one, hopefully.

(http://i1158.photobucket.com/albums/p604/superdjc/IMAG0767.jpg)

The orange blobs at the front. They're capacitors, but what sort?
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: ElektroQuark on October 02, 2012, 01:07:47 pm
Tantalums.
Title: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: mikelem on October 10, 2012, 09:55:01 pm
This is on the PCB of my FLUKE 75 multimeter (which is currently not displaying everything it should).
Is it a cap?
Should that split/crack be there?
What do those numbers mean?

I like this meter and I'd like to revive it but I'm running out of parts to replace. Any thoughts?

Thanks!
-M
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: ablacon64 on October 10, 2012, 11:19:42 pm
That crack should not be there. Looks like a varistor. Maybe if you provide a full view photo....
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: vk6zgo on October 11, 2012, 06:29:11 am
I would say it is a spark gap.
They used them on the socket board for the CRT on a lot of colour TVs.
The first time I saw them,I thought they were faulty capacitors.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: SeanB on October 11, 2012, 03:04:42 pm
Spark gap. It should basically measure as open circuit till the voltage across it reaches betwwen 1-2 kilovolts where it breaks down.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Short Circuit on October 12, 2012, 10:08:28 am
Anybody happen to know this connector?
Only have this photo, so cannot measure the thing, but my guess its a 2.5mm or 2.54mm pitch.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: necroscope on October 12, 2012, 11:43:19 am
Next up fellas..

I found these in the loft today, can't seem to find out what they are from the numbers on them, any ideas please?

Numbers around the top rim of one of them are 771139 and SGS87305

Thank you

orb
Looks like an equivelent to a  LM305  regulator here is a pic of one here http://www.wellgainelectronics.com/ProductImages/ics_VoltageRegulator/NSC%20IC%20LM305H.JPG (http://www.wellgainelectronics.com/ProductImages/ics_VoltageRegulator/NSC%20IC%20LM305H.JPG)  they were quite commonly used in arcade machies power regulator supplys in the late 70's early 80's.

Edit Just noticed it has already been answered... Fail on my part.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: whatchitfoool on November 05, 2012, 10:36:26 pm
Anyone have any idea about this connector?
its a ZIF type female for a 5 pin, single sided cable.  specifically fits the li-ion battery connector for ipod video / classics.  real small pin spacing; maybe 0.5mm

i would love a part number, or even a good starting point for finding a reasonable match.


(http://i.ebayimg.com/t/iPod-Video-5th-Gen-Logic-Board-Battery-Connector-/00/s/NjAwWDY2OA==/$(KGrHqJ,!ooFBsb45j+SBQiVk40qqw~~60_12.JPG)
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: notsob on November 05, 2012, 11:08:50 pm
ifixit carry basic ipod spares, doesn't look like they carry that connector, so perhaps send them an email

http://www.ifixit.com (http://www.ifixit.com)
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: whatchitfoool on November 06, 2012, 12:07:06 am
i need  a source for 500-1000, at least.

other-wise ill have to look into a different approache
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: notsob on November 06, 2012, 02:46:55 am
OK , I was thinking 1 off, so try http://www.toby.co.uk/index.aspx, (http://www.toby.co.uk/index.aspx,) they have a big range of connectors and you can email them the connector picture etc and they will try to find it for you.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: whatchitfoool on November 07, 2012, 06:52:53 pm
anyone have any suggestions on terms and categories to start looking for something like this?
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: steve30 on November 19, 2012, 04:10:26 pm
Does anyone know what the connectors on the ends of this cable are called?

http://phenoptix.co.uk/products/adafruit_male_female_jumper_150mm (http://phenoptix.co.uk/products/adafruit_male_female_jumper_150mm)

If so, can these connectors be purchased and used on their own?
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: T4P on November 19, 2012, 08:58:28 pm
The female one is usually a Dupont connector(as the chinese call it) while the male one ... is also dupont
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: steve30 on November 20, 2012, 12:49:47 pm
The female one is usually a Dupont connector(as the chinese call it) while the male one ... is also dupont

I've heard the Dupont name before. As far as I can tell though, I can't find anyone who sells these connectors on their own.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Astroplio on November 20, 2012, 01:34:21 pm
@steve30

Check molex part number 43031-0007 (micro-fit 3.0 connectors) as they call them, might be what you need.

But I suggest to download the pdf catalog from various distributors (connectors section) and browse it, you might see something that suits your needs better!
Printed versions are always better for browsing. I found that molex part number on an old 2007-2008 printed catalog from RS Components for example, that I keep handy.

George
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: dr_p on December 18, 2012, 12:03:30 pm
The female one is usually a Dupont connector(as the chinese call it) while the male one ... is also dupont

I've heard the Dupont name before. As far as I can tell though, I can't find anyone who sells these connectors on their own.

I think it comes from the french "Du Pont". I'm not too good at french, but I think it means "of bridge" as in bridging wire or jumper wire.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Bored@Work on December 18, 2012, 05:39:02 pm
The female one is usually a Dupont connector(as the chinese call it) while the male one ... is also dupont

I've heard the Dupont name before. As far as I can tell though, I can't find anyone who sells these connectors on their own.

I think it comes from the french "Du Pont". I'm not too good at french, but I think it means "of bridge" as in bridging wire or jumper wire.

In case of the connectors it indirectly comes from the chemical company DuPont. Among many other things they do wire isolations and materials for connectors. The designation "DuPont connector" is a misnomer coming from China. Someone mistook the manufacturer of a wire or connector material for the name of the connector or cable assembly, and that happened to get a live of its own. Especially because those 2.54 mm pitch, 0.64 mm square pin connectors don't have a common name. Every manufacturer calls them differently. Maybe the name will really stick, and we finally get a common name for these connectors.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: vk6zgo on December 19, 2012, 01:10:46 am
The female one is usually a Dupont connector(as the chinese call it) while the male one ... is also dupont

I've heard the Dupont name before. As far as I can tell though, I can't find anyone who sells these connectors on their own.

I think it comes from the french "Du Pont". I'm not too good at french, but I think it means "of bridge" as in bridging wire or jumper wire.

In case of the connectors it indirectly comes from the chemical company DuPont. Among many other things they do wire isolations and materials for connectors. The designation "DuPont connector" is a misnomer coming from China. Someone mistook the manufacturer of a wire or connector material for the name of the connector or cable assembly, and that happened to get a live of its own. Especially because those 2.54 mm pitch, 0.64 mm square pin connectors don't have a common name. Every manufacturer calls them differently. Maybe the name will really stick, and we finally get a common name for these connectors.

A bit like the way suppliers started calling Belling Lee coax connectors "PAL connectors"! ;D
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: CarlG on January 01, 2013, 08:18:29 pm
@watchitfool

It looks a lot like Molex 52559 (http://www.molex.com/molex/products/datasheet.jsp?part=active/0525590652_FFC_FPC_CONNECTORS.xml) but they don't come in 5 pin...

//C
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: firewalker on January 02, 2013, 03:13:18 pm
This is a logic level n-MOSFET, isn't it?

2SK1904 (http://www.datasheetcatalog.org/datasheet/sanyo/ds_pdf_e/2SK1904.pdf)

Alexander.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: SeanB on January 02, 2013, 03:19:57 pm
Not really, it would like a little more voltage unless you run it under 5A.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: firewalker on January 02, 2013, 03:35:20 pm
Thanks m8.

Alexander.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: BravoV on January 11, 2013, 07:13:24 am
What is this thing ?

Found it in old CRT computer monitor main board, located around the power switching circuit at mains input area, and through the trace, one of it's leg was connected to the common mode transformer which is connected at the mains line.

Put a TO220 diode beside it to show it's relative size, and no, its not a fuse cause there is already a glass fuse and a mov in the circuit. Measured results in the pic and during measurements, swapped probes (+/-) positions and also diode mode show no polarity.

TIA
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: SeanB on January 11, 2013, 07:31:29 am
Degaussing thermistor. It is connected across the mains ( nowdays via a relay to reduce power) and has the degaussing coil on the CRT connected to the middle pin across to the left pin ( bottom view, the one with 2k3 resistance) so that when power is supplied it allows an AC current to flow through the coil. The device has a PTC thermistor and a NTC thermistor inside as 2 discs connected between the pins. As the device heats up the 17R unit heats up and the 2k3 unit drops in resistance will it reaches equilibrium where almost all the voltage is dropped and no current flows in the coil. This results in the current in the coil starting at a high value then smoothly dropping in value to near zero, just right to remove any residual magnetism from a CRT front mask so it does not cause colour errors.

You also get a 2 pin version, where it self heats and has a VDR action, such that it basically drops the current to under 10mA through the coil.

Just note that these do run rather hot in use.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: BravoV on January 11, 2013, 07:48:24 am
So this thing called "degaussing thermistor" which is just a NTC + PTC bonded together, thanks SeanB  !  :-+
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: SeanB on January 11, 2013, 08:08:13 am
Yes, if you rip it apart you will find 3 plates with 2 ceramic discs between them, grey with a silver coating on the flat faces.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Nermash on January 11, 2013, 09:18:06 am
I googled a lot and could not find much info about the "SK" designator and component itself, found on the hard drive pcbs.

It looks like some ceramic resonator or filter....

Similar thread on Arduino forum with picture: http://arduino.cc/forum/index.php?topic=126081.0 (http://arduino.cc/forum/index.php?topic=126081.0)

Can anyone offer some definitive answer?
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: SeanB on January 11, 2013, 02:01:38 pm
Looks like a ceramic filter for sure, but the best would be to wait for Free_Electron to see, as he is the Hard drive Guru (amongst many other hats) here.

Up to you Vincent...........
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: StuUK on January 11, 2013, 09:35:15 pm
Has anybody got a clue what this mystery (to me) SMD component is. It's pictured next to a 5p (UK) coin, so its about 2cm/1inch long and the front of the component is transparent.

Even best guesses appreciated  :)

Piccy of front and back attached....
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: SeanB on January 12, 2013, 05:12:56 am
Surface mount connector. The mylar tape ( brown) on top is removed after soldering to enable the plugging in of the other side. From the looks of it it will be used to connect 2 pcb's together with the mating part having a similar footprint but a projecting plug. Common in cellphones and other small units as an interconnect.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: StuUK on January 12, 2013, 01:19:34 pm
Thanks, that made sense. I removed one of the pieces of tape and could see that it is indeed a connector with a very fine pitch...
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: dr_p on January 14, 2013, 06:10:55 am
Folks, I have one unknown component. I think is a MOSFET, but can't just figutre out what. IRF Z46 maybe? But that is TO-220.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: amyk on January 14, 2013, 06:28:41 am
IRF7404 (http://www.irf.com/product-info/datasheets/data/irf7404.pdf)
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: dr_p on January 14, 2013, 11:07:48 pm
 :palm: thank you
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: G7PSK on January 18, 2013, 02:07:33 pm
 This is not a component as such, more of an assembly of a quarter inch jack socket with a piece of wire in a yellow container. I got them in among a job lot at an auction. Does any one know what these are used for as I have no idea.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: SeanB on January 18, 2013, 04:35:58 pm
Probably were a ground lead for something.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: StuUK on January 20, 2013, 05:23:02 pm
Any ideas what this 40 PIN DIP IC is please  |O, before I chuck em?

Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: SeanB on January 20, 2013, 05:37:50 pm
Peel the label off..... Most likely an OTP microcontroller, or if you are lucky a EEPROM device that can be erased.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: StuUK on January 20, 2013, 06:09:25 pm
 :) Should have been brave enough to do that in the first place, turns out to be a Microchip

PIC16C74B-041/P4AP
052338H

http://ww1.microchip.com/downloads/en/DeviceDoc/30605c.pdf (http://ww1.microchip.com/downloads/en/DeviceDoc/30605c.pdf)

I would assume its probably been factory programmed with some proprietry code. I wonder (hope) if its reprogrammable as I have inherited 20 of these with a job lot 'lucky dip' of components.  ;D
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: StuUK on January 20, 2013, 08:33:01 pm
:) Should have been brave enough to do that in the first place, turns out to be a Microchip

PIC16C74B-041/P4AP
052338H

http://ww1.microchip.com/downloads/en/DeviceDoc/30605c.pdf (http://ww1.microchip.com/downloads/en/DeviceDoc/30605c.pdf)

I would assume its probably been factory programmed with some proprietry code. I wonder (hope) if its reprogrammable as I have inherited 20 of these with a job lot 'lucky dip' of components.  ;D

 :-[ should have read more carefully, its OTP!!  :palm:
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: SeanB on January 20, 2013, 08:48:52 pm
Yes, but look first before binning, as they could be blank still, just having the label on  then never programmed.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: StuUK on January 20, 2013, 10:42:56 pm
Yes, but look first before binning, as they could be blank still, just having the label on  then never programmed.

True, but how can I tell?
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: SeanB on January 21, 2013, 04:45:57 am
Stick them in a programmer and do a blank check....... Otherwise place in breadboard and add crystal and reset, then apply power and look for activity on pins which says a program is running. Blank will do nothing other than count up address range and roll over.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: StuUK on January 21, 2013, 08:52:15 am
Stick them in a programmer and do a blank check....... Otherwise place in breadboard and add crystal and reset, then apply power and look for activity on pins which says a program is running. Blank will do nothing other than count up address range and roll over.

Thanks I'll give that a try (or at least hold onto them until I can)...
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: UPI on February 26, 2013, 11:04:20 pm
Does anyone recognize this connector and hopefully also know a place to purchase them?
The spacing between pins is .050" and it is mounted in a PCB that is .8mm or around .033" thick.

Thanks

Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: flolic on March 05, 2013, 09:39:30 pm
Looking for any info for smd  component marked "K4A". It is most probably some kind of switching regulator IC.
Two of those are in power supply part of "AR.Drone" quadcopter that I'm trying to repair.

(https://dl.dropbox.com/u/21387397/slike/eevblog/k4a.jpg)
(image taken from some Russian forum)
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: amspire on March 06, 2013, 02:21:42 am
Looking for any info for smd  component marked "K4A".
It is a LM158 - a wide temperature range two opamp version of the common quad opamp LM324.

This version is in the DFN8 package which LM158QT.

If you are not using it under extreme temperature conditions, a LM358 in a suitable package would be fine.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Mike_M on March 08, 2013, 03:23:58 am
I've got a component that I would like to figure out what it is  =0).

Little rectangle notched on one side.   tapered back top.   and stamped with FIOY  (not sure if F10Y or FIOY) on it.

Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: flolic on March 08, 2013, 08:39:09 am

It is a LM158 - a wide temperature range two opamp version of the common quad opamp LM324.

I'm afraid it's not  :-\
Pinout does not match at all, and this component must be some kind of switcher step down IC because it is connected directly to 4.7uH inductor.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: TerraHertz on March 08, 2013, 12:51:14 pm
Here's an IC that is some kind of switch-mode controller. It's on an inverter-type microwave oven PCB which I'm interested in adapting as a HV power supply. Depending on whether the circuit is suitable.
So far, no luck searching for the part number: AN9DB07SB 929S6E02

The oven is a Panasonic NN-SD686S, but I've seen this identical inverter PCB used in two other different Panasonic microwave ovens, so I'm hoping it's going to be common 'street findings' in future.

Full story with teardown pics here: http://everist.org/tales/20130308_microwave_hacks.htm (http://everist.org/tales/20130308_microwave_hacks.htm)
 
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: orbiter on March 08, 2013, 01:26:50 pm
Here's an IC that is some kind of switch-mode controller. It's on an inverter-type microwave oven PCB which I'm interested in adapting as a HV power supply. Depending on whether the circuit is suitable.
So far, no luck searching for the part number: AN9DB07SB 929S6E02

I believe the logo is the Matsushita/Panasonic logo. The only info I can find remotely relating to that series of IC is this one.

http://www.semicon.panasonic.co.jp/ds4/AN9D_E_discon.pdf (http://www.semicon.panasonic.co.jp/ds4/AN9D_E_discon.pdf)
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: TerraHertz on March 08, 2013, 01:50:21 pm
Ow! That's not good at all. Custom analog, proprietary, and probably no public data at all. Darn it.
That leaves just observing what it does, then looking for a way to replace it with something easily available.
Where 'it' would probably be easiest if I ignore the IC, and consider that whole rider board as a black box.

Thanks though.

 
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: midasgossye on March 11, 2013, 06:31:10 am
I've been checking too on the controller for the oven, no luck this time. |O
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: ddavidebor on March 15, 2013, 08:24:53 pm
I've got a component that I would like to figure out what it is  =0).

Little rectangle notched on one side.   tapered back top.   and stamped with FIOY  (not sure if F10Y or FIOY) on it.


check with multimeter if it is a diode.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: firewalker on March 16, 2013, 12:48:33 pm
Please, remind me the name of this npn/pnp voltage amplifier configuration.

(http://i.imgur.com/LtB6TJK.png)

Alexander.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: kizzap on March 16, 2013, 11:30:10 pm
Please, remind me the me of this npn/pnp voltage amplifier configuration.

http://i.imgur.com/LtB6TJK.png (http://i.imgur.com/LtB6TJK.png)

Alexander.

Is it just a non-inverting amplifier of some form?

-kizzap
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: nicknails on March 17, 2013, 01:38:55 am
Looking for any info for smd  component marked "K4A". It is most probably some kind of switching regulator IC.
Two of those are in power supply part of "AR.Drone" quadcopter that I'm trying to repair.

(https://dl.dropbox.com/u/21387397/slike/eevblog/k4a.jpg)
(image taken from some Russian forum)

It's an AZ431 made by BCD Semiconductor.  Shunt mode regulator.

http://www.bcdsemi.com/Upload/Product%20Doc/Datasheet/AZ431-B%20D3.3%20121205.pdf (http://www.bcdsemi.com/Upload/Product%20Doc/Datasheet/AZ431-B%20D3.3%20121205.pdf)
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: dr_p on March 18, 2013, 12:19:49 am
package seems to be DFN-8, so the 431 varity doesn't fit, plus the OP mentioned something about being directly connected to an inductor.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: xygor on March 18, 2013, 09:41:59 pm
Here's an IC that is some kind of switch-mode controller. It's on an inverter-type microwave oven PCB which I'm interested in adapting as a HV power supply. Depending on whether the circuit is suitable.
So far, no luck searching for the part number: AN9DB07SB 929S6E02

The oven is a Panasonic NN-SD686S, but I've seen this identical inverter PCB used in two other different Panasonic microwave ovens, so I'm hoping it's going to be common 'street findings' in future.

Full story with teardown pics here: http://everist.org/tales/20130308_microwave_hacks.htm (http://everist.org/tales/20130308_microwave_hacks.htm)
No help on the IC, but I have some answers to other questions you posed at the linked site.
Some Litz wire is available here:
http://www.surplussales.com/Wire-Cable/LitzWire.html (http://www.surplussales.com/Wire-Cable/LitzWire.html)

And in the transformer, the extra magnetic path (the one with the wide gap) introduces a controlled amount of leakage inductance by creating flux that does not couple to the secondary.  It saves having an extra inductor component in series with the primary winding since it is incorporated into the transformer.  It's probably a resonant converter.


Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Mike Warren on March 25, 2013, 05:29:12 am
I've got a component that I would like to figure out what it is  =0).

Little rectangle notched on one side.   tapered back top.   and stamped with FIOY  (not sure if F10Y or FIOY) on it.

Probably too late to help you, but it looks like an ICPF10 400mA semiconductor fuse.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: BobbyK on March 30, 2013, 02:01:55 am
Please, remind me the name of this npn/pnp voltage amplifier configuration.

(http://i.imgur.com/LtB6TJK.png)

Alexander.


IMHO looks like a Sziklai pair. Sometimes also called a complementary darlington - because it uses one PNP and one NPN. You can read up here:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sziklai_pair (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sziklai_pair)
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Hardcorefs on April 01, 2013, 08:14:46 am
Looking for any help on the following parts:

2160 7A1
16UN1801 0612 G

They are part of a buck voltage converter around a MAX8538

Thanks
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Hardcorefs on April 01, 2013, 11:41:20 pm
OK
 I found the  16UN part, seems philips make TWO parts with exactly the SAME part number

One is SOT23 which is only a single part, and it was this showing up in searches......

So I just need to know the other part.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: c4757p on April 01, 2013, 11:48:29 pm
The other one is a MOSFET.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Hardcorefs on April 04, 2013, 10:01:42 am
Yep... that I know , I was looking for a part or manufacturer ref....
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Hardcorefs on April 07, 2013, 04:19:17 am
K got it!!!!

HAT2160H-EL-E  Renesas Technology Corp
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: ResR on April 09, 2013, 03:19:16 pm
Look what I found in a dumpster-dive.  :o A set of 5 serious diodes D2-25-4 and D2-25-7. Any idea how much current and voltage it can rectifier? These things are biggest semiconductors I ever hold in my hand with M-12 bolt to connect to the heatsink.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: SeanB on April 09, 2013, 04:09:51 pm
Well, they are Russian made, so probably 25A units that can be used as room heaters.......
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: ResR on April 09, 2013, 04:26:34 pm
Perfect.  :-DD It is sub-zero cold here for many months from October to March/April  :P Hmm... On one russian site was written that it's 250A 400V (?) although someone from my work said too that it maybe is just 25A diodes._
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: G7PSK on April 09, 2013, 05:04:44 pm
I had a mig welder that had three similar looking diodes but UK made that was rated to 200 amps the transformer was three phase.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: PA0PBZ on April 09, 2013, 05:14:24 pm
Looks like 25A, 400 and 700 volts, see:

http://www.ebay.com/itm/D2-25-6-NEW-INDUSTRIAL-RECTIFIER-DIODE-25A-600V-/250684091515 (http://www.ebay.com/itm/D2-25-6-NEW-INDUSTRIAL-RECTIFIER-DIODE-25A-600V-/250684091515)

Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: ResR on April 09, 2013, 06:48:45 pm
eBay?  ???  I don't trust that site for accuracy. I'm planning to make a decent PSU from parts i have in a basement or in my mind, my cardboard box transformer PSU burned out the compact bridge rectifier again dispite the forced cooling of the fan while testing a small schematic, 25A should be fair enough, but 250A is better chances to survive accidental shortcuts. Although it is similar or same as the one in that link._
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: cubemike99 on April 15, 2013, 01:33:00 am
Any info on a TO-3 package labeled:

    M
10243
 8439

? The M looks like the Motorola logo, and the device is on a 48V 3A PS. Thanks for the help.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: mikes on April 15, 2013, 11:12:19 pm
Any info on a TO-3 package labeled:

    M
10243
 8439
Probably a house labeled pass transistor. But Lambda also used dual rectifiers in a TO-3, so you should find a schematic or draw out the circuit. If it's a pass transistor, it's probably non-critical, just make sure the V/A ratings are big enough. I used some 2N6284s to fix a Lambda 24V/3A linear.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: kizzap on April 29, 2013, 05:26:36 am
I don't really need any help with identification...more...just thought it was a funny brand...

(http://users.tpg.com.au/luce90//sus%20caps.jpg)

-kizzap
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: orbiter on April 29, 2013, 07:56:43 am
I've not seen that make before either, just another Taiwan band I guess. I'd rather them be called Su'spect, though, because at least then I'd know what I was dealing with :)

I'm assuming you already know the two in the centre of shot are failing (tops bulged)
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: kizzap on April 29, 2013, 08:19:18 am
Heh, yeah I know they were suss (or a con. take your pun ;) ). Replaced the six of them, and the monitor the board was pulled from works!   :-+ :scared:
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: G7PSK on April 29, 2013, 12:29:33 pm
Thats a good abbreviation for suspect condensers.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Telequipment on May 13, 2013, 01:45:23 pm
 most likely a Infrared sensor (infra red sensor- infra-red sensor- IR sensor). For use with PICAXE circuits to detect infra-red signals from a TV style remote control or another PICAXE chip. 2.7V to 5.5V operation.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: c4757p on May 27, 2013, 04:21:27 pm
I've got an insultingly simple one - what's the name of this? I bought them from god knows where on eBay, just called "2.54mm headers", and I want a name to put them in my component library under. They're ridiculously common, so someone's got to know a proper name for them!
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: duskglow on May 27, 2013, 04:23:29 pm
I dunno, I'd think "header" would be a perfectly appropriate name for it.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: c4757p on May 27, 2013, 04:28:02 pm
Would a "shrouded header" be enough? I didn't want to use 'header' because it's bigger than an unshrouded one, so it needs a bigger courtyard and thus a different footprint.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: orbiter on May 27, 2013, 05:05:28 pm
Is it not just referred to as a 2.54mm Molex connector?
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: metalphreak on June 02, 2013, 08:11:00 am
http://www.jst-mfg.com/product/pdf/eng/eXH.pdf (http://www.jst-mfg.com/product/pdf/eng/eXH.pdf)


JST "XH" connector. Spacing is 2.5mm (close enough to 2.54 that it doesn't matter unless you have a high pin count connector)
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: wraper on June 04, 2013, 10:40:14 am
Does anyone know the name of this connector? Never seen that before. Guy from my work said that they received PH electrodes with such connectors but without any wires. I think it's some surplus, damn cheapskates. Now they don't know what to do with them.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: vk6zgo on June 04, 2013, 02:45:24 pm
It looks a bit like a Siemens coax connector.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: G7PSK on June 05, 2013, 01:41:05 pm
Any one know what this is please, the one on the left in the photo. with the sil pad, it says D288 on top and Y-920 at the bottom, one leg appears to be open and I am not sure if its a transistor or back to back diode, its from a scope power supply. Google does not come up with it but does with BD288.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: dr_p on June 05, 2013, 02:01:56 pm
Any one know what this is please, the one on the left in the photo. with the sil pad, it says D288 on top and Y-920 at the bottom, one leg appears to be open and I am not sure if its a transistor or back to back diode, its from a scope power supply. Google does not come up with it but does with BD288.

http://www.svntc.com/TPDF/1272.pdf (http://www.svntc.com/TPDF/1272.pdf)


When in doubt, add "2S" before the name of what looks like a transistor
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: peter.mitchell on June 17, 2013, 12:17:24 pm
Anyone know what package this bridge rectifier is in?
(https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/677635/bridgerectifier.jpg)

I have a whole bunch of the I got a few years ago, decided to make something with them.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: madires on June 17, 2013, 12:37:49 pm
Anyone know what package this bridge rectifier is in?
(https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/677635/bridgerectifier.jpg)

I have a whole bunch of the I got a few years ago, decided to make something with them.

I think it's called GBJ. Really!
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: peter.mitchell on June 17, 2013, 02:34:05 pm
I think it's called GBJ. Really!

Holy crap, i thought that was part of the part number! I mean, you never see transistors in to-220 packages with to-220 written on them ect! I feel dumb :(
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: madires on June 17, 2013, 02:51:13 pm
I think it's called GBJ. Really!

Holy crap, i thought that was part of the part number! I mean, you never see transistors in to-220 packages with to-220 written on them ect! I feel dumb :(

It's also part of the part number. Those bridge rectifiers are so common that the manufactures simply use the package, amps and voltage as part number.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: G7PSK on June 20, 2013, 02:00:43 pm
I need some tac switch extensions, but I do not know what they are called. I have a board which has a number of tac. switches on it that I want to mount in a case. I have seen these devises which mount on the case to make contact with the board mounted switches but no idea where to look as I do not know the correct name.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Len on June 20, 2013, 03:20:53 pm
I need some tac switch extensions, but I do not know what they are called. I have a board which has a number of tac. switches on it that I want to mount in a case. I have seen these devises which mount on the case to make contact with the board mounted switches but no idea where to look as I do not know the correct name.
They seem to be called "extenders" or "plungers". Here's one:
http://www.digikey.com/product-detail/en/2S09-05.0/679-2201-ND/2034757 (http://www.digikey.com/product-detail/en/2S09-05.0/679-2201-ND/2034757)
and here's a bunch more (not all for tact switches):
http://www.digikey.com/scripts/dksearch/dksus.dll?pv184=2918&pv184=469&pv184=2608&FV=fff40011%2Cfff80054&mnonly=0&newproducts=0&ColumnSort=0&page=1&quantity=0&ptm=0&fid=0&pageSize=25 (http://www.digikey.com/scripts/dksearch/dksus.dll?pv184=2918&pv184=469&pv184=2608&FV=fff40011%2Cfff80054&mnonly=0&newproducts=0&ColumnSort=0&page=1&quantity=0&ptm=0&fid=0&pageSize=25)
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Telequipment on June 30, 2013, 05:05:04 pm
Hello , I have this component here not sure what it is code is ITT RA15,it long glass tube, with two wires out of the base, there looks to be a filament, don't think it's a bulb, could it be a fuse,i first thought perhaps it is a reed relay, but the one's I have the wires are either end Help. ITT RA15
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: SeanB on June 30, 2013, 05:47:43 pm
It is a thermistor unit, and is normally used in self heating mode to provide stabilisation of analogue circuits. They are commonly used in Wein oscillators to keep the loop gain constant and so generate a constant amplitude sine wave.

Another use is as a temperature sensor in amplifiers to keep the bias constant with external temperature changes.

http://www.murata.com/products/catalog/pdf/r44e.pdf (http://www.murata.com/products/catalog/pdf/r44e.pdf)

http://www.avx.com/docs/masterpubs/ntctherm.pdf (http://www.avx.com/docs/masterpubs/ntctherm.pdf)

for more info.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Telequipment on July 01, 2013, 05:03:51 am
Thank you Sean, wondered what it was
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: SeanB on July 01, 2013, 04:29:53 pm
I was going to use one when I made an ESR meter, but instead used a 28V grain of wheat leaded lamp instead as a PTC. Still have a few around in a box somewhere. I just had to look thorugh the box of assorted leaded lamps and test a few of the mixed ones to sort out a 28V one. Took 3V from 2 AA cells and tested lamps to find those that did not glow ( the glowing ones were the 5V ones) then tested the dark ones on 12V to get the non glowing again ( 12V lamps0 and finally checked them on 24V to see if they still worked. Took the first one and used it and put the rest back in the box mixed as before.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: G7PSK on July 07, 2013, 09:20:15 am
Hi I have a TO220 package on a chinese PWM motor controller labeled STPS205100CT,  G40N2 and CHN305 I have tried Google but cannot find any info on this device, in fact all it seems to bring up is dodgy Russian web sites with links to other even more dodgy Russian porn sites. Any one have an idea as to what this device is please.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: romovs on July 07, 2013, 09:51:37 am
Hi I have a TO220 package on a chinese PWM motor controller labeled STPS205100CT,  G40N2 and CHN305 I have tried Google but cannot find any info on this device, in fact all it seems to bring up is dodgy Russian web sites with links to other even more dodgy Russian porn sites. Any one have an idea as to what this device is please.

A ST power shottky diode?
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: metalphreak on July 07, 2013, 10:34:45 am
STPS20S100CT

That 5 is an S :)

http://www.alldatasheet.com/datasheet-pdf/pdf/111350/STMICROELECTRONICS/STPS20S100CT.html (http://www.alldatasheet.com/datasheet-pdf/pdf/111350/STMICROELECTRONICS/STPS20S100CT.html)
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: G7PSK on July 07, 2013, 08:55:52 pm
STPS20S100CT

That 5 is an S :)

http://www.alldatasheet.com/datasheet-pdf/pdf/111350/STMICROELECTRONICS/STPS20S100CT.html (http://www.alldatasheet.com/datasheet-pdf/pdf/111350/STMICROELECTRONICS/STPS20S100CT.html)
Thanks for the reply.
It more a shoddy diode than a schottky diode The PWM is supposed to be rated at 10 amps but this diode gets to hot to touch at 1.4 amps and the writing is duff as well as the 5 is written as an S
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: SeanB on July 08, 2013, 06:22:18 pm
Probably a regular 1A silicon die in a plastic package ( bet the back is poorly moulded and very small as well) sold as the expensive part.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: nelsonro on July 19, 2013, 05:12:10 pm
Hi, blown my poor rigol dg1022 to hell with a short on the gnd to a live power rail  |O does anyone know what this is? it's right before the output and 2 pads are connecting the the signal to the output while 2 other pads are connected to gnd, problem is this part has become almost a short to gnd on the signal and as such there is no signal coming out of the rigol, the unit works fine if i just bridge the pads but don't what to risk working without this protection whatever it is
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: amyk on July 21, 2013, 10:55:40 am
You'll need a clearer picture than that, and perhaps show the component in context on the board.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: SeanB on July 21, 2013, 11:54:16 am
I am going to guess it is a common mode RF choke, or a transient suppressor device that clamps overvoltage to ground.

http://www.yuden.co.jp/or/product/category/emisuppression/CM01S600T.html (http://www.yuden.co.jp/or/product/category/emisuppression/CM01S600T.html)

Is a start to look.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: nelsonro on July 21, 2013, 03:17:36 pm
more images, the sinal is very clean even without the part, from the side the part looks like it has a cylindrical core glued in place so maybe as SeanB said it's a rf choke?

edit: thinking of cutting the part if it helps
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: PA0PBZ on July 21, 2013, 07:08:45 pm
The better quality picture you posted together with the pcb makes it almost certain it is an output filter, some kind of LC combination circuit.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: nelsonro on July 23, 2013, 10:15:12 pm
Thanks for the help, gave me a few ideas for new things to put there  ;D
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: richcj10 on August 15, 2013, 05:13:33 am
I have SOT23 package that has the value 01CL on it.
I have the schematic it is in attached.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: nelsonro on August 15, 2013, 07:06:06 pm
looks like a mosfet or transistor to short 5v to gnd in case of battery over-voltage, better to blow a fuse than a battery i guess. that or someone messed-up the schematic, the datasheet for the battery charger does have a few use cases with mosfets in it but none in the bat pin
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: TerraHertz on August 16, 2013, 02:25:19 pm
With this thing I know what it is, more or less, but can't find data. Only a few incidental mentions of it being used.

It's by Ortel Corp USA. Model PD050-PM   S/N P791.

It's a high bandwidth fiber-optic to photo-diode, with an SMA output connector. I was buying something else from an ebay seller in the USA, and this was only $20 and could go in the same box. The fiber had an obvious kink near the optical connector, and now on arrival, shining a laser through the fiber, yes the glass core was snapped. I cut it off there - still leaving 50cm of fiber on the sensor.

So now I'm also looking for a 2nd hand kit for terminating fiber in these connectors. Actually have been for a while, but not really trying. Here's more motivation.

Would anyone have an old Ortel data book, by any chance? I'd never even heard of them.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: madires on August 16, 2013, 03:06:07 pm
So now I'm also looking for a 2nd hand kit for terminating fiber in these connectors. Actually have been for a while, but not really trying. Here's more motivation.

The connector at the right seems to be a FC/PC. Is it the same connector as at the back of the diode? A short patch cable should cost about US$ 15-20. I'd choose a SC or LC connector for the non-diode side, since FC/PC is really outdated. And please also check if there's any marking on the current fiber which would indicate if it's single or multimode (something like 9/125 or 50/125).
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: TerraHertz on August 16, 2013, 03:30:50 pm
So now I'm also looking for a 2nd hand kit for terminating fiber in these connectors. Actually have been for a while, but not really trying. Here's more motivation.

The connector at the right seems to be a FC/PC. Is it the same connector as at the back of the diode? A short patch cable should cost about US$ 15-20. I'd choose a SC or LC connector for the non-diode side, since FC/PC is really outdated. And please also check if there's any marking on the current fiber which would indicate if it's single or multimode (something like 9/125 or 50/125).

Unfortunately, the fiber is terminated directly into the sensor. Glued in, with heatshrink cover. It's very likely the fiber is terminated very directly to the actual sensor inside. So, I need to put a new connector on the other end.

I don't know anything about coms fiber standards, connectors, etc. I do have various Cisco routers and stuff, some with fiber connectors (that I've never used.) But mainly I was thinking this might be useful for a project unrelated to coms. The objective would be to examine the light output from something, that might contain components up into the GHz range. So I more need a way to couple the fiber to a lens system, like a C mount small camera lens.

Can you suggest a url for a good review of current fiber connector types, and pros/cons?

There's no marking I can see in the fiber. The sheath seems to be fairly stiff nylon(?) tubing about 1mm dia, with a fiber fairly loose inside the hollow core.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: madires on August 16, 2013, 04:53:10 pm
Unfortunately, the fiber is terminated directly into the sensor. Glued in, with heatshrink cover. It's very likely the fiber is terminated very directly to the actual sensor inside. So, I need to put a new connector on the other end.

Then the next best thing would be to look for someone with the proper tools to attach a new connector.


Quote
Can you suggest a url for a good review of current fiber connector types, and pros/cons?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fiber_connectors (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fiber_connectors) :-) SC is fine. And if you need something else later on there are back-to-back adapters and patch cables with different connectors at both sides.

Quote
There's no marking I can see in the fiber. The sheath seems to be fairly stiff nylon(?) tubing about 1mm dia, with a fiber fairly loose inside the hollow core.

That's a pity because the marking would tell us roughly which transmission windows are to be expected.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: TerraHertz on August 17, 2013, 04:01:09 am
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fiber_connectors (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fiber_connectors) :-) SC is fine. And if you need something else later on there are back-to-back adapters and patch cables with different connectors at both sides.
Ha ha ha... no matter *how* many times I tell myself to search first, ask 2nd, I still get caught doing that sometimes. Old pre-internet habit. Anyway, thanks.

Quote
Quote
There's no marking I can see in the fiber. The sheath seems to be fairly stiff nylon(?) tubing about 1mm dia, with a fiber fairly loose inside the hollow core.

That's a pity because the marking would tell us roughly which transmission windows are to be expected.

Ah. That's something that didn't occur to me. I just presumed the transmission spectra would be flat. I would like to find out. Hopefully when (if) I find the data for this, it will include that info. If not, I have a 20cm length of the fiber with a connector on one end. Could put a connector on the other end too. But would a 20cm length be enough to do transmission spectra measurement? Perhaps not.

I don't suppose it's possible to tell, by looking at the fiber under a microscope?

Well, all this should wait till I find the data. I can probably determine if the sensor is working, even before putting a connector on the free end of the fiber.
It's nice that it has a male SMA. It can mount directly on an input of my HP 54121T 20GHz scope. Assuming it doesn't need a bias supply, which it might.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: madires on August 17, 2013, 10:00:38 am
I don't suppose it's possible to tell, by looking at the fiber under a microscope?

If you got a ruler with a µm scale :-) But you could check the relative difference between the core and the cladding. Multimode has usualy a 50µm (sometimes 62.5) core and a 125µm cladding (hence the marking 50/125) . Singlemode is 9/125 typically.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: TerraHertz on August 18, 2013, 02:30:16 pm
If you got a ruler with a µm scale :-)

Heh. It's called a micrometer.  I do.

Quote
But you could check the relative difference between the core and the cladding. Multimode has usualy a 50µm (sometimes 62.5) core and a 125µm cladding (hence the marking 50/125) . Singlemode is 9/125 typically.

After slitting a bit of the outer nylon sheath, then slitting off a few mm of the next sheath under magnification (it's some kind of silicone stuff I think, quite soft), the fiber is indeed 0.125mm (125um).  But it seems to be glass, and I can't think of any way to determine the size of the core. The core and cladding are just two different density glasses melded together, right?

Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: SeanB on August 18, 2013, 03:59:37 pm
Technically it is an outer cladding cylinder over an inner rod then fused together and drawn into a fibre, but yes it is one single unit even though the composition of the glass changes between outside and centre.
Title: Sensor
Post by: mswhin63 on August 20, 2013, 02:33:05 pm
Hi, Can anyone tell me what kind of sensor it is that is in the photo please. Just cleaning out some parts.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: JoannaK on August 22, 2013, 06:16:24 pm
Help!

I'm in a middle of repairing an Scooter CDI unit (from Hyosung SF50) and while de-potting/examining the system I found a 3 legged part with following desriptions I think is faulty.

- 3 legs, black and looks like regular to-92 transistor.  (thus no picture)
- At the component, there are 2 lines of markings:   P4M   and   3X
- PCB Silkscreen has making   Q5  ... (so most likely transistor, perhaps Fet?)
- All 3 legs are shorted together internallty (2ohms or less.. )  :--

This part is located next of 2N3904 transistor and NEC 2P4M thyristor which are connected together and to best of my knowleldge do the capasitor discharge that causes the ingnition to fire.

Totally unrelated, but this cdi unit has embedded AT90S2313 -4PI microcontroller and I located In circuit programming header (unpopopulated, though) so it might be possible to read back the code/data of those CDI module.

Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: PA0PBZ on August 22, 2013, 07:15:43 pm
- At the component, there are 2 lines of markings:   P4M   and   3X
This part is located next of 2N3904 transistor and NEC 2P4M thyristor which are connected together and to best of my knowleldge do the capasitor discharge that causes the ingnition to fire.

Coincidence?

(http://img01.taobaocdn.com/bao/uploaded/i1/T1na_tXcdgXXbGlfMT_011607.jpg)
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: JoannaK on August 22, 2013, 07:46:27 pm
It may indeed well be, that the unknown part is/was NEC made. Unfortunately NEC sold that part of the company to Renesas some years ago.

Also these parts are so old, that the best bet would be searching the Obsolete-bin, but so far no luck
http://www.renesas.eu/req/obsolete_search.do?event=discontinuedSearch (http://www.renesas.eu/req/obsolete_search.do?event=discontinuedSearch)
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: PA0PBZ on August 22, 2013, 07:59:16 pm
This link says it is a 500V 0.4A Thyristor: http://articulo.mercadolibre.cl/MLC-412226324-p4m-p4m-03-03p4m-thyristor-tiristor-scr-to-92-500v-04a-_JM (http://articulo.mercadolibre.cl/MLC-412226324-p4m-p4m-03-03p4m-thyristor-tiristor-scr-to-92-500v-04a-_JM)
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: JoannaK on August 22, 2013, 11:34:16 pm
Thank you.

As far as I know it's quite common for thyristors to fail to total short (essnetially fuse together permanently), and the location/wiring suppports the idea of second SCR ..

There seems to be quite a many similar high-volt thyristors available at to-92 case. And of those that I have checked, even pinout compatible. So I'll go and purchase some BT149G or MCR100-6G tomorrow (assuming I find some at local shop) and will try if that was the problem.

(edit)
 I attached pic of the part, it really looks like one PA0PBZ linked. )
PS: I know.. I shoudl take pics with real camera and not try to *** up with a phone.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Alexei.Polkhanov on August 23, 2013, 12:38:32 am
eBay?  ???  I don't trust that site for accuracy. I'm planning to make a decent PSU from parts i have in a basement or in my mind, my cardboard box transformer PSU burned out the compact bridge rectifier again dispite the forced cooling of the fan while testing a small schematic, 25A should be fair enough, but 250A is better chances to survive accidental shortcuts. Although it is similar or same as the one in that link._

?2-25 - is a diode 25A, digit that follows it mean voltage class. for example ?2-25-4 means 25A, 400V. Letter '?' means D in Cyrillic for diode. I was 10 years old 30 years ago - they were already history back then ;D

Model: ?2-25-4
Type: power, rectifier
Max reverse voltage(V):400
Max forward current(?): 25
Anode:
Cathode: body
Thread: ?12
Max temp: 130°C
(Voltage drop?) Vfm ?1.8V
Max reverse current Irm ?18mA
?30mm

Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Alexei.Polkhanov on August 23, 2013, 12:52:37 am
I found this component on power supply board of some sort. Have no idea what it can be - large flat, yellow square with few markings on it.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: oPossum on August 23, 2013, 01:00:38 am
Looks like a PPTC fuse

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Resettable_fuse (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Resettable_fuse)
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: SeanB on August 24, 2013, 02:19:17 pm
2400mA one if I remember correctly the ratings table. Will not trip at that current until it is at 100C, and then will have to have to cool. Max ratings typically are 30V for breaking. They will not trip if the current is under 2x the rated, and if the voltage is under 5V then they are not likely to trip at all unless there is a dead short.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Alexei.Polkhanov on August 24, 2013, 07:11:56 pm
2400mA one if I remember correctly the ratings table. Will not trip at that current until it is at 100C, and then will have to have to cool. Max ratings typically are 30V for breaking. They will not trip if the current is under 2x the rated, and if the voltage is under 5V then they are not likely to trip at all unless there is a dead short.
Thanks, it make sense. I tried to connect it in series with 8 ohm power resistor and then applied 30V - nothing happened, resistor got very hot and that is it. I don't think I have power supply that can trip it . I touched it with the tip of soldering iron and I think it worked as expected.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: SeanB on August 24, 2013, 08:36:51 pm
Often the rating used is more a requirement of the on resistance of the device than the circuit current. the internal resistance can vary with temperature below trip, and can get quite high even at current below trip. As well they have a limited number of trip cycles before they fail, either by cracking and going open or worse by quietly going short circuit.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: TerraHertz on August 26, 2013, 01:23:21 pm
These are telephone line transient suppressors, formed (I think) by a short spark gap sealed inside.
But I can't find the manufacturer or the data for them.

I have a box full of them, and want to use some on cables connecting two buildings together. But it would be nice to know the breakdown voltage. The only HV power supply I have handy only goes to 350V, and these don't breakdown at that.

Can anyone point me to a data sheet for these?

The numbers are "35087" and "10A"
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: SeanB on August 26, 2013, 07:39:39 pm
Those are gas discharge tubes, generally Siemens and littlefuse made those for phone systems.

http://www.littelfuse.com/products/gas-discharge-tubes.aspx (http://www.littelfuse.com/products/gas-discharge-tubes.aspx)



Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: TriNitroTolueen on September 03, 2013, 02:14:55 pm
Hi guys,

My computers' power supply released some of his magic blue smoke today. I found the blown component but I can't read the part number because a piece of it is missing. It was mounted to a huge heat sink so it might be some kind of voltage regulator...

Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: madires on September 03, 2013, 02:27:22 pm
My computers' power supply released some of his magic blue smoke today. I found the blown component but I can't read the part number because a piece of it is missing. It was mounted to a huge heat sink so it might be some kind of voltage regulator...

I'd guess it's some transistor 2SCxx27 (TO126 package, 1A perhaps).
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: TriNitroTolueen on September 03, 2013, 03:13:28 pm
My computers' power supply released some of his magic blue smoke today. I found the blown component but I can't read the part number because a piece of it is missing. It was mounted to a huge heat sink so it might be some kind of voltage regulator...

I'd guess it's some transistor 2SCxx27 (TO126 package, 1A perhaps).

Yeah that could be possible, its a switching power supply and this component is pretty close to the mains rectifier diodes.

Thanks!

Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: firehopper on September 04, 2013, 12:25:34 pm
help ident this strange chip I found some where no clue where anymore.


Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: orbiter on September 04, 2013, 12:38:18 pm
Looks like an optocoupler
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: PA0PBZ on September 04, 2013, 12:51:37 pm
Looks like an optocoupler

The Bay agrees: http://www.ebay.com/itm/SD3494-Opto-8-Pin-CLEAR-DIP-PACKAGE-COLLECTIBLE-RARE-NOS-/370568309481 (http://www.ebay.com/itm/SD3494-Opto-8-Pin-CLEAR-DIP-PACKAGE-COLLECTIBLE-RARE-NOS-/370568309481)
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: firehopper on September 04, 2013, 12:57:18 pm
Looks like an optocoupler
if it is its only 1/2 of one, those are 4 photo sensors of sometype.. output .5 volt each in direct sunlight. and theres 4 sensors..
its some sort of sensor device. but not a optocoupler.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: c4757p on September 04, 2013, 12:58:42 pm
Looks like an optocoupler

The Bay agrees: http://www.ebay.com/itm/SD3494-Opto-8-Pin-CLEAR-DIP-PACKAGE-COLLECTIBLE-RARE-NOS-/370568309481 (http://www.ebay.com/itm/SD3494-Opto-8-Pin-CLEAR-DIP-PACKAGE-COLLECTIBLE-RARE-NOS-/370568309481)

Quote
RARE- VERY COLLECTIBLE

 :-DD
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: SeanB on September 04, 2013, 06:19:57 pm
Linear optosensor. Used to either detect position of a light source or of a flag to make a very precise switch. A large version of the line scanner used in a multifunction machine, digital copier or fax machine.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Alexei.Polkhanov on September 04, 2013, 09:34:44 pm
Looks like an optocoupler
if it is its only 1/2 of one, those are 4 photo sensors of sometype.. output .5 volt each in direct sunlight. and theres 4 sensors..
its some sort of sensor device. but not a optocoupler.
Haha, yes very funny Ebay listing - "Opto" - opto-what? sensor? Isolator?  Looks to me like some sort of sensor hence the transparent body. Yes it could be some sort of linear opto-sensor but with only 4 segments ... hmmmm strange.

Color sensor?
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: MatCat on September 05, 2013, 05:23:30 am
I am thinking it's a regulator, part that says GGRTW which I can't find on google.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: adnewhouse on September 06, 2013, 02:41:58 am
Anyone know what this is? I took a picture of the die because it had a window. The only markings were "c51a". My guess is a laser somthing.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: ElectroIrradiator on September 14, 2013, 12:32:41 pm
Does anybody have a datasheet - or know an equivalent - for an Intersil ITS80008, please?

It is a DIP40 and almost certainly some form of digital volt/multimeter, complete with 4x 7 segment LED drivers. I have come across one in a nice, little panel meter from the late seventies, and wouldn't mind knowing how not to blow out the inputs. The meter is (probably) a type 713 from IMC, Tucson, AZ, US of A.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: amyk on September 14, 2013, 01:54:48 pm
Quote from: adnewhouse
Anyone know what this is? I took a picture of the die because it had a window. The only markings were "c51a". My guess is a laser somthing.
Where did it come out of?

Does anybody have a datasheet - or know an equivalent - for an Intersil ITS80008, please?

It is a DIP40 and almost certainly some form of digital volt/multimeter, complete with 4x 7 segment LED drivers. I have come across one in a nice, little panel meter from the late seventies, and wouldn't mind knowing how not to blow out the inputs. The meter is (probably) a type 713 from IMC, Tucson, AZ, US of A.
RE the schematic and see, does it look anything like the ICL7106? http://www.intersil.com/content/dam/Intersil/documents/fn30/fn3082.jpg (http://www.intersil.com/content/dam/Intersil/documents/fn30/fn3082.jpg)
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: ElectroIrradiator on September 14, 2013, 02:22:01 pm
RE the schematic and see, does it look anything like the ICL7106? http://www.intersil.com/content/dam/Intersil/documents/fn30/fn3082.jpg (http://www.intersil.com/content/dam/Intersil/documents/fn30/fn3082.jpg)
Unfortunately the chip doesn't appear to be an exact equivalent of the ICL7106. First, the pinout of the ITS80008 is nearly - yet not quite - a mirror reverse(!) of the ICL7106. Yet there are maddening differences, like the '08 taking +5V power on pin 40, and ground on pin 20, while the '7106 runs on +9V between pin 1 and 26.

The ICL7106 may be a good starting point for a full RE though. Thanks for the heads-up. :)

The meter is an IMC type 513A, by the way. Previous number provided is not correct.

Edit: The chip may be an ICL7107R, which is the LED driver equivalent of the '06 (intended for driving LCDs). They have different pinouts, and the '07R runs on +5V on the pins mentioned. :D
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: JeanF on September 15, 2013, 10:32:33 am
Hello there,

Does anyone know what sort of pressure sensor this is ? It comes from a digital barometer sold for sailing. The instrument itself is sold at a high price but the construction quality is incredibly poor : not waterproof, paper pcb, single sided board, loose wires, a single miniature incandescent bulb for lcd backlight...

On the board there was only a single, custom barometer chip which is of no interest, and this. I guess this must be the pressure sensor. There is a hole in the PCB just underneath, as you can see from the back.

The manufacturer/seller of the instrument ("Vion") did not even develop the product, as we can see the PCB is labeled "alpes deis" which seems to be a very small French electronics development company. I won't even try to contact them, they won't answer at all since they know I represent zero profit for them  ^-^

(http://jfsimon.net/images/forums/unknownpressuresensor/th_front.jpg) (http://jfsimon.net/images/forums/unknownpressuresensor/front.jpg)
(http://jfsimon.net/images/forums/unknownpressuresensor/th_back.jpg) (http://jfsimon.net/images/forums/unknownpressuresensor/back.jpg)

thanks !  8)
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: fluxcapacitor on September 16, 2013, 02:54:38 am
here you go .

http://www.industrysearch.com.au/Pressure-Sensor-MS5534C-Barometer-Module/p/84960 (http://www.industrysearch.com.au/Pressure-Sensor-MS5534C-Barometer-Module/p/84960)

http://www.amsys.info/products/ms5534.htm (http://www.amsys.info/products/ms5534.htm)

http://www.datasheetdir.com/MS5534A+Pressure-Sensors (http://www.datasheetdir.com/MS5534A+Pressure-Sensors)

Pressure Sensor | MS5534C Barometer Module

EDIT: Yours is a MS5534A .
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: JeanF on September 16, 2013, 08:04:34 am
Awesome ! Thank you very much !  :-+ :-+

It looks like an interesting device, with some nice features, at first glance  ^-^
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: fluxcapacitor on September 16, 2013, 10:12:47 pm
I am thinking it's a regulator, part that says GGRTW which I can't find on google.

What is the pcb from ? + model name/number on pcb etc .
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Alexei.Polkhanov on September 16, 2013, 11:49:49 pm
Wow, lovely sensors they have - MS5805 includes 24 DAC with 15 cm altitude resolution. :-)
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: mikec on September 22, 2013, 09:59:01 pm
Ok so this component is a capacitor I am pretty sure of that, however I have no idea what type of capacitor. Doesn't look like any electrolytic or ceramic capacitor I have ever seen.

Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: fluxcapacitor on September 22, 2013, 11:43:41 pm
Ok so this component is a capacitor I am pretty sure of that, however I have no idea what type of capacitor. Doesn't look like any electrolytic or ceramic capacitor I have ever seen.

what is the pcb from ? make/model might help if theres a schematic.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Rufus on September 23, 2013, 01:07:42 am
Ok so this component is a capacitor I am pretty sure of that,

It is a polyester film capacitor mostly (if not exclusively) made by EPCOS.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Alexei.Polkhanov on September 23, 2013, 03:25:55 am
Yes very much like it. I wonder who painted the sides with blue paint?
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: fluxcapacitor on September 23, 2013, 08:33:46 am
Theres some datasheets here:

http://www.epcos.com/web/generator/Web/Sections/ProductCatalog/Capacitors/FilmCapacitors/MetallizedPolyester/Page,locale=en.html (http://www.epcos.com/web/generator/Web/Sections/ProductCatalog/Capacitors/FilmCapacitors/MetallizedPolyester/Page,locale=en.html)

The caps are ,radial Boxed,radial uncoated ,radial coated etc and a note in one the datasheets about mounting -

Notes on mounting
When mounting these capacitors, take into account creepage distances and clearances to
adjacent live parts. The insulating strength of the cut surfaces to other live parts of the circuit is
1.5 times the capacitors rated DC voltage, but is always at least 300 V DC.

That could be why theyve been "painted"  ?
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: SeanB on September 23, 2013, 06:12:17 pm
The painting is just the "extra protected" version. Those generally are nice capacitors, and are made on a large wheel and then cut to size before final lead attachment.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: chicken on September 25, 2013, 03:59:58 pm
What are the components in the metallic packages? I never noticed them before.

The packages look like oscillators. But the components are used in power supply related context (big inductors and caps), which I think eliminates that possibility. What else? Fancy caps? Tiny transformers?

Source: 27" iMac teardown on iFixit
http://www.ifixit.com/Teardown/iMac+Intel+27-Inch+EMC+2639+Teardown/17828/1 (http://www.ifixit.com/Teardown/iMac+Intel+27-Inch+EMC+2639+Teardown/17828/1)
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: chicken on September 25, 2013, 06:48:31 pm
Ok, I think I figured it out: International Rectifier DirectFET MOSFETs
http://www.irf.com/product-info/directfet/ (http://www.irf.com/product-info/directfet/)
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: N TYPE on September 27, 2013, 02:20:39 pm
Hi can anybody tell me what these parts are soldered to the legs of this to92?
Have no idea what they might be called
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Codemonkey on September 27, 2013, 02:27:25 pm
Hi can anybody tell me what these parts are soldered to the legs of this to92?
Have no idea what they might be called

They look like PCB Turrets to me
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: notsob on September 27, 2013, 11:40:34 pm
Test points, there are a quite a few to choose from, here are some examples

http://www.toby.co.uk/content/catalogue/series.aspx?id=6&Category=154 (http://www.toby.co.uk/content/catalogue/series.aspx?id=6&Category=154)

http://www.toby.co.uk/content/catalogue/series.aspx?id=6&Category=31 (http://www.toby.co.uk/content/catalogue/series.aspx?id=6&Category=31)
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: IZ3IJG on October 07, 2013, 11:18:51 am
Guess what is this
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: c4757p on October 07, 2013, 11:23:49 am
S504T dual-gate "MOS Monolithic Integrated Circuit" (http://pdf.datasheetcatalog.com/datasheet/vishay/85043.pdf)
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: JoeO on October 07, 2013, 12:07:14 pm
S504T dual-gate "MOS Monolithic Integrated Circuit" (http://pdf.datasheetcatalog.com/datasheet/vishay/85043.pdf)
A TV Tuner?  Wow!
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: IZ3IJG on October 07, 2013, 12:42:53 pm
S504T dual-gate "MOS Monolithic Integrated Circuit" (http://pdf.datasheetcatalog.com/datasheet/vishay/85043.pdf)
A TV Tuner?  Wow!
Actually a wide-band low-noise amplifier, core component for this project:
http://lna4all.blogspot.it/2013/04/lna-for-all-low-noise-amplifier-for.html (http://lna4all.blogspot.it/2013/04/lna-for-all-low-noise-amplifier-for.html#comment-form)
Title: Re: What's this please?
Post by: PA0PBZ on October 09, 2013, 06:41:20 pm
Oh! Oh! May I?

The hand drawn part is the rough copy of the silk screen that was under the component. Basically a zigzag in a rectangle. Probably some power component, but I have never seen the symbol, so no idea.

EDIT: added a picture with a ruler. It's about 10mm wide.


What happened to your photos?

My guess: after 2.5 years most bits are recycled and used somewhere else on the 'net?
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Fryguy on October 17, 2013, 09:29:36 am
Hi can anybody tell me what these parts are soldered to the legs of this to92?
Have no idea what they might be called

To me it looks like they are crimped to the to92's legs so i'd say they are contacts for a twist socket like the ones on a fluorescent lamp starter .

I guess the to92 part is a temperature sensor .
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Isaac on October 30, 2013, 11:21:33 pm
Hi,

It's a inductorless SR IC. Its powered from the mains (110/240 V ac). Ok, I know what it is, but i can not identify the part number on the IC. I wonder if someone can identify the IC based on the traces on the pcb. I don't have a better picture of it. It's from the "Moteino"  website.

Thanks.
 
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: fluxcapacitor on October 31, 2013, 12:45:19 am
the picture isnt clear enough.

http://lowpowerlab.com/contact/ (http://lowpowerlab.com/contact/)
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Isaac on October 31, 2013, 02:05:27 pm
According to the guy, it's a Supertex SR-086 Inductorless Switching Regulator.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: edwardcurrentclamps on November 02, 2013, 03:26:42 am
Hi!

Can someone confirm whether this is a quad positioning sensor or something else?

Appreciate all input!

Thanks
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: SeanB on November 02, 2013, 05:38:13 pm
Uncased 4 quadrant large area photodiode definitely.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: edwardcurrentclamps on November 03, 2013, 12:16:14 am
Thanks,

any idea where I get something like that? I also wondered, how are you so sure. In what kind of application have you seen something like that before?

Thanks
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: SeanB on November 03, 2013, 05:53:40 am
Large area silicon chip with bond wires. Applications are sensing in things like industrial equipment to detect alignment, or other applications which were use once.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Phaedrus on November 13, 2013, 12:12:42 am
What connector is this? Some type of coax...

http://th03.deviantart.net/fs70/PRE/i/2013/316/a/4/connector_by_phaedrus2401-d6u1cyp.jpg (http://th03.deviantart.net/fs70/PRE/i/2013/316/a/4/connector_by_phaedrus2401-d6u1cyp.jpg)

I need a 100Mhz 10x scope probe with that connector, and BNC on the other end. Don't know what to call it to search for it.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: fluxcapacitor on November 13, 2013, 12:32:42 am
It looks like an RP-SMA connector .As used in wifi .
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: firehopper on November 13, 2013, 01:12:17 am
Thanks,

any idea where I get something like that? I also wondered, how are you so sure. In what kind of application have you seen something like that before?

Thanks
I think smaller versions of that are used in cd/dvd/blueray players.. not 100% on that though
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: fluxcapacitor on November 13, 2013, 04:34:30 am
What connector is this? Some type of coax...

http://th03.deviantart.net/fs70/PRE/i/2013/316/a/4/connector_by_phaedrus2401-d6u1cyp.jpg (http://th03.deviantart.net/fs70/PRE/i/2013/316/a/4/connector_by_phaedrus2401-d6u1cyp.jpg)

It's just a standard male SMA connector, RP-SMA swaps the pin to the other side of the connection.

Yes it is.My bad  :palm:  :=\
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: AndersAnd on November 13, 2013, 04:52:10 pm
Anyone know what the FET labelled E401 is (second schematic). It's in the peak detector circuit and it looks like the drain and source are shorted together.
Is it maybe used as a variable resistance device? Anyone know a substitute or part number?

BTW This is a very nice voltmeter with plenty of rectification options and bandpass filter selections. Perfect for audio work really (or anything to 500 KHz).

(http://www.chinaicmart.com/uploadfile/ic-circuit/200962422510387.gif)

(http://www.chinaicmart.com/uploadfile/ic-circuit/20096242260761.gif)

Though it's built with standard components, this ac voltmeter contains many features not typi-cally found in commercial meters; the most unusual is a selection of rectification modes. The meter responses available include true RMS ('fRMS), average, RMS-calibrated average responding, positive peak, negative peak, positive-peak hold, and negative-peak hold.

 High- and low-pass filters (S1 and S6, respectively) allow the -3-dB-passband to be varied from as little as 10 Hz to 200 Hz, to as wide as dc to 500 kHz. The low-pass filter also is effective in the 100x amplifier mode, where the input equivalent noise level is only 0.3 pV, with 10-kHz roll-off.

(NOT WRITTEN BY ME)
Looks like a standard N-channel JFET being used as a diode for clip detection. If you tie the drain and source together the JFET also works similar to a diode, except you have one P-region and two N-regions.

What I find interesting is that the part number is not called out while every other part on both schematics is clearly labeled as to what the specific part number is or at least the value. Instead, for that part they apparently used the PCB part identifier label. That seems rather odd and possible a clue as well.
I have never seen a JFET used like that before. I wonder if they are using it as a Schottky diode.
Anyone know what the FET labelled E401 is (second schematic).

Well I guess it is an E401. Maybe at the time it was a good choice for use as a low leakage diode, maybe it or a similar JFET still is.

I found LS841 listed as an equivalent. Searching will turn up a datasheet for that, strangely it is a dual n-channel JFET.

If you are trying to re-create this circuit you just need a low leakage diode or JFET used as one. The LS841 gate leakage is specified at 50pA max, 25C and 20v so that's a target to match.
I just came across this new topic today: What does this JFET circuit do?
www.eevblog.com/forum/projects/what-does-this-jfet-circuit-do/ (https://www.eevblog.com/forum/projects/what-does-this-jfet-circuit-do/)

JFETs were used in the same Source-Drain short circuited configuration in HP 3456A 6½ Digit Digital Multimeter as input protection diodes connected to Vcc and Vee as you can see in the service manual posted in that topic.

This Burr-Brown (now TI) application note mentioned in that topic explains why and how to use JFETs as diodes:
DIODE-CONNECTED FET PROTECTS OP AMPS www.ti.com/lit/SBOA058 (http://www.ti.com/lit/SBOA058)

Basically it's because JFETs have much lower leakage current than PN-junction devices like diodes and BJTs normally has, like Rufus mentioned.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: NickPrince on November 18, 2013, 04:59:47 pm
Hey all!

I'm helping a local non-profit build up a few arcade cabinets they had donated to them in various states of working. I already fixed up their copy of NFL Blitz 99 (Go Bears!), and the kids requested I get going on Tekken 2, and I don't blame them.

I've got the cabinet in my shop, and I've gotten it fixed up through the ROM board (get a masculine "GOOOOD MORNING!" every time I plug it in now), but the CRT works very intermittently. Checked the internals, and, thankfully, the anode discharge resistor is still working, and everything looks pretty good up until that, but then I noticed a component near the power-supply that didn't look right:

(http://i.imgur.com/mBktRf1l.jpg) (http://imgur.com/mBktRf1)

I'm betting that's why the CRT only comes on intermittently. There may be more, but I have no idea where to go once this thing gets ID'd and replaced. I've got good tools, though, and have faith in myself, but what the hell is this?

(http://i.imgur.com/L14cepWl.jpg) (http://imgur.com/L14cepW)

(http://i.imgur.com/cSZxBHnl.jpg) (http://imgur.com/cSZxBHn)

Thanks in advance! Will keep the thread up-to-date with results.

Also, this has been a pretty fun project so far, and I'd like to build up the habit of documenting my work to share, any resources for starting a new thread?
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: madires on November 18, 2013, 05:08:49 pm
Please measure the resistance between both "0V" taps. It might be an autotransformer (one winding, no isolation).
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: NickPrince on November 18, 2013, 05:20:21 pm
Oof! It's out of range for my Fluke 179, so beyond 50 M? - Is that indicating that there isn't a short?
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: AndersAnd on November 18, 2013, 05:37:22 pm
Oof! It's out of range for my Fluke 179, so beyond 50 M? - Is that indicating that there isn't a short?
It's probably a 1:1; 115 V; 1 A isolation transformer.
On the multiple voltages side only the 0 V an 115 V terminals has been soldered, same voltages as on the other side, so it has been used in 1:1 mode.

What ac voltage do you measure on the between 0 V an 115 V terminals the output side when you put 120 Vac mains voltage on the 0 V an 115 V input terminals?


Doesn't look like anything is wrong with this to me.
And with an intermittent fault, I really doubt this isolation transformer is what causes the fault.

But if the transformer is broken you should be able to replace it with any standard 115 V or 120 V 1:1 isolation transformer with a 115 VA (115 V * 1 A) or higher rating.
Like these two 130 VA and 135 VA examples from Mouser:

http://www2.mouser.com/ProductDetail/Triad-Magnetics/VPS230-570/?qs=%2fha2pyFaduhOD0jibV2nm8lnZ4UdaxDociGravMI74YJ9J53fBGaVA%3d%3d (http://www2.mouser.com/ProductDetail/Triad-Magnetics/VPS230-570/?qs=%2fha2pyFaduhOD0jibV2nm8lnZ4UdaxDociGravMI74YJ9J53fBGaVA%3d%3d)

http://www2.mouser.com/ProductDetail/Hammond/169TS/?qs=%2fha2pyFadug3UFJw%252bR6Egr5Hadcx0iEbk%252be6%252bvco6Ok%3d (http://www2.mouser.com/ProductDetail/Hammond/169TS/?qs=%2fha2pyFadug3UFJw%252bR6Egr5Hadcx0iEbk%252be6%252bvco6Ok%3d)
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Rory on November 18, 2013, 05:44:33 pm
This wouldn't happen to be from a Williams pinball machine or other arcade game would it?
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: AndersAnd on November 18, 2013, 05:46:33 pm
This wouldn't happen to be from a Williams pinball machine would it?
No, he wrote Tekken 2.

http://www.arcade-museum.com/game_detail.php?game_id=10060 (http://www.arcade-museum.com/game_detail.php?game_id=10060)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fizRCdZaw8I# (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fizRCdZaw8I#)
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Rory on November 18, 2013, 05:51:38 pm
Google search 3P87 transformer takes to http://www.arcade-museum.com/manuals-videogames/P/Playchoice-Ctop.pdf (http://www.arcade-museum.com/manuals-videogames/P/Playchoice-Ctop.pdf) in parts list. Schematic shows 'isolation transformer'.

Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: NickPrince on November 18, 2013, 06:08:11 pm
Oof! It's out of range for my Fluke 179, so beyond 50 M? - Is that indicating that there isn't a short?
What ac voltage do you measure on the between 0 V an 115 V terminals the output side when you put 120 Vac mains voltage on the 0 V an 115 V input terminals?

I'm getting the full 120VAC, which would make sense if it's working. I guess I'm gonna back-trace through the rest to make sure the full voltage is coming through (only had 65V through the two original leads). So what is this unit doing? Cleaning/stabilizing the AC?

Google search 3P87 transformer takes to http://www.arcade-museum.com/manuals-videogames/P/Playchoice-Ctop.pdf (http://www.arcade-museum.com/manuals-videogames/P/Playchoice-Ctop.pdf) in parts list. Schematic shows 'isolation transformer'.

Thank you!

Oof! It's out of range for my Fluke 179, so beyond 50 M? - Is that indicating that there isn't a short?
It's probably a 1:1; 115 V; 1 A isolation transformer.
On the multiple voltages side only the 0 V an 115 V terminals has been soldered, same voltages as on the other side, so it has been used in 1:1 mode.

If the transformer is broken you should be able to replace it with any standard 115 V or 120 V 1:1 isolation transformer with a 115 VA (115 V * 1 A) or higher rating.
Like these two 130 VA and 135 VA examples from Mouser:

http://www2.mouser.com/ProductDetail/Triad-Magnetics/VPS230-570/?qs=%2fha2pyFaduhOD0jibV2nm8lnZ4UdaxDociGravMI74YJ9J53fBGaVA%3d%3d (http://www2.mouser.com/ProductDetail/Triad-Magnetics/VPS230-570/?qs=%2fha2pyFaduhOD0jibV2nm8lnZ4UdaxDociGravMI74YJ9J53fBGaVA%3d%3d)

http://www2.mouser.com/ProductDetail/Hammond/169TS/?qs=%2fha2pyFadug3UFJw%252bR6Egr5Hadcx0iEbk%252be6%252bvco6Ok%3d (http://www2.mouser.com/ProductDetail/Hammond/169TS/?qs=%2fha2pyFadug3UFJw%252bR6Egr5Hadcx0iEbk%252be6%252bvco6Ok%3d)

If it's outputting the full 120VAC, I'm trusting it's not the headache.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: AndersAnd on November 18, 2013, 06:30:44 pm
So what is this unit doing? Cleaning/stabilizing the AC?
An galvanic isolation transformer isolates the electronics from the mains supply for safety reasons. Read more here: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Isolation_transformer


Repairing and working on electronic devices connected to mains voltages should always be done behind an external isolation transformer anyways, also for safety reasons in case you touch a live wire.


Intermitten faults in vintage electronics is often caused by soldering joints that has gone bad or dried out electrolytic capacitors.

Have you tried tapping components  and PBCs with the handle of a screwdriver or use diagnostic freeze spray and a blow dryer to provoke the intermittent fault?
These are the most common tools for locating intermittent faults in electronics.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: nadona on November 22, 2013, 05:14:47 am
I couldn't find these connectors. Are they same type?
GenRad Capacitor standard http://goo.gl/A55QCM (http://goo.gl/A55QCM)
Fluke A55 Thermal Converter http://goo.gl/8Ou6tg (http://goo.gl/8Ou6tg)

Thanks
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: G7PSK on November 22, 2013, 08:38:26 am
The first link shows some form of shielde 2 pin connector and the second link to the gen rad cap shows what looks like a female Belling-Lee connector.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: vk6zgo on November 23, 2013, 01:24:38 am
The Genrad one is a General Radio connector-----they're even older than Belling Lee  connectors!

Very good,but quite large. ;D

I have seen the 2 pin one around somewhere---probably on a Fluke accessory!
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: nadona on November 23, 2013, 07:02:04 am
The seller of thishttp://bit.ly/1fusf3k (http://bit.ly/1fusf3k) think it is a sure GenRad 874 connector.

Still looking for information on how to connect a Fluke A55 to a DMM or RT.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: cravenhaven on November 23, 2013, 09:44:20 am
I'm attempting to fix my mums Toshiba laptop that only switches on intermittently (like 1 in 20 attempts) and the battery doesnt charge.
I have come across a bit of an anomaly with a couple of devices that are involved with the battery charger cct that look like 3 terminal regulators but have odd voltages if that is what they are. One has 19v on the case and RH pin and 0 on the LH pin, and the other has 12.6V on the case and 19V on the 2 pins?.

The parts are marked as Fairchild 1J20CB, but I cant find any reference to them anywhere.

Any help?
Allan
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: AndersAnd on November 23, 2013, 10:03:28 am
The parts are marked as Fairchild 1J20CB, but I cant find any reference to them anywhere.
You're looking at the wrong part of the text.
It says:
1J20CB
FDD
6685


So it's a Fairchild FDD6685 30V P-Channel PowerTrench MOSFET: http://www.fairchildsemi.com/pf/FD/FDD6685.html (http://www.fairchildsemi.com/pf/FD/FDD6685.html)
Quote
**Package Marking Convention

Line 1:$Y (Fairchild logo)
&Z (Plant Code)
&3 (3-Digit Date Code)
&K
Line 2:FDD
Line 3:6685
Fairchild Packaging - Top Mark Search for FDD6685: http://www.fairchildsemi.com/topmark/#search/FDD6685 (http://www.fairchildsemi.com/topmark/#search/FDD6685)

Here's a better picture of one: http://www.ebay.com/itm/360492328840 (http://www.ebay.com/itm/360492328840)
(http://i.ebayimg.com/t/1x-Fairchild-FDD6685-30V-P-Channel-PowerTrench-MOSFET-/00/s/NzIwWDcwNA==/z/XW8AAMXQ4YtSL5IP/$(KGrHqJ,!oIFIqib,-n3BSL5IPD5z!~~60_3.JPG)

It's probably part of a switched mode power supply, so you can't just count on measured DC voltages but need to measure the signals with an oscilloscope.

But I'm not sure if the one next to it that looks burned it is the same part number. It could also be a complimentary N-channel MOSFET instead. Can't see what the part number says on that one. The best way to find out is to trace the MOSFET gates back to the SMPS-driver IC and check the datasheet for that IC.


Looks like one had a similar problem with a Toshiba laptop here (text in Polish): http://www.elektroda.pl/rtvforum/topic2192501.html (http://www.elektroda.pl/rtvforum/topic2192501.html)

(http://obrazki.elektroda.pl/6853959800_1326736956.jpg)

(http://obrazki.elektroda.pl/3896964000_1326736993.jpg)


And another one: http://www.elektroda.pl/rtvforum/topic1415016.html (http://www.elektroda.pl/rtvforum/topic1415016.html)
(http://img27.imageshack.us/img27/6147/20214486.png)

And another Toshiba laptop power supply repair with schematic.
Check the Toshiba laptop switched mode power supply schematic here: http://www.elvikom.pl/forum/viewtopic.php?lang=en&f=209&t=10789 (http://www.elvikom.pl/forum/viewtopic.php?lang=en&f=209&t=10789)
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: cravenhaven on November 24, 2013, 08:44:06 am
Wow thanks AnderAnd.
I thought I had already tried looking for the bottom number with no results and the top number at least gave me a vague possibility. Anyway shows my lack of experience.
Thanks very much for the links, I have translated some of them and they will be quite useful once I get to understand it a bit more.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: TheBay on December 13, 2013, 08:05:16 pm
Check for dry joints on LOPT (Flyback transformer) also could be a faulty LOPT, dry joints on main output transistor, chopper transistor, do you get retrace lines at all or any field collapse? Any faint raster on screen when it goes off?

What monitor is it, hantarex, wells gardner, electrohome?

It's not that transformer, as stated it's that's a isolation transformer. I bet it's dry joints or LOPT.


Oof! It's out of range for my Fluke 179, so beyond 50 M? - Is that indicating that there isn't a short?
It's probably a 1:1; 115 V; 1 A isolation transformer.
On the multiple voltages side only the 0 V an 115 V terminals has been soldered, same voltages as on the other side, so it has been used in 1:1 mode.

What ac voltage do you measure on the between 0 V an 115 V terminals the output side when you put 120 Vac mains voltage on the 0 V an 115 V input terminals?


Doesn't look like anything is wrong with this to me.
And with an intermittent fault, I really doubt this isolation transformer is what causes the fault.

But if the transformer is broken you should be able to replace it with any standard 115 V or 120 V 1:1 isolation transformer with a 115 VA (115 V * 1 A) or higher rating.
Like these two 130 VA and 135 VA examples from Mouser:

http://www2.mouser.com/ProductDetail/Triad-Magnetics/VPS230-570/?qs=%2fha2pyFaduhOD0jibV2nm8lnZ4UdaxDociGravMI74YJ9J53fBGaVA%3d%3d (http://www2.mouser.com/ProductDetail/Triad-Magnetics/VPS230-570/?qs=%2fha2pyFaduhOD0jibV2nm8lnZ4UdaxDociGravMI74YJ9J53fBGaVA%3d%3d)

http://www2.mouser.com/ProductDetail/Hammond/169TS/?qs=%2fha2pyFadug3UFJw%252bR6Egr5Hadcx0iEbk%252be6%252bvco6Ok%3d (http://www2.mouser.com/ProductDetail/Hammond/169TS/?qs=%2fha2pyFadug3UFJw%252bR6Egr5Hadcx0iEbk%252be6%252bvco6Ok%3d)
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: TheBay on December 16, 2013, 09:37:52 pm
SMD Diode identification, EPP 47 is all that's marked, Becker Indianapolis BE7920

Picture attached, was taken with mobile phone, do not have a digital camera handy.

https://www.dropbox.com/sc/krzm94a01vecd4o/qermgHRZSY (https://www.dropbox.com/sc/krzm94a01vecd4o/qermgHRZSY)
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: PedroDaGr8 on December 18, 2013, 05:43:44 am
Ok I need help with this one. I got a Fluke 83 series I in auction that won't turn on. I had almost given up having checked all the usual stuff like fuses etc which are all fine. Until tonight I was bored checking random part values and noticed there was only 68ohms resistance between the positive and negative battery terminals. Hmm I wonder why it wouldn't start. After removing several items that tested bad in circuit, but were fine out of circuit, I came across this. It's clearly bad (roughly 50 ohms across every terminal), I am guessing that it is a bjt of some sort but my googlefoo is failing me. I apologize if it's easy but my laptop is off for warranty repairs so I'm limited to phone searches. The item doesn't have a designator number on the silk screen but it was located top right beneath the LCD.(http://img.tapatalk.com/d/13/12/18/paruhy3e.jpg)

Thanks guys and gals for your help. Hopefully I can save another device from the trash can.

Sent from my EVO using Tapatalk

Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Andy Watson on December 18, 2013, 09:25:25 am
Ok I need help with this one. I got a Fluke 83 series I
Is this any help? It gives a "simplified power supply schematic".
http://assets.fluke.com/manuals/83_85_87smeng0500.pdf (http://assets.fluke.com/manuals/83_85_87smeng0500.pdf)
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: orbiter on December 18, 2013, 01:17:15 pm
Ok I need help with this one. I got a Fluke 83 series I in auction that won't turn on. I had almost given up having checked all the usual stuff like fuses etc which are all fine. Until tonight I was bored checking random part values and noticed there was only 68ohms resistance between the positive and negative battery terminals. Hmm I wonder why it wouldn't start. After removing several items that tested bad in circuit, but were fine out of circuit, I came across this. It's clearly bad (roughly 50 ohms across every terminal), I am guessing that it is a bjt of some sort but my googlefoo is failing me. I apologize if it's easy but my laptop is off for warranty repairs so I'm limited to phone searches. The item doesn't have a designator number on the silk screen but it was located top right beneath the LCD.(http://img.tapatalk.com/d/13/12/18/paruhy3e.jpg)

Thanks guys and gals for your help. Hopefully I can save another device from the trash can.

Sent from my EVO using Tapatalk



Not had time to look through the 80 series schematic but the 702 device is indicating on the following site as an N-CH Mosfet

http://www.marsport.org.uk/smd/mainframe.htm (http://www.marsport.org.uk/smd/mainframe.htm)
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: AndersAnd on December 18, 2013, 02:14:19 pm
my googlefoo is failing me.
You need to improve your lacking googlefoo a lot then, because 702 is a very easy marking to find using google.  :-DMM
Simply google 702 SMD marking or include the housing type SOT23 and google 702 SOT23 marking, or simply just 702 marking.
Then you will get plenty of hits for 2N7002, which is probably the most common of all SMD MOSFETs. Very cheap and easy to find, so you're lucky if this is the only thing broken. It's also a device that's easy to damage.
Be careful when replacing it. MOSFETs are very easy to damage by static electricity. And it can just get partly damaged so you might not be able to tell it's damaged right away.

But other than goggling marking codes, the other place to start out looking for SMD codes is simply looking in a SMD codebook like the one mentioned in the post above. There's a number of different ones to check, for example:

http://www.systek.ru/marking.php (http://www.systek.ru/marking.php)
http://www.marsport.org.uk/smd/mainframe.htm (http://www.marsport.org.uk/smd/mainframe.htm)
http://www.s-manuals.com/smd (http://www.s-manuals.com/smd)
http://www.angelfire.com/electronic2/rch/smt.html (http://www.angelfire.com/electronic2/rch/smt.html)
http://elektronikjk.republika.pl/s1.html (http://elektronikjk.republika.pl/s1.html)

PDF SMD codebooks:
http://www.electroschematics.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/04/SMD-code-book.pdf (http://www.electroschematics.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/04/SMD-code-book.pdf)
http://www.siongboon.com/projects/2013-09-22_reverse_engineering/doc/SMD-2012-sample.pdf (http://www.siongboon.com/projects/2013-09-22_reverse_engineering/doc/SMD-2012-sample.pdf)
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: PedroDaGr8 on December 18, 2013, 03:53:01 pm
Ok I feel retarded now. I saw the links last night to 2n7002. For some stupid reason my brain though 2nXXXX is to92 must be a Google error from using the words 702 and mosfet.  I blame the bourbon :D Thanks a bunch guys I've bookmaked those sites for future reference. I didn't know they existed.

Sent from my EVO using Tapatalk

Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: AndersAnd on December 18, 2013, 06:58:06 pm
2N7000 is the leaded TO-92 version of 2N7002. Almost the same MOSFET, both 60 V N-channel, but different housing and a bit different current and power handling capabilities etc.

2N7000 / 2N7002 / NDS7002A datasheet https://www.fairchildsemi.com/ds/2N/2N7000.pdf (https://www.fairchildsemi.com/ds/2N/2N7000.pdf)

2N doesn't tell anything about the housing type. The first digit just tells how many P-N junctions it has. So in the American JEDEC naming system 1N is for didoes and 2N is for BJTs, Triacs, SCRs, JFETs or MOSFETs (but not dual-gate).
Here's a post I made in another topic about the JDEC naming system: https://www.eevblog.com/forum/chat/555th-video/msg335916/#msg335916 (https://www.eevblog.com/forum/chat/555th-video/msg335916/#msg335916)
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: PedroDaGr8 on December 18, 2013, 11:35:31 pm
Thanks that was actually really informative.

Sent from my EVO using Tapatalk

Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: TheBay on December 19, 2013, 02:34:20 pm
SMD Diode identification, EPP 47 is all that's marked, Becker Indianapolis BE7920

Picture attached, was taken with mobile phone, do not have a digital camera handy.

https://www.dropbox.com/sc/krzm94a01vecd4o/qermgHRZSY (https://www.dropbox.com/sc/krzm94a01vecd4o/qermgHRZSY)

Picture here:

(http://i.imgur.com/gDGoeQs.jpg)
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: peter.mitchell on December 20, 2013, 09:21:25 am
SMD Diode identification, EPP 47 is all that's marked, Becker Indianapolis BE7920

Picture attached, was taken with mobile phone, do not have a digital camera handy.


Picture here:
www.useasmallerpicture.com (http://www.useasmallerpicture.com)


Does this seem appropriate:
http://www.vishay.com/docs/88407/tpsmc68tpsmc47a.pdf (http://www.vishay.com/docs/88407/tpsmc68tpsmc47a.pdf)
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: TheBay on December 20, 2013, 09:45:43 am
Thank you for this, makes some sense :) I wonder if excess voltage supplied i.e. 24v caused it to go S/C

This is the logo on the device, who is the manufacturer?
(http://img.alibaba.com/photo/438751853/SM6T6V8A_SMD_DIODE.jpg)


SMD Diode identification, EPP 47 is all that's marked, Becker Indianapolis BE7920

Picture attached, was taken with mobile phone, do not have a digital camera handy.


Picture here:
www.useasmallerpicture.com (http://www.useasmallerpicture.com)


Does this seem appropriate:
http://www.vishay.com/docs/88407/tpsmc68tpsmc47a.pdf (http://www.vishay.com/docs/88407/tpsmc68tpsmc47a.pdf)
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: peter.mitchell on December 20, 2013, 11:42:51 am
Thank you for this, makes some sense :) I wonder if excess voltage supplied i.e. 24v caused it to go S/C

This is the logo on the device, who is the manufacturer?
(http://img.alibaba.com/photo/438751853/SM6T6V8A_SMD_DIODE.jpg)


SMD Diode identification, EPP 47 is all that's marked, Becker Indianapolis BE7920

Picture attached, was taken with mobile phone, do not have a digital camera handy.


Picture here:
www.useasmallerpicture.com (http://www.useasmallerpicture.com)


Does this seem appropriate:
http://www.vishay.com/docs/88407/tpsmc68tpsmc47a.pdf (http://www.vishay.com/docs/88407/tpsmc68tpsmc47a.pdf)

That logo is for  General Semiconductor, who are now owned by Vishay Technology, the above mentioned company.

The device is a TVS, it is designed to go short circuit to clamp voltages to a specified level, this one, marked EPP states 23.1v maximum working voltage, and 25.7v-28.4v breakdown voltage. Whilst designed to withstand high currents for short periods of time (to clamp the voltage), expectedly, it will be damaged under exceptional stress for extended periods.

The wikipedia page is quite helpful in regards to this device. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Transient-voltage-suppression_diode (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Transient-voltage-suppression_diode)
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: TheBay on December 20, 2013, 04:19:40 pm
That explains my assumption, some vehicles are 24v obviously so this goes short to take out main fuse to save damage to the unit.
Maybe someone jump started the vehicle it came out of.

Have seen that logo a few times but had no idea what manufacturer it is, I've found the part on RS :)

Thanks again,
Dale


Thank you for this, makes some sense :) I wonder if excess voltage supplied i.e. 24v caused it to go S/C

This is the logo on the device, who is the manufacturer?
(http://img.alibaba.com/photo/438751853/SM6T6V8A_SMD_DIODE.jpg)


SMD Diode identification, EPP 47 is all that's marked, Becker Indianapolis BE7920

Picture attached, was taken with mobile phone, do not have a digital camera handy.


Picture here:
www.useasmallerpicture.com (http://www.useasmallerpicture.com)


Does this seem appropriate:
http://www.vishay.com/docs/88407/tpsmc68tpsmc47a.pdf (http://www.vishay.com/docs/88407/tpsmc68tpsmc47a.pdf)

That logo is for  General Semiconductor, who are now owned by Vishay Technology, the above mentioned company.

The device is a TVS, it is designed to go short circuit to clamp voltages to a specified level, this one, marked EPP states 23.1v maximum working voltage, and 25.7v-28.4v breakdown voltage. Whilst designed to withstand high currents for short periods of time (to clamp the voltage), expectedly, it will be damaged under exceptional stress for extended periods.

The wikipedia page is quite helpful in regards to this device. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Transient-voltage-suppression_diode (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Transient-voltage-suppression_diode)
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: AndersAnd on December 21, 2013, 12:13:38 am
Have seen that logo a few times but had no idea what manufacturer it is,
Just like there's SMD marking databases online, there's also semiconductor logo databases available.

E.g. these ones:
http://www.dibsplace.com/design/ICLogos.htm (http://www.dibsplace.com/design/ICLogos.htm)
http://www.elnec.com/support/ic-logos/ (http://www.elnec.com/support/ic-logos/)
http://how-to.wikia.com/wiki/How_to_identify_integrated_circuit_%28chip%29_manufacturers_by_their_logos (http://how-to.wikia.com/wiki/How_to_identify_integrated_circuit_%28chip%29_manufacturers_by_their_logos)
http://www.chipdocs.com/logos/logotypes.html (http://www.chipdocs.com/logos/logotypes.html)
http://www.classiccmp.org/rtellason/logos/semiconductorlogos.html (http://www.classiccmp.org/rtellason/logos/semiconductorlogos.html)
http://www.dialelec.com/semiconductorlogos.html (http://www.dialelec.com/semiconductorlogos.html)
http://www.westfloridacomponents.com/manufacturer-logos.html (http://www.westfloridacomponents.com/manufacturer-logos.html)
http://freespace.virgin.net/matt.waite/resource/logos/ (http://freespace.virgin.net/matt.waite/resource/logos/)

Only the last of the above links doesn't have the GS logo and the associated General Semiconductor name, but only show an older star logo for GS.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: TheBay on December 21, 2013, 12:18:36 am
Some useful info there, thanks :)


Have seen that logo a few times but had no idea what manufacturer it is,
Just like there's SMD marking databases online, there's also semiconductor logo databases available.

E.g. these ones:
http://www.dibsplace.com/design/ICLogos.htm (http://www.dibsplace.com/design/ICLogos.htm)
http://www.elnec.com/support/ic-logos/ (http://www.elnec.com/support/ic-logos/)
http://how-to.wikia.com/wiki/How_to_identify_integrated_circuit_%28chip%29_manufacturers_by_their_logos (http://how-to.wikia.com/wiki/How_to_identify_integrated_circuit_%28chip%29_manufacturers_by_their_logos)
http://www.chipdocs.com/logos/logotypes.html (http://www.chipdocs.com/logos/logotypes.html)
http://www.classiccmp.org/rtellason/logos/semiconductorlogos.html (http://www.classiccmp.org/rtellason/logos/semiconductorlogos.html)
http://www.dialelec.com/semiconductorlogos.html (http://www.dialelec.com/semiconductorlogos.html)
http://www.westfloridacomponents.com/manufacturer-logos.html (http://www.westfloridacomponents.com/manufacturer-logos.html)
http://freespace.virgin.net/matt.waite/resource/logos/ (http://freespace.virgin.net/matt.waite/resource/logos/)

Only the last of the above links doesn't have the GS logo and the associated General Semiconductor name, but only show an older star logo for GS.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: cubemike99 on January 29, 2014, 03:05:49 am
BTC 0207-010F

All I know is that it is the chip inside the Brymen-257/Greenlee-510A. Thanks.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: AndersAnd on January 29, 2014, 10:07:53 am
BTC 0207-010F

All I know is that it is the chip inside the Brymen-257/Greenlee-510A. Thanks.
BTC is most likely short for BRYMEN TECHNOLOGY CORPORATION, which is the full company name: http://www.brymen.com (http://www.brymen.com)
So it's probably some kind of custom chip, and datasheets or other documentation is usually not available for custom chips.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: cubemike99 on January 30, 2014, 05:13:02 pm
BTC 0207-010F

All I know is that it is the chip inside the Brymen-257/Greenlee-510A. Thanks.
BTC is most likely short for BRYMEN TECHNOLOGY CORPORATION, which is the full company name: http://www.brymen.com (http://www.brymen.com)
So it's probably some kind of custom chip, and datasheets or other documentation is usually not available for custom chips.

Would a small company like Brymen really have custom chips? I was thinking it's a common DMM chip simply rebranded. Oh well.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: timelessbeing on February 02, 2014, 11:47:14 pm
How do I identify these diodes (schottky, zener etc.), and what do the stripes mean?
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: AndersAnd on February 03, 2014, 12:07:14 am
How do I identify these diodes (schottky, zener etc.), and what do the stripes mean?
Have you measured the diode forward voltage with a multimeter? Easy way to tell if it's silicium, schottky or germanium diodes. And you could reverse bias them with a resistor in series to measure if it's zener didoes.


Edit: Diode color codes: http://www.crystalradio.net/cal/diodeid.shtml (http://www.crystalradio.net/cal/diodeid.shtml)
If these codes are used with two digit type:
White - Yellow = 1N94
Brown - White = 1N19

Or maybe it's the opposite, if you star reading from the other end.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: timelessbeing on February 03, 2014, 01:08:43 am
With my DMM, I measure nothing ("1") in either direction.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: AndersAnd on February 03, 2014, 01:34:32 am
With my DMM, I measure nothing ("1") in either direction.
At the DMM diode setting?
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: timelessbeing on February 03, 2014, 01:35:32 am
Yes, and I know it works because I can test other diodes.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: SeanB on February 03, 2014, 06:33:51 pm
Those are not diodes but are spark gaps. The clue is the resistor like inside with the ring cut all the way around the middle. They are going to be open circuit till you reach the break over voltage, probably around 90V or so.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: timelessbeing on February 04, 2014, 12:54:51 am
Aha! Thanks you SeanB.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Terabyte2007 on February 05, 2014, 03:51:41 pm
I look parts up all the time, but I can't find this one at all! Any ideas???

It came out of a power supply so my guess is a regulator or dual schottky diode of some sort.

Sorry, the print is faded. Hope you can read it!
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: SeanB on February 05, 2014, 04:00:13 pm
N channel mosfet?
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: G7PSK on February 05, 2014, 04:11:37 pm
N Channel enhancement mode  Mosfet.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Terabyte2007 on February 05, 2014, 07:34:13 pm
N Channel enhancement mode  Mosfet.

Awesome, thanks...
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: rsjsouza on February 05, 2014, 09:51:41 pm
A MOSFET.
http://pdf.datasheetcatalog.com/datasheet/stmicroelectronics/5372.pdf (http://pdf.datasheetcatalog.com/datasheet/stmicroelectronics/5372.pdf)
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: uoficowboy on February 11, 2014, 05:37:42 am
Here are two blown fuses from a device I'm repairing. They're both fuses, and they're both toasty. The top one has small cracks in it, while the other one was in two pieces when I found it.

The top one seems to just say F 1/8 A. In front and under the F is a sort of L

The bottom one has two things written on it. One side says 5A (with a strange upside down triangular symbol in front of the 5) and the other side says E 5A (or maybe F 5A) - it's possible the bottom segment of the E is another L like the other fuse.

Does anybody know what these are? I'd love to replace them with the exact right part as they go in a very expensive piece of equipment.

Thank you!
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: gibbled on February 11, 2014, 05:44:39 am
They look like Picofuses.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: timelessbeing on February 11, 2014, 06:04:14 am
Yup. Littelfuse Pico fuse
http://www.littelfuse.com/products/fuses/axial-radial-thru-hole-fuses/pico-fuses.aspx (http://www.littelfuse.com/products/fuses/axial-radial-thru-hole-fuses/pico-fuses.aspx)

(http://www.littelfuse.com/~/media/Images/Electronics/Products/Electronics_Fuses/Littelfuse_Fuse_Pico_TL.jpg)

(http://web.onetel.com/~uncletony/images/s5.gif)
This is a safety marking meaning "Product is safe to fit on materials combustible above 200°C"
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: uoficowboy on February 11, 2014, 06:57:32 am
They look like Picofuses.
Wow - 7 minutes to answer! Geeze man - did you think I had all day? Try to hurry it up a bit more next time! :P

Thanks - that is perfect. Am I right in thinking that these look to be 0.125A and 5A fuses? They look a lot like 251 series picofuses, so I think that would make the appropriate part numbers: 0251.125MXL and 0251005.MXL.

Again, thanks for the super speedy response. Much appreciated. I can't wait to get this device up and running again!

edit: a friend at Littelfuse confirmed that I have the right part numbers. Sweet!
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: AndersAnd on February 11, 2014, 06:19:10 pm
In front and under the F is a sort of L
edit: a friend at Littelfuse confirmed that I have the right part numbers. Sweet!
With a friend working at Littelfuse you should be able to guess the LF logo on a fuse is short for Littelfuse.  :-DMM
Littelfuse is probably the best know fuse brand in the world.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: rjk5378 on February 11, 2014, 10:51:54 pm
Can anyone tell me what these are? I presumably must have known at some point in the past, because I have about 15 or so of them in a component drawer where they have probably residing for at least 20 years or so, but darned if I can remember what they are, even assuming I ever knew. They are encased in ceramic or some kind of polymer. One side is flat, and the other side has a cylindrical bulge across it. Dimensions are about 10 mm across, about 10 mm tall, not counting leads, plus two points of about another 2 or 3 mm where the encased leads seem to extend up at the top. The flat part and the bulge are about 5 mm or so thick. Some kind of identifying color code on the flat sides, e.g., Brown-Black-Black, Yellow-Red-Black, etc. Less than an ohm resistance, and can't get any capacitance reading. Seem to recall gettng some kind of inductance reading when I chacked about a year ago, but (a) it was with a really cheap junk LCR meter, and (b) can't remember what the readings were. Thanks.

-- Bob, KY3R
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: G7PSK on February 12, 2014, 08:47:32 am
Look a bit like dipped polymer fuses to me.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Jad.z on February 16, 2014, 03:30:53 pm
Hi

Does anybody know what these two SOT-89 devices are?
I couldn't find anything on them.

QK33C
QK25C

(http://i57.tinypic.com/9pvrba.jpg)

Thanks
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: peter.mitchell on February 16, 2014, 03:33:10 pm
They are marked U instead of Q, so they're ICs.
33 usually means 3.3v
25 usually means 2.5v
i assume they're both linear regulators, correct me if i'm wrong.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: mariush on February 16, 2014, 04:26:11 pm
Yeah, most likely. 
Probably  input - ground - output and tab connected to ground.  You can see the output of 3.3v regulator going into the input of the 2.5 regulator, so assume they're both ldos, probably 100-150mA max.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: aroby on February 16, 2014, 05:05:48 pm
So, I know what this component is (an AVR relay from a 220V APC UPS).   The UPS is showing that it has an AVR relay weld fault, so I would like to replace all 4 of these relays.  The problem is that this part is proprietary, so Omron can't tell me the specs.  There seems to be sufficient info on the part to locate an Omron replacement, I'm just not sure what I'm looking at and how to translate that into an Omron part.

Can anyone help me decipher this?

Thanks

Anthony
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: SeanB on February 16, 2014, 05:51:33 pm
First hit using the part number g8p-1c4p from mouser.

http://uk.mouser.com/ProductDetail/Omron-Electronics/G8P-1C4P-DC24/?qs=CX134%252bdLMDEluPjpvK29fA== (http://uk.mouser.com/ProductDetail/Omron-Electronics/G8P-1C4P-DC24/?qs=CX134%252bdLMDEluPjpvK29fA==)

Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: AndersAnd on February 16, 2014, 06:43:35 pm
Hi

Does anybody know what these two SOT-89 devices are?
I couldn't find anything on them.

QK33C
QK25C

(http://i57.tinypic.com/9pvrba.jpg)

Thanks
Look at the bottom number R133A

Datasheet for similar device: UTC [UNISONIC TECHNOLOGIES] UR133/A 500mA Low Dropout Voltage Regulator [LDO]:
http://www.utc-ic.com/uploadfile/2011/0902/20110902012023486.pdf (http://www.utc-ic.com/uploadfile/2011/0902/20110902012023486.pdf)

The C in QK25C / QK33C shows the pinout (look at page 2 in the above datasheet).

Pin code C [QK25C / QK33C]
Pin 1 = Ground
Pin 2 = In
Pin 3 = Out

QK25C = 2.5 V

QK33C = 3.3 V

UR133/A = A is the code for 500 mA
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: denelec on February 16, 2014, 06:52:48 pm
Can anyone tell me what these are? I presumably must have known at some point in the past, because I have about 15 or so of them in a component drawer where they have probably residing for at least 20 years or so, but darned if I can remember what they are, even assuming I ever knew. They are encased in ceramic or some kind of polymer. One side is flat, and the other side has a cylindrical bulge across it. Dimensions are about 10 mm across, about 10 mm tall, not counting leads, plus two points of about another 2 or 3 mm where the encased leads seem to extend up at the top. The flat part and the bulge are about 5 mm or so thick. Some kind of identifying color code on the flat sides, e.g., Brown-Black-Black, Yellow-Red-Black, etc. Less than an ohm resistance, and can't get any capacitance reading. Seem to recall gettng some kind of inductance reading when I chacked about a year ago, but (a) it was with a really cheap junk LCR meter, and (b) can't remember what the readings were. Thanks.

-- Bob, KY3R

They are inductors. 
About 30 years ago, I bought an assorted package of inductors from Radio-Shack. They were in liquidation. Cost me about nothing.
See attached images.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Jad.z on February 16, 2014, 07:05:58 pm
Thank you both peter.mitchell & mariush.

I confirmed that they are LDOs after I obtained an identical working board for testing.

Thank you for the details AndersAnd.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: aroby on February 16, 2014, 08:45:55 pm
First hit using the part number g8p-1c4p from mouser.

Sorry, I wasn't clear in my post.  I've seen the parts listed under this code at Mouser and Digikey, but I'm not sure what I should be looking for as a replacement.  Your link is for the G8P-1C4P-DC24 - I was wondering about the 20A and 30A notation on the original parts and how to match those up with the Omron parts.

Thanks
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: SeanB on February 16, 2014, 09:06:52 pm
20A parts are a SPDT relay, the 30A parts are SPST. SPDT is a G8P-1C4P 24V and SPST is a G8P-1A4P 24V. The SPDT relay will work in the footprint of the SPST one but there will be a pin ( pin4) that is either unconnected or which will need to be cut off flush with the relay housing if there is no PCB hole for it. In a UPS they are going to be pretty much only there for the overload capacity and the mains isolation of the contacts and frame. Current will in most cases be well below the max rating.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: aroby on February 16, 2014, 09:27:14 pm
20A parts are a SPDT relay, the 30A parts are SPST. SPDT is a G8P-1C4P 24V and SPST is a G8P-1A4P 24V. The SPDT relay will work in the footprint of the SPST one but there will be a pin ( pin4) that is either unconnected or which will need to be cut off flush with the relay housing if there is no PCB hole for it. In a UPS they are going to be pretty much only there for the overload capacity and the mains isolation of the contacts and frame. Current will in most cases be well below the max rating.

Thanks for the explanation. I'll get my order placed and see if I can resurrect this UPS!

Anthony
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: rjk5378 on February 16, 2014, 10:12:22 pm
They are inductors. 
About 30 years ago, I bought an assorted package of inductors from Radio-Shack. They were in liquidation. Cost me about nothing.

Thanks. That makes sense. These may indeed have been collecting dust here for 30 years now. I think I must have gotten in on the same close-out sale that you did! Now I can go decipher the color coded stripes and see what I presumably have.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Rerouter on February 18, 2014, 10:17:01 am
I'm trying to find a matching connector to this, the only lead i have is it may be AMP branded (all other connectors on device are)

its 4 pins, with 0.1' pin spacing, and the plug end is shaped like a D,
Title: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: romantronixlab on February 23, 2014, 02:00:39 pm
Been reading all posts on this thread to see if it has already been asked, same on the web. I am fixing a JVC Everio and testing found a component that to me is out of specs by testing with a similar one next to it on the same PCB.
The green is good, battery gets charge; red is bad no start under bat power only on AC adapter.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: SeanB on February 23, 2014, 02:12:18 pm
PCB mount fuse? Or a burnt out low ohm resistor.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: PA0PBZ on February 23, 2014, 02:45:22 pm
A fuse, NMFZ007-2R5X-K , 2.5A 24V
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: fluxcapacitor on February 23, 2014, 03:06:47 pm
PA0PBZ bet me to it. I found a similar schematic for a JVC GZ-HD3 that has the same  fuses .

http://diagramas.diagramasde.com/camaras/JVC%20Camcorder%20GZ-HD3%20-%20Diagrama%20Esquematico.pdf (http://diagramas.diagramasde.com/camaras/JVC%20Camcorder%20GZ-HD3%20-%20Diagrama%20Esquematico.pdf)   (page 21)

NMFZ007-2R5X-K
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: romantronixlab on February 23, 2014, 03:37:02 pm
A fuse, NMFZ007-2R5X-K , 2.5A 24V

 Is that a 0603, still learning the size aspect of smd
Don't know how much thanks to give so thanks :-+ :-+ :-+ :-+ :-+ :-+ :-+
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: AndersAnd on February 23, 2014, 07:00:55 pm
Is that a 0603, still learning the size aspect of smd
Hard to tell from a picture, but I think it's 0805 and the 4 parts to the left of the fuses being 0603 and the 0 ohm resistor marked '000' being 1206.

But if you're in doubt, just measure the length and width with a ruler or even better a calliper.
Here's all the standard SMD resistor dimensions in mm:
(http://i00.i.aliimg.com/img/pb/023/743/471/471743023_753.jpg)

The dimensions are also shown on Dave's µRuler: http://www.eevblog.com/projects/uruler/ (http://www.eevblog.com/projects/uruler/)

(http://www.eevblog.com/images/projects/uRuler.jpg)


But you don't have to work with SMD's for long before you learn to easily tell the difference between the most common sizes like 1206, 0805 and 0603 just by looking at them.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: mathsquid on February 23, 2014, 10:00:22 pm
Do any of you chaps recognize the logo on the pot in this picture?  I'd like to buy 5 of them to overhaul my microkorg synthesizer, but the only supplier I've found sells them for $6 each.  I'm hoping I find another source for them.

Thanks.

Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: fluxcapacitor on February 23, 2014, 10:40:31 pm
They`re made by bourns .

http://uk.mouser.com/ProductDetail/Bourns/PTV111-3420A-B103/?qs=nqw9FAyaR8OFhofgARComA== (http://uk.mouser.com/ProductDetail/Bourns/PTV111-3420A-B103/?qs=nqw9FAyaR8OFhofgARComA==)

PTV111-3420A-B103

http://www.muffwiggler.com/forum/viewtopic.php?t=80651&sid=b4bbb00148a1c0a0b6ad5b40a0d6ba54 (http://www.muffwiggler.com/forum/viewtopic.php?t=80651&sid=b4bbb00148a1c0a0b6ad5b40a0d6ba54)
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: mathsquid on February 24, 2014, 12:48:31 am
Thanks!!
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: rakesh on February 25, 2014, 11:14:06 am
I bought a used fluke 189 multimeter from a seller https://www.eevblog.com/forum/Smileys/default/smiliey_dmm.gif (https://www.eevblog.com/forum/Smileys/default/smiliey_dmm.gif)  . He gave me a set of probes which don't fit in any of the jacks of fluke 189 . I was wondering does anybody know what kind of probes are these and can it be used with this meter. All the probes are marked fluke on them.

sorry for the picture quality.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: aroby on March 22, 2014, 11:51:04 pm
I have two burned out SMD components I need to replace.  One is a diode, the other (I think) is a transistor.  It's hard to make out the markings, but the board has others with similar markings, so I am going to assume these are the same.  I'm not familiar with how to decode the markings and then do a mouser or digikey search for these.

The diode looks like it says A4 with a sideways E or 3.  The transistor says 7CW with a sideways 83.  Can someone point me in the right direction ?

Thanks

Anthony
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: ablacon64 on March 23, 2014, 12:01:52 am
I guess...
7CW: http://www.nxp.com/documents/data_sheet/MMBT2222A.pdf (http://www.nxp.com/documents/data_sheet/MMBT2222A.pdf)
A4: http://www.nxp.com/documents/data_sheet/BAV70_SER.pdf (http://www.nxp.com/documents/data_sheet/BAV70_SER.pdf)
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: firewalker on April 09, 2014, 09:58:40 am
Any info on this sensor? I believe it is an analog air sub-pressure sensor from an car engine air intake.

(http://i.imgur.com/EEIMO6Gs.jpg) (http://i.imgur.com/EEIMO6G.jpg) (http://i.imgur.com/j8DzaURs.jpg) (http://i.imgur.com/j8DzaUR.jpg) (http://i.imgur.com/QLYv3TCs.jpg) (http://i.imgur.com/QLYv3TC.jpg)

Alexander.

Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: fluxcapacitor on April 10, 2014, 12:09:17 am
i found a few that are similar .No info on the pcb or part numbers .

http://www.hoperf.com/sensor/barometer_16/HP03M.htm (http://www.hoperf.com/sensor/barometer_16/HP03M.htm)

http://www.ebay.com/itm/10pcs-lot-Pressure-sensor-Pressure-sensor-700KPa-/121246383906?pt=Battery_Chargers&hash=item1c3ad8ff22 (http://www.ebay.com/itm/10pcs-lot-Pressure-sensor-Pressure-sensor-700KPa-/121246383906?pt=Battery_Chargers&hash=item1c3ad8ff22)

http://www.apollounion.com/en/p-MS5201-SMD-Pressure-Sensor-356.html (http://www.apollounion.com/en/p-MS5201-SMD-Pressure-Sensor-356.html)
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: firewalker on April 10, 2014, 06:00:37 am
Thanks you!

Alexander.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: 128er on April 10, 2014, 10:30:17 pm
This thing is out of an old 70's military radio device. The marking is "LCC 4K7". Its simply a short in both directions, no semiconductor, no capacitance...

It was built in a shielding can, like the drawing

Could it be, that it is only for a proper penetration of shielding cans to carry out/in a signal?

Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: gibbled on April 10, 2014, 11:04:20 pm
Perhaps a feedthrough cap.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: fluxcapacitor on April 11, 2014, 12:18:46 am
i thin its a pass through cap or bulkhead connector.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: LukeW on April 11, 2014, 01:18:02 am
Definitely a feedthough capacitor, or maybe just an environmentally-resistant but still removable and serviceable feedthrough into a closed box.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: 128er on April 11, 2014, 01:45:13 am
Sometimes my brain starts to clatter - and, ah, a few of the modules i have kept. There marked as C's with "4700" on it. But the two i have seperate, are definitely shorted. No capacitance in every respect. I will try to measure the things in the module.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: vk6zgo on April 11, 2014, 02:27:34 am
The capacitance is between the centre lead & the outer threaded case.
It is a convenient way to bypass a lead which has to pass through a metal panel.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: 128er on April 11, 2014, 02:47:23 am
D'oh! Silly me. Excuse my stupidity. I think I got it :D

Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: AndersAnd on April 11, 2014, 07:33:04 am
http://www.analog.com/static/imported-files/rarely_asked_questions/moreInfo_raq_filters4Switchers.html (http://www.analog.com/static/imported-files/rarely_asked_questions/moreInfo_raq_filters4Switchers.html)

(http://www.analog.com/static/imported-files/rarely_asked_questions/filters4Switchers_figure11.gif)
Fig 11. Feedthrough capacitor and feedthrough pi filter.
These prevent HF signals from entering or leaving screened enclosures via power or signal lines.

Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: OSIDbarlow on April 15, 2014, 09:17:02 am
Thanks,

any idea where I get something like that? I also wondered, how are you so sure. In what kind of application have you seen something like that before?

Thanks

These devices are used in position sensing applications, such as for laser guided weaponry or encoded machine systems (like scanning galvanometers for lasers). The position of the incident light source is calculated by determining the input current differential between the 4 segments - if the current output is equal from all 4 segments, you are in the direct centre (so for a laser guided missile it is hitting the target). I can help you with sourcing these devices. Email me for details.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Alexei.Polkhanov on April 16, 2014, 06:00:37 am
These devices are used in position sensing applications, such as for laser guided weaponry or encoded machine systems (like scanning galvanometers for lasers). The position of the incident light source is calculated by determining the input current differential between the 4 segments - if the current output is equal from all 4 segments, you are in the direct centre (so for a laser guided missile it is hitting the target). I can help you with sourcing these devices. Email me for details.

So that is a quadrant photodiode like this one from Digikey: http://www.digikey.ca/product-detail/en/SXUVPS4C/958-1018-ND/4047472 (http://www.digikey.ca/product-detail/en/SXUVPS4C/958-1018-ND/4047472).
I was looking for cheaper version of one like this without any luck.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: SeanB on April 17, 2014, 08:05:40 pm
A cheap one is available in every CD player optical block.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: 128er on April 20, 2014, 12:16:51 am
It's me again  :)

Please name that connector type. Its on a Wandel & Goltermann PDH/SDH Transmission-/Jitteranalyzer.

Thanks!
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: firehopper on April 20, 2014, 10:52:19 am
tnc maybe? threaded bnc?
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: jamesglanville on April 23, 2014, 10:16:20 pm
I got a pile of these in a bag of random electronic parts:

(http://i.imgur.com/LiKce3o.jpg)
(http://i.imgur.com/zWRwymR.jpg)

Marked "SSC TRDU2 7906C"

I measure resistances of (multiple parts) 107.4, 55.2, 116.1,116.6, 88.2 ohms.
So they act like resistors, but have different values despite identical markings, the leads suggest polarity to me (but resistance the same both ways), and they look adjustable but I can't move them.
Any ideas as to what they are / why would anyone make such weird looking resistors?
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Richard Crowley on April 24, 2014, 01:40:46 am
They are almost certainly SCRs.  In a "press-fit" package where you insert the package into a slightly undersize hole in the heat sink mass. Of course, the case itself is one of the Main Terminals.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: jamesglanville on April 24, 2014, 02:07:35 am
Yep you're right - thanks! I tested them and they seem to work as I'd expect from an SCR. Any ideas on how to get the specs or are they essentially useless without? I guess I could test one to destruction then back off a lot....
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: TheAmmoniacal on April 27, 2014, 08:20:06 pm
I hope this question belongs here, as it's not a component and I do "know" what it is. This is a lead-acid battery charger made for 12V batteries (6-cell), with a capacity from 10 to 50 Ah. But what I would like to know is how it charges the batteries, and if it's appropriate to use for charging a "small" 4.05 kg 12V/12Ah lead-acid battery (sealed, spec sheet: http://huanyubattery.com/en/admin/Upimg/20079121921160538.pdf (http://huanyubattery.com/en/admin/Upimg/20079121921160538.pdf) ) Is it a three-stage charger? Does it float charge? Trickle? etc. I hope someone can tell from the chip!

The inside of the charger looks like this (the rest of the unit is just a transformer):

Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: PedroDaGr8 on April 27, 2014, 08:34:14 pm
I hope this question belongs here, as it's not a component and I do "know" what it is. This is a lead-acid battery charger made for 12V batteries (6-cell), with a capacity from 10 to 50 Ah. But what I would like to know is how it charges the batteries, and if it's appropriate to use for charging a "small" 4.05 kg 12V/12Ah lead-acid battery (sealed, spec sheet: http://huanyubattery.com/en/admin/Upimg/20079121921160538.pdf (http://huanyubattery.com/en/admin/Upimg/20079121921160538.pdf) ) Is it a three-stage charger? Does it float charge? Trickle? etc. I hope someone can tell from the chip!

The inside of the charger looks like this (the rest of the unit is just a transformer):

The main IC there is an LM324 basically the most standard of op-amps you can find. So my guess is that the circuit is about as "dumb simple" as you can get it. I'm guessing they use a voltage reference and basically charge until that voltage reference is met. Without seeing a schematic my guess is you could build this yourself for under $2 for all of the parts, thats how cheap it is.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: SeanB on April 28, 2014, 09:49:32 am
Yep you're right - thanks! I tested them and they seem to work as I'd expect from an SCR. Any ideas on how to get the specs or are they essentially useless without? I guess I could test one to destruction then back off a lot....

I just found a SCR that I have in a stud mount, it is rated 16A and 300V, sop yours is likely around 10A and probably 200V rated.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: SeanB on April 28, 2014, 09:53:02 am
Simple, it charges at a set current sensed by the current shunt, either using a SCR or a transistor to control the current to average the current to the set value, until the battery reaches 12V, when it tapers the current off till it stops charging at a voltage of 13.8V for float charging. If it is a boost charger it will cut of at 14.4V, and then should be disconnected.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: romantronixlab on May 02, 2014, 11:24:28 am
Oh boy this resourceful forum we can't live with out. >:D
Gday
I have this controller that has a burnt IC regulator, I think, but it have a 57b6 on the ic but cannot find any information on it. I was able to at least take a pic of a working unit since the one I am working on is toasted. The only thing I do know is it can work with 1A, nothing else.

Again Thank You all.

Edit: It is IC1
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: MLXXXp on May 02, 2014, 01:48:35 pm
romantronixlab,

57b6 marking could be a TP4057 lithium battery charge controller.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: TerraHertz on May 03, 2014, 10:21:19 am
I'm looking for the data for an Exar switch mode regulator IC used in a Hewlett Packard product made in the mid to late 1980s.
The instrument is a HP 54120B sampling scope.
The chip is marked:
   Exar 1826-1120
   9042 C5280.
The "1826-1120" is a HP part number, but I cannot find this in any HP part # index I have.
The package is a 20-pin ceramic DIP.
I have an Exar 1987 data book, but none of the switching regulator ICs listed have 20 pins.

Pics are the power supply board (with several of the larger components removed for ease of circuit tracing), and the IC.
Even just a block diagram of the IC would be a big help, since I'm only drawing the circuit out before attempting to find the fault.
It's not a complex board. From the traces it's obvious that pin 10 is GND, 1 & 2 are "+5VR", and 20 is "+14.6".

At the time that 20GHz scope was built, is was 'big secrets, export restricted' stuff. I have a horrible feeling HP deliberately used some obscure/custom parts even on bog standard sections like the power supply boards, just to mess with anyone trying to reverse engineer it.
I'm really hoping that's not the case, and this is a standard Exar IC that happens to not be in my 1987 databook.

The board is from a 'not working, for spares' unit I bought recently, and it's probably this board that stops it from powering up. Expected it to be an easy fix, but then hit this mystery IC.

Edit to add: And it's this kind of stuff that makes me think this is a case of deliberate obtuseness. Here's an example of a HP part number cross reference, published well after that instrument's manufacture. What number is missing?
(https://www.eevblog.com/forum/chat/what's-this-please-(component-advice)/?action=dlattach;attach=92272;image)

I have the HP service manual for the 54120T, but it contains no schematics. 'Too secret for you.'
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: romantronixlab on May 03, 2014, 10:59:48 am
romantronixlab,

57b6 marking could be a TP4057 lithium battery charge controller.

Thank You MLXXXp, How do I know to interpret those codes. Is there a table indicating meaning of the IC? I did find a SMD code table for resistors an diodes but nothing else.

BTW: it is a charge controller for a lithium work lamp.

Again Thanks :-+

Edit: could it be a TSM1052. Found it on digikey.
Edit again: Datasheet http://www.st.com/web/en/resource/technical/document/datasheet/CD00152575.pdf (http://www.st.com/web/en/resource/technical/document/datasheet/CD00152575.pdf)
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: peter.mitchell on May 03, 2014, 11:07:36 am
romantronixlab,

57b6 marking could be a TP4057 lithium battery charge controller.

Thank You MLXXXp, How do I know to interpret those codes. Is there a table indicating meaning of the IC? I did find a SMD code table for resistors an diodes but nothing else.

BTW: it is a charge controller for a lithium work lamp.

Again Thanks :-+
http://www.systek.ru/marking.php?work=schowfulllist (http://www.systek.ru/marking.php?work=schowfulllist) is pretty good - but it can be a bit overwhelming
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: MLXXXp on May 03, 2014, 11:18:36 am
How do I know to interpret those codes. Is there a table indicating meaning of the IC?

There are people maintaining tables of IC markings but I don't think there's anything official across manufacturers.

In this case, I just did a Google search for "57b6 sot" (SOT is the package type) and got a likely hit on the TP4057. A second search for TP4057, along with your description and looking at your board photo, then confirmed the probable match.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: fluxcapacitor on May 03, 2014, 11:51:04 pm
found this info that might help.Use google translate

http://www.radioamateur.org/forums/index.php?/topic/30785-xr1826-1120/ (http://www.radioamateur.org/forums/index.php?/topic/30785-xr1826-1120/)

edit: http://www.ashlea.co.uk/p/XR1826-1120.aspx (http://www.ashlea.co.uk/p/XR1826-1120.aspx)
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Excavatoree on May 04, 2014, 01:55:17 am
I'm a bit confused by the markings on this 4x surface mount resistor I harvested for smd removal practice.  It measures 8.0 K exactly, I checked several.  I was thinking it may be a poorly printed "8", but they don't measure 8.2K, they are 8.0 K.

Can anyone offer any insight? 
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: tsmith35 on May 04, 2014, 02:05:43 am
I'm looking for the data for an Exar switch mode regulator IC used in a Hewlett Packard product made in the mid to late 1980s.
The instrument is a HP 54120B sampling scope.
The chip is marked:
   Exar 1826-1120
   9042 C5280.
The "1826-1120" is a HP part number, but I cannot find this in any HP part # index I have.
The package is a 20-pin ceramic DIP.
I have an Exar 1987 data book, but none of the switching regulator ICs listed have 20 pins.
Interestingly, I crossed it to NSN 5262-01-304-8068. I found some minimally useful info here (http://www.ctg123.com/rapid-quote-system-request/?part=5962013098068) and here (http://www.lintechcomponents.com/product/013098068/18261120/28480), but further searching turns up that this IC is used in missile guidance and navigation systems (link (http://www.alicorp.com/NSNWhite/5962/5962013048068.HTM)), so perhaps that's why it's so hard to find information about it.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: TerraHertz on May 04, 2014, 03:02:34 am
found this info that might help.Use google translate

http://www.radioamateur.org/forums/index.php?/topic/30785-xr1826-1120/ (http://www.radioamateur.org/forums/index.php?/topic/30785-xr1826-1120/)

edit: http://www.ashlea.co.uk/p/XR1826-1120.aspx (http://www.ashlea.co.uk/p/XR1826-1120.aspx)

Sadly, no that's not it. The UC2823A is a 16 pin DIP. It has a 20 pin PLCC-20 package version, but the pin functions still don't match the PCB.

Interestingly, I crossed it to NSN 5262-01-304-8068. I found some minimally useful info here (http://www.ctg123.com/rapid-quote-system-request/?part=5962013098068) and here (http://www.lintechcomponents.com/product/013098068/18261120/28480), but further searching turns up that this IC is used in missile guidance and navigation systems (link (http://www.alicorp.com/NSNWhite/5962/5962013048068.HTM)), so perhaps that's why it's so hard to find information about it.

Hmm. Interesting. Though frustrating and absurd, since it's just a simple switch mode controller IC from the 1980s.
That link
  http://www.alicorp.com/NSNWhite/5962/5962013048068.HTM (http://www.alicorp.com/NSNWhite/5962/5962013048068.HTM)
  White Paper for NSN 5962-01-304-8068
says "unit price is $2888.00" which is hilarious. Bonus entertainment value if you click on the 'more info' tab up the top.

Oh yes, this is a secret 1980s switch mode regulator IC.

Those two suppliers you linked look like they scrape data off each other and elsewhere. A more likely source listing is:
  http://www.digchip.com/datasheets/quote.php?action=search&pn=1826-1120 (http://www.digchip.com/datasheets/quote.php?action=search&pn=1826-1120)

Just for giggles, I'll inquire the price for 5. I don't actually know yet if my one is faulty, but it would be fun to cleave the top off one and see how much of the circuit could be derived from looking at the chip.



Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: AndersAnd on May 04, 2014, 09:51:42 am
I'm a bit confused by the markings on this 4x surface mount resistor I harvested for smd removal practice.  It measures 8.0 K exactly, I checked several.  I was thinking it may be a poorly printed "8", but they don't measure 8.2K, they are 8.0 K.

Can anyone offer any insight?
There's nothing strange or wrong about this. SMD resistors with only 3 digits on them are ±5 % resistors. SMD resistors with 4 digits on the other hand are usually ±1 %
These are 8k2 ohm resistors with a ±5 % tolerance, so 8k0 ohm is well within specifications.

-5%:
8k2 ohm * 0.95 = 7k79 ohm

+5%:
8k2 ohm * 1.05 = 8k61 ohm

So everything in the range between 7k79 and 8k61 is within specifications.
They probably all have the same measured value because they're all from the same production run.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: AndersAnd on May 04, 2014, 10:08:44 am
How do I know to interpret those codes. Is there a table indicating meaning of the IC?

There are people maintaining tables of IC markings but I don't think there's anything official across manufacturers.

In this case, I just did a Google search for "57b6 sot" (SOT is the package type) and got a likely hit on the TP4057. A second search for TP4057, along with your description and looking at your board photo, then confirmed the probable match.
The last digit '6' just indicates the production batch in this case and can vary from part to part.
Only 57b stays the same on all devices.

I got this info from this Chinese datasheet using Google translate: http://www.ecranic.com/files/TP4057.pdf (http://www.ecranic.com/files/TP4057.pdf)

Couldn't find an English datasheet, but found an English datasheet for TP4056: https://dlnmh9ip6v2uc.cloudfront.net/datasheets/Prototyping/TP4056.pdf (https://dlnmh9ip6v2uc.cloudfront.net/datasheets/Prototyping/TP4056.pdf)
This is is a similar device, with 1 A charge capability instead of the 500 mA of TP4057.

Linear Devices also makes similar charge ICs named LTC4056 and LTC4057, but they're not identical.

Lygte-info made a test of a cheap TP4056 based USB charger from eBay: http://lygte-info.dk/review/Review%20Charger%20TP4056%20UK.html (http://lygte-info.dk/review/Review%20Charger%20TP4056%20UK.html)
The owner of that site is also a member er of this forum under the username HKJ: https://www.eevblog.com/forum/profile/?u=24271 (https://www.eevblog.com/forum/profile/?u=24271)
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Excavatoree on May 05, 2014, 12:52:24 am
I'm a bit confused by the markings on this 4x surface mount resistor I harvested for smd removal practice.  It measures 8.0 K exactly, I checked several.  I was thinking it may be a poorly printed "8", but they don't measure 8.2K, they are 8.0 K.

Can anyone offer any insight?
There's nothing strange or wrong about this. SMD resistors with only 3 digits on them are ±5 % resistors. SMD resistors with 4 digits on the other hand are usually ±1 %
These are 8k2 ohm resistors with a ±5 % tolerance, so 8k0 ohm is well within specifications.

-5%:
8k2 ohm * 0.95 = 7k79 ohm

+5%:
8k2 ohm * 1.05 = 8k61 ohm

So everything in the range between 7k79 and 8k61 is within specifications.
They probably all have the same measured value because they're all from the same production run.

Ah, failure to perform a simple mathematical operation in my head.   I should have written it out, or at least punched it into a calculator.  I didn't even consider it, as they all are spot on, right at 8K. 

My apologies.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: fluxcapacitor on May 06, 2014, 01:51:00 am
found this info that might help.Use google translate

http://www.radioamateur.org/forums/index.php?/topic/30785-xr1826-1120/ (http://www.radioamateur.org/forums/index.php?/topic/30785-xr1826-1120/)

edit: http://www.ashlea.co.uk/p/XR1826-1120.aspx (http://www.ashlea.co.uk/p/XR1826-1120.aspx)

Sadly, no that's not it. The UC2823A is a 16 pin DIP. It has a 20 pin PLCC-20 package version, but the pin functions still don't match the PCB.

maybe this will help then,its not the same model as yours though, its a 54110D .

http://forum.vintage-audio-laser.com/resolution-pannes/54110d-deux-pour-prix-t15860.html (http://forum.vintage-audio-laser.com/resolution-pannes/54110d-deux-pour-prix-t15860.html)
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: TerraHertz on May 11, 2014, 05:23:49 pm
maybe this will help then,its not the same model as yours though, its a 54110D .

http://forum.vintage-audio-laser.com/resolution-pannes/54110d-deux-pour-prix-t15860.html (http://forum.vintage-audio-laser.com/resolution-pannes/54110d-deux-pour-prix-t15860.html)

That's the identical board, in fact the whole machine is very similar, just some extra 'scope' boards in the cage.
What is interesting is his pic: 54110 pcb 300V sch.jpg  (54110 pcb 300V sch.jpg (28.29 Kio) Vu 767 fois)
That appears to be part of an original HP schematic, which isn't in my 54120T so called 'service manual'.
His pic above that, the block diagram, IS in my manual, identical except in mine it's called Figure 6B-11.
Found a service manual for the 54110D here: http://elektrotanya.com/hp_agilent-technologies_54110d_digitizing_oscilloscope.pdf/download.html (http://elektrotanya.com/hp_agilent-technologies_54110d_digitizing_oscilloscope.pdf/download.html)
But still no schematics.


Are you a member of that forum by any chance? If so, could you ask him where he got that schematic, and for the complete scan?
If not, I'll join, and contact him myself.
I've started tracing the schematic on the assumption it's not available, but if it can be found that's obviously much easier.
Board overlay (doesn't have part #s yet):

Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: fluxcapacitor on May 12, 2014, 11:33:08 pm
No ,i`m not a member,sorry .I just found it using a google search.If you can`t get in touch with him there is a cd on ebay with the full service guide plus a service supplement with everything you need.If you take a look at the cd it has the hp part numbers. At the bottom of that listing though it says :

THIS CD WAS REPRODUCED WITH PERMISSION: COURTESY OF AGILENT TECHNOLOGIES INC.

http://www.ebay.com/itm/HP-54110D-MANUALS-BOARD-LEVEL-SCHEMATICS-3-VOLUMES-/220416346054?pt=BI_Books_Manuals&hash=item3351d687c6 (http://www.ebay.com/itm/HP-54110D-MANUALS-BOARD-LEVEL-SCHEMATICS-3-VOLUMES-/220416346054?pt=BI_Books_Manuals&hash=item3351d687c6)


The same service manual you found on elektrotanya is available from agilent ,but not the other supplements.

http://www.home.agilent.com/agilent/techSupport.jspx?pid=54110D:epsg:pro&sortKey=date&pageMode=MN&lc=eng&cc=IN (http://www.home.agilent.com/agilent/techSupport.jspx?pid=54110D:epsg:pro&sortKey=date&pageMode=MN&lc=eng&cc=IN)

Ive done a google search for the 54110-90903 supplement but found nothing, not for free anyway .
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: TerraHertz on May 13, 2014, 07:16:11 am
No ,i`m not a member,sorry .I just found it using a google search.If you can`t get in touch with him there is a cd on ebay with the full service guide plus a service supplement with everything you need.If you take a look at the cd it has the hp part numbers. At the bottom of that listing though it says :

THIS CD WAS REPRODUCED WITH PERMISSION: COURTESY OF AGILENT TECHNOLOGIES INC.

http://www.ebay.com/itm/HP-54110D-MANUALS-BOARD-LEVEL-SCHEMATICS-3-VOLUMES-/220416346054?pt=BI_Books_Manuals&hash=item3351d687c6 (http://www.ebay.com/itm/HP-54110D-MANUALS-BOARD-LEVEL-SCHEMATICS-3-VOLUMES-/220416346054?pt=BI_Books_Manuals&hash=item3351d687c6)


The same service manual you found on elektrotanya is available from agilent ,but not the other supplements.

http://www.home.agilent.com/agilent/techSupport.jspx?pid=54110D:epsg:pro&sortKey=date&pageMode=MN&lc=eng&cc=IN (http://www.home.agilent.com/agilent/techSupport.jspx?pid=54110D:epsg:pro&sortKey=date&pageMode=MN&lc=eng&cc=IN)

Ive done a google search for the 54110-90903 supplement but found nothing, not for free anyway .

Yeah I found that ebay one too. Also this other one from Artek:
http://www.ebay.com/itm/HP-Hewlett-Packard-54120A-54121A-54121T-Ops-Service-manuals-2-volumes-/370982507560? (http://www.ebay.com/itm/HP-Hewlett-Packard-54120A-54121A-54121T-Ops-Service-manuals-2-volumes-/370982507560?)
which is for the 54121T - my exact one. Though the listing is slightly mixed up, it does say
Quote
INCLUDING a rare set of BOARD LEVEL SCHEMATICS !!!!
CONTENTS (REPEATED FOR EACH MAJOR BOARD ASSEMBLY)
THEORY OF OPERATION
COMPONENT LEVEL PARTS LISTS
BLOCK DIAGRAMS
BOARD PARTS LOCATORS
DETAILED COMPONENT LEVEL SCHEMATICS

Hopeful. 'Rare' - they're not kidding. Guess I'll have to buy it and see.
However, that partial schematic posted on the French forum seems to be much higher res than I'd expect from a commercially scanned manual schematic. I'll still ask him where it came from.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: fluxcapacitor on May 14, 2014, 05:23:46 am
if you can`t contact the french guy then the cd on ebay is your best bet, you can get a paypal refund if its not as described .
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: jlmoon on May 22, 2014, 09:55:20 pm
And the last photo:

PWM IC.. like a 3842 pwm controller
Draw the circuit around it and post.

JLM
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: TheBorg on May 24, 2014, 08:05:43 pm
Anyone know if there is a standardized connector for NEMA 17 stepper motors? Right now I have some steppers with connectors and it looks like 2mm JST but I'm not 100% sure.

Just wondering if it is a standard part or if every manufacturer has a different connector.  :-//
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: fluxcapacitor on May 25, 2014, 02:22:44 am
Just find out the model and manufacturer ,then find the datasheet, it should give info regarding the connector.

http://reprap.org/wiki/NEMA_17_Stepper_motor (http://reprap.org/wiki/NEMA_17_Stepper_motor)
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: TheBorg on May 25, 2014, 03:45:12 am
Just find out the model and manufacturer ,then find the datasheet, it should give info regarding the connector.

http://reprap.org/wiki/NEMA_17_Stepper_motor (http://reprap.org/wiki/NEMA_17_Stepper_motor)
:palm: Durp. Should've been my first step.   ::)
The mating connector is here! http://www.digikey.com/product-detail/en/PHR-6/455-1162-ND/608604 (http://www.digikey.com/product-detail/en/PHR-6/455-1162-ND/608604)
Now to get a component footprint.  ^-^ Thanks!
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: max666 on May 31, 2014, 01:41:22 am
Ok, i don't think I'm going out on a limb, if I say this is an inductor. But what is it specifically and what is it used for?
Could it be for impedance matching of RF antennas?

(http://i.imgur.com/2kcWMHO.jpg)
(http://i.imgur.com/vvqzdg7.jpg)
Type CRP 303983
TFIRX37YY  UX-10035A
15 HENRIES @ 0.110 AMPS D. C.
D. C. RESISTANCE 296 OHMS NOM.
WORK VOLTAGE 11800
RAYTHEON MFG. CO.
WALTHAM, MASS.
5950-645-6213
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Richard Crowley on May 31, 2014, 02:26:20 am
It seems unlikely it was made for RF antenna use.
It is notable that it has such an extraordinarily high working voltage (11.8 KV) but such a remarkably low working current 110 mA).

In these days of solid-state, it is hard to imagine something good for only ~3.5W, but 11.8 KV.
Perhaps a power smoothing or modulation reactor for a fire-bottle transmitter or something???

The color of the case and the stamp give it a military aura, like something out of a battleship?
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: rexxar on May 31, 2014, 02:31:00 am
Wow. That's interesting. 15H? As in whole Henries? I didn't know they actually made inductors in that range  :o

OT: I actually had a conversation with one of my professors about a test question being broken because it'd require a 33KH inductor to get the "correct" reactance  :-DD
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Alexei.Polkhanov on May 31, 2014, 03:01:28 am
I think it is a Reactor. Plenty are available on Ebay and here is a paper explaining its purpose and where it is used: http://www.ab.com/support/abdrives/documentation/techpapers/Line%20Reactors%20and%20AC%20Drives1.pdf (http://www.ab.com/support/abdrives/documentation/techpapers/Line%20Reactors%20and%20AC%20Drives1.pdf)
Could be from anywhere - old railroad locomotive, multi-kilowatt factory motor drives etc.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: fluxcapacitor on May 31, 2014, 03:12:38 am
i found this with a description.It is a REACTOR .

http://coilsandtransformers.tpub.com/218/00-645-6213.htm (http://coilsandtransformers.tpub.com/218/00-645-6213.htm)

    Description

        A coil or coils usually constructed with cores having low magnetic reluctance, whose primary purpose is to furnish an inductive impedance in power or audio frequency circuit ranging from zero to 20 kilohertz (kilocycles). Includes audio frequency and power filter chokes, audio reactors and swinging chokes. Does not include transformers or coils used above audio frequency range. Excludes SATURABLE REACTOR. For reactors with air cores, see COIL (as modified).

Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Alexei.Polkhanov on May 31, 2014, 03:14:09 am
OT: I actually had a conversation with one of my professors about a test question being broken because it'd require a 33KH inductor to get the "correct" reactance  :-DD
I wonder how many Henries are in thing on photo?
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: TVman on May 31, 2014, 05:48:39 am
none!  :-DD
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Rufus on May 31, 2014, 06:01:30 am
Ok, i don't think I'm going out on a limb, if I say this is an inductor. But what is it specifically and what is it used for?

What it says on the tin a 15H inductor with very high working voltage.

What it was made for is a puzzle. Nothing RF the reactive impedance is about 5k at 60Hz.

Could be a smoothing choke for a high voltage power supply or perhaps ballast for a high voltage tube - maybe an x-ray tube.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: SeanB on May 31, 2014, 06:07:11 am
Most likely a DC smoothing choke for a high power AM transmitter, used to remove hum from the driver side ( the 100mA rating is a little low for the PA side, that will be a lot more, so likely for a low power side relative to the main output of typically 10-100kW) so that you do not get mains hum modulated onto the Audio signal. Probably has a 10uF capacitor on the input side and another on the load side separate on the chassis, and is fed from the main HT rail.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: G7PSK on May 31, 2014, 08:19:43 am
Looks like its for a HV neon lamp.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: xquercus on May 31, 2014, 11:07:11 am
Ok, i don't think I'm going out on a limb, if I say this is an inductor. But what is it specifically and what is it used for?

Fluxcapacitor's link includes a National Stock Number so some NATO country presumably purchased it at some point -- that and it was manufactured by Raytheon.  It would indeed be interesting to find out what it's intended applications is.  If you decide to take it apart, I'd be very interested in seeing how and on what the coil is wound.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: SeanB on May 31, 2014, 11:45:54 am
Ok, i don't think I'm going out on a limb, if I say this is an inductor. But what is it specifically and what is it used for?

Fluxcapacitor's link includes a National Stock Number so some NATO country presumably purchased it at some point -- that and it was manufactured by Raytheon.  It would indeed be interesting to find out what it's intended applications is.  If you decide to take it apart, I'd be very interested in seeing how and on what the coil is wound.

I would recommend against opening it. It likely is oil filled, and likely the oil fill is pure PCB oil, and thus toxic. The construction will be a copper winding over a phenolic paper insulating core, with spacers per layer and interwinding paper sheets, with a laminated steel core with a large gap in the middle or a distributed gap, all bolted together with bolts into a steel frame and spaced out from the can on bakelite spacers so that leakage to the core will not cause problems. The wire to the ceramic terminals will be in 2 layers of glass fibre woven sleeving and will go to solder lugs that are bolted to the underside of the ceramic insulators. Likely breakdown voltage of the coil to the frame is 30kV minimum.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: xquercus on May 31, 2014, 12:02:04 pm

I would recommend against opening it. It likely is oil filled, and likely the oil fill is pure PCB oil, and thus toxic.

Ahh, very good point.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: max666 on May 31, 2014, 04:54:16 pm
Yeah, 15H for RF use; I should have known better.

Thank you very much, guys! (http://i.imgur.com/X1w2UKp.gif)

Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Alexei.Polkhanov on June 01, 2014, 01:46:44 am
Yes we want teardown! teardown! teardown! teardown!
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Richard Crowley on June 01, 2014, 05:42:24 am
SeanB already offered IMHO a very likely description of the construction of that inductor.  An inductor, even an "exotic" one like this just seems very very low on the list of interesting things to dissect.  And the likelyhood of being filled with PCB is another good reason to leave it alone, even though there is not universal agreement that PCBs are carcinogenic.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: SeanB on June 01, 2014, 06:13:09 am
US navy method of dealing with PCB filled warships is to either sink them, leave them in storage until they fall apart and sink, or send them to India to be cut up by non US citizens, who die and do not appear on US stats. In all cases export the stuff away. Same way they deal with all the depleted Uranium, by exporting it. In small pieces. In war zones. Far Far Away.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Alexei.Polkhanov on June 01, 2014, 07:04:43 am
Well, PCB maybe not something you want to put on your bread but if you drill 2 holes you probably can easily drain it out. Unless it is heated to really high temperature it is not going generate any deadly toxins. I mean it is everywhere and everyone have been exposed to so much of it already. Handling some transformer oil does not create any real danger.

Also it is most likely not filled with PCB-based oil.



Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: SeanB on June 01, 2014, 07:13:54 am
Military surplus, likely made in the 1950's or so. Of course it uses PCB oil, as that was he de facto high voltage insulating oil then until the late 1970's when it was phased out.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: daqq on June 02, 2014, 08:31:03 am
What could this have been used for:

http://www.ebay.com/itm/POWERFUL-DIODE-ARRAY-LASER-BOARD-GOLD-PLATED-OPTICS-UNKNOWN-APPLICATION-/251537146876?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item3a90c843fc (http://www.ebay.com/itm/POWERFUL-DIODE-ARRAY-LASER-BOARD-GOLD-PLATED-OPTICS-UNKNOWN-APPLICATION-/251537146876?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item3a90c843fc)

? Also, what kind of board is it on? That's not standard FR4. Looks really impressive though :)
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: G7PSK on June 02, 2014, 08:37:54 am
The board looks like phenolic resin, what it was used for I have no idea.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: xquercus on June 02, 2014, 12:06:08 pm
Can anyone take a shot identifying the micro in the attached pic?  It's an 18-pin DIP package and reads:

LESTER 2409
01950 V1.0
9650     L1

The 9650 is likely a date code.  This is in a Invacare Action "24 Volt Fully Automatic Battery Charger" manufactured in 1997.  All the other parts are easy to ID but this is an oddball.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: daqq on June 02, 2014, 12:20:37 pm
Most likely a re-branded microcontroller (guessing by the adjacent ceramic resonator). A PIC would be my guess by the power line (big fat line) position in the middle.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: fluxcapacitor on June 02, 2014, 01:26:24 pm
It will most likely be a PIC as daqq said .The charger is made by lester electrical

http://www.invacare.com/cgi-bin/imhqprd/inv_catalog/partsPHII_home.jsp?s=0&partsHome=partsHome&newSearch=true (http://www.invacare.com/cgi-bin/imhqprd/inv_catalog/partsPHII_home.jsp?s=0&partsHome=partsHome&newSearch=true)

http://www.lesterelectrical.com/products/ (http://www.lesterelectrical.com/products/)

EDIT:
http://www.invacare.com/cgi-bin/imhqprd/inv_catalog/partsPHII_home.jsp?s=0&pagePostCount=1&partsHome=searchCategoriesToParts&formNbr=94-108&categoryDropDown=16484~~16484.pdf&selectedModelID=16484&catalogDropDownBox=94-108&fromPage=searchResults&partNbrOrDescr=LESTER&catalogTitle=Action+Series+Arrow%C2%AE+4M900%2f5M900+Ranger+X%E2%84%A2+M3900+Ranger+II%E2%84%A2+RM900++ (http://www.invacare.com/cgi-bin/imhqprd/inv_catalog/partsPHII_home.jsp?s=0&pagePostCount=1&partsHome=searchCategoriesToParts&formNbr=94-108&categoryDropDown=16484~~16484.pdf&selectedModelID=16484&catalogDropDownBox=94-108&fromPage=searchResults&partNbrOrDescr=LESTER&catalogTitle=Action+Series+Arrow%C2%AE+4M900%2f5M900+Ranger+X%E2%84%A2+M3900+Ranger+II%E2%84%A2+RM900++)

http://www.invacare.com/cgi-bin/imhqprd/inv_catalog/parts2002_big_image.jsp?s=0&imagePath=R1994_108_059C.gif (http://www.invacare.com/cgi-bin/imhqprd/inv_catalog/parts2002_big_image.jsp?s=0&imagePath=R1994_108_059C.gif)


Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: tsmith35 on June 02, 2014, 03:27:29 pm
Lester 240901950 shows up in searches, but no datasheets that I could find.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: xquercus on June 02, 2014, 08:20:51 pm
Thank you, guys.  I did quite a bit of searching and missed that Lester was the name of the company that manufactured the entire charge controller.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: amyk on June 03, 2014, 12:39:09 pm
Most likely a re-branded microcontroller (guessing by the adjacent ceramic resonator). A PIC would be my guess by the power line (big fat line) position in the middle.
Position of the resonator doesn't fit with any PIC I know.

On the other hand, it does fit the Zilog Z86 (http://www.xinpian.net/zilog/z86/Z86L0208SSC.pdf).
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Terabyte2007 on July 30, 2014, 01:30:42 pm
I am relatively sure these are PCB fuses but I can't seem to find the rating. Does anyone know what the rating of these is?

Thanks,
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: PA0PBZ on July 30, 2014, 01:47:12 pm
One black band = 2A according to this:


(https://www.eevblog.com/forum/chat/what's-this-please-(component-advice)/?action=dlattach;attach=103953;image)

No warranties whatsoever of course...
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Terabyte2007 on July 30, 2014, 01:59:11 pm
One black band = 2A according to this:


(https://www.eevblog.com/forum/chat/what's-this-please-(component-advice)/?action=dlattach;attach=103953;image)

No warranties whatsoever of course...

Thanks, this helps!

I may sacrifice one for a test!  :D
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Sionyn on August 01, 2014, 11:58:27 am
anybody recognise the manufacture logo of this microswitch looks like alps, but i can't find any datasheets about alps micro switchs
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: AndersAnd on August 01, 2014, 12:04:23 pm
anybody recognise the manufacture logo of this microswitch looks like alps, but i can't find any datasheets about alps micro switchs
Yes that's an Alps switch.

ALP Switch Disassembly and Assembly Guide http://projectfed.blogspot.dk/2012/12/repairing-omron-and-alps-buttons.html (http://projectfed.blogspot.dk/2012/12/repairing-omron-and-alps-buttons.html)

Repairing Omron and Alps buttons http://projectfed.blogspot.dk/2012/12/repairing-omron-and-alps-buttons.html (http://projectfed.blogspot.com/2012/12/repairing-omron-and-alps-buttons.html)

Alps SKCL/SKCM series http://deskthority.net/wiki/Alps_CM (http://deskthority.net/wiki/Alps_CM)

From this link here's an old Alps keyboard switch with the same Alps logo which has since been replaced with a more modern ALPS logo:

(http://deskthority.net/w/images/9/99/Alps_SKCL-SKCM_base.jpg)
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Sionyn on August 01, 2014, 09:44:14 pm
cheers  AndersAnd i moding this agetec aracde stick to usb
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Hex173t on August 02, 2014, 05:48:36 pm
I have this device that is made by WRE (Wide Range Electronics), model 642-115.  Inside is what looks like a transformer, but there is no secondary output.  It draws 9.5 amps when on, is very heavy, and when on with a steel nail on it it orients the nail from left to right.

My best guess is it's a degausser.  Does anyone know this device?

Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: AndersAnd on August 02, 2014, 05:58:22 pm
I have this device that is made by WRE (Wide Range Electronics), model 642-115.  Inside is what looks like a transformer, but there is no secondary output.  It draws 9.5 amps when on, is very heavy, and when on with a steel nail on it it orients the nail from left to right.

My best guess is it's a degausser.  Does anyone know this device?
Yes a degausser / magnetic eraser to delete magnetic tapes, floppy discs, hard drives or similar.
A "transformer" with no secondary is just a coil. In this case the coil is used to create a very strong magnetic field.
Don't put a mechanical watch or credit card anywhere near it.


Hee's a similar one with a magnetic tape on top of it.

(http://i.ebayimg.com/00/s/ODAwWDEyMDA=/z/UPEAAOxycgVTe25f/$_57.JPG)



the most expensive one I found for sale with a quick search on eBay is 779 USD, so you never know, it might still be worth something:
http://www.ebay.com/itm/400742606111 (http://www.ebay.com/itm/400742606111)

(http://i.ebayimg.com/00/s/Mjk5WDQwMA==/z/rpkAAOxyeR9TI5xz/$_12.JPG) (http://i.ebayimg.com/00/s/MjY2WDQwMA==/z/ATUAAMXQPatTI5x3/$_12.JPG) (http://i.ebayimg.com/00/s/MjY3WDQwMA==/z/rukAAOxyeR9TI5x4/$_12.JPG)
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Richard Crowley on August 02, 2014, 06:19:33 pm
Many of the final-generation digital tape media were very-high-coercivity and required very strong magnetic fields to erase the tape.  Thus the high prices for what would have otherwise simple commodity degaussers (half-a-transformer as AndersAnd said.)
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Hex173t on August 02, 2014, 06:26:16 pm
Well how about that?  I got it for free, figuring I could use the enclosure for something.  It's not as big as the high dollar ones on ebay but still, might be worth more than I paid.

Thanks all

Bill
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Terabyte2007 on August 02, 2014, 07:16:09 pm
While cleaning up my parts bin I found this. Curious, I wanted to see what it was so I pulled out my Fluke and measured about 11 MOhms. I then checked it again and got 7M. So I pulled out another DMM, my Amprobe, 9M, again another Fluke, 15M. I then checked it with my Electrometer, 23M, I then used my LCR meter, 3.4K, 2nF capacitance and no inductance. But the curious problem, I get widely different measured values across all my test gear which has me curious as to what this is? If anything, just out of curiosity!
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: SeanB on August 02, 2014, 07:26:43 pm
It is a diode............

Likely 1N745 200V zener diode.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: PA0PBZ on August 02, 2014, 07:28:03 pm
What is it ,glass? Is there any text on it beside the C D I'm imagining to see?
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Terabyte2007 on August 02, 2014, 07:30:07 pm
What is it ,glass? Is there any text on it beside the C D I'm imagining to see?

It might be glass or an epoxy resin of sorts. It has CD printed twice on it. SeanB mentioned it may be a diode, but it does not have the properties of most diodes I worked with.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Terabyte2007 on August 02, 2014, 07:35:02 pm
It is a diode............

Likely 1N745 200V zener diode.

Thanks, I'll take a look at the datasheet.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Terabyte2007 on August 02, 2014, 07:49:03 pm
It is a diode............

Likely 1N745 200V zener diode.

Your right, it's a zener. Never even thought to check that, the coding on the part got me. Not sure I ever ran across banding like that with a zener diode. Thanks!
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: AndersAnd on August 03, 2014, 11:25:44 am
(https://www.eevblog.com/forum/chat/what's-this-please-(component-advice)/?action=dlattach;attach=104304;image)
It is a diode............

Likely 1N745 200V zener diode.
Why 745?

As far as I can tell the color code is violet (7), yellow (4), blue (6) and the 4th ring looks brown (A) but the picture isn't too well lit, so I'm not entirely sure from the picture if the 4th ring is brown (A) or red (B)? So shouldn't it be 1N746A or 1N746B?
The brown or red 4th ring indicates it's an 'A' or 'B' model respectively: 1N746A or 1N746B according to this Diode Color ID Chart : http://www.crystalradio.net/cal/diodeid.shtml (http://www.crystalradio.net/cal/diodeid.shtml)
(http://www.crystalradio.net/cal/diodeid.jpg)

You can also entered the color code as an 1N color code in MiscEl [Miscellaneous electronics calculations]: http://www.miscel.dk/MiscEl/miscel.html (http://www.miscel.dk/MiscEl/miscel.html)

1N746A screenshot:
(https://www.eevblog.com/forum/chat/what's-this-please-(component-advice)/?action=dlattach;attach=104407;image)

1N746B screenshot:
(https://www.eevblog.com/forum/chat/what's-this-please-(component-advice)/?action=dlattach;attach=104409;image)
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: SeanB on August 03, 2014, 11:35:36 am
Easy enough to tell if it is a 3v or 200V zener then, use a resistor and a 10v supply. I got the diode part right, though I probably misread the colours on it.

5, 6 what is a simple one digit error in the LSB going to do anyway............ ;)

Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Terabyte2007 on August 03, 2014, 11:42:04 am
Great info! Thanks much! A little embarrassed though that I did not even think to check for a diode. Trying to cram too much into my day and not taking the time!  :palm:
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Electronics on August 18, 2014, 07:41:10 pm
I happened to get this board when I bought a HV powersupply for radar. I can identify all the pieces other than these black components. They're all mounted on a central metal bar which has connections at either end. The resistance between the two connections on the side is almost nothing (<0.5 Ohms). Anyone got any ideas?
(http://i.imgur.com/i5uBMMMl.jpg)(http://i.imgur.com/AaYdwpJl.jpg)(http://i.imgur.com/BX0V0cXl.jpg)
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Richard Crowley on August 18, 2014, 07:53:42 pm
I strongly suspect those are mechanical (magnetostrictive) delay lines.  Was this by any chance a phased-array radar?

EDIT: On second thought, with only two terminals, it seems more likely they are inductors.  Although I wonder about the use of that common bolt through the center of all the devices. It seems like that would constitute a "secondary turn" that couples them all together. Or maybe not, if it is not a complete turn/loop.

You see warnings with modern torrodial power transformers to NOT create an unintentional "shorted turn" by using a metallic bolt with both ends in contact with the  chassis, etc.

(http://i141.photobucket.com/albums/r73/topcom/ShortedTurn.jpg)
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: sunnyhighway on August 18, 2014, 08:42:11 pm
The number on top looks like a NATO stock number, which can be broken down.

5950-99-523-4132

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_NATO_Supply_Classification_Groups (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_NATO_Supply_Classification_Groups)
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/NATO_Stock_Number (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/NATO_Stock_Number)

59xx: Electrical and Electronic Equipment Components
99: United Kingdom

The first three segments can be found here:
http://www.abtus.com/assets/downloads/2008/12/Abtus_Nato_List.pdf (http://www.abtus.com/assets/downloads/2008/12/Abtus_Nato_List.pdf)

523: Some sort of transformer?
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Alexei.Polkhanov on August 19, 2014, 03:34:25 am
Wow that looks like some old equipment! What year is that radar from?
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Alexei.Polkhanov on August 19, 2014, 03:36:50 am
I would be curious to know what material those spacers (disks) made from?
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: IO390 on August 19, 2014, 05:56:19 pm
Image credit goes to Robrenz. It's from the PSU thread but I can't find many pictures of these things...

Those number selector things, where do you get them and what is the proper name? I've also seen one where it has a sort of notched wheel sticking out and you can turn that, as opposed to buttons.

Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: PA0PBZ on August 19, 2014, 06:10:02 pm
"Thumbwheel" for some reason:

https://www.google.com/search?q=thumbwheel&tbm=isch (https://www.google.com/search?q=thumbwheel&tbm=isch)

Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Richard Crowley on August 19, 2014, 06:12:05 pm
Those are pushbutton-actuated "thumbwheel switches".
In the example above, it is quite probable the switches and the "fine control" pot at the right are logically connected together as a simple potentiometer in an analog circuit.
They commonly used 1-2-4-8 stepped resistors wired to the BCD-encoded switch segments.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Alexei.Polkhanov on August 22, 2014, 01:52:34 am
I am still puzzled by those black components from radar's power supply. Hate mysteries :-) If Richard's theory that these are inductors is right then I wonder why they market pins as "S" and "F"? For inductor it should not matter right? Also I don't understand how exactly such delay line would work? Metal bar in the center is connected which means it is not just for mounting.

Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Rufus on August 22, 2014, 02:50:02 am
I am still puzzled by those black components from radar's power supply. Hate mysteries :-) If Richard's theory that these are inductors is right then I wonder why they market pins as "S" and "F"?

The electrical connections to the rod going through the middle suggests the rod is a single turn primary of a toroidal transformer with the blocks being multiple secondary windings. S and F is likely Start and Finish of the winding, the phase being important.

The devices on the aluminum brackets look like they could be dual diodes in TO220 packages. It could be 6 separate supplies but it looks more like some kind of multiplier stack producing a single high voltage output. I would not be surprised if it is a pulse supply with a capacitor being discharged into the primary periodically.

Having searched the web a bit dumping a capacitor into the primary of a pulse transformer the secondary of which powers a magnetron seems to be a common way of generating short radar pulses.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Richard Crowley on August 22, 2014, 04:13:39 am
I am still puzzled by those black components from radar's power supply. Hate mysteries :-) If Richard's theory that these are inductors is right then I wonder why they market pins as "S" and "F"?
Start and Finish (the two ends of the winding).
Quote
For inductor it should not matter right?
Theoretically. But if there were some intended interaction along that magnetic shish-kabob, then they would probably want the physical windings "in-phase".
Quote
Also I don't understand how exactly such delay line would work? Metal bar in the center is connected which means it is not just for mounting.
Maybe it is just grounded. Especially if it is subject to some high-level RF fields, etc.  Hard to believe it is intended to be a "winding" of the composite inductor. It would be extraordinarily low impedance. Unless they were running some high-current signal through it, but I would expect heavier wiring.   :-//
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Alexei.Polkhanov on August 22, 2014, 05:06:45 am
Then pulse will be for a pulse TWT tube or Klystron like on photo but smaller. I am not sure if those things can be called "magnetron". It must have been pretty small radar then. :-\ Sources I found on internet like this http://www.aps.anl.gov/Accelerator_Systems_Division/Radio_Frequency/Presentations_and_Lectures/Cross_Training/Documents/Cours_Presentation%203-7-08.pdf (http://www.aps.anl.gov/Accelerator_Systems_Division/Radio_Frequency/Presentations_and_Lectures/Cross_Training/Documents/Cours_Presentation%203-7-08.pdf) show that inductors used to make the pulse shaped more uniformly square, not to generate delay.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Alexei.Polkhanov on August 22, 2014, 07:07:10 am
I think I found complete description of that entire assembly!

Look at this document on page 70 where they talk about "output stalk": http://www.lle.rochester.edu/media/publications/lle_review/documents/v133/133_07_Solid.pdf (http://www.lle.rochester.edu/media/publications/lle_review/documents/v133/133_07_Solid.pdf). Center rod is output. So it is a HV pulse transformer and that thing is called "pulser stack". Design described in the paper is pretty cool - they used METGLAS cores and 90 $80 RF  MOSFETs.  :D
(http://canada.newark.com/ixys-rf/ixzr08n120a/mosfet-n-rf-isoplus247/dp/42M1935?ost=IXZR08 (http://canada.newark.com/ixys-rf/ixzr08n120a/mosfet-n-rf-isoplus247/dp/42M1935?ost=IXZR08))

So those black components are definitely inductors and they most likely have high-permeability core inside.

Edit: I think it is essentially non-destructive version of flux compression generator (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Explosively_pumped_flux_compression_generator (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Explosively_pumped_flux_compression_generator)). I sooo want to build one now >:D.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Electronics on August 22, 2014, 01:14:06 pm
The devices on the aluminum brackets look like they could be dual diodes in TO220 packages. It could be 6 separate supplies but it looks more like some kind of multiplier stack producing a single high voltage output.
The TO220 packages are BT151's - SCRs
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Alexei.Polkhanov on August 22, 2014, 05:31:53 pm
The devices on the aluminum brackets look like they could be dual diodes in TO220 packages. It could be 6 separate supplies but it looks more like some kind of multiplier stack producing a single high voltage output.
The TO220 packages are BT151's - SCRs
Looking at the schematics from the document I linked see it is almost exactly same except SCRs are used instead of MOSFET and also I don't see any charge storage capacitors and clamping diodes. Those big blue components on the left look like HV capacitors but they are not connected to inductors directly?
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: TheBorg on August 23, 2014, 03:33:56 am
Any idea what these connectors are? I commonly see them on laptops (mostly Apple devices). Looks like I need to repair a few and can't seem to find anywhere to buy them...


Edit: been searching some more and it might be the Pico-EZ mate connector series. Though if anyone thinks otherwise, please feel free to tell me!
http://www.digikey.com/product-detail/en/0781710002/WM4459CT-ND/2424928 (http://www.digikey.com/product-detail/en/0781710002/WM4459CT-ND/2424928)
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: ablacon64 on August 24, 2014, 01:44:25 am
Any idea what these connectors are? I commonly see them on laptops (mostly Apple devices). Looks like I need to repair a few and can't seem to find anywhere to buy them...

I believe those are Apple proprietary connectors since I only see them on Apple's laptops. Once I had one like those broken, it was for the cooler fan, since I couldn't find a replacement just desoldered it and soldered the cooler fan wires directly to the motherboard pads.

Edit: See this: http://www.digikey.com/product-detail/en/0781710004/WM4460CT-ND/2424929 (http://www.digikey.com/product-detail/en/0781710004/WM4460CT-ND/2424929)
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: d-chord on August 24, 2014, 05:06:28 am
Hi,

I'm not sure that this is the appropriate thread for this, but here goes.

I've got an LG OS-5020 oscilloscope that I recently purchased (my first scope).  It apparently had a blown channel 2.  I did a little poking around and decided to swap what I'm pretty sure is a JFET between channels 1 and 2.  After swapping this component (labeled "304 E7G" - photo attached), channel 1 worked and channel 2 didn't.  The channel that doesn't work doesn't have a trace at all.  I don't have a schematic, but there is one available for a similar scope, the OS-9020G.  This schematic lists a part "2SK304E" and is the only FET in the parts list.

It doesn't seem like this part is available anymore, so I bought an ON Semi "MFP4393" which seemed to be fairly similar.  The pinouts are different, so I had to do some creative bending of the legs to make sure the S/G/D pins are in the right holes (marked on the circuit board even, which is nice).  There's no change with this part in place; the failed channel still doesn't display.  And yes, I checked and the legs weren't shorted against each other.  I even tried a MOSFET (Fairchild BS170) to no avail.  I guess there's no standard pinout for FETs because the BS170 actually does have the same pinout as the supposed original.

One other piece of information is that I measured the resistance between legs of each of the two components.  Assuming I have the pinouts correct, the bad one measures:  S-D: 204 Ohms, S-G and D-G are both about 10K.   The good one measures: S-D: about 60K and S-G and D-G are open.

I was hoping that someone might be able to confirm that this part is in fact a JFET.

If anyone has any other advice on what might be a good replacement, it would be appreciated.

-David
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Richard Crowley on August 24, 2014, 05:48:04 am
Google says that "Buy-Transistors" has 7 of them for sale at £1.44 each.
http://www.buy-transistors.com/transistors/2sk304e.html (http://www.buy-transistors.com/transistors/2sk304e.html)
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: amyk on August 24, 2014, 11:53:25 am
Any idea what these connectors are? I commonly see them on laptops (mostly Apple devices). Looks like I need to repair a few and can't seem to find anywhere to buy them...


Edit: been searching some more and it might be the Pico-EZ mate connector series. Though if anyone thinks otherwise, please feel free to tell me!
http://www.digikey.com/product-detail/en/0781710002/WM4459CT-ND/2424928 (http://www.digikey.com/product-detail/en/0781710002/WM4459CT-ND/2424928)
You might want to check the schematic... at least I know that J6500 on an M51 board is a Foxconn HS8804F-B. (http://www.fit-foxconn.com/search/Product_Details_Report.asp?P_PN=HS8804F-B&P_type=Wire-to-Board%20Connector&P_Family=Header&P_Series=WTB%20SMT%20Header&searchTypeID=4) Not surprising as Foxconn make much of Apple's boards.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: d-chord on August 24, 2014, 12:58:46 pm
Thanks Richard!  I've got two of those JFETs on the way (one spare just in case).

-David
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: TheBorg on August 26, 2014, 02:24:29 am
Any idea what these connectors are? I commonly see them on laptops (mostly Apple devices). Looks like I need to repair a few and can't seem to find anywhere to buy them...


Edit: been searching some more and it might be the Pico-EZ mate connector series. Though if anyone thinks otherwise, please feel free to tell me!
http://www.digikey.com/product-detail/en/0781710002/WM4459CT-ND/2424928 (http://www.digikey.com/product-detail/en/0781710002/WM4459CT-ND/2424928)
You might want to check the schematic... at least I know that J6500 on an M51 board is a Foxconn HS8804F-B. (http://www.fit-foxconn.com/search/Product_Details_Report.asp?P_PN=HS8804F-B&P_type=Wire-to-Board%20Connector&P_Family=Header&P_Series=WTB%20SMT%20Header&searchTypeID=4) Not surprising as Foxconn make much of Apple's boards.

Yikes, thats a very close part! I can't find a schematic for it dang it. However I think it is the EZ mate, the text in the corner as well as height matches on a similar board. I would check the pin to pin distance but I don't trust my calipers down at 0.05mm difference.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: IO390 on September 03, 2014, 01:36:03 pm
I've found some old panel meters and the manufacturer's name is in some sort of italics so I can't read it. Does anyone recognise it?
Cheers
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: ElektroQuark on September 03, 2014, 01:40:53 pm
Ernest Turner instruments
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: IO390 on September 03, 2014, 02:19:29 pm
Ernest Turner instruments

Thanks!
Title: Re: Sensor
Post by: mswhin63 on September 03, 2014, 02:38:26 pm
Hi, Can anyone tell me what kind of sensor it is that is in the photo please. Just cleaning out some parts.

Just in case someone wanted to know what the above item was that was posted late last year, It turns out to be Hall effect sensors mounted inside brass fitting.

Click above the quote link to see the offending component
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Hardcorefs on September 04, 2014, 04:26:15 am
Had A dig about but cannot find  full part number for:
buck/boost chip
Chip2

Also looking for the manufacturer of the inductor, since I have a couple smashed( its 4mm across the ferrite flat sides and about 6.8mm board solder to solder)

I was going to get the inductance from a scope+sig gen. combo.


I'm more interested in a spec sheet to get the maximum working current so I can substitute a more available part.

Thanks


Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: tautech on September 04, 2014, 04:35:56 am
LT3740 DC-DC 300 KHz
http://cds.linear.com/docs/en/press-release/LT3740%20Press%20Release.pdf (http://cds.linear.com/docs/en/press-release/LT3740%20Press%20Release.pdf)
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Hardcorefs on September 04, 2014, 08:36:15 am
Hi,
Thanks for the quick reply, I had actually tried maxim/TI & Linear and did not get any hits……

But this at least gets me in the ballpark for a design I can use to figure out the inductor
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: AndersAnd on September 04, 2014, 09:44:52 am
U31 (chip 2) is a Linear Technology LTC3601.

LTC3601 1.5A, 15V Monolithic Synchronous Step-Down Regulator:
 http://cds.linear.com/docs/en/datasheet/3601fb.pdf (http://cds.linear.com/docs/en/datasheet/3601fb.pdf)

Part marking at page 2 says: "PART MARKING: LFJC (16-Lead (3mm × 3mm) Plastic QFN)", just like it says in your picture.

Took less than 30 seconds to find this a simple Google search: http://lmgtfy.com/?q=LFJC+IC (http://lmgtfy.com/?q=LFJC+IC)

(https://www.eevblog.com/forum/chat/what's-this-please-(component-advice)/?action=dlattach;attach=107797;image)

http://www.linear.com/product/LTC3601 (http://www.linear.com/product/LTC3601)

QFN-16
(http://cds.linear.com/image/8385.png)

Typical Application
(http://cds.linear.com/image/8383.png)
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Hardcorefs on September 04, 2014, 10:10:09 am
Much appreciated… I just don't know what is going on at the moment….. It's been a rough week……
Title: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: timb on September 04, 2014, 10:34:59 am
Hey guys, any idea what this IC is? It's on a cheap $1 boost regulator from China. I've googled the numbers with every combination of words I can think of and nothing...

31 E12

(http://tapatalk.imageshack.com/v2/14/09/04/330c90ecdb44f59a5a6fd9822c7f6d30.jpg)

Another, unrelated question: I've got an inductor I pulled off an old laptop motherboard. It's labeled "100PF" on the top. I imagine this means 100uH, but I've just never seen that letter combination before. Any ideas?

Thanks!


Sent from my Smartphone
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: tautech on September 04, 2014, 10:44:13 am
Maybe this guy: Google search "31 sot23-6 ic"
http://www.digikey.com/product-detail/en/MAX6363LUT31-T/MAX6363LUT31-T-ND/507139 (http://www.digikey.com/product-detail/en/MAX6363LUT31-T/MAX6363LUT31-T-ND/507139)
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: timb on September 04, 2014, 06:57:51 pm
Nope, linked part is a uP Watchdog. The part I’m after would be for a boost (step-up) converter with an external switch (at least there’s an external FET connecting the output side of the inductor to ground; the IC seems to connect to the anode of the output diode, but I assume that’s for power). Input voltage range is 2.3 to 5.5V; output is programmed at 5V on this unit, but I imagine the range is 5-12V at least.

Though that Google search is bringing up some interesting results!
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: tsmith35 on September 05, 2014, 01:34:59 am
Hey guys, any idea what this IC is? It's on a cheap $1 boost regulator from China. I've googled the numbers with every combination of words I can think of and nothing...
31 E12

Same IC, same indentations, PN 31-E12... Aliexpress (http://www.aliexpress.com/store/product/6-lcd-power-supply-ic-31-e12-401f-an-22b-ip59m-hh2ca/413018_851736799.html)
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: timb on September 05, 2014, 01:43:52 am
Hey guys, any idea what this IC is? It's on a cheap $1 boost regulator from China. I've googled the numbers with every combination of words I can think of and nothing...
31 E12

Same IC, same indentations, PN 31-E12... Aliexpress (http://www.aliexpress.com/store/product/6-lcd-power-supply-ic-31-e12-401f-an-22b-ip59m-hh2ca/413018_851736799.html)

Nice! Now to find a datasheet…
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: PedroDaGr8 on September 05, 2014, 06:33:52 am
Got a strange one. What is this? It was on a data logger near the Holtek  uC. There is a crystal oscillator so I don't think it's that. Just stuck me as strange.

(http://img.tapatalk.com/d/14/09/05/edare6ed.jpg)

(http://img.tapatalk.com/d/14/09/05/tybyquta.jpg)



Sent from my LGLS990 using Tapatalk

Title: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: timb on September 05, 2014, 06:57:25 am
That's a crystal or ceramic resonator, for sure. See how it connects straight to the two capacitors, which in turn go to ground? It also goes into adjacent pins on the uC.

I've seen them in very similar packages.

A lot of uC's use two crystals: One for the main clock/PLL and another (normally 32.768KHz) for the aux clock or RTC!



Sent from my Smartphone
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: amyk on September 05, 2014, 12:27:13 pm
Hey guys, any idea what this IC is? It's on a cheap $1 boost regulator from China. I've googled the numbers with every combination of words I can think of and nothing...
31 E12

Same IC, same indentations, PN 31-E12... Aliexpress (http://www.aliexpress.com/store/product/6-lcd-power-supply-ic-31-e12-401f-an-22b-ip59m-hh2ca/413018_851736799.html)
Except that doesn't actually say what it is...

Here's the closest I could find: http://www.yuantai-tech.com/uploadfile/20130107104303355.pdf (http://www.yuantai-tech.com/uploadfile/20130107104303355.pdf)
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: wiss on September 07, 2014, 01:32:09 pm
What is this? "Normal" pin-spacing. Might be DDR-tech.

Diode-resistance tested it, 0.6 V from pins 1-4 to pin 5, open circuit in the opposite direction.  Diode array with common cathode at pin 5? What would the use be?
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: janekm on September 07, 2014, 01:38:12 pm
Got a strange one. What is this? It was on a data logger near the Holtek  uC. There is a crystal oscillator so I don't think it's that. Just stuck me as strange.

(http://img.tapatalk.com/d/14/09/05/edare6ed.jpg)

(http://img.tapatalk.com/d/14/09/05/tybyquta.jpg)



Sent from my LGLS990 using Tapatalk

I've used that one... 32.768kHz crystal :) (I suppose it could be a different frequency but that's the most likely) I love that package with the see-through glass top...
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: SeanB on September 07, 2014, 02:47:29 pm
What is this? "Normal" pin-spacing. Might be DDR-tech.

Diode-resistance tested it, 0.6 V from pins 1-4 to pin 5, open circuit in the opposite direction.  Diode array with common cathode at pin 5? What would the use be?

Could be  used for overvoltage protection on digital lines, clamping spikes to Vcc rail so preventing latch up of TTL chips. They were quite common on industrial computers and such as protection where input lines could be routed near high current rails or have transients from hot plugging the cards into the system.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: PedroDaGr8 on September 09, 2014, 12:42:03 am
Got a strange one. What is this? It was on a data logger near the Holtek  uC. There is a crystal oscillator so I don't think it's that. Just stuck me as strange.

(http://img.tapatalk.com/d/14/09/05/edare6ed.jpg)

(http://img.tapatalk.com/d/14/09/05/tybyquta.jpg)



Sent from my LGLS990 using Tapatalk

I've used that one... 32.768kHz crystal :) (I suppose it could be a different frequency but that's the most likely) I love that package with the see-through glass top...

I think you guys are right now that I look at it. The connected capacitors should have been a dead give away.

Now I have this identify request. This is a used deuterium lamp from a BioRad FPLC . I want to identify the connector because it is really nice and solid feeling. It would come in very handy for some stuff if I can source it for a decent price. My guess is no based on how nice it feels and how expensive the instrument is but it would be good to know either way.

(http://img.tapatalk.com/d/14/09/09/5yba4uza.jpg)

(http://img.tapatalk.com/d/14/09/09/y8ugu9un.jpg)

(http://img.tapatalk.com/d/14/09/09/zu9avabu.jpg)

I don't recognize this logo and googling LC connector brings up a bunch of fiber optic connectors.
(http://img.tapatalk.com/d/14/09/09/ymydeqy8.jpg)

Sent from my LGLS990 using Tapatalk
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: tautech on September 09, 2014, 12:51:23 am
Google "7 pin din connector" for various images and suppliers
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: PedroDaGr8 on September 09, 2014, 01:04:23 am
Google "7 pin din connector" for various images and suppliers

I was hoping someone recognized that exact manufacturers logo. I'm familiar with the wide selection of din connectors.

Sent from my LGLS990 using Tapatalk

Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Alexei.Polkhanov on September 09, 2014, 03:22:23 am
Now I have this identify request. This is a used deuterium lamp from a BioRad FPLC . I want to identify the connector because it is really nice and solid feeling. It would come in very handy for some stuff if I can source it for a decent price. My guess is no based on how nice it feels and how expensive the instrument is but it would be good to know either way.

Very interesting. I am just curious why FPLC  is using Deuterium lamp - would not modern UV LEDs suffice? Does it need short wave UV like <260 nm to work?
Sorry for dumb question. I just found out what FPLC is from this video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N7vxq948l-U (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N7vxq948l-U) It is always fascinating to find out about some kind of rare industrial gadget.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: PedroDaGr8 on September 09, 2014, 03:35:32 am
Now I have this identify request. This is a used deuterium lamp from a BioRad FPLC . I want to identify the connector because it is really nice and solid feeling. It would come in very handy for some stuff if I can source it for a decent price. My guess is no based on how nice it feels and how expensive the instrument is but it would be good to know either way.

Very interesting. I am just curious why FPLC  is using Deuterium lamp - would not modern UV LEDs suffice? Does it need short wave UV like <260 nm to work?
Sorry for dumb question. I just found out what FPLC is from this video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N7vxq948l-U (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N7vxq948l-U) It is always fascinating to find out about some kind of rare industrial gadget.

It is used in a multi-wavelength absorbance detector. This particular module can detect absorbance at four different user selected wavelengths from 190nm-800nm. This is very useful in determining particular compounds as they come off the column. FPLC can range from small analytical grade instruments like the BioRad NGC and the GE AKTA up to enormous industrial grade prep instruments. They are mainly used for the rapid purification of biological mixtures and reactions.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: tsmith35 on September 09, 2014, 03:43:53 am
Now I have this identify request. This is a used deuterium lamp from a BioRad FPLC . I want to identify the connector because it is really nice and solid feeling. It would come in very handy for some stuff if I can source it for a decent price. My guess is no based on how nice it feels and how expensive the instrument is but it would be good to know either way.

It's made by Binder-USA (http://www.binder-usa.com). Looks like their 682 series (http://www.binder-usa.com/general-search/682), but I can't narrow it down without knowing the connector size, termination type, etc.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: PedroDaGr8 on September 09, 2014, 03:56:29 am
Now I have this identify request. This is a used deuterium lamp from a BioRad FPLC . I want to identify the connector because it is really nice and solid feeling. It would come in very handy for some stuff if I can source it for a decent price. My guess is no based on how nice it feels and how expensive the instrument is but it would be good to know either way.

It's made by Binder-USA (http://www.binder-usa.com). Looks like their 682 series (http://www.binder-usa.com/general-search/682), but I can't narrow it down without knowing the connector size, termination type, etc.

That is really damn impressive, I would never have guessed that was just a B. It most certainly does look like the 682 binder connector. Thanks a bunch mate!
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: timb on September 09, 2014, 07:10:19 am

Now I have this identify request. This is a used deuterium lamp from a BioRad FPLC . I want to identify the connector because it is really nice and solid feeling. It would come in very handy for some stuff if I can source it for a decent price. My guess is no based on how nice it feels and how expensive the instrument is but it would be good to know either way.

It's made by Binder-USA (http://www.binder-usa.com). Looks like their 682 series (http://www.binder-usa.com/general-search/682), but I can't narrow it down without knowing the connector size, termination type, etc.

That is really damn impressive, I would never have guessed that was just a B. It most certainly does look like the 682 binder connector. Thanks a bunch mate!

Except for the fact that the "C" in that logo would be backwards... X-D

(That said, LC actually would be the initials for a company that does connectors: L-Com) [Not in your connector's case though.]


Sent from my Smartphone
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: taiteki on September 11, 2014, 06:33:30 pm
Hello!
I bought a cheap current and voltage monitor YB27VA 1.5 (1% error).

I cant find the main IC. i think is a MC, but the IC doesn't has any label.

I found some info of an old version.
http://we.easyelectronics.ru/upgrade-repair/voltmetr-ampermetr-yb27va-v13-i-ego-versii.html (http://we.easyelectronics.ru/upgrade-repair/voltmetr-ampermetr-yb27va-v13-i-ego-versii.html)
I updated the schematic and start to looking for the pin out ... Microchip, Atmel and ST.
i find nothing with same pinout (Vcc, Vss, Analog imput, etc...).

Some one remember this Vcc and Vss pinout in a MC?


Thx!

(https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/-81Ai6Q2tIOQ/VBIHFXphJqI/AAAAAAAAw48/Md45qNGD3oI/w749-h562-no/P9110388.JPG)
(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-h6VgV4ozIYY/VBIHGx39OlI/AAAAAAAAw5I/w55QFDXYkjc/w749-h562-no/P9110389.JPG)
(https://lh6.googleusercontent.com/-GQDDhpGtXoU/VBIHHxF8M-I/AAAAAAAAw5c/1j3Th7bijHk/w749-h562-no/P9110390.JPG)
(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-ppSrrbLUkwM/VBIHHXxA8YI/AAAAAAAAw5Q/r8auImGiM2U/w540-h434-no/v1.5.bmp)
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: PA0PBZ on September 11, 2014, 06:47:18 pm
Your pictures are not public available. That, or the URL is wrong...
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: taiteki on September 11, 2014, 08:36:13 pm
sorry  |O , fixed  :-+
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: tautech on September 11, 2014, 08:54:53 pm
Lets start with identifying the package. Looks like a 20 pin SOIC but maybe wider.
You will need to measure width & length accurately.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: amyk on September 12, 2014, 05:04:18 am
Just from the fact that VDD/VSS are 1/20 and two ADC inputs 18/19, and pin 4 is grounded, I'm going to guess it's a PIC16F6xx with disabled MCLR.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: taiteki on September 12, 2014, 03:09:11 pm
Just from the fact that VDD/VSS are 1/20 and two ADC inputs 18/19, and pin 4 is grounded, I'm going to guess it's a PIC16F6xx with disabled MCLR.

But 16F631 has VDD in pin 1 and VSS in pin 20, and this IC has VDD in pin 20 and VSS in pin 1.

Lets start with identifying the package. Looks like a 20 pin SOIC but maybe wider.
You will need to measure width & length accurately.


(http://www.elnec.com/pics/sop-soic/soic20-300m.gif)
yes a SOIC 20 12,7x7,4 mm.

thx!
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: amyk on September 13, 2014, 06:37:06 am
But 16F631 has VDD in pin 1 and VSS in pin 20, and this IC has VDD in pin 20 and VSS in pin 1.
From https://www.eevblog.com/forum/reviews/youyue-858d-some-reverse-engineering-custom-firmware/60/ (https://www.eevblog.com/forum/reviews/youyue-858d-some-reverse-engineering-custom-firmware/60/) S3F94C4/S3F94C8 is a possible match.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: taiteki on September 13, 2014, 09:56:42 am
But 16F631 has VDD in pin 1 and VSS in pin 20, and this IC has VDD in pin 20 and VSS in pin 1.
From https://www.eevblog.com/forum/reviews/youyue-858d-some-reverse-engineering-custom-firmware/60/ (https://www.eevblog.com/forum/reviews/youyue-858d-some-reverse-engineering-custom-firmware/60/) S3F94C4/S3F94C8 is a possible match.

 :clap: :clap:

Yes! i think you are 100% right

YB27UA                            S3F94Cx
Vcc  = 3V                       1,8 to 5,5 V @ 0.4 - 4M Hz(LVR disable)
at least 10bits ADC         10-bit conversion resolution
PIN 18 and 19 ADC        ADC0 and ADC1
Internal oscilator            Internal RC: 3.2MHz
Pin 4 as I/O config.         P1.2 is used as input only. Or nReset.
20 pin SOIC pack.           20-SOP-375

(https://lh4.googleusercontent.com/-EL6XBayO5mk/VBQTzrTXA0I/AAAAAAAAw5w/fVvLvBwkeCo/w523-h353-no/zilog%2BS3F94x.bmp)

Thanks a lot, the same MC in two cheap chinese circuits.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Fagear on September 14, 2014, 02:37:27 pm
What are these DPAK devices?
Two "F5T" and two "F5T" with underscore. One of them has blown.
Couldn't find anything in SMD code catalogs. :-//


They are on MediaVision MV 4000 PREMIUM 3D vintage sound card.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: bktemp on September 14, 2014, 03:00:48 pm
Looks like NPN and PNP transistors, probably for the output amplifier.
http://www.yjfy.com/images/oldhard/sound/Pro_audio_Spectrum16_650-0022-01.jpg (http://www.yjfy.com/images/oldhard/sound/Pro_audio_Spectrum16_650-0022-01.jpg)
Same board with 2N4922 instead of F5T:
http://www.yjfy.com/images/oldhard/sound/Pro_audio_Spectrum_16.jpg (http://www.yjfy.com/images/oldhard/sound/Pro_audio_Spectrum_16.jpg)
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: uoficowboy on September 16, 2014, 04:36:03 am
I have some white coax cable that Comcast dropped off. I'd like to put new ends on it - but want to make sure I buy the right crimps.

It is labeled "Amphenol CTFC-T10 4002132 6 series (ETL) US CATV 18 AWG" - does this match a more common style of cable? Maybe RG-6? Or is there a reason I wouldn't want to use this cable? I'm worried that one mention of it I found online suggested it was goo filled for outdoor usage.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Richard Crowley on September 16, 2014, 05:04:30 am
What does "new ends" mean?  F-connector?  BNC?
Nobody in the universe is in a better position to determine whether it is "filled with goo" than YOU are.
Clearly the goo doesn't prevent Comcast from properly terminating it.

There tends to little or no information about these kinds of cable because they are used only by cable companies and never sold to other customers.
It is probably similar to RG-6.  But good luck identifying compatible connectors if you can't even identify the cable.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: tsmith35 on September 16, 2014, 11:17:03 am
I have some white coax cable that Comcast dropped off. I'd like to put new ends on it - but want to make sure I buy the right crimps.

It is labeled "Amphenol CTFC-T10 4002132 6 series (ETL) US CATV 18 AWG" - does this match a more common style of cable? Maybe RG-6? Or is there a reason I wouldn't want to use this cable? I'm worried that one mention of it I found online suggested it was goo filled for outdoor usage.

Any Comcast coax I've ever seen has been normal RG6. I've not found any "goo", though I believe some F-connectors may have a sealing gel inside to help prevent moisture entry. I wouldn't use crimpers, though. Most every coax I've seen for many years uses compression connectors.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: uoficowboy on September 16, 2014, 03:15:27 pm
What does "new ends" mean?  F-connector?  BNC?
Nobody in the universe is in a better position to determine whether it is "filled with goo" than YOU are.
Clearly the goo doesn't prevent Comcast from properly terminating it.

There tends to little or no information about these kinds of cable because they are used only by cable companies and never sold to other customers.
It is probably similar to RG-6.  But good luck identifying compatible connectors if you can't even identify the cable.
I want to put new F connectors on it to change the length. I was hoping to not have to chop in to the cable first in case I'm not able to terminate it (ie it being a strange style).

Any Comcast coax I've ever seen has been normal RG6. I've not found any "goo", though I believe some F-connectors may have a sealing gel inside to help prevent moisture entry. I wouldn't use crimpers, though. Most every coax I've seen for many years uses compression connectors.
Interesting - I had not been aware that some connectors were compression, and others crimp. Doing some reading it sounds like compression connectors are much better for outdoors, which is where I'm installing this. To install compression connectors you need the compression tool, right?

I've attached photos of my cable (I have a bunch of this, not just the one roll). Is that RG-6? Is there a way of telling?

Thanks!
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: SeanB on September 16, 2014, 03:45:56 pm
F connector outdoors needs sealing with self amalgamating tape and then a coat of regular insulation tape over it, all sealed with liquid electrical tape. I use it all except the liquid tape ( insane price here for it) and the connectors come apart easily after a decade outdoors. Regular twist on non crimp f connectors and no problems. Just tape the connector, the socket to the base and the cable for about 1 inch along the PVC insulation.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Richard Crowley on September 16, 2014, 04:58:48 pm
As you have already guessed, re-terminating this cable is not nearly as easy as you think it is.
I seriously question why you even want to shorten the cable, especially if it is going outdoors.
The very many significant risks of attempting this far exceed any possible benefit you would achieve.

Yes, you would need a compression tool to properly install a compression connector (assuming you can find one that will fit the cable in the first place.)
And then you ALSO need some sort of weather protection as SeanB has stated.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: tsmith35 on September 17, 2014, 02:16:54 am
I want to put new F connectors on it to change the length. I was hoping to not have to chop in to the cable first in case I'm not able to terminate it (ie it being a strange style).

Any Comcast coax I've ever seen has been normal RG6. I've not found any "goo", though I believe some F-connectors may have a sealing gel inside to help prevent moisture entry. I wouldn't use crimpers, though. Most every coax I've seen for many years uses compression connectors.
Interesting - I had not been aware that some connectors were compression, and others crimp. Doing some reading it sounds like compression connectors are much better for outdoors, which is where I'm installing this. To install compression connectors you need the compression tool, right?

I've attached photos of my cable (I have a bunch of this, not just the one roll). Is that RG-6? Is there a way of telling?
The strange ends are just plastic knobs that are added to conventional F-connectors to make the connectors more finger-friendly for quick setup by customers.

Are you planning on using these indoors? If so, it's quite easy to re-terminate them with compression connectors, but you'll need several things to do it well: compression connectors, stripping tool and compression tool. You should be able to buy what you need at Home Depot or Lowe's. An Ideal brand compression tool runs about $15, stripper tool is about $15, connectors are about $6 for 10 connectors.

http://www.homedepot.com/s/coax%2520compression?NCNI-5 (http://www.homedepot.com/s/coax%2520compression?NCNI-5)
http://www.homedepot.com/p/Steren-2-Blade-Rotary-Coax-Stripper-ST-204-205/205315702 (http://www.homedepot.com/p/Steren-2-Blade-Rotary-Coax-Stripper-ST-204-205/205315702)
http://www.homedepot.com/s/f-connectors?NCNI-5 (http://www.homedepot.com/s/f-connectors?NCNI-5)

And you'll want a pair of wire cutters, of course. Since you have several of these cables, cut the end off of one of the cables and have a look. Check out some of the videos (https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=coax+compression). It's actually kind of fun making up custom coax.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: uoficowboy on September 17, 2014, 03:22:49 am
I want to put new F connectors on it to change the length. I was hoping to not have to chop in to the cable first in case I'm not able to terminate it (ie it being a strange style).

Any Comcast coax I've ever seen has been normal RG6. I've not found any "goo", though I believe some F-connectors may have a sealing gel inside to help prevent moisture entry. I wouldn't use crimpers, though. Most every coax I've seen for many years uses compression connectors.
Interesting - I had not been aware that some connectors were compression, and others crimp. Doing some reading it sounds like compression connectors are much better for outdoors, which is where I'm installing this. To install compression connectors you need the compression tool, right?

I've attached photos of my cable (I have a bunch of this, not just the one roll). Is that RG-6? Is there a way of telling?
The strange ends are just plastic knobs that are added to conventional F-connectors to make the connectors more finger-friendly for quick setup by customers.

Are you planning on using these indoors? If so, it's quite easy to re-terminate them with compression connectors, but you'll need several things to do it well: compression connectors, stripping tool and compression tool. You should be able to buy what you need at Home Depot or Lowe's. An Ideal brand compression tool runs about $15, stripper tool is about $15, connectors are about $6 for 10 connectors.

http://www.homedepot.com/s/coax%2520compression?NCNI-5 (http://www.homedepot.com/s/coax%2520compression?NCNI-5)
http://www.homedepot.com/p/Steren-2-Blade-Rotary-Coax-Stripper-ST-204-205/205315702 (http://www.homedepot.com/p/Steren-2-Blade-Rotary-Coax-Stripper-ST-204-205/205315702)
http://www.homedepot.com/s/f-connectors?NCNI-5 (http://www.homedepot.com/s/f-connectors?NCNI-5)

And you'll want a pair of wire cutters, of course. Since you have several of these cables, cut the end off of one of the cables and have a look. Check out some of the videos (https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=coax+compression). It's actually kind of fun making up custom coax.
This is going to go outside, but on a covered patio in California (read: barely any rain). So I suspect I don't need to go too crazy with the weather protection (but I could be wrong!)
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: tsmith35 on September 17, 2014, 11:30:32 am
This is going to go outside, but on a covered patio in California (read: barely any rain). So I suspect I don't need to go too crazy with the weather protection (but I could be wrong!)
Yeah, you should be fine. Use silicone (electrical) grease on the inside of the threaded portion, and paint some RTV on the outside of the connector after it's tightened in place. Ideally, you could wrap the outside of the connector with self-vulcanizing tape -- either the normal electrical (thick) type or the thin type (they sell it in plumbing to seal up leaky pipes) should last you quite a while.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: tsmith35 on September 20, 2014, 03:56:08 am
Hey guys, any idea what this IC is? It's on a cheap $1 boost regulator from China. I've googled the numbers with every combination of words I can think of and nothing...
31 E12

Same IC, same indentations, PN 31-E12... Aliexpress (http://www.aliexpress.com/store/product/6-lcd-power-supply-ic-31-e12-401f-an-22b-ip59m-hh2ca/413018_851736799.html)

Nice! Now to find a datasheet…
I contacted the seller, and he sent the attached datasheet.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: amyk on September 20, 2014, 01:50:33 pm
Hey guys, any idea what this IC is? It's on a cheap $1 boost regulator from China. I've googled the numbers with every combination of words I can think of and nothing...
31 E12

Same IC, same indentations, PN 31-E12... Aliexpress (http://www.aliexpress.com/store/product/6-lcd-power-supply-ic-31-e12-401f-an-22b-ip59m-hh2ca/413018_851736799.html)

Nice! Now to find a datasheet…
I contacted the seller, and he sent the attached datasheet.
It'd be wise to save a copy of that somewhere, since it appears to be the only reference to the part on the entire Internet! According to the PDF details it came from a datasheet site but is nowhere to be found there either. All references indicate the company has disappeared (the datasheet is from 2007), but some phrases in the datasheet suggest that many other companies have made nearly identical parts with nearly the same datasheets:

http://www1.futureelectronics.com/doc/RICHTEK/RT9266GE.pdf (http://www1.futureelectronics.com/doc/RICHTEK/RT9266GE.pdf)
http://www.hotchip.com.cn/DownFiles/HT9266_SPEC_english_1.0.pdf (http://www.hotchip.com.cn/DownFiles/HT9266_SPEC_english_1.0.pdf)
http://www.hoperf.cn/upload/ldodc/HD9266.pdf (http://www.hoperf.cn/upload/ldodc/HD9266.pdf)
http://pdf.dzsc.com/ML9/ML9266.pdf (http://pdf.dzsc.com/ML9/ML9266.pdf)
http://www.keyen.com.tw/upload/11/file233.pdf (http://www.keyen.com.tw/upload/11/file233.pdf)
http://www.chipfly.com.cn/File.asp?Id=10 (http://www.chipfly.com.cn/File.asp?Id=10)
http://www.eorex.com/downloads/datasheets/power/EP4001.pdf (http://www.eorex.com/downloads/datasheets/power/EP4001.pdf)
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Precipice on September 29, 2014, 08:25:13 pm
I've got quite a few (10,000?) ICS612G-01T, that I'd like to be able to either use, or toss with a clear conscience.
They're from ICS (Integrated Circuit Systems ), date-coded 0407, so just before IDT bought out ICS.
TSSOP16 package, and I'd imagine they're a crystal oscillator stage, and a couple (or more) PLL stages, possibly programmable by pin strapping, or maybe (ideally!) programmable by i2c. It'd be nice to be able to drop them into designs where I can cope with oddball frequencies...
Office and company moves mean I don't have paper databooks from that era, and searching has come up dry, apart from people in far-off lands who want to sell me their stock.

So: Has any kind soul got, or got access to, ICS/IDT timing products databooks from 2007 or a bit later? ICS216G is what I'm after...
I'd be happy to barter a reel of these parts, or something else from my stash, for an answer!

Cheers!


Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: tautech on September 30, 2014, 01:32:29 am
There is a bunch of very similar ICS IC's listed as LOW PHASE NOISE CLOCK MULTIPLIER here:
http://www.utsource.net/pdf/pdf-ICS614M-01T.html (http://www.utsource.net/pdf/pdf-ICS614M-01T.html)

Hope that helps.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: PA0PBZ on September 30, 2014, 10:21:44 am
It's shown on page 45 in this service manual : http://www.download-service-manuals.com/en/manual.php?file=Philips-4052.pdf (http://www.download-service-manuals.com/en/manual.php?file=Philips-4052.pdf)

Maybe it helps a bit.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Precipice on September 30, 2014, 12:28:45 pm
There is a bunch of very similar ICS IC's listed as LOW PHASE NOISE CLOCK MULTIPLIER here:
http://www.utsource.net/pdf/pdf-ICS614M-01T.html (http://www.utsource.net/pdf/pdf-ICS614M-01T.html)
Hope that helps.

Yeah, unfortunately not, I had a play with one on a breakout board, nothing good happened!
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Precipice on September 30, 2014, 12:32:07 pm
It's shown on page 45 in this service manual : http://www.download-service-manuals.com/en/manual.php?file=Philips-4052.pdf (http://www.download-service-manuals.com/en/manual.php?file=Philips-4052.pdf)

Maybe it helps a bit.

Ooh, that's sort of promising, thanks!
Although, if that's true, it's a multi-output 16.9344MHz to 27MHz converter, that takes enough 5V to need a local 100uF decoupler!
Still. that's enough information to trigger the bounty - where would you like your reel of these marvellous devices posted to? :)

Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: PA0PBZ on September 30, 2014, 01:09:14 pm
Still. that's enough information to trigger the bounty - where would you like your reel of these marvellous devices posted to? :)

Well... You know... I think I have to pass on this generous offer, but thanks anyway  :-+
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: janoc on October 01, 2014, 12:39:23 pm
Hello,

I am looking for the model number or type of this connector:

http://www.back2gaming.com/wp-content/gallery/razer-hydra/razer_hydra21.jpg (http://www.back2gaming.com/wp-content/gallery/razer-hydra/razer_hydra21.jpg)
(sorry for the crappy image, I don't have the device here to take a proper pic)

Here is the receptacle next to a regular micro USB connector (micro USB on the left):
http://voz.vn/wp-content/uploads/2011/08/RazerHydra-4.jpg (http://voz.vn/wp-content/uploads/2011/08/RazerHydra-4.jpg)

It is a connector used on the Razer Hydra game controller. It has 7 pins, it is slightly larger than a regular micro USB, shaped like a smaller version of a HDMI connector.

Is this something off-the-shelf or did Razer invest into a proprietary connector? I was searching for something similar at DigiKey, but couldn't find anything.

Any tips are appreciated.



Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: PedroDaGr8 on October 27, 2014, 09:10:05 pm
Curious if anyone knows the make or type of these resistors. They are from the detector module on a PerkinElmer UV-Vis. Trying to figure out if anything is worth salvaging.

(http://tapatalk.imageshack.com/v2/14/10/27/3f345f58bc94d5f9b5da48cfc43ad2b8.jpg)

(http://tapatalk.imageshack.com/v2/14/10/27/770033ade3efe8826318d7520b6ac611.jpg)

(http://tapatalk.imageshack.com/v2/14/10/27/b7a22c3b733ec78bb55c66ba47e6d7fe.jpg)
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Alexei.Polkhanov on October 27, 2014, 10:42:48 pm
Those are high value precision ceramic resistors especially since they appear next to those lovely precision BurrBrown OpAmps ($45/piece new)  . I would keep them together with the board till I actually have specific use for them otherwise you maybe just wasting time by de-soldering something you will never ever use. If you want to sell them on Ebay - just cut out whole section of PCB with resistors and OpAmps and sell it with everything still soldered on - it worth more this way IMO.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: PedroDaGr8 on October 27, 2014, 11:45:07 pm
Those are high value precision ceramic resistors especially since they appear next to those lovely precision BurrBrown OpAmps ($45/piece new)  . I would keep them together with the board till I actually have specific use for them otherwise you maybe just wasting time by de-soldering something you will never ever use. If you want to sell them on Ebay - just cut out whole section of PCB with resistors and OpAmps and sell it with everything still soldered on - it worth more this way IMO.

Yeah I could tell there are high value, the highest being 1.9G I guess. I was wondering if I could find the precision, temp coeff, etc. for them or if there are datasheets are available. Since there is no manufacturer mark, I figured it was a long shot at best. The op-amps are very nice looking. Additionally, on the other side of the board are a pair of Hamamatsu S1226-44BQ extended UV range silicon photodiodes (3.6mm by 3.6mm detector area).

(http://tapatalk.imageshack.com/v2/14/10/27/6df14135ff1d2aa87444f1ddc65c49bf.jpg)

(http://tapatalk.imageshack.com/v2/14/10/27/0c4ad5b5d11f4371b7af88d439d3b975.jpg)

(http://tapatalk.imageshack.com/v2/14/10/27/cf78b5022546d5364645968b6d7f9ccc.jpg)

(http://tapatalk.imageshack.com/v2/14/10/27/f8779fc7376702e13798630fe66f5faa.jpg)

(http://tapatalk.imageshack.com/v2/14/10/27/0b75b50d9fa217602019d20867fb0dad.jpg)
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: TonyStewart on October 27, 2014, 11:54:33 pm
Looks like a floating Relay controlled DAC precision gain differential amplifier.  Reminds me of a SCADA system I designed for remote controlling Lambda PS using HP rack and HP9825 circa 1978...  Part of a research pre-launch rocket control system.

But Perkin Elmer uses for gas analyzers
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Alexei.Polkhanov on October 30, 2014, 05:20:57 am
remote controlling Lambda PS
What is "Lambda PS"? Lambda brand Power Supply?  1978 - I was 5 y old, cannot recall if there were better choices of photo-diodes for optical links besides UV-enhanced ones :-) Really curious WHY god WHY !?
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Hardcorefs on October 31, 2014, 02:28:16 am
Looking to identify these:
Q101N
L8E008


L8E003, I suspect it is a 'PJ0Q' TI LOW-DROPOUT REGULATOR

Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: TonyStewart on November 04, 2014, 01:12:31 pm
In every CRT monitor or TV I have taken apart, there was this odd inductor that has a permanent magnet glued to it. Is that to offset the magnetic field generated by a DC bias current so a cheaper core can be used?


These are used for corner deflection correction magnets controlled by the CRT controller with front panel display.  Use Dead Pixel Tester (free) dpt.exe  to test all,Monitors for alignment and for LCD's useful for pixel sync testing (alternate black whiTe pixel pattern is the best pattern ) and Gamma Correction test patterns with gradient colours. Use Monitor correction to make a picture perfect calibration. Pin corner correction?

Also There are also ,Common Mode CM, chokes to suppress EMI from the video RGB 50 Ohm signals on VGA cables which carry pixel clock analog DAC rates.  DAC clock rate = number of pixels on screen * refresh rate e.g.  1920*1080*60Hz > 120MHz.  They are either snap clamped  or molded plastic 2 split C ferrite cores.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Phaedrus on November 06, 2014, 08:31:16 pm
Can anyone help me identify this mosfet pack?

It's an 8-pin MLPD (or DFN or similar) dual N-channel mosfet pack, >30A, used in a 12V->5V synchronous buck converter. Markings read B6350D (or it could be 863500; the markings are really faded). I can't find anything at all on Google. If anyone could point me in the direction of a datasheet or even just the name of the manufacturer I'd be much obliged.

Sorry for the crap picture, I can take a better one with my macro lens if needed.

Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: AndersAnd on November 06, 2014, 08:40:45 pm
Can anyone help me identify this mosfet pack?

It's an 8-pin MLPD (or DFN or similar) dual N-channel mosfet pack, >30A, used in a 12V->5V synchronous buck converter. Markings read B6350D (or it could be 863500; the markings are really faded). I can't find anything at all on Google. If anyone could point me in the direction of a datasheet or even just the name of the manufacturer I'd be much obliged.

Sorry for the crap picture, I can take a better one with my macro lens if needed.
You mentioned B6350D and 863500, but it never occured to you the right answer might be a combination of your two suggestions: 86350D or B63500? :palm:

It took me less than 30 seconds to google this part and find it at TI's homepage, using "86350D mosfet" as the first search term.

The marking is most likely CSD86350Q5D Synchronous Buck NexFET™ Power Block MOSFET Pair http://www.ti.com/product/csd86350q5d (http://www.ti.com/product/csd86350q5d)
'D' at the end of the part number could stand for 'Dual MOSFET'.

(http://www.ti.com/graphics/folders/partimages/CSD86350Q5D.jpg) (http://www.ti.com/ds_dgm/images/alt_slps223e.gif)

Looks like your module from a Cooler Master PC power supply:
http://www.coolermaster.com/powersupply/modular-vs-series/v550s/ (http://www.coolermaster.com/powersupply/modular-vs-series/v550s/)

http://www.gamersky.com/hardware/201405/365642_14.shtml (http://www.gamersky.com/hardware/201405/365642_14.shtml)
(https://www.eevblog.com/forum/chat/what%27s-this-please-%28component-advice%29/?action=dlattach;attach=116953;image)

(http://img1.gamersky.com/image2014/05/20140525zy_1/gamersky_059origin_117_20145251453125.jpg)

http://www.itocp.com/htmls/02/n-5302-5.html (http://www.itocp.com/htmls/02/n-5302-5.html)
(http://www.itocp.com/html/20140409/article/V550/images/17.jpg)
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: PA0PBZ on November 06, 2014, 08:58:16 pm
The marking is most likely CSD86350Q5D Synchronous Buck NexFET™ Power Block MOSFET Pair

Good find, the pinout matches too:

(https://www.eevblog.com/forum/chat/what's-this-please-(component-advice)/?action=dlattach;attach=116935;image)
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Phaedrus on November 06, 2014, 10:08:04 pm
Haha, I tried B6350D, B63500, and 863500, but somehow I missed 86350D.   |O :-DD Thanks
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: TheGreatGooglyMoogly on November 08, 2014, 12:38:15 am
I bought this on eBAY, so lets have a little 4000 series challenge. I have not been able to find a datasheet on this, the only pinout i have found seems very similar to the CD4034 bus exchange chip. Have fun!

CD4036AE
RCA  845

(24-DIP)
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: tsmith35 on November 08, 2014, 01:48:01 am
Found it mentioned as a memory module here (http://www.google.com/patents/US3973205)...
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: TonyStewart on November 08, 2014, 09:59:05 am
I bought this on eBAY, so lets have a little 4000 series challenge. I have not been able to find a datasheet on this, the only pinout i have found seems very similar to the CD4034 bus exchange chip. Have fun!

CD4036AE
RCA  845

(24-DIP)

Too easy... 1st search found this....   http://www.maxim4u.com/download.php?id=1560999&pdfid=AEF0F16A3D0BB7F6BA69C03D02758254&file=0282%5Ccd4036a_622111.pdf (http://www.maxim4u.com/download.php?id=1560999&pdfid=AEF0F16A3D0BB7F6BA69C03D02758254&file=0282%5Ccd4036a_622111.pdf)
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: amyk on November 09, 2014, 02:51:48 am
Interesting... the https://archive.org/details/RcaCmosI.c.Databook1983 (https://archive.org/details/RcaCmosI.c.Databook1983) lists CD4036A once but the page for it was replaced with the datasheet for another IC, but the datasheet is present in this other databook (http://bitsavers.trailing-edge.com/pdf/rca/_dataBooks/1982_RCA_CMOS_Microprocessors_Memories_and_Peripherals.pdf). Somehow that number seems to have gotten lost.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: TheGreatGooglyMoogly on November 10, 2014, 06:15:01 pm
Thanks to everyone, I missed checking the one site.

The problem seems to be that the part #'s were overloaded/exchanged at some point. The CD4039 is also a similar device, and if you search CD4039, the datasheet for both devices (CD4036/4039) is the first hit. If you search CD4036, you get a bunch of "dealers" and "brokers" type sites.

The patent hints at the true use of the devices: TV channel storage for Zenith TV's

If you would like to buy mystery vintage chips, this is where I got the chip from:

http://stores.ebay.com/acpsurplus/ (http://stores.ebay.com/acpsurplus/)
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Alexei.Polkhanov on November 12, 2014, 04:15:29 am
I found this 2 device among other RF/microwave stuff. Some of it is from 1970, but some more recent. It is 2 port ( 2 SMA connectors ) device/assembly, has 2 strong magnets on both sides and inside something that looks like a circulator. I am not sure of the purpose of magnets also 3 components are mounted inside one half and soldered on top. They could be resistors or capacitors.
Here are photos of mystery device. What it is?
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: SeanB on November 12, 2014, 04:45:51 am
RF isolator. It is a circulator with the middle port attached to a terminating resistor so that power only flows through in one direction. reverse power is dissipated in the resistor. Magnets are part of the circulator.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Alexei.Polkhanov on November 12, 2014, 07:14:53 am
Thanks, it make sense.

I did some reading on it - appears to be that circulator with magnets is a particular kind known since 1950s. I have seen microstrip-based circulators that had no magnets. I understand that purpose of magnets is to separate signals by means of Faraday effect in microwaves. Still I am puzzled what those round components are? Small rectangular piece of ceramic material with a slit through which copper trace is passing through - I assume it is for filtering? Red SMD components that looks to me like 50 or 100 ohm resistor does not show up as such when I tried to probe it in circuit.

Are there modern circulators that are made using this technology?

I got a clue from looking at some photos that it could be made by "Aertech".

Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: SeanB on November 12, 2014, 06:19:43 pm
Round components are likely trimmer capacitors to match the striplines and minimise the return signal. Red components are likely either a capacitor with a terminating resistor. built in, or a lossy capacitor.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Majorstrain on December 10, 2014, 01:20:20 pm
Does anyone recognize the logo on these OPTO chips?
It's inside the pin one designation and looks like a laid back 4.

New old stoke that I procured and I haven't seen that logo before.

Cheers,
Phil
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Majorstrain on December 10, 2014, 01:57:13 pm
Is that really a 1960 date code on the LM316D?
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: amyk on December 10, 2014, 04:17:49 pm
Does anyone recognize the logo on these OPTO chips?
It's inside the pin one designation and looks like a laid back 4.

New old stoke that I procured and I haven't seen that logo before.

Cheers,
Phil
Fairchild FCD820/FCD820C (http://www.alldatasheet.com/datasheet-pdf/pdf/51231/FAIRCHILD/FCD820.html).

Quote
Is that really a 1960 date code on the LM316D?
No, more likely 1976/1977. National wasn't even making opamps in 1960.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: PA0PBZ on December 10, 2014, 08:53:17 pm
Does anyone recognize the logo on these OPTO chips?
It's inside the pin one designation and looks like a laid back 4.

New old stoke that I procured and I haven't seen that logo before.

Cheers,
Phil
Fairchild FCD820/FCD820C (http://www.alldatasheet.com/datasheet-pdf/pdf/51231/FAIRCHILD/FCD820.html).

(http://img2.wikia.nocookie.net/__cb20070327080501/howto/en/images/4/47/Ic_manuf_logo--Fairchild_Semi-1.gif)
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Majorstrain on December 11, 2014, 01:51:35 am
Thanks guys,

The logo makes a lot more sense when you look at it the right way up. :palm:
Cheers for the date codes as well.

Phil
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: AndersAnd on December 24, 2014, 08:10:06 am
Thanks guys,

The logo makes a lot more sense when you look at it the right way up. :palm:
Cheers for the date codes as well.

Phil
Semiconductor Manufacturer Logos
http://www.elnec.com/support/ic-logos/ (http://www.elnec.com/support/ic-logos/) | http://www.elnec.com/support/ic-logos/manufacturer-description/?manuf=Fairchild (http://www.elnec.com/support/ic-logos/manufacturer-description/?manuf=Fairchild)
http://www.dibsplace.com/design/ICLogos.htm (http://www.dibsplace.com/design/ICLogos.htm)
http://how-to.wikia.com/wiki/How_to_identify_integrated_circuit_%28chip%29_manufacturers_by_their_logos/K-O (http://how-to.wikia.com/wiki/How_to_identify_integrated_circuit_%28chip%29_manufacturers_by_their_logos/K-O)
http://www.classiccmp.org/rtellason/logos/semiconductorlogos.html (http://www.classiccmp.org/rtellason/logos/semiconductorlogos.html)
https://www.westfloridacomponents.com/manufacturer-logos.html (https://www.westfloridacomponents.com/manufacturer-logos.html)
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Fig8man on December 25, 2014, 10:12:20 pm
Anyone know what this chip is? I've searched both lines separately and together but can't find any info on it. (http://tapatalk.imageshack.com/v2/14/12/25/4f860973e185dc24cc3650096aec5948.jpg)


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: tautech on December 25, 2014, 10:38:31 pm
SOIC 14 Package?
Photo not quite shows the whole package.
Add the package description to your search.

There is an F183 PIC in 14 pin SOIC that my search revealed but dont't take it as the answer yet.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Fig8man on December 26, 2014, 12:02:09 am

SOIC 14 Package?
Photo not quite shows the whole package.
Add the package description to your search.

There is an F183 PIC in 14 pin SOIC that my search revealed but dont't take it as the answer yet.


The chip has 16 pins, trying to take a picture through a magnifying glass with an iphone is surprisingly hard.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Richard Crowley on December 26, 2014, 06:42:18 am
It is frequently helpful to know the CONTEXT here!  What kind of gadget is this?  What does the rest of the board look like?
From the partial photo, it looks like a really low-end, mass-produced consumer board, which makes it quite possible those are indecipherable house-numbers.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: firewalker on January 03, 2015, 01:05:37 pm
Does anyone recognize the type and the maker of the following pot? It is the focus control of a Hameg HM605 oscilloscope. The two pin are just for mounting purposes.

(http://i.imgur.com/EjVEkjTs.jpg) (http://i.imgur.com/EjVEkjT.jpg)  (http://i.imgur.com/Y2EnX8gs.jpg) (http://i.imgur.com/Y2EnX8g.jpg)  (http://i.imgur.com/XaXzuTas.jpg) (http://i.imgur.com/XaXzuTa.jpg)  (http://i.imgur.com/tH32gvWs.jpg) (http://i.imgur.com/tH32gvW.jpg)  (http://i.imgur.com/wZ5PxiMs.jpg) (http://i.imgur.com/wZ5PxiM.jpg)

Alexander.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: AndersAnd on January 04, 2015, 01:54:21 pm
Does anyone recognize the type and the maker of the following pot? It is the focus control of a Hameg HM605 oscilloscope. The two pin are just for mounting purposes.

(http://i.imgur.com/EjVEkjTs.jpg) (http://i.imgur.com/EjVEkjT.jpg)  (http://i.imgur.com/Y2EnX8gs.jpg) (http://i.imgur.com/Y2EnX8g.jpg)  (http://i.imgur.com/XaXzuTas.jpg) (http://i.imgur.com/XaXzuTa.jpg)  (http://i.imgur.com/tH32gvWs.jpg) (http://i.imgur.com/tH32gvW.jpg)  (http://i.imgur.com/wZ5PxiMs.jpg) (http://i.imgur.com/wZ5PxiM.jpg)

Alexander.
Looks similar to the bushless version of Piher PC-16: http://www.piher.net/sensors/index.php?page=shop.product_details&flypage=flypage.tpl&product_id=26&category_id=1&option=com_virtuemart&Itemid=31 (http://www.piher.net/sensors/index.php?page=shop.product_details&flypage=flypage.tpl&product_id=26&category_id=1&option=com_virtuemart&Itemid=31)
With the exception that the 2 mounting pins at the top are wider spaced than the outer 2 pins at the bottom.

(http://piher.net/sensors/components/com_virtuemart/shop_image/product/PC16_4af167d32f86d.png) (https://www.eevblog.com/forum/chat/what%27s-this-please-%28component-advice%29/?action=dlattach;attach=127812;image)

You can download the manuals including schematics and PCB-layouts for all Hameg scopes here http://www.hameg.com/manuals.0.html?&no_cache=1 (http://www.hameg.com/manuals.0.html?&no_cache=1)
But please note, they do not include schematics in any non-German manuals. So you need to also download the German HM605 manual to get the schematics and PCB-layouts at the end of the manual.
The focus potentiometer in HM605 is part number VR601 and it's placed on the Z-board. It looks like it is connected to -1250V at through a 392k resistor at one side, so you might need a high voltage approved potentiometer to be safe.

But is the potentiometer broken? Usually it's one of the high value resistors in series with the focus potentiometer going open circuit that causes focus problems. That's a common problem with high value resistors. I've worked at a audio and television manufacturer that had a design rule to never use resistors above 1 Mohm (IIRC) for the same reason, because they often break by going open circuit. Something you usually don't learn while studying, but learn the hard way. At some point someone forgot this design rule in a product and it was overlook in design reviews. So this design made it all the way to production. And as a result a lot of products soon came if for repair with an open circuit high value resistor as a result. Actually I don't know if this is only a problem with high value carbon resistors, or if it's also a problem with metal film resistors. Anybody know or has any experience with this?
At least I do know from experience that regular 1/4W 5% carbon film resistors above 1 Mohm often break with a open circuit after only a short while for no apparent reason, so these high value resistors are very unreliable. So if someone needed >1 Mohm in a design, instead two or more <= 1 Mohm resistors in parallel or series should always be used for reliability reasons.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: firewalker on January 05, 2015, 08:23:30 am
Looks similar to the bushless version of Piher PC-16: http://www.piher.net/sensors/index.php?page=shop.product_details&flypage=flypage.tpl&product_id=26&category_id=1&option=com_virtuemart&Itemid=31 (http://www.piher.net/sensors/index.php?page=shop.product_details&flypage=flypage.tpl&product_id=26&category_id=1&option=com_virtuemart&Itemid=31)
With the exception that the 2 mounting pins at the top are wider spaced than the outer 2 pins at the bottom.

(http://piher.net/sensors/components/com_virtuemart/shop_image/product/PC16_4af167d32f86d.png) (https://www.eevblog.com/forum/chat/what%27s-this-please-%28component-advice%29/?action=dlattach;attach=127812;image)

You can download the manuals including schematics and PCB-layouts for all Hameg scopes here http://www.hameg.com/manuals.0.html?&no_cache=1 (http://www.hameg.com/manuals.0.html?&no_cache=1)
But please note, they do not include schematics in any non-German manuals. So you need to also download the German HM605 manual to get the schematics and PCB-layouts at the end of the manual.
The focus potentiometer in HM605 is part number VR601 and it's placed on the Z-board. It looks like it is connected to -1250V at through a 392k resistor at one side, so you might need a high voltage approved potentiometer to be safe.

But is the potentiometer broken? Usually it's one of the high value resistors in series with the focus potentiometer going open circuit that causes focus problems. That's a common problem with high value resistors. I've worked at a audio and television manufacturer that had a design rule to never use resistors above 1 Mohm (IIRC) for the same reason, because they often break by going open circuit. Something you usually don't learn while studying, but learn the hard way. At some point someone forgot this design rule in a product and it was overlook in design reviews. So this design made it all the way to production. And as a result a lot of products soon came if for repair with an open circuit high value resistor as a result. Actually I don't know if this is only a problem with high value carbon resistors, or if it's also a problem with metal film resistors. Anybody know or has any experience with this?
At least I do know from experience that regular 1/4W 5% carbon film resistors above 1 Mohm often break with a open circuit after only a short while for no apparent reason, so these high value resistors are very unreliable. So if someone needed >1 Mohm in a design, instead two or more <= 1 Mohm resistors in parallel or series should always be used for reliability reasons.

Thanks you for you answer and you effort to help me! I already own the service manuals (German) for this oscilloscope. When the focus problem occurred I was sure that it was one of the resistors that went wrong (R609 to R613 or R615). Gut no. It was VR601. One of the pins wasn't making contact with the graphite inside. I replaced the pot with a 470k one (high voltage from an old CRT tv) and it works fine now. The problem is that the shaft for controlling the focus doesn't much. 

I want to buy a "non working" HM605 for spare parts, but usually the sellers don;t ship outside Germany.

Alexander.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: AndersAnd on January 09, 2015, 08:42:56 am
I want to buy a "non working" HM605 for spare parts, but usually the sellers don;t ship outside Germany.
A lot of German eBay sellers will ship outside Germany if you ask them about the shipping costs to your country, even though the auction often states they don't ship outside Germany. But that's just because many won't go through the trouble of filling in shipping costs to several countries, unless someone is interested or because they don't think anyone is willing to pay for international shipping of the item they sell.
I've often experienced this myself when asking eBay sellers who doesn't list international shipping.

As an alternative you can use a German mail forwarder like, so you can send it to their German adress and they will forward it to your address abroad: http://mailboxde.com (http://mailboxde.com)
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: wiss on January 09, 2015, 09:38:36 am
I have noticed that you will not be able to bid on an item with "Germany Only"-shipping unless you set your country to Germany.
And it seems to be a total bitch to fill out the "More than one country"-shipping in the a no-initial-cost auction, and many sellers do not particularity enjoy reading/writing English...
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: tsmith35 on January 09, 2015, 11:42:18 am
It's not always because of any laziness on the seller's part... international shipping (at least here in the US) is a pain in the rear. The customs forms, invoices and all that combine to make international shipping a somewhat time-consuming activity. On top of that, the delays due to customs may be significant, leading to negative feedback while the item is in transit.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: wiss on January 09, 2015, 01:29:07 pm
It's not always because of any laziness on the seller's part...

Well, when you see an hour or two of work ahead of you to find and enter that information and give up, I would not call that lazy...

Quote
international shipping (at least here in the US) is a pain in the rear. The customs forms, invoices and all that combine to make international shipping a somewhat time-consuming activity. On top of that, the delays due to customs may be significant, leading to negative feedback while the item is in transit.

Compare:
Solartron 7075 within Germany: 6:99 EUR (DHL)
To normal EU: 21:99 EUR (DHL)
Sweden, domestic: 235 SEK (~24 EUR) (Posten)
Sweden to Germany: 685 SEK WTF!!

Within EU no customs or VAT.

Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Vgkid on January 10, 2015, 06:28:14 pm
Those shipping cost are atrocious, that is over 3x the amount to ship my 7065 across the country. Heck i could ship it to Canada cheaper.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: AndersAnd on January 11, 2015, 08:20:15 am
It's not always because of any laziness on the seller's part... international shipping (at least here in the US) is a pain in the rear. The customs forms, invoices and all that combine to make international shipping a somewhat time-consuming activity.
As a private seller you don't have to fill out any custom forms or VAT forms when shipping abroad, at least here in Europe. You only have to attach a invoice, so customs in the receiving country can figure out the value and import duty and VAT if any. And auto creating a complete invoice from an eBay auction is very easy, you just have to hit a button once the auction has ended and print it. So this really isn't an issue at all.

And if you as a private person sell to another EU country there's no import duties or VAT involved at all. However if you are a business and sell over a certain amount annually to another EU country you have to charge the VAT rate of the receiving EU country. But this is not an issue as a private seller.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: janoc on January 11, 2015, 09:10:59 pm
As a private seller you don't have to fill out any custom forms or VAT forms when shipping abroad, at least here in Europe. You only have to attach a invoice, so customs in the receiving country can figure out the value and import duty and VAT if any. And auto creating a complete invoice from an eBay auction is very easy, you just have to hit a button once the auction has ended and print it. So this really isn't an issue at all.

This isn't completely true. It may depend on country, but when I was sending a small package to US from France, the post was demanding me to fill an entire customs declaration for it because it was going outside of the EU customs union. The paperwork can be pretty significant if sending anything worth more than about 100 euro outside of EU.

There is pretty much the same procedure if you are sending something by DHL or UPS. You must fill a ton of paperwork related to customs. The transporter will handle the actual customs for you (and the recipient pays for it!), but still. Oh and God protect you if the customs don't like something on the declaration, then the true nightmare starts.



Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: tsmith35 on January 12, 2015, 12:56:32 am
As a private seller you don't have to fill out any custom forms or VAT forms when shipping abroad, at least here in Europe. You only have to attach a invoice, so customs in the receiving country can figure out the value and import duty and VAT if any. And auto creating a complete invoice from an eBay auction is very easy, you just have to hit a button once the auction has ended and print it. So this really isn't an issue at all.
This isn't completely true. It may depend on country, but when I was sending a small package to US from France, the post was demanding me to fill an entire customs declaration for it because it was going outside of the EU customs union. The paperwork can be pretty significant if sending anything worth more than about 100 euro outside of EU.
Yeah, same deal for me... full customs form filled out with copies, with signature and invoice. USPS doesn't provide tracking except for the higher-$ shipping tiers, and with eBay & PayPal rules, the purchaser can simply claim they didn't receive it and get a full refund.

I guess eBay may have improved the process, and shipping within the EU may be easier than shipping to the EU from outside, but time and risk typically increase with shipping distance. I'm a long way from Europe.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: IO390 on January 20, 2015, 12:05:08 pm
I'm wondering what this part is. I've googled the part number but I've found nothing, which is odd as it is a TI part. It seems to be connected to the output of the fpga in a Siglent function generator. Here's a picture (not mine): http://sigrok.org/wimg/a/a6/Siglent_sdg1010_analog_ti_d85801.jpg (http://sigrok.org/wimg/a/a6/Siglent_sdg1010_analog_ti_d85801.jpg)
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: PA0PBZ on January 20, 2015, 12:15:58 pm
I'm wondering what this part is. I've googled the part number but I've found nothing, which is odd as it is a TI part. It seems to be connected to the output of the fpga in a Siglent function generator. Here's a picture (not mine): http://sigrok.org/wimg/a/a6/Siglent_sdg1010_analog_ti_d85801.jpg (http://sigrok.org/wimg/a/a6/Siglent_sdg1010_analog_ti_d85801.jpg)

DAC8580? http://www.ti.com/lit/ds/symlink/dac8580.pdf (http://www.ti.com/lit/ds/symlink/dac8580.pdf)
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: IO390 on January 20, 2015, 12:22:27 pm
I'm wondering what this part is. I've googled the part number but I've found nothing, which is odd as it is a TI part. It seems to be connected to the output of the fpga in a Siglent function generator. Here's a picture (not mine): http://sigrok.org/wimg/a/a6/Siglent_sdg1010_analog_ti_d85801.jpg (http://sigrok.org/wimg/a/a6/Siglent_sdg1010_analog_ti_d85801.jpg)

DAC8580? http://www.ti.com/lit/ds/symlink/dac8580.pdf (http://www.ti.com/lit/ds/symlink/dac8580.pdf)

Yep, that's it. Thanks  :-+
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: wiss on January 23, 2015, 05:58:33 pm
It's a crystal, but why 4 pins? Is it smart in any way? Does anyone know of a datasheet?
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: elgonzo on January 23, 2015, 06:17:59 pm
It's a crystal, but why 4 pins? Is it smart in any way? Does anyone know of a datasheet?

It is an oscillator. Not sure whether it operates at 3.3V or 5V and what kind of output it has (TTL/CMOS/...).

Unless someone can find the datasheet for that specific SE-TIME oscillator, i would suggest to find out by experimentation (start with 3.3V to avoid magic smoke). Use datasheets from other oscillators (http://www.digikey.com/product-search/en?pv139=243&FV=fff4000d%2Cfff8016e%2C1140050&k=oscillator&mnonly=0&newproducts=0&ColumnSort=0&page=1&quantity=0&ptm=0&fid=0&pageSize=25) as reference for the pinout and operational characteristics. I expect this oscillator to be compatible both in pins and operations with oscillators of the same type from other manufacturers.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: wiss on January 23, 2015, 06:45:03 pm
Thanks!
Using the pinout of this: http://www.digikey.com/product-detail/en/ECS-100AX-500/X951-ND/827244 (http://www.digikey.com/product-detail/en/ECS-100AX-500/X951-ND/827244)
I made it work from about 3 V. Are they any good? Or just very convenient?

Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: elgonzo on January 23, 2015, 07:20:47 pm
Thanks!
Using the pinout of this: http://www.digikey.com/product-detail/en/ECS-100AX-500/X951-ND/827244 (http://www.digikey.com/product-detail/en/ECS-100AX-500/X951-ND/827244)
I made it work from about 3 V. Are they any good? Or just very convenient?

Mostly convenience. A crystal would need some circuity to turn the oscillating voltage from the crystal into a clock signal. Usually MCUs and such have such circuity integrated. An oscillator already provides a clock signal (TTL/CMOS/whatever) without requiring additional circuity somewhere else.

However, nowadays, crystals are preferred. Not only because the BOM will likely be cheaper, but also it is easier to realize low power applications (a MCU can easily shutdown its clock generator if it goes to sleep -- try to do this with an external oscillator...)
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Howardlong on January 23, 2015, 07:29:38 pm
Thanks!
Using the pinout of this: http://www.digikey.com/product-detail/en/ECS-100AX-500/X951-ND/827244 (http://www.digikey.com/product-detail/en/ECS-100AX-500/X951-ND/827244)
I made it work from about 3 V. Are they any good? Or just very convenient?

Mostly convenience. A crystal would need some circuity to turn the oscillating voltage from the crystal into a clock signal. Usually MCUs and such have such circuity integrated. An oscillator already provides a clock signal (TTL/CMOS/whatever) without requiring additional circuity somewhere else.

However, nowadays, crystals are preferred. Not only because the BOM will likely be cheaper, but also it is easier to realize low power applications (a MCU can easily shutdown its clock generator if it goes to sleep -- try to do this with an external oscillator...)

It depends on the requirements. For example, if you need an accurate oscillator, say 2ppm or better, you're going to need an external canned oscillator such as a TCXO.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: elgonzo on January 23, 2015, 07:46:32 pm
It depends on the requirements. For example, if you need an accurate oscillator, say 2ppm or better, you're going to need an external canned oscillator such as a TCXO.

You are right. TXCOs are also available in these 4-pin TH packages. But i guess they would be designated specifically on the package, hence my assumption that the SE-TIME osc. in the picture would not be a TXCO. Or are there TXCOs that are not marked as such?
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: synapsis on January 28, 2015, 01:42:11 am
I figure this is the closest thread for this question, since I already know what it is. I just need to know where to get it. About 4 years ago, our EE sourced this pogo pin, and he's no longer with the company.

Thanks in advance!
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: miguelvp on January 29, 2015, 03:56:58 am
... since I already know what it is. I just need to know where to get it....

If you already know what is it, why don't you share so others can help you find it instead of they having to figure that out first?
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Richard Crowley on January 29, 2015, 04:04:49 am
If you already know what is it, why don't you share so others can help you find it instead of they having to figure that out first?
He said what it is:  It is a pogo-pin.  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pogo_pin (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pogo_pin)
He is asking about sourcing it.
Although one would need some Real World dimensions to do an accurate search.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: tsmith35 on January 29, 2015, 11:32:37 am
Not exactly identical, but look up pogo pin masher. Round tip, but with knurling.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: mswhin63 on February 03, 2015, 01:34:06 pm
I have a 6 Pin IC came from a Charger circuit Sennheiser but would like to get the datasheet. Anyone recognise the number on the components plus the other marking. I believe it belongs to a particular manufacturer but never seen this type before.

Sorry about the quality of the image, but it it was difficult to get the number and so I had to enhance it to see more clearly.

Cheers
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: tautech on February 03, 2015, 06:36:23 pm
There are many hits for T1, can you identify the package?
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Richard Crowley on February 03, 2015, 10:45:48 pm
Identifying the markings on tiny SMD packages requires more than just the mark and even the package.
It also requires the "context" of what is around it, the general historic era, what kind of circuit, etc. etc.
As tautech said, there are many different SMD parts, even in that package, marked "T1"
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: maxinecoless on February 10, 2015, 03:54:46 am
I think ..it is a kind of IC( Integrated Circuits)
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: mswhin63 on February 10, 2015, 04:28:36 am
Identifying the markings on tiny SMD packages requires more than just the mark and even the package.
It also requires the "context" of what is around it, the general historic era, what kind of circuit, etc. etc.
As tautech said, there are many different SMD parts, even in that package, marked "T1"

As mentioned in the post it is from a Sennheiser charging cct. I cant elaborate further. I am not very experienced at identifying non common packages but to say it is extremely small. about 3mm x 1.5mm roughly.

I cant get a hold of the circuit, but I still have another board, I may consider reverse engineer it, just do have a lot of time at this stage. I will add to the forum later when I have the time.

Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: tautech on February 10, 2015, 08:44:17 am
Identifying the markings on tiny SMD packages requires more than just the mark and even the package.
It also requires the "context" of what is around it, the general historic era, what kind of circuit, etc. etc.
As tautech said, there are many different SMD parts, even in that package, marked "T1"

As mentioned in the post it is from a Sennheiser charging cct. I cant elaborate further. I am not very experienced at identifying non common packages but to say it is extremely small. about 3mm x 1.5mm roughly.

I cant get a hold of the circuit, but I still have another board, I may consider reverse engineer it, just do have a lot of time at this stage. I will add to the forum later when I have the time.
If you Google "smd package identification" and use Vernier calipers you'll have the answer.
Calipers are now "a must" for electronic work.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Terabyte2007 on February 17, 2015, 12:23:28 pm
Sorting through a box of NOS parts I came across this. As far as I can tell it appears to be some sort of heating element or spark element possibly. Any help in correctly identifying this item would be greatly appreciated. It has about 95 Ohms across the two input terminals, no PN junctions detected so it's purely resistive. It also has on each end inside a pointed rather thick electrode of some sort.

Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: mswhin63 on February 17, 2015, 01:32:13 pm
Sorting through a box of NOS parts I came across this. As far as I can tell it appears to be some sort of heating element or spark element possibly. Any help in correctly identifying this item would be greatly appreciated. It has about 95 Ohms across the two input terminals, no PN junctions detected so it's purely resistive. It also has on each end inside a pointed rather thick electrode of some sort.

Could be a heating element to heat the fuel before arriving at the injection system, also has an inlet and outlet so it could also be a switch to disconnect the flow.
Can't imagine sparking the fuel before the cylinder.

Have you tried to connect the coil to 12V or lower to see what it does.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: elgonzo on February 17, 2015, 01:56:18 pm
It looks like something related to low/high-pressure applications. Note on one end the large number of mounting holes and an indentation for what looks like an o-ring. The other end is just a flat surface with only four mounting holes. Could it be perhaps a part of something like a valve/emitter or fixture for some kind of measurement apparatus for a high/low-pressure chamber? (Not sure how the 95 Ohm would fit into that speculation, though...)
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: SeanB on February 17, 2015, 07:40:58 pm
Magnetic polariser, it would be attached between a scalar ring set and the LNB of an older C band ( or other band of interest) dish, to enable you to select the polarisation, selecting the polarisation by passing a constant current ( 35mA IIRC or in that ballpark) through it. Was used in the old days before they could make low loss RF switches in a LNB, but a low loss ferrite that would skew polarisation depending on the magnitude and direction of a current in the coil wound around it was easy to do. Date code suggests it was made in December 1997.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Terabyte2007 on February 17, 2015, 07:46:57 pm
Magnetic polariser, it would be attached between a scalar ring set and the LNB of an older C band ( or other band of interest) dish, to enable you to select the polarisation, selecting the polarisation by passing a constant current ( 35mA IIRC or in that ballpark) through it. Was used in the old days before they could make low loss RF switches in a LNB, but a low loss ferrite that would skew polarisation depending on the magnitude and direction of a current in the coil wound around it was easy to do. Date code suggests it was made in December 1997.

Awesome! Thanks Sean...
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: mswhin63 on February 17, 2015, 10:50:31 pm
Sorting through a box of NOS parts I came across this. As far as I can tell it appears to be some sort of heating element or spark element possibly. Any help in correctly identifying this item would be greatly appreciated. It has about 95 Ohms across the two input terminals, no PN junctions detected so it's purely resistive. It also has on each end inside a pointed rather thick electrode of some sort.

Do you want to clarify NOS acronym for us. I haven't used many waveguide so I think there is a bit of a misunderstanding. It does though resemble a waveguide but it also represents a pressure manifold of a Nitrious Oxide System albeit a large one.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: tautech on February 18, 2015, 01:46:10 am
Sorting through a box of NOS parts I came across this. As far as I can tell it appears to be some sort of heating element or spark element possibly. Any help in correctly identifying this item would be greatly appreciated. It has about 95 Ohms across the two input terminals, no PN junctions detected so it's purely resistive. It also has on each end inside a pointed rather thick electrode of some sort.

Do you want to clarify NOS acronym for us. I haven't used many waveguide so I think there is a bit of a misunderstanding. It does though resemble a waveguide but it also represents a pressure manifold of a Nitrious Oxide System albeit a large one.
Outside the Automotive high performance industry NOS is invaribly taken to mean "New, Old Stock"
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: mswhin63 on February 18, 2015, 05:00:52 am
OK, thanks for the clarification  :palm:.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Terabyte2007 on February 18, 2015, 02:44:24 pm
Part of the recently acquired NOS (New Old Stock) parts I gained a few crystal oscillators, good to have around! There is one in particular that I am interested in finding the datasheet for but can't seem to locate one. It's a Corning MC937X5-002W 155.520000 MHz oscillator which I am very interested getting some info on. I have attached some pics. Any help would again be greatly appreciated.

Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: electr_peter on February 18, 2015, 07:45:18 pm
Component has markings "407J(M? symbol)41". It measures open circuit, has no significant capacitance. It is rectangular shaped and very thin, only 2-3mm.

It was used near a heated components. I guess it is a thermal switch, NO and closing at determined temperature. If the heater catches on fire, device will close, short out the supply, blow the fuse in a power supply and prevent power from reaching fire.

However, I could not confirm my guess after looking through thermal switch catalogues. Thermally operated switches usually use bimetallic strips which are much larger in size.

Any ideas?
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Richard Crowley on February 18, 2015, 08:14:39 pm
It could be a failed (open) RTC or thermistor(?)
Assuming that the scale in your photo is cm.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: electr_peter on February 18, 2015, 08:37:35 pm
Photo shows cm reference.
I do not have original circuit anymore, but I recall that part was located very close to main heater power bus. Device was not soldered, just press fitted by contact spring action. Heater had a dedicated thermocouplethermistor and thermostat very close to heat source, this device was separated by strong plastic wall from a heater. Thus I would think it is a NO thermal (suicide) switch rather than a sensor.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: envisionelec on February 19, 2015, 04:44:38 am
It's an obsolete "voltage dependent resistor" AKA Varistor from Stackpole. Stackpole SV230K23.

Here are the specs:

http://www.datasheets360.com/pdf/8484616839472155797 (http://www.datasheets360.com/pdf/8484616839472155797)
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: envisionelec on February 19, 2015, 05:07:39 am
Part of the recently acquired NOS (New Old Stock) parts I gained a few crystal oscillators, good to have around! There is one in particular that I am interested in finding the datasheet for but can't seem to locate one. It's a Corning MC937X5-002W 155.520000 MHz oscillator which I am very interested getting some info on. I have attached some pics. Any help would again be greatly appreciated.

Here you go.

https://web.archive.org/web/20000816192941/http://www.corningfrequency.com/catalog/937_pg058.pdf (https://web.archive.org/web/20000816192941/http://www.corningfrequency.com/catalog/937_pg058.pdf)
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Terabyte2007 on February 19, 2015, 01:02:34 pm
Part of the recently acquired NOS (New Old Stock) parts I gained a few crystal oscillators, good to have around! There is one in particular that I am interested in finding the datasheet for but can't seem to locate one. It's a Corning MC937X5-002W 155.520000 MHz oscillator which I am very interested getting some info on. I have attached some pics. Any help would again be greatly appreciated.

Here you go.

https://web.archive.org/web/20000816192941/http://www.corningfrequency.com/catalog/937_pg058.pdf (https://web.archive.org/web/20000816192941/http://www.corningfrequency.com/catalog/937_pg058.pdf)

Thank you!  8)
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: electr_peter on February 19, 2015, 10:39:22 pm
It's an obsolete "voltage dependent resistor" AKA Varistor from Stackpole. Stackpole SV230K23.
Here are the specs:
http://www.datasheets360.com/pdf/8484616839472155797 (http://www.datasheets360.com/pdf/8484616839472155797)
It could be varistor. I would like to test your suggestion >:D, but I do not have HV source at the moment.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: electr_peter on February 24, 2015, 10:00:47 pm
I am looking for a datasheet of C0-J05 voltage regulator. Vin ~5v, Vout should be in 2.8-3.6V range. SOT-23 package with 5 pins, 2005-2006 vintage.

The closest match I found is Ricoh R1154N105B (http://pdf1.alldatasheet.com/datasheet-pdf/view/201760/RICOH/R1154N105B.html), but it has way too high output voltage and markings are not identical.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Jad.z on March 03, 2015, 01:35:50 am
Hi electr_peter,

It is most likely RT9701 (http://www.richtek.com/product_detail.jsp?s=358)
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: 173DSP on March 03, 2015, 02:54:34 am
Hello all, hopefully someone can help me identify this particular component. Unfortunately, it failed and whats left does not have any markings on it, and the only other example on the board looks like its about to suffer the same fate, but hopefully its still recognizable to someone.  See attached, R15 is the failed component, R56 looks like its the same part, except it appears to be swelling. Thanks in advance!
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: AndersAnd on March 04, 2015, 08:36:26 am
Hi electr_peter,

It is most likely RT9701 (http://www.richtek.com/product_detail.jsp?s=358)
I think you-re right about that. The data sheet you link to doesn't include marking codes, but I found an older data sheet from year 2000 with the marking code C0 in it: http://wenku.baidu.com/view/77ad2c00bed5b9f3f90f1cb2.html (http://wenku.baidu.com/view/77ad2c00bed5b9f3f90f1cb2.html)
So it's the R9701xB version with the chip enable pin included. The pinout matches too.

The 3 letters/digits after C0- are probably date codes.

If you google RT9701 you'll find several pictures of SMDs with the C0-xxx marking on it.

Is the part used for an USB port?
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: electr_peter on March 04, 2015, 09:48:19 am
Hi electr_peter,
It is most likely RT9701 (http://www.richtek.com/product_detail.jsp?s=358)
I think you-re right about that. The data sheet you link to doesn't include marking codes, but I found an older data sheet from year 2000 with the marking code C0 in it: http://wenku.baidu.com/view/77ad2c00bed5b9f3f90f1cb2.html (http://wenku.baidu.com/view/77ad2c00bed5b9f3f90f1cb2.html)
So it's the R9701xB version with the chip enable pin included. The pinout matches too.
The 3 letters/digits after C0- are probably date codes.
Thanks for suggestions, Jad.z and AndersAnd. You are probably right about the part.
Quote
Is the part used for an USB port?
Device does not have USB port. There were 2 devices with the same marking, both in a power supply line. It provided ~3.3V to 2.0V regulator (with massive filtering) for a DVD media device (MT1389 - DVD player SoC).

I thought could be voltage regulator as that SoC require few exact voltages, but I am not sure.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Alexei.Polkhanov on March 14, 2015, 07:30:31 am
I got some junk that used to be laser range finder from around 1985. I am looking at flash bulb trigger circuit and I found a component which is made by RCA (?) - S2600M. Funny thing I even found a datasheet for this thing, but still I am puzzled - what it is? BJT? Seems not, what would be correct symbol for it?
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Vgkid on March 14, 2015, 07:36:12 am
The datasheet says it is an scr???
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: aveekbh on March 14, 2015, 07:39:33 am
It's an SCR - take a look at w2aew's video if you are confused - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lSqCiCc7jQc (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lSqCiCc7jQc)
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: tautech on March 14, 2015, 07:44:07 am
The datasheet says it is an scr???
Yep, also states it's a thyristor....how many more clues do you need?    :-//
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Alexei.Polkhanov on March 15, 2015, 12:06:21 am
Yes, thanks. Sorry I must have turned off my brains at some moment :) Definitely missed the word "thyristor" in description.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: gildasd on March 22, 2015, 12:41:01 am
New Ti 84 - Based on the EZ80, big upgrade from the Z80.
Anyhow, between the French version that sports a full exact calculus motor (everything that can written as a fraction, root, power or trig is written as such)  and the "back to basics US version", there are minor component differences.
All are easy to identify, except the D01 in the top left... Not sure about it:

Any ideas?
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: tautech on March 22, 2015, 07:24:13 am
Any idea what the package might be?
Footprint looks very strange for a diode.  :-//

You could take a punt and just use a signal diode.
Probably better to reverse engineer that part of the circuit including the IC, then ask for advice, maybe in a dedicated thread.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: miguelvp on March 22, 2015, 07:36:05 am
Looks like an IR data port, so I googled TI-84 Infrared and sure enough some later models come with it.
Could it be that instead of what you thought it was?
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: gildasd on March 22, 2015, 09:34:15 am
Looks like an IR data port, so I googled TI-84 Infrared and sure enough some later models come with it.
Could it be that instead of what you thought it was?
Does not seem to fit the bill... THe IR is not a difference between these two models...
Ti sometimes uses custom packages in its calculators to make modding them much harder.

Edit:
It's a two colour led. The little circuit below is a classic two led driver...
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: miguelvp on March 22, 2015, 07:29:32 pm
That's why I thought it was some IR communication setup, because it did look like two LEDs, but you are right, they seem to be both for output not one for input and the other for output.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Fluxed Matter on April 03, 2015, 10:30:08 pm
Hi All. I am look for the name of this type of connector and where I can order it. Anyone know who makes it and what it is called?

Thanks for the help.

Fluxed
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: tsmith35 on April 05, 2015, 04:14:59 pm
Hi All. I am look for the name of this type of connector and where I can order it. Anyone know who makes it and what it is called?
How about this? Stator to R&R Connector and Terminals (http://cycleterminal.com/) (about 2/3 down the page, on the right)
aka Yazaki 3 Pin Connector
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Richard Crowley on April 05, 2015, 05:23:53 pm
Hi All. I am look for the name of this type of connector and where I can order it. Anyone know who makes it and what it is called?
Context is always helpful.  It looks somewhat like the kind of connector you find for traditional incandescent sealed-beam headlights on a vehicle.
They are basically the kind of connectors that attach to spade-lugs, but held within the white plastic shell.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Fluxed Matter on April 06, 2015, 07:13:26 pm
Context is always helpful. 

Sorry, I should have explained better. The connector is used in an electric scooter. I had it but some bastard stole the old batteries with the connector still attached. I have new batteries now but I want to get proper replacement it, and I guess I will also need the contacts too.

tsmith35 thanks for the link,  The R&R kit may be the ticket.

Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: miguelvp on April 06, 2015, 08:54:39 pm
If you only have added razor

http://www.monsterscooterparts.com/e21.html?gclid=CjwKEAjw3YipBRDL2bHhjLmFkQsSJADtzktjO3hCds_y860zdMfPcaHzeTRuTBO3rW07Ka4uVAkXMhoCLeLw_wcB (http://www.monsterscooterparts.com/e21.html?gclid=CjwKEAjw3YipBRDL2bHhjLmFkQsSJADtzktjO3hCds_y860zdMfPcaHzeTRuTBO3rW07Ka4uVAkXMhoCLeLw_wcB)


Discontinued:
http://www.monsterscooterparts.com/ract5wicomoe.html (http://www.monsterscooterparts.com/ract5wicomoe.html)
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Fluxed Matter on April 06, 2015, 11:10:16 pm
Quote
If you only have added razor

http://www.monsterscooterparts.com/e21.html?gclid=CjwKEAjw3YipBRDL2bHhjLmFkQsSJADtzktjO3hCds_y860zdMfPcaHzeTRuTBO3rW07Ka4uVAkXMhoCLeLw_wcB (http://www.monsterscooterparts.com/e21.html?gclid=CjwKEAjw3YipBRDL2bHhjLmFkQsSJADtzktjO3hCds_y860zdMfPcaHzeTRuTBO3rW07Ka4uVAkXMhoCLeLw_wcB)


Discontinued:
http://www.monsterscooterparts.com/ract5wicomoe.html (http://www.monsterscooterparts.com/ract5wicomoe.html)


miguelvp, thanks I found that all over the internet too. I don't want the harness I want just the connector at the end
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: mswhin63 on April 07, 2015, 04:27:16 am
Looks like a generic Automotive connector. I have seen loads of different varieties at automotive shops. Not good at online stores though.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Richard Crowley on April 07, 2015, 05:02:49 am
I don't want the harness I want just the connector at the end
By "connector" do you mean the whole white plastic shell?  Or just the metal contacts?
They look like ordinary "spade lugs" (or rather the female part that slips over the male spade lug.)
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Fluxed Matter on April 07, 2015, 03:04:04 pm
@mswhin63 I have checked a few of my local auto parts stores but most carry the GM type which is not the same. But I will check a couple more in my area. Thanks

@Richard Crowley, Yes the whole white plastic shell with the metal contacts.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Excavatoree on April 07, 2015, 05:05:41 pm
Hi All. I am look for the name of this type of connector and where I can order it. Anyone know who makes it and what it is called?

Thanks for the help.

Fluxed

Could this be it?

http://www.te.com/catalog/products/en?q=0-0172132-1 (http://www.te.com/catalog/products/en?q=0-0172132-1)
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: AndersAnd on April 08, 2015, 07:50:20 pm
Context is always helpful. 

Sorry, I should have explained better. The connector is used in an electric scooter. I had it but some bastard stole the old batteries with the connector still attached. I have new batteries now but I want to get proper replacement it, and I guess I will also need the contacts too.

tsmith35 thanks for the link,  The R&R kit may be the ticket.

(https://www.eevblog.com/forum/chat/what%27s-this-please-%28component-advice%29/?action=dlattach;attach=145758;image)
Chinese Scooter Parts Wiring Harness Kit Plugs Terminals 3 pin battery connector
http://www.ebay.com/itm/22143896476 (http://www.ebay.com/itm/22143896476)
This ad is for 4 pieces of 3 pin female battery connectors with the brass ends..buy multiple purchases and only pay 1 shipping fee..

(http://i.ebayimg.com/00/s/MTQ2OFgxMTAx/z/z-sAAOxywFhTcX8Q/$_57.JPG)

(http://i.ebayimg.com/00/s/MTQ2OVgxMTAx/z/gQoAAOxyItRTcX74/$_57.JPG)

(http://i.ebayimg.com/00/s/MTIyNFgxNDY4/z/f3cAAOxyItRTcX7g/$_57.JPG)
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: AndersAnd on April 08, 2015, 08:01:17 pm
10 Sets X 3 Pin 6.3mm 3P Connector Terminals Scooter Moped EBike Controller ATV
http://www.ebay.com/itm/321508387956 (http://www.ebay.com/itm/321508387956)

(http://i.ebayimg.com/00/s/NDIzWDUwMA==/z/VxQAAMXQVT9S9btY/$_57.JPG)

(http://y.photo.qq.com/img?s=C74LNh4Kt&l=y.jpg)
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: AndersAnd on April 08, 2015, 08:05:59 pm
Nylon Latching Connector Pair 3-pin 6.3mm 1/4" Male/Female 18-14AWG #E37C
http://www.ebay.com/itm/261494574193 (http://www.ebay.com/itm/261494574193)

(http://i.ebayimg.com/00/s/NjAwWDgwMA==/z/8cMAAOxyzpdTizll/$_57.JPG)
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Fluxed Matter on April 08, 2015, 09:52:57 pm
Excavatoree and AndersAnd thank you both very much. That exactly what I have been searching for.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: odessa on April 13, 2015, 12:34:01 pm
Hi,

Can someone identify these please ?

I think they are BY509 HV diodes, if so does the small purple ring on the indicate the anode ?

Thanks
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: android on April 13, 2015, 01:21:17 pm
According to datasheet archive (http://www.datasheetarchive.com/BY509-datasheet.html#) it indicates cathode...if it's really a BY509. Purple is an unusual color and its location on the wire instead of the body is also unusual so your guess is probably good.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: odessa on April 13, 2015, 01:32:48 pm
That's great, thanks very much  :)
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: nitro2k01 on April 20, 2015, 11:40:01 am
Are there any common or less common diodes where the anode is marked with a band instead of the cathode? Marking the cathode is the usual standard.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Vgkid on April 22, 2015, 04:40:40 am
A connector about 1.93mm in diameter, I'm thinking mmcx male
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: TSL on April 22, 2015, 05:40:01 am
That's an SMP connector, fairly typical for tiny on board RF these days.

http://www.digikey.com/product-detail/en/SMP-MSLD-PCS/ARF1594-ND/1012555 (http://www.digikey.com/product-detail/en/SMP-MSLD-PCS/ARF1594-ND/1012555)

regards

Tim
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Vgkid on April 22, 2015, 04:42:49 pm
Before you  replied i was thinking u.fl connector.
Did some more research, and the mounting pad size specs matches the u.fl.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: TSL on April 22, 2015, 11:03:04 pm
Before you  replied i was thinking u.fl connector.
Did some more research, and the mounting pad size specs matches the u.fl.

Oooh yes, that looks closer to yours, they look very similar to the SMP's.

regards

Tim
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Vgkid on April 22, 2015, 11:59:12 pm
^^^ The micronometer clued me into it.
You know it is tiny when it is the same size as the tip on your soldering iron.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: nostromo on May 05, 2015, 10:06:19 am
Can someone help identify this power connector? It's used in Nokia Flex Power Distributor, I couldn't find it anywhere.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: electr_peter on May 05, 2015, 10:16:30 am
Can someone help identify this power connector? It's used in Nokia Flex Power Distributor, I couldn't find it anywhere.
Stick wires in and clamp it down with screws? You can use wire with spade terminal to plug in directly.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Richard Crowley on May 05, 2015, 12:30:25 pm
Can someone help identify this power connector? It's used in Nokia Flex Power Distributor, I couldn't find it anywhere.
It is not a commodity component. It is a custom part made for that unit. Either kludge a DIY replacement or get an exact replacement from Nokia.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: nostromo on May 05, 2015, 04:25:32 pm
Yes, probably a specially designed connector for that part.
Well... I'll have to improvise something...
Thanks for the help.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: abigbell on May 09, 2015, 04:03:23 am
 :wtf: why I cant see anything, the image are blocked!

haaaaappy life in china, they block every thing. |O |O |O |O
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: IO390 on May 14, 2015, 07:03:41 pm
Well I'm totally and utterly bamboozled by this one. It's a SOT-89 package and I'm pretty sure it's a LDO. The pinout is 1: Vout??? 2: GND 3: Vin

The markings are "M1" on one end and "31" on the other. I've spent a while googling but haven't found anything. The output is connected to an LCD via the connector next door. Anyone else got any ideas?

Full size image: http://imgur.com/2KmBzbc (http://imgur.com/2KmBzbc)

(http://i.imgur.com/2KmBzbcm.jpg)
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: tautech on May 14, 2015, 11:59:34 pm
http://www.nxp.com/documents/data_sheet/2PB1424.pdf (http://www.nxp.com/documents/data_sheet/2PB1424.pdf)
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: IO390 on May 15, 2015, 10:36:18 am
http://www.nxp.com/documents/data_sheet/2PB1424.pdf (http://www.nxp.com/documents/data_sheet/2PB1424.pdf)

I love you
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: tautech on May 15, 2015, 10:41:25 am
http://www.nxp.com/documents/data_sheet/2PB1424.pdf (http://www.nxp.com/documents/data_sheet/2PB1424.pdf)

I love you
Now, now, that will do.

"M1 marking SMD SOT-89 IC data", first hit in Google, then follow your nose.....  ;)
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: amyk on May 15, 2015, 04:14:54 pm
A 2PB1424 is marked M1, but not the only device to have that marking. Especially if you think it's an LDO...
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Terabyte2007 on May 16, 2015, 11:03:22 pm
Anyone know what this part is? I can't seem to find a datasheet on it. Any help would be greatly appreciated!

Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: tautech on May 17, 2015, 12:03:41 am
Try this one: http://www.seekdatasheet.com/Datasheet-72946-60K860B.html (http://www.seekdatasheet.com/Datasheet-72946-60K860B.html)
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Terabyte2007 on May 17, 2015, 12:07:57 am
Try this one: http://www.seekdatasheet.com/Datasheet-72946-60K860B.html (http://www.seekdatasheet.com/Datasheet-72946-60K860B.html)

That link took me to an ZXRD1000 Inductor part. ???
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: tautech on May 17, 2015, 12:15:20 am
Try this one: http://www.seekdatasheet.com/Datasheet-72946-60K860B.html (http://www.seekdatasheet.com/Datasheet-72946-60K860B.html)

That link took me to an ZXRD1000 Inductor part. ???
Bugger, sorry, net is slow here today and it looked promising.
Well at least your post got a bump.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: wraper on May 17, 2015, 12:19:57 am
Anyone know what this part is? I can't seem to find a datasheet on it. Any help would be greatly appreciated!
60KQ60B schottky diode.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Terabyte2007 on May 17, 2015, 12:53:00 pm
Anyone know what this part is? I can't seem to find a datasheet on it. Any help would be greatly appreciated!
60KQ60B schottky diode.

Thank's man. I thought the Q was an 8.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: kolonelkadat on May 21, 2015, 12:02:16 am
I cant seem to get any love from google recently.


Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: tautech on May 21, 2015, 03:16:01 am
I cant seem to get any love from google recently.
Did you include the package type in your search?
"R32 marking SMD TO-?? datasheet pdf" or some thing like that mostly seems to work for me.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: kolonelkadat on May 21, 2015, 07:06:02 pm
I cant seem to get any love from google recently.
Did you include the package type in your search?
"R32 marking SMD TO-?? datasheet pdf" or some thing like that mostly seems to work for me.

i did. Ive tried pretty much every combination of text on the package i can think of too.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: amyk on May 22, 2015, 02:07:39 am
Check ON's site. If you're desperate you can go through all their sot-223 datasheets, or email them with that picture.

R32 is a datecode, it's 3064 that you'll need to figure out.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: nostromo on May 22, 2015, 05:50:51 pm
Couldn’t find this one used in IBM SystemX SSD 50GB (P/N: 43W7714)
SMD marking code is AEL with some bars above and below. Package dimensions looks like a SSOT25.
The closest I could find is Torex XC74xxx series but couldn’t find SMD mark info in the document.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: PA0PBZ on May 22, 2015, 06:47:01 pm
http://smdcode.com/tr/smd/code/ael-xc6114c519mr-voltage-detector-integrated-circuit-9240/ (http://smdcode.com/tr/smd/code/ael-xc6114c519mr-voltage-detector-integrated-circuit-9240/)

Makes sense, power management, it's close to the batteries.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: nostromo on May 22, 2015, 08:29:03 pm
Thanks for the reply.
The problem is that AEL seems to be a SSOT25 and the datasheet doesn't mention this package.
In the picture below you can see A04G (the voltage detector SOT25) and the AEL at its side.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: LukeW on May 30, 2015, 04:52:16 pm
An "identify that component" challenge:

28-pin 0.3" DIP IC, possibly some sort of microcontroller.
Markings have been deliberately etched off.

It's from a cheap eBay-generic serial CNC handwheel pulse generator - maybe something old, or something obscure from China.

Pin 4: UART RXD
Pin 5: UART TXD
Pin 6: 11.0592 MHz crystal, plus typical crystal load capacitors.
Pin 7: Other side of the crystal oscillator.
Pin 14: Ground
Pin 28: +5V supply.

Any takers?
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Randall W. Lott on June 02, 2015, 09:12:57 pm
Any idea what this is?
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Yansi on June 02, 2015, 09:32:12 pm
High voltage resistor divider, probably.  ...and frequency compensated with the blue ceramic cap.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: nali on July 28, 2015, 08:07:36 pm
Wonder if anyone can offer pointers to this please? Not sure what the package is but C18 is an 0805 for reference. I can't quite work out if the lines are indicating fields e.g. date code.

From tracing assuming pin 1 is at the bottom of the pic I can say pins 1&2 are 0v, pin3 is +5v and the others are analogue signals which I'm trying to trace. Maybe some sort of clamp?

Thanks
N
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: tautech on July 28, 2015, 10:13:02 pm
Looks like a SOT23-6 package.  :-//
Theres a few CF* devices you could check for a match here:
http://www.s-manuals.com/smd/cf (http://www.s-manuals.com/smd/cf)
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Yansi on July 28, 2015, 11:42:16 pm
INA213 - about a minute or two of googling. Grhhhhh.

http://www.ti.com/lit/ds/symlink/ina210.pdf (http://www.ti.com/lit/ds/symlink/ina210.pdf)
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: nali on July 29, 2015, 07:00:23 am
INA213 - about a minute or two of googling. Grhhhhh.

http://www.ti.com/lit/ds/symlink/ina210.pdf (http://www.ti.com/lit/ds/symlink/ina210.pdf)

Thanks, that's the one! Out of interest, what did you Google? I tried searching and a few sites like s-manuals.com & smdcodes.com but didn't get any hits for a 6-pin device. In the end I opted for a punt on here and some sleep...
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: AndersAnd on August 05, 2015, 08:15:01 pm
INA213 - about a minute or two of googling. Grhhhhh.

http://www.ti.com/lit/ds/symlink/ina210.pdf (http://www.ti.com/lit/ds/symlink/ina210.pdf)

Thanks, that's the one! Out of interest, what did you Google?
I wasn't the one googling it, but just tried to google "SOT23-6 CFT" and this showed up as the 4th hit:
http://www.aliexpress.com/item/INA213AIDCKT-TI-Chip-screen-printing-CFT-SOT23-6-IC-100-new-original-Free-shipping/1888451678.html (http://www.aliexpress.com/item/INA213AIDCKT-TI-Chip-screen-printing-CFT-SOT23-6-IC-100-new-original-Free-shipping/1888451678.html)
Quote
INA213AIDCKT TI Chip screen printing:CFT SOT23-6 IC 100% new original Free shipping
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: kolonelkadat on August 12, 2015, 08:21:32 pm
I found this on the ground at the park today. I suspect its part of some sort of drone, but i dont know.
The micro is a PIC12F629. The back side is just a button and a battery holder.
When powered at ~3v3 the led blinks when you press the button, but stops as soon as you release it.

Anyone have any ideas?

(http://i.imgur.com/PhdV3Vv.jpg)
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: AndersAnd on August 12, 2015, 08:40:12 pm
It can be a "Universal Keychain IR Remote TV Shutter" like https://www.eevblog.com/forum/chat/'tv-b-gone'-pic-based-tv-killer/ (https://www.eevblog.com/forum/chat/'tv-b-gone'-pic-based-tv-killer/)
It's more likely a key fob wireless remote for a car or a garage port opener.
The PCB-track running all along the edge looks like the antenna.
The LED is probably just a red or green indicator LED which lights up every time the remote key is pressed. Had it been an IR-remote LED, it would have pointed forwards instead of upwards.

Here's one with interchangeable circuit board with and one of the numbers is the same ATCN-1 as printed on your PCB : http://www.ebay.com/itm/clicker-fob-keyless-remote-starter-entry-wireless-beeper-keyfob-Ford-GOHPCMINI-/231316246733 (http://www.ebay.com/itm/clicker-fob-keyless-remote-starter-entry-wireless-beeper-keyfob-Ford-GOHPCMINI-/231316246733)

Quote
Interchangeable circuit board #s:
ATCD-1
ATCN-1
ATCD

(http://i.ebayimg.com/00/s/NjMxWDQxNw==/z/POEAAOSwRLZT-31w/$_12.JPG)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iGpzG86tJQo (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iGpzG86tJQo)
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: unitedatoms on August 12, 2015, 08:52:19 pm
Right. The XTAL on silkscreen confused me, so I thought that the metal part is ordinary crystal. I see now, it has 8 legs, like possibly radio transmitter should.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: kolonelkadat on August 12, 2015, 09:19:42 pm
Mystery solved! thanks AndersAnd. I never would have guessed that.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: LukeW on August 14, 2015, 02:15:41 am
See the photo of the cable on this page:

https://www.duniway.com/part/LEY-NT150-CBL (https://www.duniway.com/part/LEY-NT150-CBL)

I'd like some sort of identification of the rectangular connector with the trapezoidal bit at one end.

Any suggestions for an equivalent connector?

The bit on the other end, that looks like a free-hanging octal valve socket on the cable with a backshell, looks like it might be fairly easy to source.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: G7PSK on August 14, 2015, 08:19:33 am
The rectangular plug looks like a modified Bell and Howell Used for all sorts of things other than projectors, my wife's wheel chair uses one for the main battery connection. The round one is an octal socket I have the plug version floating around somewhere in one of my bins.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: TheElectricChicken on August 14, 2015, 10:58:47 am
the link to duniway is very bad, it wont show me the image
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: PA0PBZ on August 14, 2015, 11:29:56 am
the link to duniway is very bad, it wont show me the image

(https://www.duniway.com/sites/default/files/styles/galleryformatter_slide/public/field/image/products/ley-nt150-cbl-l_0.jpg)
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: AndersAnd on August 14, 2015, 03:16:09 pm
the link to duniway is very bad, it wont show me the image
Same cable here: http://www.pchemlabs.com/product.asp?pid=2880 (http://www.pchemlabs.com/product.asp?pid=2880)
(http://www.idealvac.com/files/images/Leybold_85760_1.gif)

@LukeW I guess you want to make your own cable? No wonder since the quoted prices for this simple 3 meter [10 feet] cable is $200-325 at the 2 links mentioned here, insane price for such a simple cable.  :bullshit:
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: TheElectricChicken on August 14, 2015, 03:59:08 pm
is this cable used to test valves from old radios ?
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: max666 on August 20, 2015, 09:02:31 pm
Ok, I know this is a voltage regulator. But how do I find a datasheet?

It's a 5V SOT23-5 linear voltage regulator with standard pinout and marking says "16MX".
How do you guys search for something like this? "SOT23-5 16MX voltage regulator" got me nowhere; maybe I'm too stupid ...
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Godzil on August 20, 2015, 09:37:13 pm
I nearly forgot, I have a japanese battery charger that I mistakenly plugs on main 230V without really checking if it was an automatique switchable one, and in fact it was working (the output was correct) unless a big bang occurred somewhere, which was of course inside the charger, a cap inside just didn't liked to be plugged on 230V.

So as I wanted to repair this board and see if I could make it working on european main voltage without major changes, aka just change some component values, I started to look at the component and try to make a schematic of it. My main problem was that there is an IC where I can't find any data sheet,
I managed from the logo on it that the original company (Matsushita) was bought by Panasonic, and try to find on there website a reference for this component, I found that it exist, but there were no documentation on it. I filled a ticket requesting for the data sheet, at some point the ticket changed to

[Q&A Destination After Changing]
Interface & Communication / Analog / DC-DC Regulator / RF
Field : Analog ICs
Detail Field : Other Analog ICs

and I finally get a "old component, we don't give data sheet for old components"... Thanks panasonic.

So here is the board :
Front: (http://www.mirari.fr/DXtH)
Back: (http://www.mirari.fr/NGnY)

And the chip is the AN8171

If anyone have information about the chip, I would be thanksful :)
I suspect that this is mainly a controller for the battery change or something related to the AC to DC converter, I'm not sure.

(I know that if a Dave will look at the PCB for this charger he will just get a heart attack, there design is quite strange, pads or track that does nowhere, some clearance between main and low voltage are just... really tiny :D

And it was made by a bit japanese company, and not a small chinese one.. :D

By the way, the FR1/FR2 are high chance to be some sort of fuse resistors, but the value, if they follow the standard resistor colour band seems strange to me (Orange, White, Black Silver if I'm correct)
I may create a topic about this specific device if some people are interested, I'm trying to find the schematics I've done at that time, but it's currently nowhere to be found, anyway I know that most of it around the transformer is false
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: AndersAnd on August 23, 2015, 08:40:42 pm
I managed from the logo on it that the original company (Matsushita) was bought by Panasonic,
No Matsushita has never been bought by Panasonic, in fact Panasonic was a just brand name for some products made by Matsushita, just like Technics. In 2008 Matsushita decided to change their company names from Matsushita Electric Industrial to Panasonic Corporation and Matsushita Electric Works to Panasonic Electric Works respectively, to conform with its global brand name "Panasonic".

Sanyo on the other hand has been acquired by Panasonic Corporation in December 2009. Fun fact: Sanyo, originally a competior of Matsushita/Panasonic was founded by Matsushita's brother-in-law, a former Matsushita employee.
[The electronics industry answer to Puma/Adidas I guess, as Puma and later Adidas, was founded by two rivalling brothers, after their relationship had deteriorated and they decided to split, after previously having worked together at what had become their common shoe factory].

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Panasonic
Quote
Panasonic Corporation, formerly known as Matsushita Electric Industrial Co., Ltd...

Name

From 1935 to October 1, 2008, the company name was "Matsushita Electric Industrial Co., Ltd."[3][4] On January 10, 2008, the company announced that it would change its name to "Panasonic Corporation", in effect on October 1, 2008, to conform with its global brand name "Panasonic".[5] The name change was approved at a shareholders' meeting on June 26, 2008 after consultation with the Matsushita family.[6]

Panasonic was founded in 1918 by Konosuke Matsushita as a vendor of duplex lamp sockets.

Matsushita's brother-in-law, Toshio Iue, founded Sanyo as a subcontractor for components after World War II. Sanyo grew to become a competitor to Panasonic, but was later acquired by Panasonic in December 2009.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Matsushita
Quote
Matsushita Electric Industrial, now Panasonic Corporation, a multinational electronics corporation based in Kadoma, Japan
Matsushita Electric Works, now Panasonic Electric Works, a lighting, building materials, and appliance manufacturer in Japan


Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Godzil on August 25, 2015, 10:59:14 am
Thanks about Matsushita, I was already aware about that, and honestly apart from beeing picky about how the name changes it did not help me on finding what this component is.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: dexters_lab on August 29, 2015, 09:36:40 am
i have seen these before but i dont recall what it is?

looks like a disc capacitor with two cylindrical bits on it... it's a 3 pin device
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: PA0PBZ on August 29, 2015, 10:16:46 am
i have seen these before but i dont recall what it is?
looks like a disc capacitor with two cylindrical bits on it... it's a 3 pin device

LC filter, the cylinders are ferrite.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: SeanB on August 29, 2015, 11:00:00 am
Pi filter, generally used on signal lines and power lines, depending on the capacitor value. 100p to 10n is common on signal lines and 100n to 220n for power rails. Ferrite beads are high loss and low inductance, giving good attenuation over around 100kHz.

Note if you accidentally apply too high a voltage ( or connect it to a 100W PA output by mistake) it does burn nicely.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Godzil on August 29, 2015, 11:02:49 am
But what is this white stuff all around?
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: SeanB on August 29, 2015, 11:10:57 am
Potting compound, probably there because the board handled high voltage and they wanted to keep surface leakage to a minimum.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: dexters_lab on August 29, 2015, 11:33:20 am
But what is this white stuff all around?

Thanks PA0PBZ & Sean

as Sean said, its potting compound and does handle high voltage, some of the components in there are rated to 6kV.

Its been sat in dichloromethane for 2 weeks, but i have run out!

Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: SeanB on August 29, 2015, 11:46:57 am
Funny enough just ordered 20l of something similar for work. But at 20 pounds per 500ml bottle I will not be using it as epoxy remover, though it will do the job. Linx solvent, used for an inkjet printer. Funny thing is it, along with the ink, has an expiry date. It also will diffuse through the HDPE bottle with time, the old expired ones I use at home ( still sealed, they expired in the service kit) have evaporated around half through the plastic.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Cubdriver on September 02, 2015, 08:17:31 am
is this cable used to test valves from old radios ?

It looks like a drive cable for a turbomolecular (high vacuum) pump. The grey rectangular connector might be some sort of European type connector, though I'm not certain off the top of my head.  I think I remember seeing them on Balzers/Pfeiffer and Leybold turbo pump controllers, but it's been years since I've touched one.

-Pat
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: jitter on September 03, 2015, 04:50:31 pm
Ok, I know this is a voltage regulator. But how do I find a datasheet?

It's a 5V SOT23-5 linear voltage regulator with standard pinout and marking says "16MX".
How do you guys search for something like this? "SOT23-5 16MX voltage regulator" got me nowhere; maybe I'm too stupid ...

No, not stupid, but some tings are not that easy to find. But not impossible.
I found this datasheet (http://www.torex.com.cn/products/voltage_regulators/data/XC6201.pdf) on a voltage regulator that I'm pretty sure is the one on your board.

First I searched for some smd codebooks and then searched inside them until I found one (http://caxapa.ru/thumbs/588912/smd-codes.pdf) that listed "16M" (I left off the "X" as it's usually different between batches anyway). Hmm, a 5 V regulator, so far so good.
It describes it as a SOT-89, but hey, usually this stuff is available in different packages, so I looked for "XC6201P502PR" anyway and found the datasheet.
It's available as a SOT-25 too which looks quite like your picture (or perhaps SOT23-5 and SOT25 look so much alike that I don't see the difference).

Looking at the datsheet a bit better I find the pinout to be the same as your picture. Still on the right track!
Scrolling down (actually searching for "mark") I found the marking scheme:
16MX means:
1: XC6201xxxx-series
6: voltage 3.1-6 V
M: 5.0 V
X: lot number

P.S. This is my first post on this forum, just joined, but I've been following the EEVblog for quite a while. I am in the industrial electronics industry and testing, repairing and calibrating is my main responsibility.

Edit: corrected links and typos.

Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: vk6zgo on September 04, 2015, 07:21:33 am
is this cable used to test valves from old radios ?

It looks like a drive cable for a turbomolecular (high vacuum) pump. The grey rectangular connector might be some sort of European type connector, though I'm not certain off the top of my head.  I think I remember seeing them on Balzers/Pfeiffer and Leybold turbo pump controllers, but it's been years since I've touched one.

-Pat

I think that may be where I saw them!
I worked for a while as an Electronics Tech at the University of Western Australia Chemistry Department.
We had a pump that kept blowing up the drive circuitry----turned out to be a mechanical fault in the pump. |O
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: max666 on September 04, 2015, 10:44:07 pm
Ok, I know this is a voltage regulator. But how do I find a datasheet?

It's a 5V SOT23-5 linear voltage regulator with standard pinout and marking says "16MX".
How do you guys search for something like this? "SOT23-5 16MX voltage regulator" got me nowhere; maybe I'm too stupid ...

No, not stupid, but some tings are not that easy to find. But not impossible.
I found this datasheet (http://www.torex.com.cn/products/voltage_regulators/data/XC6201.pdf) on a voltage regulator that I'm pretty sure is the one on your board.

First I searched for some smd codebooks and then searched inside them until I found one (http://caxapa.ru/thumbs/588912/smd-codes.pdf) that listed "16M" (I left off the "X" as it's usually different between batches anyway). Hmm, a 5 V regulator, so far so good.
It describes it as a SOT-89, but hey, usually this stuff is available in different packages, so I looked for "XC6201P502PR" anyway and found the datasheet.
It's available as a SOT-25 too which looks quite like your picture (or perhaps SOT23-5 and SOT25 look so much alike that I don't see the difference).

Looking at the datsheet a bit better I find the pinout to be the same as your picture. Still on the right track!
Scrolling down (actually searching for "mark") I found the marking scheme:
16MX means:
1: XC6201xxxx-series
6: voltage 3.1-6 V
M: 5.0 V
X: lot number

P.S. This is my first post on this forum, just joined, but I've been following the EEVblog for quite a while. I am in the industrial electronics industry and testing, repairing and calibrating is my main responsibility.

Edit: corrected links and typos.

(http://i.imgur.com/iysdsoi.gif)  Thank you so much, you're my hero!

http://caxapa.ru/thumbs/588912/smd-codes.pdf (http://caxapa.ru/thumbs/588912/smd-codes.pdf) ... in Russia smd codebook finds you!   :P
I didn't know there is even a difference between SOT-23-5 and SOT-25.

Thanks for helping me out, I almost gave up hope on this one. But most importantly, thank you for showing me how you did it.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: jitter on September 05, 2015, 11:27:51 am
:blush:

You're welcome!

A tip I can give is to search for the most recent datasheets at the manufacturer's websites rather than at datasheet websites like "alldatasheet" or similar.
I find that datasheets on those kinds of websites may not be up to date.

That recently presented a problem at work... a customer changed a part from manufacturer A to manuf. B. Manuf. B only made it in shape X according to the datasheet. Hmm... that no longer fits the pcb design... Then I searched for the datasheet at the manufacturer's website: hey... this one says it's available it in shapes X, Y and Z... => no problem.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Deathwish on September 05, 2015, 11:32:52 am
(http://i.imgur.com/iysdsoi.gif)  Thank you so much, you're my hero!

http://caxapa.ru/thumbs/588912/smd-codes.pdf (http://caxapa.ru/thumbs/588912/smd-codes.pdf) ... in Russia smd codebook finds you!   :P
I didn't know there is even a difference between SOT-23-5 and SOT-25.

Thanks for helping me out, I almost gave up hope on this one. But most importantly, thank you for showing me how you did it.

Thanks for the link, I didn't have that one, now I do, see,  it all helps others out.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Quarlo Klobrigney on September 05, 2015, 11:33:54 am
Pronounced Muh-shush-tah = Matsushita :-+
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Ysjoelfir on September 06, 2015, 11:52:52 am
Hello everyone!
I recently looked through a little pile of old stuff where I found some... interesting devices. Two of them I couldn't find anything about. One is a transistor in a "kind of TO-92 case". It is written C - A 6 16. Picture one.

The other one is another transistor in a rather unusual case that looks like a metal can TO-5 case, without a metal can.  It is written "SGS DW 6714 1818", picture two.

The last one is a NE540H. I found quite some information and some sort of a datasheet (attached). It is a integrated amplifier driver which should work with just two complementary output transistors and some peripheral attached. BUT: this datasheet-thingy isn't enough in my oppinion. It says what the pinout looks like, but it doesn't tell me anything about how to configure it and i would love to get more information about this things.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: wiss on September 06, 2015, 05:01:22 pm
Hello everyone!
I recently looked through a little pile of old stuff where I found some... interesting devices. Two of them I couldn't find anything about. One is a transistor in a "kind of TO-92 case". It is written C - A 6 16. Picture one.

To me it looks like "C - A S 16", I have seen those somewhere, I didn't find any at home, maybe a thread about an old DDR-DMM in here then...
I think it is a DDR-era transistor, some guys at Chemnitz made a collection of datasheets for DDR-stuff:
https://www.tu-chemnitz.de/etit/zentral/ddr/ (https://www.tu-chemnitz.de/etit/zentral/ddr/)

Didn't find your device there but this might help in further research!

Edit:

Maybe SC116? https://www.eevblog.com/forum/testgear/vintage-teardown-and-hopefully-repair-rft-g-1001-500-benchmultimeter/msg367219/#msg367219 (https://www.eevblog.com/forum/testgear/vintage-teardown-and-hopefully-repair-rft-g-1001-500-benchmultimeter/msg367219/#msg367219)
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Richard Crowley on September 06, 2015, 07:09:00 pm
SGS was a European semiconductor manufacturer back in the day. That is probably an OEM "house number".  Quite possibly the same as a commodity transistor, but custom-labeled for a specific customer.  The $20 transistor tester would reveal exactly what kind of device and some key parameters (like gain/hFE, etc.)

Quote
SGS Semiconductor Ltd
Merged with STMicroelectronics in 1987, SGS Semiconductor was, at the time, ranked 14th in a list of top semiconductor suppliers. With annual sales exceeding $800 million, the company aggressively pursued a strategy of consolidation within the semiconductor industry. Known for a tireless dedication to innovation within their markets, SGS Semiconductor tasked over one-quarter of their employees and allotted over one-quarter of their annual revenue to research and development.
- See more at: http://www.aeri.com/mfg/sgs-semiconductor-ltd/#sthash.IUFVU7fs.dpuf (http://www.aeri.com/mfg/sgs-semiconductor-ltd/#sthash.IUFVU7fs.dpuf)
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: uoficowboy on September 06, 2015, 10:18:25 pm
This is probably an easy one... I have some large capacitors, probably film, that are labeled:

W-F 225J
HF200V
:D.

There is also a logo of some sorts that is a M with a rounded box around it. I can post pics if needed. Capacitor is through hole, maybe 3cm pitch, 3.5cm long, 8mm thick, and maybe 1.5cm tall (all approximations, not measurements).

Anybody know what it is? It's from a fairly modern (10 years old maybe?) piece of Japanese test equipment.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Quarlo Klobrigney on September 06, 2015, 11:11:32 pm
From Matsushita aka Panasonic 200 Volt 2.2µF ±5% capacitor.

This is probably an easy one... I have some large capacitors, probably film, that are labeled:

W-F 225J
HF200V
:D.

There is also a logo of some sorts that is a M with a rounded box around it. I can post pics if needed. Capacitor is through hole, maybe 3cm pitch, 3.5cm long, 8mm thick, and maybe 1.5cm tall (all approximations, not measurements).

Anybody know what it is? It's from a fairly modern (10 years old maybe?) piece of Japanese test equipment.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: uoficowboy on September 07, 2015, 12:02:31 am
From Matsushita aka Panasonic 200 Volt 2.2µF ±5% capacitor.

This is probably an easy one... I have some large capacitors, probably film, that are labeled:

W-F 225J
HF200V
:D.

There is also a logo of some sorts that is a M with a rounded box around it. I can post pics if needed. Capacitor is through hole, maybe 3cm pitch, 3.5cm long, 8mm thick, and maybe 1.5cm tall (all approximations, not measurements).

Anybody know what it is? It's from a fairly modern (10 years old maybe?) piece of Japanese test equipment.
Yes, that's the logo! Thanks for the help!
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: uoficowboy on September 07, 2015, 12:47:51 am
OK one more question for you all!

I have some Sanyo electrolytics on a board. Some are marked
10
---
25
and others are marked
4.7
---
25

Safe to assume these are 10uf/4.7uf 25V caps?
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Quarlo Klobrigney on September 07, 2015, 01:13:30 am
Yes, but not at the same time!
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Ysjoelfir on September 07, 2015, 07:00:05 am
Thanks wiss and Richard Crowley for your informations about these devices!
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: PA0PBZ on September 11, 2015, 01:07:15 pm
This is a little transformer (20x30x30mm) that gave up life in a Hirschmann cable TV amplifier. It's  230 to 15.5V/100mA
It's a PCB mount model, but the thing is that Hirschmann decided not to use a PCB for this one but used some hooks in the metal bottom an plastic top of the case to hold it in place and solder the wires directly to the transformer. I can find enough PCB mount transformers that can do the job, but they will never exactly fit, and I don't want to have the AC contacts rolling around... Apart from glue or tape my option is to find the exact thing, and of course there is no brand (I think...) and the various numbers did not do the job in Google.

TL;DR: Anyone can come up with a brand name for the transformer?

(https://www.eevblog.com/forum/chat/what's-this-please-(component-advice)/?action=dlattach;attach=170676;image)


(http://image.allekabels.nl/image/129-0/hirschmann-antenneversterker-versterking-21-db.jpg)
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Richard Crowley on September 11, 2015, 05:25:33 pm
Even if you knew the brand name for the transformer, it seems quite likely it is an OEM part that you probably couldn't get at retail.
IME, your chances of finding a mechanical equivalent replacement range between slim and none.
Your best bet would be to find something with the same specs: 15.5V @ 100mA, that fits inside the case.
Or else just convert it to use a wall-wart which should be easy to find.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Deathwish on September 11, 2015, 05:29:06 pm
Got a picture of the other side ?. it says 15,5V not 15.5V so is it a dual secondary
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: wiss on September 11, 2015, 05:32:56 pm
Got a picture of the other side ?. it says 15,5V not 15.5V so is it a dual secondary
Or non english, German and Swedish and many other languages use decimal comma. It say "Sek", not "Sec", would make me guess non english.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: jitter on September 11, 2015, 05:48:44 pm
Yeah. That's probably a German made transformer.

15,5 V would be 15.5 V in English speaking countries.
Sek. is Sekundär and I'll let you guess what that might be in English  ;).

I would probably go and buy an off the shelf 15 V 100 mA transformer of similar or at least suitable dimensions. E.g. something like one of these (https://www.conrad.nl/nl/printtransformatoren-o2170211.html?filterVermogen=1%2C5+VA&filterSecundaire+spanning=15+V).
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: bktemp on September 11, 2015, 05:58:40 pm
This is a little transformer (20x30x30mm) that gave up life in a Hirschmann cable TV amplifier. It's  230 to 15.5V/100mA

TL;DR: Anyone can come up with a brand name for the transformer?
Hirschmann was a German manufacturer.

I can not see anything that looks like a manufacturer name.

All German made transformers I have seen (Block, era, Gerth) look different. It is probably a custom made part from China
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: SeanB on September 11, 2015, 06:22:57 pm
Grab any replacement that fits, and glue it down in the housing with 2 part polyurethane epoxy. Will not melt with heat, and will never let go either. Done it plenty of times, and it works well.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: uoficowboy on September 15, 2015, 05:18:14 am
I have a blown glass, through hole diode. I believe it is a DO-35 package, but am not sure. I believe it says 18B2 on it. I believe it is a zener diode - probably between 12 and 22V (18V would make sense).

Anybody know what this is? I was hoping 18.2V was a standard zener voltage, but it doesn't seem to be.

It is out of some Japanese test equipment and they seem to mostly (only) use Japanese parts. So I would guess it's from a Japanese manufacturer, but am not positive.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Quarlo Klobrigney on September 15, 2015, 10:26:17 am
Should be just that 18.2V ZD. Why not test it. Look on Google for "how to test zener diodes"

I have a blown glass, through hole diode. I believe it is a DO-35 package, but am not sure. I believe it says 18B2 on it. I believe it is a zener diode - probably between 12 and 22V (18V would make sense).

Anybody know what this is? I was hoping 18.2V was a standard zener voltage, but it doesn't seem to be.

It is out of some Japanese test equipment and they seem to mostly (only) use Japanese parts. So I would guess it's from a Japanese manufacturer, but am not positive.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: max666 on September 15, 2015, 11:26:22 am
Should be just that 18.2V ZD. Why not test it. Look on Google for "how to test zener diodes"

I have a blown glass, through hole diode. I believe it is a DO-35 package, but am not sure. I believe it says 18B2 on it. I believe it is a zener diode - probably between 12 and 22V (18V would make sense).
...

Language is a funny thing; I'm pretty sure uoficowboy meant "blown" as in defect and not "blown" as in glass blowing ;)
Or do you know more about testing deep fried diodes? I'd imagine they are delicious.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Godzil on September 15, 2015, 12:51:28 pm
Deep fried diodes are quite good along a steak
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: uoficowboy on September 15, 2015, 03:25:59 pm
Should be just that 18.2V ZD. Why not test it. Look on Google for "how to test zener diodes"

I have a blown glass, through hole diode. I believe it is a DO-35 package, but am not sure. I believe it says 18B2 on it. I believe it is a zener diode - probably between 12 and 22V (18V would make sense).

Anybody know what this is? I was hoping 18.2V was a standard zener voltage, but it doesn't seem to be.

It is out of some Japanese test equipment and they seem to mostly (only) use Japanese parts. So I would guess it's from a Japanese manufacturer, but am not positive.
As max666 pointed out - the diode is dead. Totally open.

I verified today with a microscope that it is indeed marked "18B2".

18.2V is not a standard zener voltage... Digi-Key doesn't stock a single one. So I think it's unlikely an 18.2V part.

Right now I'm guessing that it's an 18V, 2% zener. That's a pretty standard/common part. Thoughts?
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Quarlo Klobrigney on September 15, 2015, 03:47:13 pm
PZU18B2 How about that part number as reference? I know that part number is SMD, but so is everything now. 
I understand what you meant a DO-35 glass.
To test a Zener is easy if you have a supply above the rated value.
There are also TVS diodes as well but I have never seen them in DO-35 glass.
I used to see these markings on a lot of Japanese electronics in the 80's & 90's. I just replaced them with common sense, a 1W @V Zener. My ECG BOOK for 18B2 says ECG5027 an 18V 1W Zener.
Even if it was 18.2V, an 18V Zener is in tolerance.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: uoficowboy on September 15, 2015, 04:40:03 pm
PZU18B2 How about that part number as reference? I know that part number is SMD, but so is everything now. 
I understand what you meant a DO-35 glass.
To test a Zener is easy if you have a supply above the rated value.
There are also TVS diodes as well but I have never seen them in DO-35 glass.
I used to see these markings on a lot of Japanese electronics in the 80's & 90's. I just replaced them with common sense, a 1W @V Zener. My ECG BOOK for 18B2 says ECG5027 an 18V 1W Zener.
Even if it was 18.2V, an 18V Zener is in tolerance.
Sounds like we're agreed - 18V zener. What's an ECG book?

I think you're missing the fact that the diode is dead. Big crack down the center. It measures open circuit both directions. I agree that testing a zener's voltage is easy - but it's only easy when the diode isn't dead :)
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Godzil on September 15, 2015, 04:49:58 pm
ECG stand for Electrocardiogram to me, but I suspect I'm wrong in this case  :-DD
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Quarlo Klobrigney on September 15, 2015, 05:01:04 pm
What we old timers used to use before NTE bought them up and used software. ECG was also in bed with Philips.
Sounds like we're agreed - 18V zener. What's an ECG book?
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Len on September 15, 2015, 07:40:32 pm
I think you're missing the fact that the diode is dead. Big crack down the center. It measures open circuit both directions.

So the blown-glass diode has blown open and measures open-circuit.

Alles klar!  :)

Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: uoficowboy on September 24, 2015, 02:19:06 am
OK - one more question.

I have this TO-220 transistor, marked D635, pulled from an old (10 years?) piece of Japanese equipment. I believe it is either an NPN BJT or an NPN darlington. Any idea what it is, and what I can replace it with? It is completely dead (about an ohm between any two terminals).
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: tautech on September 24, 2015, 02:51:58 am
OK - one more question.

I have this TO-220 transistor, marked D635, pulled from an old (10 years?) piece of Japanese equipment. I believe it is either an NPN BJT or an NPN darlington. Any idea what it is, and what I can replace it with? It is completely dead (about an ohm between any two terminals).
As with most Jap transistors add 2S and you get 2SD635

Google "2SD635 data pdf" and you'll have plenty of datsheets to choose from.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Mr.B on September 24, 2015, 03:01:01 am
Even if you Google D635 datasheet you get plenty of hits...
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: uoficowboy on September 24, 2015, 04:08:49 am
OK - one more question.

I have this TO-220 transistor, marked D635, pulled from an old (10 years?) piece of Japanese equipment. I believe it is either an NPN BJT or an NPN darlington. Any idea what it is, and what I can replace it with? It is completely dead (about an ohm between any two terminals).
As with most Jap transistors add 2S and you get 2SD635

Google "2SD635 data pdf" and you'll have plenty of datsheets to choose from.
So I had seen the 2SD635 - which is a darlington - but there is also a BD635, which is not a darlington. Is there any way to confirm which it is?

Also, do you recognize the logo on that transistor? It reminds me of the Fairchild logo - but it's not the same.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: tautech on September 24, 2015, 04:15:41 am
OK - one more question.

I have this TO-220 transistor, marked D635, pulled from an old (10 years?) piece of Japanese equipment. I believe it is either an NPN BJT or an NPN darlington. Any idea what it is, and what I can replace it with? It is completely dead (about an ohm between any two terminals).
As with most Jap transistors add 2S and you get 2SD635

Google "2SD635 data pdf" and you'll have plenty of datsheets to choose from.
So I had seen the 2SD635 - which is a darlington - but there is also a BD635, which is not a darlington. Is there any way to confirm which it is?

Also, do you recognize the logo on that transistor? It reminds me of the Fairchild logo - but it's not the same.
In my experience it is much more common that this would be a 2S device, a BD device would normally have the full device code, not shortened like is common with Asian devices.

A check of specs against the application normally proves which is which and restores sanity.  :phew:
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: uoficowboy on September 24, 2015, 04:28:22 am
Even if you Google D635 datasheet you get plenty of hits...
The problem is that Google turns up multiple similar parts that both have D635 in their part number and are in the same package.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: uoficowboy on September 24, 2015, 04:48:21 am
OK - one more question.

I have this TO-220 transistor, marked D635, pulled from an old (10 years?) piece of Japanese equipment. I believe it is either an NPN BJT or an NPN darlington. Any idea what it is, and what I can replace it with? It is completely dead (about an ohm between any two terminals).
As with most Jap transistors add 2S and you get 2SD635

Google "2SD635 data pdf" and you'll have plenty of datsheets to choose from.
So I had seen the 2SD635 - which is a darlington - but there is also a BD635, which is not a darlington. Is there any way to confirm which it is?

Also, do you recognize the logo on that transistor? It reminds me of the Fairchild logo - but it's not the same.
In my experience it is much more common that this would be a 2S device, a BD device would normally have the full device code, not shortened like is common with Asian devices.

A check of specs against the application normally proves which is which and restores sanity.  :phew:
I think you're right.

The D635 device is being used as a voltage regulator - there is a zener holding up its base voltage, and its collector is tied to an unregulated supply. The BD635 has pretty low gain so it'd require more current on the base it than the pullup on the zener/base could really handle (4.7K). 2SD635 it must be!

I just ordered some up. Hopefully that'll be the final strange part this device needs...
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: helius on September 24, 2015, 06:20:56 am
Also, do you recognize the logo on that transistor? It reminds me of the Fairchild logo - but it's not the same.
Toshiba
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Alexei.Polkhanov on September 24, 2015, 08:11:19 pm
I am guessing that this is an Operational Amplifier but I am unable to find any reference or datasheet for it. I think it is because it is from pre-internet era of 1984. I have tried to search it on one of big supplier's website - "RS", also no luck. If anyone recognizes it - thanks in advance!


Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: SeanB on September 24, 2015, 08:28:34 pm
RS 307-468, which is a house coded part supplied by RS. Not available in the online catalogue, but probably is in the paper catalogue as a discontinued part number.  If a single opamp it will be a 741or a 308 most likely, or if a dual any one of many generic audio amplifier chips. Single you will have to see where the offset pins are connected to determine if 741, offset to -15V, or 308 offset to +15V.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Deathwish on September 24, 2015, 09:00:10 pm
googling the rs part number gets you this

ZN459 data sheet : ETC1 - ULTRA LOW NOISE WIDEBAND PREAMPLIFIER
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: SeanB on September 24, 2015, 09:06:38 pm
Seems to agree, but no longer stocked by RS for some reason. Will be a little hard to get a drop in replacement if it is faulty, as it is a dual unit with controlled gain.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Alexei.Polkhanov on September 25, 2015, 12:43:27 am
Thank you very much! ZN459 makes perfect sense!

I did not realize that it is the second number that is RS part number - nice to know for future.
It looks obsolete but only thing I needed to know is bandwidth and noise. 800pV/Hz^0.5 - will be hard to match ... but it is still available from few places ~$20/piece.

Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: gildasd on October 09, 2015, 07:28:21 am
I cannot find any data sheet about this varistor (7N241K 39+) that I pulled out of a cordless phone (Samsung).
It ended up solving a problem I was having on a bredboard test circuit by mistake (I thought it was a ceramic capacitor).
A basic idea of what it is to be able to buy an equivalent would be lovely!
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: PA0PBZ on October 09, 2015, 08:03:15 am
I cannot find any data sheet about this varistor (7N241K 39+)

Try to search for jvr7n241k
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: GNU_Ninja on October 09, 2015, 09:47:26 am
I cannot find any data sheet about this varistor (7N241K 39+) that I pulled out of a cordless phone (Samsung).
It ended up solving a problem I was having on a bredboard test circuit by mistake (I thought it was a ceramic capacitor).
A basic idea of what it is to be able to buy an equivalent would be lovely!

Here: https://vikiwat.com/productfile/433/userfiles-productimages-17262-varistor-jvr7n241k-200-vdc-150-vac-0.pdf (https://vikiwat.com/productfile/433/userfiles-productimages-17262-varistor-jvr7n241k-200-vdc-150-vac-0.pdf)  :)
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: gildasd on October 09, 2015, 01:12:41 pm
I cannot find any data sheet about this varistor (7N241K 39+)

Try to search for jvr7n241k
I cannot find any data sheet about this varistor (7N241K 39+) that I pulled out of a cordless phone (Samsung).
It ended up solving a problem I was having on a bredboard test circuit by mistake (I thought it was a ceramic capacitor).
A basic idea of what it is to be able to buy an equivalent would be lovely!

Here: https://vikiwat.com/productfile/433/userfiles-productimages-17262-varistor-jvr7n241k-200-vdc-150-vac-0.pdf (https://vikiwat.com/productfile/433/userfiles-productimages-17262-varistor-jvr7n241k-200-vdc-150-vac-0.pdf)  :)
Thanks, I was searching in the wrong range, I pulled this put of a 6V device, I was sure it was not 240V... Live and learn.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: pmichel on October 10, 2015, 03:08:18 am
I'm looking for some information on 4 ICs. They all come from an automotive engine controller. I have found several sites where I can buy new ones, but that's not what I need. I would prefer to have the full datasheet, but the most helpful information for me would be the pinouts. Does anyone have any idea where I can find them?

First one looks like maybe a small microcontroller?
Made by ST.
45048
1MU2114.
This is the only one for which I have found nothing at all.

Second one is a PMIC.
Made by Freescale.
SC900656VW
A2C020162
I have found at least 4 outputs from the IC - 3 at 5V and one at 2.6V.

Third one seems to be an injector driver based on the descriptions I've found online.
Made by ST.
ATIC39-B4
A2C08350

Fourth one I don't know the function.
Made by ST.
A2C31376-C3
ATIC35
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Richard Crowley on October 10, 2015, 03:19:48 am
If you can't find any documentation via Google, etc. then it seems extraordinarily likely that they are industry-specific or even full-custom chips made specifically for vehicular ECU products.  Good luck finding ANY documentation. There are many chips like this which are sold within a tight-knit community of vendor and a handful of customers. The documents are never published or released to anyone except their industrial OEM customers.

This  didn't come out of a Volkswagen Diesel, did it?   ???
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: pmichel on October 10, 2015, 04:25:05 am
Navistar. They don't have the information on their electronics, someone else builds it for them.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: SeanB on October 10, 2015, 05:13:15 am
Thanks, I was searching in the wrong range, I pulled this put of a 6V device, I was sure it was not 240V... Live and learn.

Used on the phone line side, to clamp impulse noise to something the line side can survive. Mostly used to provide protection to close lightning strikes, a direct one on the line just blows the whole phone apart.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: nicknails on November 14, 2015, 05:22:24 pm
So this one isn't too complicated. Looks to me like a 1K metal film resistor. The trouble is that according to the service manual (it's from a Fluke 45), it's a 3.3K Wire wound. I just want to verify that it's a 1K and what type it is.

The outside has a blue and a brown line on it with a decent sized space in between. After breaking off the epoxy, it just looks like a metal tube. There are 2 slots cut in it. I broke it in half and it's all white inside. No idea the material, ceramic maybe.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Richard Crowley on November 14, 2015, 05:33:37 pm
Yes, it certainly looks like a film resistor.
The resistance is the coating on the surface of the ceramic "plug".
The "slots" are probably where they "trimmed" the value with a laser.

You didn't mention WHY you removed it? (Or why you destroyed it?)
You can't tell the value (1K vs 3K3 or any other value) by looking at it.
Didn't you measure it?  Why would you think it is "1K"?
If the document says 3K3, then why would you want to put anything else in there?
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: nicknails on November 14, 2015, 06:17:17 pm
I have 4 Fluke 45's that were all damaged by either high voltage on the input or some sort of weird ground noise from testing a HV DC/DC converter. On a good Fluke 45, this measures 1K-Ohm dead nuts (in circuit). I took it apart because a good one measures 1K, but the diagram shows 3.3K.

I've attached the schematic and the parts list. Offending part is R5.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Richard Crowley on November 14, 2015, 07:14:19 pm
I don't see "3.3K" anywhere in the parts list. I see R5 shown as 3.5K
I also see that R5 and RT1 appear to have been hand-altered after the diagram was published.
Perhaps you have the wrong schematic for your make/model/serial number.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: jitter on November 15, 2015, 01:54:17 pm
I have 4 Fluke 45's that were all damaged by either high voltage on the input or some sort of weird ground noise from testing a HV DC/DC converter. On a good Fluke 45, this measures 1K-Ohm dead nuts (in circuit). I took it apart because a good one measures 1K, but the diagram shows 3.3K.

I've attached the schematic and the parts list. Offending part is R5.

What is the colour code of the resistor in the good Fluke 45?
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: nicknails on November 16, 2015, 05:13:04 pm
I don't see "3.3K" anywhere in the parts list. I see R5 shown as 3.5K
I also see that R5 and RT1 appear to have been hand-altered after the diagram was published.
Perhaps you have the wrong schematic for your make/model/serial number.

Oops. I meant to say 3.5K, not sure why I have 3.3K stuck in my head. Nearest I can tell is that there's only the one schematic.


What is the colour code of the resistor in the good Fluke 45?


The good one is the same on the outside. It has a blue stripe and a green stripe just like the original picture.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: uoficowboy on January 08, 2016, 07:37:28 pm
I recently got a Kikusui PLZ150W load on Ebay. It's missing one of the plastic nut things on the terminals on the front. Picture attached.

Anybody know where I can get another one? For size, it's compatible with a 4mm banana jack. Not sure about the thread size but I can probably figure it out of needed.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Yansi on January 08, 2016, 09:07:38 pm
Get a pair of new ones that will fit. This type of thing is not usually sold in pieces, not these cheapies at all.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Alexei.Polkhanov on January 09, 2016, 05:17:48 am
Find one of these BNC-to-banana adapters and I think that plastic thing that is on it will fit your load. Perhaps you can find one that will fit just by looking at photos on whichever site you buy it from.

Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: jitter on January 09, 2016, 09:01:06 am
They're called "pole terminal". Any electronics store/webshop should have them in different quality grades.

(http://www.conrad.com/medias/global/ce/7000_7999/7300/7330/7337/733764_BB_00_FB.EPS_1000.jpg)
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: nadien on January 10, 2016, 06:11:54 pm
12R cood
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: alsetalokin4017 on January 10, 2016, 08:52:47 pm
Get a pair of new ones that will fit. This type of thing is not usually sold in pieces, not these cheapies at all.

This ^.

There are so many different brands, manufacturers, etc. that it is unlikely that you will be able to match the thread from a "random" part to fit your particular banana jack terminal. Unless you know someone who is parting out that same power supply model.... unlikely.

Get a pair of new ones (the entire assembly) that will fit.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: DG41WV on January 14, 2016, 12:39:36 pm
This fuse like thing was in an Anritsu voltmeter. anyone know what it is ?

(http://i.imgur.com/ybjhVug.jpg)
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Codemonkey on January 14, 2016, 12:46:57 pm
Its as the marking on the panel implies, its an elapsed time indicator, not a fuse:

Discussion of something similar here (scroll down)

http://www.forum.radios-tv.co.uk/viewtopic.php?f=20&t=4861 (http://www.forum.radios-tv.co.uk/viewtopic.php?f=20&t=4861)

http://www.forum.radios-tv.co.uk/download/file.php?id=9382&sid=edf1198a99128074e6af309fa2528d3d&mode=view (http://www.forum.radios-tv.co.uk/download/file.php?id=9382&sid=edf1198a99128074e6af309fa2528d3d&mode=view)
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: PA0PBZ on January 14, 2016, 12:47:36 pm
This fuse like thing was in an Anritsu voltmeter. anyone know what it is ?

Hint: it is labeled exactly as it is right above...
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: albert22 on January 14, 2016, 02:19:58 pm
More info on the elapsed timer. Here:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Cxj399LuX1M (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Cxj399LuX1M)
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Godzil on January 14, 2016, 07:35:19 pm
So I finally took time to take a picture of the weird components in the farnell power supply I get (LS 30-10)

From the component silkscreen, they are Tx like the two transformer, but I found the shape a bit strange, anyone has info on them?

Edit: with picture it's even better :D

(https://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20160114/264a56c9ae549ac42606fc5197423494.jpg)
(https://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20160114/9875b7eaa938c3efbd627b054dc18c42.jpg)


Edit2: By the way, if any one have the documentation/schematics that was given with this power supply, I would be really please if you can share. The only thing I found was that: http://www.ioffer.com/i/farnell-ls30-10-power-supply-schematic-circuit-diagram-522130208 (http://www.ioffer.com/i/farnell-ls30-10-power-supply-schematic-circuit-diagram-522130208) but I don't really want to pay something dubious, and especially because if was given for free with the power supply (I want to check if the low rampup time is due to the capacitors, that are may going to fail, or if it's normal)
(Ho, the big caps there seems to be rubycon one, yummy :))
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Richard Crowley on January 14, 2016, 09:44:39 pm
If they have more than two terminals, then they are almost certainly transformers. And if only two, then they are inductors.
In either case it seems quite unlikely that they have any significant failure mode (at least without a dozen other components also failing).

It looks like a switch-mode power-supply (SMPS).  Slow ramp-up time seems like an early warning of imminent failure.  Unless it was specifically designed that way for whatever purpose in the larger picture.

SMPS are generally quite difficult to repair, even WITH the schematic diagram.  Most of us just replace the entire SMPS with a new one because they are much cheaper to replace than to repair.
Title: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Godzil on January 14, 2016, 09:54:08 pm
That would be sad, it's a nearly 30year old power supply :( (in good conditions)

The initial rise time is not that bad, it's more when changing the current limiter or the voltage output that it is a bit slow, it's maybe inherent to this power supply)
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: RobertoLG on February 05, 2016, 04:33:19 am
hello I need some advice about this diode, I need to find a modern equivalent, It says at the body T 3D 0j, nothing else, I googled it but can't find anything, sorry for the bad pictures they are the best I can take, if somebody can help thanks
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Cubdriver on February 05, 2016, 04:41:30 am
What is it from/ what is its purpose?  Rectifier, something else? 

-Pat
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Richard Crowley on February 05, 2016, 04:46:09 am
If you can't Google the markings, then you are probably better off replacing it by description/specification.
You should be able to tell from the circuit what the voltage and current ratings should be.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: RobertoLG on February 05, 2016, 04:55:31 am
it's a rectifier, from an old stereo Gradiente DS 700, can't find the schematics either
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: tautech on February 05, 2016, 05:35:47 am
it's a rectifier, from an old stereo Gradiente DS 700, can't find the schematics either
For mains or low voltage?
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: RobertoLG on February 05, 2016, 06:07:19 am
eh, nevermind SK 308 - 1 amp/ 1000volt one should be enough, thanks anyway
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: nali on February 05, 2016, 08:59:41 am
Not a component per se -

This was attached to the top of an Intel WG82574 QFN64 package Ethernet chip on a Commell fanless SBC. It seems to be made of a ceramic material and is fixed by double-sided tape. You can see it in-situ here http://www.globalamericaninc.com/commell-le-374.html (http://www.globalamericaninc.com/commell-le-374.html), it's between the bottom of the mag jack and the main heatsink.

I've never seen this before so I wondered if anybody recognised it? The only guesses I can come up with is either a head shield to protect the chip from heat radiating from the main CPU heatsink (the 82574 itself has a large thermal pad) or maybe some form of EMI absorption? The pad shows no sign of magnetism though.

I'm inclined to think heat shield. We have a couple of hundred of these and I have a 3-4 with Ethernet failure after a couple of year's service - the only mode of failure to date.

Edit: pic attached 
 
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: amyk on February 05, 2016, 11:52:39 am
Ceramic heat sink. Supposedly more efficient than regular ones, but nearly impossible to clean...

http://uk.farnell.com/amec-thermasol/mpc151525t/heat-sink-ceramic-15-15-2-5-std/dp/1892471 (http://uk.farnell.com/amec-thermasol/mpc151525t/heat-sink-ceramic-15-15-2-5-std/dp/1892471)
http://www.banana-pi.net/index.php/en/product/banana-pi/heat-sink/sic-ceramic-heat-sink-for-banana-pi-detail (http://www.banana-pi.net/index.php/en/product/banana-pi/heat-sink/sic-ceramic-heat-sink-for-banana-pi-detail)
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: nali on February 05, 2016, 12:27:48 pm
Ceramic heat sink. Supposedly more efficient than regular ones, but nearly impossible to clean...

http://uk.farnell.com/amec-thermasol/mpc151525t/heat-sink-ceramic-15-15-2-5-std/dp/1892471 (http://uk.farnell.com/amec-thermasol/mpc151525t/heat-sink-ceramic-15-15-2-5-std/dp/1892471)
http://www.banana-pi.net/index.php/en/product/banana-pi/heat-sink/sic-ceramic-heat-sink-for-banana-pi-detail (http://www.banana-pi.net/index.php/en/product/banana-pi/heat-sink/sic-ceramic-heat-sink-for-banana-pi-detail)

That's the one, thanks!  I actually took a quick look through that section of Farnell's site as I buy most of my components from them but missed that   :-[
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: crazyjim30 on February 05, 2016, 10:30:16 pm
Could someone please help me ID this? The closest anyone has been able to come to a positive ID is "some type od audio related equipment". (http://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20160205/d939e75a65868c20eabd1d13e49f6f1a.jpg)(http://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20160205/b88efac3b7a7dd4478589386113e9df5.jpg)(http://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20160205/0c7fe11e991de356dde37484937a0d71.jpg)(http://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20160205/f69c22a79485f913127d4b3a82b40ebd.jpg)(http://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20160205/f653b6c665ebe020b777e8b7a8dc947d.jpg)

Sent from my SM-G900V using Tapatalk

Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: oPossum on February 05, 2016, 11:00:13 pm
Crossover network for a 2 way speaker.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: crazyjim30 on February 06, 2016, 05:41:14 am
Crossover network for a 2 way speaker.
Thanks. That came in a "grab bag" of random components and stumped the entire EET department.

Sent from my SM-G900V using Tapatalk

Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Brumby on February 06, 2016, 06:15:07 am

... and stumped the entire EET department.


Seriously?  Wow.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: bills on February 06, 2016, 06:30:09 am
+1 yes it is sad that they did not know what it was (or is)
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: crazyjim30 on February 06, 2016, 06:31:13 am
Well, they were able to isolate it to "audio component". That's something. ????

Sent from my SM-G900V using Tapatalk

Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Richard Crowley on February 06, 2016, 06:33:37 am

... and stumped the entire EET department.


Seriously?  Wow.

There seems to be a whole generation (or two?) of people who have never practiced "Don't turn it on, take it apart!", and likely don't even understand why anyone would do that. They are appliance operators who don't have the slightest clue (or even curiosity) what's inside their high-tech toys.  Users of a certain brand of computers and other products named after a common fruit are a prime example of this "dumb-user" class.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Brumby on February 06, 2016, 06:43:00 am
I wouldn't have thought that would have applied to an EET department!
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Brumby on February 06, 2016, 06:46:53 am
Users of a certain brand of computers and other products named after a common fruit are a prime example of this "dumb-user" class.

Just read that again....

 :-+
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: helius on February 06, 2016, 07:39:46 am
I take exception to your careless slander of Apricot PC users!
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Brumby on February 06, 2016, 07:45:52 am
Awww.....  The Apricot.         *fond memories*

I remember them when they first came out.  They weren't too bad.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Alexei.Polkhanov on February 10, 2016, 05:47:16 am
This Mitsubishi chip is coming from 1990s wireless modem. My Google-fu technique is pretty good but I failed to find any reference to it. What is this? Mixer, amplifier, filter?  Perhaps somebody recognize this or somebody know how to look it up?
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: lonetos on February 12, 2016, 01:19:35 pm
Dear Forum members,

Does anybody have clue where I can find the datasheet of this IC ? It seems to be re-badged or something. Seems to look like this one, VX1937   VGA-to-AV/S Video Converter, but the crystal which is on the pcb is 24Mhz not 27Mhz...

Thanks in advance.

Toshio
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Alexei.Polkhanov on February 12, 2016, 09:03:50 pm
Dear Forum members,

Does anybody have clue where I can find the datasheet of this IC ? It seems to be re-badged or something. Seems to look like this one, VX1937   VGA-to-AV/S Video Converter, but the crystal which is on the pcb is 24Mhz not 27Mhz...
Did you try checking pins? If Ground pins, power pins and other pints that you can identify are on same positions then it must be just re-branded IC you guessed.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: lonetos on February 13, 2016, 09:39:39 am
Yes I tried checking some pins, but I can't find the datasheet of the vx1937 (pin layout) either, so this makes it a bit harder. Well maybe its just better to put this vga converter in the bin, and connect my c64 to a lcd instead of an old crt :)
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: vk6zgo on February 13, 2016, 11:23:56 am
Awww.....  The Apricot.         *fond memories*

I remember them when they first came out.  They weren't too bad.

We had an "Orange" at work.
I only remember the name because of the time I upset everyone.

The "Computer Guru" had written a nice program that allowed you to enter the name of a remote radio or TV site,& it would show the status of that station.

In its final form,it was intended to dial up the site & download the data ,but at the time was set up with a dummy source of information.

I entered "Kununurra",& it went crazy,scrolling through every station on the network.
It turned out that the programmer had misspelled the station as "Kununarra".

I swore off Computers for a while!
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: BobbyK on February 21, 2016, 05:55:16 pm
I got plenty of these in a grab bag. Wondering what they are, and how they can be used. There is a part number but I cannot find any datasheet. Looks like some sort of LED/optical component. Would be great to know how to use the component.

(http://[IMG]http://i66.tinypic.com/3307nsz.jpg)



Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: tautech on February 21, 2016, 06:51:07 pm
A guess would be an LDR, but never seen one in a package like that.  :-//
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: djQUAN on February 21, 2016, 07:04:24 pm
I would guess some kind of photo diode/transistor for quadrature sensing.
similar to here: http://www.didel.com/microkit/encoder/Encoder.html (http://www.didel.com/microkit/encoder/Encoder.html)
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: bktemp on February 21, 2016, 10:04:45 pm
My guess: It is a position sensor. I have a similar sensor in a different package. It is either 4 independent photodiodes, or a single large photodiode with connections on all 4 sides. If you measure and compare the 4 currents you can estimate the exact position of a small light beam on the sensor.
I found this, it looks like my guess is correkt:
http://letsmakerobots.com/node/37867 (http://letsmakerobots.com/node/37867)
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: BobbyK on February 22, 2016, 06:39:50 am
Thanks for your answers. It seems like it is in fact some sort of position sensor. What would something like this be used in? I am assuming that for anything that wants to move across and get detected the travel would be very small. Any ideas where this might come from or be used?
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Richard Crowley on February 22, 2016, 06:55:02 am
This is the kind of sensor you see used with a laser beam and X-Y servos where you can sense how far to the right or left you are from the beam, and how high or low.  And then re-position to center the beam in the mid-point of the sensors.  Or using a pin-hole beam from a sun-tracking system to follow the sun across the sky, etc.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: BobbyK on February 22, 2016, 07:00:04 am
I love the idea for tracking the Sun Richard. I'll see if I can put something together with two of these to track on a vertical+horizontal axis. Might be a cool little project to maximize solar cell efficiency. I don't have any large panels, but it will be interesting to see if it's worth the power needed to run a small system. I am assuming that it is always worth it with large panels. Thanks everyone.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: bktemp on February 22, 2016, 07:48:57 am
The commong name for this type of sensor is PSD: position sensitive detector
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Position_sensitive_device
Using this term you should find many appnotes with more or less usefull usages.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: BobbyK on February 22, 2016, 08:36:57 am
Great Find! Now I know where to look - searching for "Position Sensitive Detector" gives a lot of good articles. :-+
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: dekra54 on February 24, 2016, 08:20:14 am
Hello Forum  :)

I just spend the whole yesterday afternoon to find a mating connector that can be mounted on to a plastic Housing, but i was unable to find the right one ( If there is any).
I have contacted the Manufacturer of the Rollerdrive but they just replied that i should buy their controller.  :(

Attached two pictures of a cut of one and a link to the PDF from the Product where the connector is attached to. (The DIP IC is just for size reference)

http://www.interroll.de/fileadmin/products/de/Resources_pdf_441307019.pdf (http://www.interroll.de/fileadmin/products/de/Resources_pdf_441307019.pdf)

Hope you have better luck  8)

Greetings Dennis
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: FlyWizard on February 24, 2016, 11:13:53 pm
Hello all,

I am trying to find a STMicro part from its markings but I'm having no luck at all. It is a TO-220 part with markings "130 082" on the first line, "GKO5D VU" on the second line, and "CHN 209" on the third line. I've searched everywhere on the internet that I can think of but nothing is found for the part. I've also inquired on the STMicro support site(twice even) and have gotten no response from them.

Any ideas on the ST part number and date code for this part? I have a bunch(meaning a couple hundred) I'd like to sell so anyone who knows, and can help identify, will get first dibs on purchasing at a great discount!

Any help is appreciated.

Thanks,
Dave
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Richard Crowley on February 24, 2016, 11:44:30 pm
It seems likely it is a "house number" and not a commodity ST product number.
So it is either a regular ST part with the customer's special inventory number,
or else it is a custom part (either custom designed, fabricated, tested or packaged).

Do you have one of those "$20 LCR ESR Transistor Diode Checker" gadgets?
https://www.eevblog.com/forum/testgear/$20-lcr-esr-transistor-checker-project/ (https://www.eevblog.com/forum/testgear/)
Chances seem pretty good that you can plug most any kind of unknown part like this in, and it will identify what it is, and the basic ratings.

If you don't have one of those things, I very strongly suggest getting one.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: FlyWizard on February 25, 2016, 11:42:00 pm
Thanks for the reply Richard. You may be right about a non-standard part number.

I do have one of that type of testers but I was hoping to be able to link it up with its datasheet.

Thanks again for your help. The search continues.......    |O
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: wiss on February 29, 2016, 02:53:02 pm
Thanks for your answers. It seems like it is in fact some sort of position sensor. What would something like this be used in? I am assuming that for anything that wants to move across and get detected the travel would be very small. Any ideas where this might come from or be used?

Quad photo-diodes are used in Atomic Force Microscopes to detect when the tip gets close to the surface and regulate the Z-piezo.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: helius on February 29, 2016, 08:18:10 pm
Thanks for your answers. It seems like it is in fact some sort of position sensor. What would something like this be used in? I am assuming that for anything that wants to move across and get detected the travel would be very small. Any ideas where this might come from or be used?
These linear photodiodes / phototransistors were used in early optical mice with a printed grid. The 4 outputs move in quadrature when a shadow passes over the sensor.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: orbiter on March 04, 2016, 10:02:56 pm
I maybe peeing into the wind here guys but if anyone can help me, you can.  I've got an IC here from a microscope camera that popped on me a
while ago when a DC-DC converter failed.

The chip in question is a 32pin QFN showing the following codes: ES 2A / GOR   

EDIT:::: It's ok guys I think I've found it .. ( Richtek - RT9992ZQW ES )

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v146/orbiter/2_zpsbwoat93c.jpg)

Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Belgarion on March 04, 2016, 11:31:32 pm
The chip in question is a 32pin QFN showing the following codes: ES 2A / GOR   

EDIT:::: It's ok guys I think I've found it .. ( Richtek - RT9992ZQW ES )

It looks like it would be the RT9992, as you found.
In case you did not find the datasheet: http://www.szfujiawei.com/aspweb_editor/UploadFile/products/201469151446853.pdf (http://www.szfujiawei.com/aspweb_editor/UploadFile/products/201469151446853.pdf)
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: orbiter on March 04, 2016, 11:38:16 pm
Thanks for that Belgarion  :-+
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: BobbyK on March 06, 2016, 04:16:58 pm
Hello all,

I am trying to find a STMicro part from its markings but I'm having no luck at all. It is a TO-220 part with markings "130 082" on the first line, "GKO5D VU" on the second line, and "CHN 209" on the third line. I've searched everywhere on the internet that I can think of but nothing is found for the part. I've also inquired on the STMicro support site(twice even) and have gotten no response from them.

Any ideas on the ST part number and date code for this part? I have a bunch(meaning a couple hundred) I'd like to sell so anyone who knows, and can help identify, will get first dibs on purchasing at a great discount!

Any help is appreciated.

Thanks,
Dave


It looks like house numbering - but at the same time the 08 and 05 make it look like its a 5 volt regulator (maybe a 7805). If you show us the circuit you found it in, you might be easily able to tell what it is. Also, if it is indeed a regulator, 

A standard 7805 e.g. from ST (got from Mouser) is numbered:
First line: L7805ACV
Second Line: GKDSL V6
Third line: CHN 506

So that tells me that the second and third lines do not really give you any helpful info. With 130 082 on the first line, it looks like it is house numbering. Now, the cheap ebay testers WILL NOT be able to tell you if this is a Regulator e.g., but if it's a Triac or transistor they will - not that that is very useful! Why don't you just start checking it out with a multimeter for diode drops etc.? BTW. if this was taken from a circuit and if you show us the circuit the part was on, it will be really easy to guess.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: djQUAN on March 06, 2016, 04:44:09 pm
*snip* If you show us the circuit you found it in, you might be easily able to tell what it is. Also, if it is indeed a regulator,   *snip* if this was taken from a circuit and if you show us the circuit the part was on, it will be really easy to guess.

The device in his pic looks brand new so I guess he got it by itself or in a grab bag.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: orbiter on March 10, 2016, 12:17:43 pm
Hi all.. I'm assuming this is a Ti DC-DC converter, It comes from the small PSU for a microscope camera. However I can't seem to find a replacement
or datasheet for this exact one.. It's coded.. VUBI, Ti33, ADD1.

Could anyone please tell me what it equates to or where to find a replacement?

Many Thanks

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v146/orbiter/1_zpsm8rygmph.jpg)


This is the PSU it's from.. Yes there is 1 blown trace, but luckily it's not used :)

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v146/orbiter/IMAG0526_zpswyrezfal.jpg)
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: PA0PBZ on March 10, 2016, 12:24:17 pm
Could anyone please tell me what it equates to or where to find a replacement?

http://www.ti.com/lit/ds/symlink/tlv62130.pdf (http://www.ti.com/lit/ds/symlink/tlv62130.pdf)
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: orbiter on March 10, 2016, 05:01:07 pm
Could anyone please tell me what it equates to or where to find a replacement?

http://www.ti.com/lit/ds/symlink/tlv62130.pdf (http://www.ti.com/lit/ds/symlink/tlv62130.pdf)

Thanks PA0PBZ. I had seen datasheet previously.. Do you know for sure that.. that is a direct replacement for the VUBI Ti33?  I only ask as the part numbers are totally different and I don't have a
datasheet of the VUBI chip to compare it too?

Many Thanks
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Richard Crowley on March 10, 2016, 05:15:29 pm
You don't have a "VUBI" 
You have a TLV62130ARGTT and the SMD marking code is "VUBI".
Did you miss the table on the addendum page 1?
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: orbiter on March 10, 2016, 05:56:47 pm
You don't have a "VUBI" 
You have a TLV62130ARGTT and the SMD marking code is "VUBI".
Did you miss the table on the addendum page 1?

Yes I did miss that, thank you for pointing me at it  :-+

So what is the Ti33 number as I have seen other IC's using the 'VUBI' top line but then letters like..  Ti55, Ti48, Ti36 etc.. Are these all the same TLV62130** ?

Thanks
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Richard Crowley on March 10, 2016, 06:22:51 pm
VUBI means TLV62130ARGTT regardless of the rest of the nomenclature.
VUBI is just the "nick-name" for TLV62130ARGTT.

"Ti" sounds suspiciously like "Texas Instruments"
The two-digit numbers are probably an encoded date code.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: orbiter on March 10, 2016, 07:41:07 pm
VUBI means TLV62130ARGTT regardless of the rest of the nomenclature.
VUBI is just the "nick-name" for TLV62130ARGTT.

"Ti" sounds suspiciously like "Texas Instruments"
The two-digit numbers are probably an encoded date code.

I appreciate the help Richard. Thank You.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: iampoor on March 17, 2016, 05:11:41 am
Whats a SH capacitor?

http://www.ebay.com/itm/271911574317?_trksid=p2060353.m1438.l2649&ssPageName=STRK%3AMEBIDX%3AIT (http://www.ebay.com/itm/271911574317?_trksid=p2060353.m1438.l2649&ssPageName=STRK%3AMEBIDX%3AIT)

Would these be suitable for 200-300ma power supply filtering? Not sure what the 2.5a rating on the side is for. Im asuming these are not electrolytic since they are rated for AC?

Never seen these before. The price is.....nice......  :-+ :-DD
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Richard Crowley on March 17, 2016, 11:39:14 am
Google reveals:  http://www.ehow.com/info_11386135_sh-capacitor.html (http://www.ehow.com/info_11386135_sh-capacitor.html)
"SH" appears to mean "self-healing".
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: iampoor on March 18, 2016, 07:47:56 am
Google reveals:  http://www.ehow.com/info_11386135_sh-capacitor.html (http://www.ehow.com/info_11386135_sh-capacitor.html)
"SH" appears to mean "self-healing".

Interesting! I just assumed they were some variation of an electrolytic.

I wonder if the current rating is the maximum current they can pass and still operate, since it appears to relate to frequency. I have a high voltage (400v DC) lab power supply project, I wonder how well these would fit the bill.  :-+
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: max666 on March 18, 2016, 02:22:01 pm
Richard you should have tagged the ehow link as Not Safe For Work!
That article talks about "metal foils exposing themselves to each other"   :-DD

I also find "a thin layer of metal vacuum replaces the aluminum foils" quite shocking. Don't play with "metal vacuum" kids!
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: FlyWizard on March 20, 2016, 08:58:19 pm
*snip* If you show us the circuit you found it in, you might be easily able to tell what it is. Also, if it is indeed a regulator,   *snip* if this was taken from a circuit and if you show us the circuit the part was on, it will be really easy to guess.

The device in his pic looks brand new so I guess he got it by itself or in a grab bag.

Yeah, brand new. I have 490 of them and really want to do something with them!
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: FlyWizard on March 20, 2016, 09:04:39 pm
Hello all,

I am trying to find a STMicro part from its markings but I'm having no luck at all. It is a TO-220 part with markings "130 082" on the first line, "GKO5D VU" on the second line, and "CHN 209" on the third line. I've searched everywhere on the internet that I can think of but nothing is found for the part. I've also inquired on the STMicro support site(twice even) and have gotten no response from them.

Any ideas on the ST part number and date code for this part? I have a bunch(meaning a couple hundred) I'd like to sell so anyone who knows, and can help identify, will get first dibs on purchasing at a great discount!

Any help is appreciated.

Thanks,
Dave


It looks like house numbering - but at the same time the 08 and 05 make it look like its a 5 volt regulator (maybe a 7805). If you show us the circuit you found it in, you might be easily able to tell what it is. Also, if it is indeed a regulator, 

A standard 7805 e.g. from ST (got from Mouser) is numbered:
First line: L7805ACV
Second Line: GKDSL V6
Third line: CHN 506

So that tells me that the second and third lines do not really give you any helpful info. With 130 082 on the first line, it looks like it is house numbering. Now, the cheap ebay testers WILL NOT be able to tell you if this is a Regulator e.g., but if it's a Triac or transistor they will - not that that is very useful! Why don't you just start checking it out with a multimeter for diode drops etc.? BTW. if this was taken from a circuit and if you show us the circuit the part was on, it will be really easy to guess.

Thanks for the info! Yeah, the second and third aren't helpful at this point. I wish I had a reference circuit - I have 490 brand new that I'd like to figure out what to do with but I'm still stuck. Sure would be nice if the STMicro support page would respond. I've inquired twice, they update their page and say it is "assigned" but they never respond - not even an email to say they are looking into it. Doesn't say much for their customer support!!

Thanks a ton for your help and suggestions! The quest continues! 

 |O
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: firewalker on March 22, 2016, 03:04:26 pm
Does MFD on old capacitors mean uF?

(http://i.imgur.com/e9Q9ZGQs.jpg) (http://i.imgur.com/e9Q9ZGQ.jpg)

Alexander.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: PA0PBZ on March 22, 2016, 03:10:55 pm
Does MFD on old capacitors mean uF?

Yes
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: helius on March 22, 2016, 03:11:58 pm
Does MFD on old capacitors mean uF?
Yes.
And "MMFD" means pF.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: SeanB on March 22, 2016, 05:29:45 pm
Replacement is a 15000uF 100V capacitor.

http://za.rs-online.com/web/p/aluminium-capacitors/6832011/ (http://za.rs-online.com/web/p/aluminium-capacitors/6832011/)

However if you are a little price concious this will probably also work well in this application, slightly lower capacitance ( but at this size likely within the tolerances of the original)

http://za.rs-online.com/web/p/aluminium-capacitors/8526531/ (http://za.rs-online.com/web/p/aluminium-capacitors/8526531/)

Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: djQUAN on March 22, 2016, 06:23:21 pm
Yeah, brand new. I have 490 of them and really want to do something with them!

Well, since you can't get the info you need, might as well do some basic diode tests to see what they are (BJT? FET? Thyristor?). Or even try using them as 78XX or 79XX regulators and see what happens.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Richard Crowley on March 22, 2016, 08:00:31 pm
Does MFD on old capacitors mean uF?
Yes
And it also means it is rather old. So it may be prudent to measure the ESR and determine if it is drying our or showing other signs of approaching its end of life.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Richard Crowley on March 22, 2016, 08:07:22 pm
Yeah, brand new. I have 490 of them and really want to do something with them!

Well, since you can't get the info you need, might as well do some basic diode tests to see what they are (BJT? FET? Thyristor?). Or even try using them as 78XX or 79XX regulators and see what happens.
And those combo component testers on Ebay are well <$20 these days. They do a marvelous job of identifying what kind of component it is, and even giving some basic measurements (like hFE, etc.)  IMHO they are a "must-have" for anyone who plays with mystery components.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: max666 on March 22, 2016, 10:14:03 pm
And it also means it is rather old. So it may be prudent to measure the ESR and determine if it is drying our or showing other signs of approaching its end of life.

How do you guys determine what ESR value is good or bad? That does depend on capacity and voltage rating, does it not? Or is Quality/Dissipation factor a better criterion?
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: jitter on March 24, 2016, 07:15:46 pm
Datasheet. There are rules of thumb with for capacity/voltage, but the real values come from datasheets.

From this (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dissipation_factor) Wiki:

(https://upload.wikimedia.org/math/b/5/2/b52297ae7743b37cba4f2b9256a50f3b.png)

Or in other words: it doesn't matter if you use DF, ESR or QF, they can all be derived from that formula. Most datasheets seem to spec DF.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: max666 on March 27, 2016, 09:41:15 pm
Damn, I was hoping there would be an easier way, I don't want to look for capacitor datasheets every time I suspect a bad CapXon cap :/
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: iampoor on March 28, 2016, 12:19:56 am
Damn, I was hoping there would be an easier way, I don't want to look for capacitor datasheets every time I suspect a bad CapXon cap :/

Plenty of bad caps will be an order of magnitude worse than their ideal value. Once you have a good general idea of what they shoukd be, it isn't too hard to tell.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: jitter on March 28, 2016, 05:42:01 am
The values that are printed on the cap are going to be enough in many applications. But please beware that there are also applications in which the ESR can be an important factor in the stability of the circuit. Too low or too high an ESR can then lead to problems when you replace a cap willy nilly.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Sjokolade on March 28, 2016, 08:22:34 pm
Pictures from ebay, anyone know what chip this is ?

Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: jitter on March 29, 2016, 04:58:48 am
I'm going to hazard a guess: a 3.3 V regulator, of possibly a generic Asian brand.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: amspire on March 29, 2016, 06:02:51 am
Pictures from ebay, anyone know what chip this is ?

At a guess, it is a "IBM-46M0864-46M0832-Feature-Key-for-Upgrading-IBM-M1015-RAID-5-50". (Google image search is great).

My guess it is a small 6-pin programmable micro that is coded in a way that it is very hard to copy. Perhaps the RAID send this board a random code, and this chip replies with a correctly hashed version of the code back. This would mean that capturing the communication is useless because it will be different every time.

If it just sends only, then if you had one, you could capture the code and try and make a circuit to copy the functionality.

It seems like it can run with two wires so power and data are sent over the same two wires. Something like the Dallas/Maxim 1-Wire technology.
Title: Re: What's this please?
Post by: VinzC on April 18, 2016, 09:16:33 pm
Oh! Oh! May I?

The hand drawn part is the rough copy of the silk screen that was under the component. Basically a zigzag in a rectangle. Probably some power component, but I have never seen the symbol, so no idea.

EDIT: added a picture with a ruler. It's about 10mm wide.

Any idea why all pictures in this thread appear completely scrambled to me? (especially the above two.)

Other than that, yes, I also find this topic extremely useful as I regularly wished anyone could give me more info about an unknown part, especially connectors.
Title: Re: What's this please?
Post by: Richard Crowley on April 19, 2016, 04:03:47 am
Any idea why all pictures in this thread appear completely scrambled to me?
I don't see any "scrambling".  Perhaps something is wrong with your browser.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: CJay on April 19, 2016, 03:32:57 pm
Awww.....  The Apricot.         *fond memories*

I remember them when they first came out.  They weren't too bad.

They were bloody awful, used to have to put a sheet of copper under the tiop cover of some of them to stop them interfering with the monitor. And the power supplies, some of them just.. *ugh* They moved on to Astec ones which had a nasty habit of chucking out -48V when some of the smoothing caps died.

We used to make *lots* of money from Apricot computer owners.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: FlyWizard on April 22, 2016, 09:59:16 pm
I've got another challenge for everyone - this time with a big pay off!

I'm trying to figure out what a N40-5835SP is. I'm told it's a voltage regulator but can't find any info. Alibaba has several show up when searching but no datasheet or info.

So here's the payoff - for the first one to supply the following -  if you can send me the manufacturer datasheet, or point me to a link for the real manufacturer datasheet, I'll send you a full tube for free!! That's 55 parts!! Free shipping to the USA as well.

The full markings on the 14 pin SOIC are "HII N40-5835SP 1203CGIX" No doubt the 1203 is the date code for the 3rd week of 2012.

I've attached a photo for your reference as well.

Any takers? I've looked everywhere and can't find a thing. Good luck!!
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: FlyWizard on April 22, 2016, 10:07:36 pm
Hello all,

I am trying to find a STMicro part from its markings but I'm having no luck at all. It is a TO-220 part with markings "130 082" on the first line, "GKO5D VU" on the second line, and "CHN 209" on the third line. I've searched everywhere on the internet that I can think of but nothing is found for the part. I've also inquired on the STMicro support site(twice even) and have gotten no response from them.

Any ideas on the ST part number and date code for this part? I have a bunch(meaning a couple hundred) I'd like to sell so anyone who knows, and can help identify, will get first dibs on purchasing at a great discount!

Any help is appreciated.

Thanks,
Dave


It looks like house numbering - but at the same time the 08 and 05 make it look like its a 5 volt regulator (maybe a 7805). If you show us the circuit you found it in, you might be easily able to tell what it is. Also, if it is indeed a regulator, 

A standard 7805 e.g. from ST (got from Mouser) is numbered:
First line: L7805ACV
Second Line: GKDSL V6
Third line: CHN 506

So that tells me that the second and third lines do not really give you any helpful info. With 130 082 on the first line, it looks like it is house numbering. Now, the cheap ebay testers WILL NOT be able to tell you if this is a Regulator e.g., but if it's a Triac or transistor they will - not that that is very useful! Why don't you just start checking it out with a multimeter for diode drops etc.? BTW. if this was taken from a circuit and if you show us the circuit the part was on, it will be really easy to guess.

Thanks for the info! Yeah, the second and third aren't helpful at this point. I wish I had a reference circuit - I have 490 brand new that I'd like to figure out what to do with but I'm still stuck. Sure would be nice if the STMicro support page would respond. I've inquired twice, they update their page and say it is "assigned" but they never respond - not even an email to say they are looking into it. Doesn't say much for their customer support!!

Thanks a ton for your help and suggestions! The quest continues! 

 |O

Hello again - I just had a thought that maybe an incentive would help - say a free tube of 50 with free shipping to the USA for the first person to send me the real manufacturer datasheet or a link to the real manufacturer datasheet!! I'm still hopeful that these will be found but I'm getting desperate!!

Thanks for any help!
Title: Re: What's this please?
Post by: VinzC on April 30, 2016, 07:52:24 pm
Any idea why all pictures in this thread appear completely scrambled to me?
I don't see any "scrambling".  Perhaps something is wrong with your browser.
I don't think there's a problem with my browser as I've just tested another one (aka Seamonkey) and the pictures appear scrambled — or should I say «deteriorated» — just like this:

  (http://imgur.com/XSJcBfol.png)
 (http://i.imgur.com/XSJcBfo.png)
Sure the pictures are more than 5 years old but even then I'd have expected a 404, not that kind of woopsie...
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: miguelvp on April 30, 2016, 08:47:56 pm
Yup, some of the 1st page images (probably all) are gone and those ones look like that to me as well.

The post in question is:
https://www.eevblog.com/forum/chat/what's-this-please-(component-advice)/msg36696/#msg36696 (https://www.eevblog.com/forum/chat/what's-this-please-(component-advice)/msg36696/#msg36696)

Maybe some database corruption that affected some images?
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: amyk on May 01, 2016, 04:44:16 am
The ones hosted here and corrupted have a very peculiar byte distribution - e.g. here's the "unknown.jpg" linked above:
Code: [Select]
0 2541
1 1287
2 1096
3 1110
4 1093
5 1049
6 1094
7 972
8 942
9 985
10 996
11 1109
12 1078
13 0  <---
14 979
15 822
16 1005
17 991
18 1213
19 819
...
253 921
254 995
255 968
All the byte values show up roughly uniformly, which is normal for compressed file formats, except 13 - not a single occurrence of that in the whole file.

I saw this same corruption last year, and noted it here:
https://www.eevblog.com/forum/chat/forum's-posts-attachment-damaged/msg771277/#msg771277 (https://www.eevblog.com/forum/chat/forum's-posts-attachment-damaged/msg771277/#msg771277)

Was an FTP backup/restore done sometime around that date? If it was, and the FTP clients' ASCII/binary setting was incorrect, it could lead to this situation. Never use ASCII mode, always binary, to avoid this issue. More info on that here:

https://blog.phpbb.com/2011/08/23/the-dangers-of-ascii-mode/ (https://blog.phpbb.com/2011/08/23/the-dangers-of-ascii-mode/)
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: amspire on May 01, 2016, 06:41:51 am
Are all the corrupted images all hosted on imgur.com? The one I looked at was.

Looks like corrupted data in a cache somewhere. Imgur sets its cache-control max-age to about 36 days in the http responses. If you wait a month or so, the pictures might come good.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: helius on May 01, 2016, 12:32:39 pm
The corrupted images I can see are hosted on this site. Not VinzC's post hosted on imgur: that's a perfectly functional image. (It just happens to be a screenshot of a corrupted image display, but ceci n'est pas une pipe.)
As noted by amyk the issue was discovered late last year: https://www.eevblog.com/forum/chat/forum's-posts-attachment-damaged/25/ (https://www.eevblog.com/forum/chat/forum's-posts-attachment-damaged/25/)
On the second page of the above thread, it appears that different users are seeing different versions of the corrupted files.
In #27 (https://www.eevblog.com/forum/chat/forum's-posts-attachment-damaged/msg771505/#msg771505), BravoV shows his hexdump of a file called "a.jpg" posted by Mechatrommer in March 14, 2011 (server time). It contains the date string "2011:03:03 15:49:58".
In #28 (https://www.eevblog.com/forum/chat/forum's-posts-attachment-damaged/msg771512/#msg771512), PA0PBZ shows his own hexdump of what is believed to be the same file. It contains a different date string "2011:03:02 16:21:12"!
When I download the file from https://www.eevblog.com/forum/chat/salvaging-old-electronics-parts-and-save-the-world/ (https://www.eevblog.com/forum/chat/salvaging-old-electronics-parts-and-save-the-world/)
(a.jpg), my copy contains the date string "2011:03:14 16:48:42". This means that different users are seeing different bytes when they request the same file from the server.
I would suggest raising the issue with CloudFlare.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: VinzC on May 01, 2016, 12:34:53 pm
Are all the corrupted images all hosted on imgur.com? The one I looked at was.

Looks like corrupted data in a cache somewhere. Imgur sets its cache-control max-age to about 36 days in the http responses. If you wait a month or so, the pictures might come good.
'M hoping I'll remember to come and check in a month or so  :-DD .

EDIT: Looks like this issue has been seriously taken on so thanks for your efforts investigating. I'm a bit late though, not always the first one to notice  ::).
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: amyk on May 01, 2016, 02:29:27 pm
The corrupted images I can see are hosted on this site. Not VinzC's post hosted on imgur: that's a perfectly functional image. (It just happens to be a screenshot of a corrupted image display, but ceci n'est pas une pipe.)
As noted by amyk the issue was discovered late last year: https://www.eevblog.com/forum/chat/forum's-posts-attachment-damaged/25/ (https://www.eevblog.com/forum/chat/forum's-posts-attachment-damaged/25/)
On the second page of the above thread, it appears that different users are seeing different versions of the corrupted files.
In #27 (https://www.eevblog.com/forum/chat/forum's-posts-attachment-damaged/msg771505/#msg771505), BravoV shows his hexdump of a file called "a.jpg" posted by Mechatrommer in March 14, 2011 (server time). It contains the date string "2011:03:03 15:49:58".
In #28 (https://www.eevblog.com/forum/chat/forum's-posts-attachment-damaged/msg771512/#msg771512), PA0PBZ shows his own hexdump of what is believed to be the same file. It contains a different date string "2011:03:02 16:21:12"!
When I download the file from https://www.eevblog.com/forum/chat/salvaging-old-electronics-parts-and-save-the-world/ (https://www.eevblog.com/forum/chat/salvaging-old-electronics-parts-and-save-the-world/)
(a.jpg), my copy contains the date string "2011:03:14 16:48:42". This means that different users are seeing different bytes when they request the same file from the server.
I would suggest raising the issue with CloudFlare.
I just downloaded it now, there are no bytes with value 13 in it so it is corrupted, and its date string says "2011:03:14 16:39:50". :wtf:

For future reference, the version I downloaded and inspected has this SHA-1 hash (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SHA-1#Data_integrity):
Code: [Select]
fdb20f2bf8d02d9faf92ac8524aa04b177dee31e  a.jpg
I suspect there is some sort of text-filtering being applied to those files (but why not the later ones...?), which would explain the lack of byte 13 and strings being changed around.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Mark on May 10, 2016, 04:34:38 pm
Any idea what this is? 

Surface mount metal can with a hole in it.   It is getting very hot and draining the battery of this phone.  No error messages reported by the android OS. 

Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Fortran on May 10, 2016, 04:41:33 pm
It looks like a barometric sensor.
Don't recognize the numbers though.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: CJay on May 10, 2016, 05:08:09 pm
It looks like a barometric sensor.
Don't recognize the numbers though.
Could well be, could also be a microphone, the OP could clarify the model of the phone and perhaps tell us if it's working for making calls, I.E. incoming/outgoing audio.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: jitter on May 10, 2016, 05:11:38 pm
The microphone is visible in the top picture and it looks like what I would have expected for a condensor type mic.
I agree that it's likely a pressure sensor, hence the hole in the can.

A quick google on "pressure sensor"  images turns up several that look similar.

(https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/c/cb/Digital_Barometer_Sensor.jpg)
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Fortran on May 10, 2016, 05:17:28 pm
According to the label on the first picture, it looks like a Ulefone Be Touch 2 (http://ulefone.com/products/betouch2/spec.html).
Doesn't seem to have pressure sensors.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Fortran on May 10, 2016, 05:28:40 pm
Microphone it is.

(http://g02.a.alicdn.com/kf/HTB1HqozLVXXXXXZXpXXq6xXFXXXs/201342240/HTB1HqozLVXXXXXZXpXXq6xXFXXXs.jpg)
Link to Aliexpress (http://www.aliexpress.com/store/product/Ulefone-be-touch-3-microphone-100-Original-USB-Plug-Charge-Board-Mainboard-Mic-For-ulefone-be/210907_32629749109.html)
Link to Ebay (http://www.ebay.com/itm/262377006655)
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Mark on May 10, 2016, 06:11:42 pm
Thanks everyone, unfortunately I read the first reply and thought I could live without a sensor so I took it off the board...  now I can't make calls  :-DD 
It seems that the mic was getting heat from a regulator on the other side of the board.  Not sure what the next step is, I don't have schematics to go on but I might look for replacement boards on aliexpress etc. 
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: jitter on May 10, 2016, 06:24:57 pm
Hmm, I stand corrected.
Now that the mic has been removed, does the regulator still get that hot?
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Mark on May 10, 2016, 09:29:16 pm
Hmm, I stand corrected.
Now that the mic has been removed, does the regulator still get that hot?

Yes, it is still hot.  The battery charges very slowly and drains very quickly.  Apart from that, the phone is functional.  I have ordered a new charger/mic board from aliexpress, but I suppose it could be anything on the main board.  The phone is "under warranty" from gearbest, but I'd rather have a go at trying to fix it myself than risk sending it back to china...
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: jitter on May 11, 2016, 05:29:33 am
There must be a reason why that regulator gets so hot. I can't imagine it's its normal operating temp if it can get the casing of the mic to go above 70° C.
Perhaps continue this in the repair section?
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Gary350z on May 31, 2016, 05:11:54 am
What's this part? :)
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Back2Volts on June 02, 2016, 01:14:32 am
What's this part? :)
It is a MOSFET car elevator  :-DD
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Vgkid on June 16, 2016, 03:18:10 am
8 pin smd. 3.0x3.1mm body
marked.
 MF EL
m101
and a
soic-14, ST Semiconductor
91p944
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: halexa on June 16, 2016, 05:20:18 am
What's this part? :)
Automotive rated MOSFET?
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Brumby on June 16, 2016, 05:37:15 am
It obviously needs a MOSFET driver.....
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: FireFlower on June 16, 2016, 08:46:55 pm
Hmm, can you hand solder succesfully 0.3mm µBGA chips? :D


Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: djQUAN on July 03, 2016, 01:52:16 pm
I need help identifying the LED. I got these from a local scrapper and he has lots of these (1000s) in a bin. He said it was Cree but I could not find any info from them. The guy did say it came from Blackberry phones as the camera flash LEDs. Reversing the polarity and it lights up red.

The die looks about the size of a 1W LED and appears similar to Cree dies.

The flex PCB also has these round things. Im not exactly sure but they look like condenser mics although it looks like an unusual place to put the mic beside the camera flash LED?

I mounted 24 of the LEDs on a PCB I have and it is quite bright.  ;D
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: SeanB on July 03, 2016, 02:53:55 pm
Not microphone but the handsfree speaker.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: djQUAN on July 03, 2016, 04:31:23 pm
I'm not sure it is a speaker. I should have put a ruler beside it.

It is about 4mm in diameter and about 1.3mm thick.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Don Hills on July 05, 2016, 01:29:02 am
It's likely to be a speaker, looking at the heavy construction and liberal bonding to the PCB for additional heat dissipation.
(Cell phone speakers are run very hard to get the acoustic output required. The voice coils are tiny and they get hot.)
Also, there wouldn't be a microphone in the middle of the back, whereas it's a logical location for a speaker / ringer transducer.

Edit: I take that back, my phone has a microphone next to the camera lens on the back.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Richard Crowley on July 05, 2016, 02:41:47 am
Microphone on the back used when shooting videos with that camera. And also in some cases as a noise-cancelling microphone where they take the sound picked up by the back camera and subtract it from the microphone on the front.

That is much too beefy for a microphone. I would be much more inclined to call that a speaker.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: djQUAN on July 08, 2016, 05:03:53 pm
I tried testing one first with a resistor, PSU and scope to see if it was an electret mic. And it was a lousy one at that as far as sensitivity is concerned so I took one apart.

Internal parts appear to be indeed an electret mic.

That is a 5mm LED for scale.

How about the LED I posted earlier, can anyone ID it?

Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Richard Crowley on July 08, 2016, 08:52:29 pm
Without seeing the OTHER side of the PC board, I'm not convinced you have a microphone there.

If it is an electret microphone capsule (with the impedance converting transistor circuit inside) then you must apply power to the microphone to make it work. It is not a passive device that generates voltage.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: djQUAN on July 09, 2016, 05:17:35 am
Without seeing the OTHER side of the PC board, I'm not convinced you have a microphone there.

If it is an electret microphone capsule (with the impedance converting transistor circuit inside) then you must apply power to the microphone to make it work. It is not a passive device that generates voltage.

I did power it. I used a variable PSU and a biasing resistor. I have used electret mic capsules in the past so I have an idea on how they work and how they should behave.

If you're talking about the tiny round PCB with a transistor and two caps on it, the back side is this one.
(https://www.eevblog.com/forum/chat/what's-this-please-(component-advice)/?action=dlattach;attach=237553;image)

If you're talking about the flex PCB the device is mounted to, it is just a ground plane.

The part is not much of use for me, just a curiosity on what it really is. What I really want is to ID the LED :)

(https://www.eevblog.com/forum/chat/what's-this-please-(component-advice)/?action=dlattach;attach=237547;image)
(https://www.eevblog.com/forum/chat/what's-this-please-(component-advice)/?action=dlattach;attach=237549;image)
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: bitslice on July 12, 2016, 10:46:39 am
I've only got the usual pointless ebay seller's potato picture of the chip

but what is a "MOSTEK MK3884N IRELAND" ?


searches lead me to http://www.cpu-world.com/Support/3/38.html (http://www.cpu-world.com/Support/3/38.html)

So I know it's one of Zilog's SIO's, but I can't work out the speed

MK3884 and MK3884-10 are 2.5 MHz parts.
MK3884-4 is a 4 MHz part.

so what is an MK3884N ?

thanks
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: PA0PBZ on July 12, 2016, 10:57:14 am
so what is an MK3884N ?

(https://www.eevblog.com/forum/chat/what's-this-please-(component-advice)/?action=dlattach;attach=239816;image)
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: bitslice on July 12, 2016, 11:15:29 am
so what is an MK3884N ?

(https://www.eevblog.com/forum/chat/what's-this-please-(component-advice)/?action=dlattach;attach=239816;image)

darn, I'd downloaded that same document the other day but didn't notice that line.
I was looking for my download of it this morning but it's lost in one of windows random download locations.

Thanks for finding it for me :)
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: ChristopherN on July 19, 2016, 09:20:49 am
Hi,

I have a rather "stealth" chip here. I can't even identify the vendor. The chip should be part of a broadband power line system.

Can anyone identify the manufacturer ? Can anyone find a datasheet?

Thanks

Christopher
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: wraper on July 19, 2016, 09:24:57 am
Can anyone identify the manufacturer ? Can anyone find a datasheet?
Mstar
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: amyk on July 19, 2016, 11:34:29 am
...about as secretive a company as Broadcom, but some datasheets have leaked. If you can figure out how to register on some Chinese forums you might be able to get these...

http://bbs.ntpcb.com/read.php?tid-50930.html (http://bbs.ntpcb.com/read.php?tid-50930.html)
http://bbs.52dtv.com/thread-22037-1-1.html (http://bbs.52dtv.com/thread-22037-1-1.html)
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Towger on July 19, 2016, 12:45:38 pm
What sort of compressed air coupler is this? I can't find it with image search, some sort of PCL knockoff?

(http://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20160719/a553692965eb13b0e2742331a7639130.jpg)
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: PA0PBZ on July 26, 2016, 07:19:28 pm
My google-fu is not very strong today. DIP8 SMPS controller, it's not the AIC1550 (it's not a DC-DC converter).


(https://www.eevblog.com/forum/chat/what's-this-please-(component-advice)/?action=dlattach;attach=243669;image)
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: amyk on July 27, 2016, 11:25:17 am
Microne ME8107A:

http://wenku.baidu.com/view/29b78b4459eef8c75ebfb328.html (http://wenku.baidu.com/view/29b78b4459eef8c75ebfb328.html)
http://www.go-gddq.com/upload/2016-02/temp_16021815004014.pdf (http://www.go-gddq.com/upload/2016-02/temp_16021815004014.pdf)
http://www.microne.com.cn/pro_detail.asp?categoryid=199&id=191 (http://www.microne.com.cn/pro_detail.asp?categoryid=199&id=191)
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: bitwelder on July 27, 2016, 01:15:59 pm
Microne ME8107A:

http://wenku.baidu.com/view/29b78b4459eef8c75ebfb328.html (http://wenku.baidu.com/view/29b78b4459eef8c75ebfb328.html)
http://www.go-gddq.com/upload/2016-02/temp_16021815004014.pdf (http://www.go-gddq.com/upload/2016-02/temp_16021815004014.pdf)
http://www.microne.com.cn/pro_detail.asp?categoryid=199&id=191 (http://www.microne.com.cn/pro_detail.asp?categoryid=199&id=191)
It would be interesting if you can tell how did you find it.
Did you happen to know already that chip, did you recognize Microne logo, or what was the process?
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: helius on July 27, 2016, 01:42:38 pm
There are lists of semiconductor logos, but the ones I know don't include MicrOne.
http://www.canics.com/mfglogos.php (http://www.canics.com/mfglogos.php)
http://www.elnec.com/support/ic-logos/?method=logo (http://www.elnec.com/support/ic-logos/?method=logo)
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: azer on July 27, 2016, 09:45:20 pm
It is the first hit on 8107a on the Chinese search engine baidu, it can also be found on aliexpress and taobao.
1550 is likely the datecode. For recent and obscure chips like this it is beneficial to know other branches of fu.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Fortran on July 28, 2016, 05:39:16 am
Anyone recognize this one?
It's from a 1988 vintage motor controller, so I'm guessing a triac of some sort.
I can't find anything resembling a datasheet, so finding a replacement is proving more difficult then expected.

Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: daqq on August 07, 2016, 01:02:47 pm
Hi guys,

Does this kind of assembly have a specific name? It was used to position optics onto a measurement system.

The ruby tipped probes are called "CMM Stylus"? Or is there another name for them?

Thanks,

David
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: SeanB on August 07, 2016, 08:06:38 pm
Anyone recognize this one?
It's from a 1988 vintage motor controller, so I'm guessing a triac of some sort.
I can't find anything resembling a datasheet, so finding a replacement is proving more difficult then expected.

Part is TAG8816, which is a now obsolete Triac from either Siemens or AEG. Most likely a BT132 triac will be a replacement for it, though I will bet that it is driven with a SAA series triac controller, and that, or the capacitors associated with it, is dead.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Fortran on August 08, 2016, 04:55:45 am
Thanks!

It is indeed AEG and driven by a TDA1085C (http://www.onsemi.com/pub_link/Collateral/TDA1085C-D.PDF) controller.
I suspect, as you said, the controller and surrounding caps where the problem.
But as I don't have the rest of the machine, I'm replacing everything just to be safe.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: 128er on August 14, 2016, 10:54:40 am
This unknown ceramic PGA chip comes from a remote control for industrial cranes. Couldn't even find the manufacturer "IST" ?

The remote control dates back to 1994. Had no time to trace the other peripherals on the board. So no idea if the crystal oscillators belongs to the ceramic chip.

I would guess that it is something like a GAL/PAL/PLD? Or even a microcontroller?  :-//
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: SeanB on August 14, 2016, 01:34:36 pm
Thanks!

It is indeed AEG and driven by a TDA1085C (http://www.onsemi.com/pub_link/Collateral/TDA1085C-D.PDF) controller.
I suspect, as you said, the controller and surrounding caps where the problem.
But as I don't have the rest of the machine, I'm replacing everything just to be safe.

If the triac died that chip will be toast as well. I have met those before, so also change electrolytic capacitors connected to it, all of them. They are pretty good at speed control, but as the capacitors age the ESR goes high, the chip goes wonky and runs the motor to full speed or runs in bursts. If the motor arcs over then it fries the TRIAC, and this kills both. If the snubber is not there across the triac add it, using a 100R 1W resistor and a 100n 250VAC class X capacitor, if there replace the capacitor as well, using a class X device.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: SeanB on August 14, 2016, 01:37:27 pm
This unknown ceramic PGA chip comes from a remote control for industrial cranes. Couldn't even find the manufacturer "IST" ?

The remote control dates back to 1994. Had no time to trace the other peripherals on the board. So no idea if the crystal oscillators belongs to the ceramic chip.

I would guess that it is something like a GAL/PAL/PLD? Or even a microcontroller?  :-//

Custom gate array, so you are SOL unless you can buy one from the manufacturer. However I would look at the clock from that ( likely) CD4001 chip, to see if it is actually oscillating.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: 128er on August 14, 2016, 01:54:37 pm
This unknown ceramic PGA chip comes from a remote control for industrial cranes. Couldn't even find the manufacturer "IST" ?

The remote control dates back to 1994. Had no time to trace the other peripherals on the board. So no idea if the crystal oscillators belongs to the ceramic chip.

I would guess that it is something like a GAL/PAL/PLD? Or even a microcontroller?  :-//

Custom gate array, so you are SOL unless you can buy one from the manufacturer. However I would look at the clock from that ( likely) CD4001 chip, to see if it is actually oscillating.

Thanks for your assessment. There is no need to repair anything. Pulled two of these remote controls out of the dumpster at work. This one from 1994 and another from 1976. Kept four heavy coordinate switches from them. And this chip purely out of curiosity what it would be.

I will decap the chip and try to get some good pictures of it.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: helius on August 14, 2016, 04:31:20 pm
The letters 'TH-GAS1' is a strong hint that it is a mask gate array. Photomicrographs are not that interesting, although if you knew the floorplan of the array you may be able to reverse engineer the RTL from the visible metal layer. Many gate arrays were programmed with a single custom metal layer, but I think some used more than one.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Cyberdragon on August 23, 2016, 09:01:40 pm
I don't know if this is missing any parts, I suspect it might be. But it appears to be some sort of high voltage switching tuby thingy. It is (or was) in a vacuum (or gas), although one of the terminals has internal cracks and I hope it hasn't vented. The contact is magnetic (part of some sort of relay or contactor maybe?).

EDIT: confirmed a vacuum relay of some sort. An image search turned up a pic of a recent Ebay listing for a device with a part similer to this one though. Mine is missing the rest of it including the coil and brackets (although if it hasn't vented I can replace those). But I can't find any other info.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: HwAoRrDk on August 26, 2016, 06:50:35 am
I'm trying to find out what this IC is exactly. It's part of a fan speed controller board.

It's an 8-pin SOIC package, and the only marking on it is 'HXN-JOa' (not sure if that 'O' is actually a zero or not). I have a suspicion it may be some kind of adjustable DC-DC buck converter that is being used to step-down 12V to a lower voltage. Possibly from a Chinese manufacturer, as the only references to the marking text I could find were on Chinese websites.

(https://www.eevblog.com/forum/chat/what's-this-please-(component-advice)/?action=dlattach;attach=250700;image)
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: amyk on August 26, 2016, 11:19:56 am
HXN-xxx markings seem to be from this company: http://www.hxsemi.com/ (http://www.hxsemi.com/)
Some more clues here: http://product.dzsc.com/product/new-1046211-20141114110510193739.html (http://product.dzsc.com/product/new-1046211-20141114110510193739.html)

Synchronous, 3A switch, 2.5-5V input, adjustable(5.5V?) output.

Further searching yields http://www.wiswood.com/ (http://www.wiswood.com/) also having some suspiciously similar HX-prefixed parts, but no definite hits...
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: HwAoRrDk on August 26, 2016, 01:24:03 pm
Thanks for that. It's odd that all of the mentions of the part marking I can find on various Chinese marketplace pages (including the one linked above) indicate that it takes only up to 5.5V input, but on this board it is definitely taking a 12V supply (and outputting an adjustable voltage between 5-11V).

Just going off the package and some of the pin-out, I had found a number of likely-looking generic buck regulator parts, but was puzzled by the fact that on this board the bootstrap and soft-start pins (1 and 8 respectively) are not connected to anything! I don't know much about switching regulators, but I'm pretty sure it wouldn't work without at least the former. :) However, on that Wiswood website, their HX1021 in a SOP8 does indeed not utilise pins 1 & 8, so perhaps it is indeed from that manufacturer. But again, the datasheet for that part says it is a 2.5-5.5V input part... :-//

The board designers wouldn't actually be crazy enough to be over-loading a 5.5V-rated part with 12V, would they? But, then again, this board is dead... >:D
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: blackbird on August 26, 2016, 03:30:31 pm
I've got some transistors of unknown specification. They are from Edgetek, as far as I can google, a defunct company from Canada.

From left to right :

N46, EDG-N54, EDG-P53 and P45

The only thing I know is the Nxx are NPN and Pxx are PNP.

Does anyone have more information or perhaps datasheets?

Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: carloscuev on August 26, 2016, 06:27:53 pm
Hi, I've been looking for hours on Mouser, Newark and Digikey for a part number for this connector so I can buy its harness, crimpable terminals, etc. for them. I'm not sure if this connector is considered an automotive one, but the board is used in an automobile. Any help to find a part number or source for them would be greatly appreciated.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Vgkid on August 27, 2016, 04:38:13 am
@Blackbird.
I cant help you, but those look like space/rad hardened transistors. Assuming that those are ceramic packages, with metal ftontd.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: HwAoRrDk on August 27, 2016, 05:16:24 am
Hi, I've been looking for hours on Mouser, Newark and Digikey for a part number for this connector so I can buy its harness, crimpable terminals, etc. for them. I'm not sure if this connector is considered an automotive one, but the board is used in an automobile. Any help to find a part number or source for them would be greatly appreciated.

I've been down the road of trying to identify and locate unknown car electrical connectors. It's not an easy job. :--

A start would be to narrow-down who the potential manufacturers of the connector are. Which make of vehicle does this come from? If one assumes a US domestic manufacturer, it's most likely that the connector will also be made by a US company. If it were, for example, a Japanese car, I would look at the Japanese connector manufacturers. Are there any markings embossed in the plastic? Look closely, as they may be tiny, or may look inconsequential.

Another way to narrow-down candidates is to ascertain the specifications of the connector. Measure the width of the terminals. Measure the space/pitch between terminals. Also the spacing of the pins on the PCB. If it's for a USDM manufacturer, there's a chance it's a USCAR-standard-compliant connector, so more than one manufacturer may produce something matching.

Also, there is a good likelihood that the entire module was made a 3rd-party supplier, and in fact uses a proprietary connector only made by that 3rd-party company. I have seen this on some cars where all the connectors on the harness are made by one major manufacturer, but at the points where it connects to a dash/window/audio module made entirely by a supplier, they use the supplier's own connectors.

Finally, what year is the vehicle? If it's more than 10-15 years old, I wouldn't put much faith in that particular connector being made any more. Especially for wire-to-board connectors (as opposed to wire-to-wire), as those tend to be for more specific applications that live/die with the lifetime of the vehicle model.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: helius on August 27, 2016, 05:40:03 am
I've been down the road of finding automotive connectors. You might think that they'd be available through normal distributor channels, but that sadly is not often the case. Japan makes a lot of the connectors that go into cars (even Volvos!) and they have limited distribution in the West. I'd echo the advice to look carefully for any markings, even seemingly insignificant ones that look like arrows.
The major Japanese connectors companies are Sumitomo, Yazaki, Fujikura, and Furukawa. Yes, I'd never heard of them either.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: jitter on August 27, 2016, 06:30:09 am
From an LED driver... I have a hard time finding info on it. Can anyone point me in the right direction?
The code reads "IAFSF".

Thanx...
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Fred27 on August 27, 2016, 06:49:51 am
Well, it's never gonna work with those solder bridges anyway. ;-)
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: jitter on August 27, 2016, 08:07:49 am
Well, it's never gonna work with those solder bridges anyway. ;-)

What solder bridges? BTW, it works.

Someone helped me along already, it seems to be a MP4026.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: HwAoRrDk on August 27, 2016, 08:15:57 am
its an obd / obd2 connector.

:wtf: No, it most definitely isn't.

How on earth was that conclusion arrived at from looking the pictures carloscuev posted? There's only the vaguest resemblance. Perhaps a visit to the local optician is in order. :-DD
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Fred27 on August 27, 2016, 08:21:33 am
Well, it's never gonna work with those solder bridges anyway. ;-)

What solder bridges? BTW, it works.

I was only joking. From the photos it looks like a really bad soldering job with all the pins on each side shorted together. Clearly that's not the case though.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: jitter on August 27, 2016, 08:48:17 am
It may look a bit less nice because it's a wave soldered pcb. The SMD parts are glued down first, when the through hole components have been stuffed next, everything is soldered in one go on the wave solder process. That makes SMD joints look a bit messy.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: whitevamp on August 27, 2016, 03:31:30 pm
its an obd / obd2 connector.

:wtf: No, it most definitely isn't.

How on earth was that conclusion arrived at from looking the pictures carloscuev posted? There's only the vaguest resemblance. Perhaps a visit to the local optician is in order. :-DD
yes you are right i was looking at a diff forum and posted wrong.
and my glasses will be in today.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Don Hills on August 28, 2016, 11:17:01 am
Hi, I've been looking for hours on Mouser, Newark and Digikey for a part number for this connector so I can buy its harness, crimpable terminals, etc. for them. I'm not sure if this connector is considered an automotive one, but the board is used in an automobile. Any help to find a part number or source for them would be greatly appreciated.

Wrecker's yard is your most likely source.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: carloscuev on August 29, 2016, 10:56:55 pm
I've been down the road of finding automotive connectors. You might think that they'd be available through normal distributor channels, but that sadly is not often the case. Japan makes a lot of the connectors that go into cars (even Volvos!) and they have limited distribution in the West. I'd echo the advice to look carefully for any markings, even seemingly insignificant ones that look like arrows.
The major Japanese connectors companies are Sumitomo, Yazaki, Fujikura, and Furukawa. Yes, I'd never heard of them either.

Thanks HwAoRrDk and Helius ! I've searched in the catalogs of Sumitomo, Yazaki, Fujikura, and Furukawa but couldn't find it in there, Furukawa makes one very similar but not exactly that one, any other japanese brand to look into? The module is from a nissan car so it must be a japanese connector.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: helius on August 29, 2016, 11:22:09 pm
I've searched in the catalogs of Sumitomo, Yazaki, Fujikura, and Furukawa but couldn't find it in there, Furukawa makes one very similar but not exactly that one, any other japanese brand to look into? The module is from a nissan car so it must be a japanese connector.
Well, JAE and JST, but I assumed you already knew those. Maybe Hirose or Omron have some automotive parts but they specialize in other areas.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Bendba on August 30, 2016, 12:27:45 am
Hi there,

I picked up an old electronic organ for free yesterday, sort of in half working condition. I'm still didn't decide what to do with it, fix it or tear it apart for the components.
I opened it to try to work out what it's made out of. And when I started reading the IC's numbers, there was barely anything talking to me, except for the 6~18 pin ic, mostly 4000 series and lm324's (they are marked CA323E)
I eventually worked out that the logo on the chips was the old national semiconductor's logo but it's still not helping me much.
I'll attach a couple of photos of some of the chips but there are too many to identify to put them all on here.

I'm wondering, is there some sort of reference table for the company's chip numbers?

There is also in the photos another chip for which I haven't worked out the manufacturer yet, marked ER2051  8049 HDA, I'm assuming it is a processor but not sure.

Any helps and tips would be very helpful.

Thanks
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: helius on August 30, 2016, 03:32:18 am
The third chip is a General Instrument ER2051, a "512 bit electrically alterable ROM". Datasheet attached.
The National chips have been custom labeled.
Anyway, most organs have a similar architecture based on high-frequency oscillators that are divided by a set of 12 registers (the top-octave generator), and then repeatedly divided by 2 to produce the frequency of each lower octave. The waves are then shaped using analog filters and envelopes. Each note is then fed into the keyswitch matrix, which can have multiple poles that mix frequencies together (in organ terms this is called foldback).
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: HwAoRrDk on August 30, 2016, 01:45:10 pm
Thanks HwAoRrDk and Helius ! I've searched in the catalogs of Sumitomo, Yazaki, Fujikura, and Furukawa but couldn't find it in there, Furukawa makes one very similar but not exactly that one, any other japanese brand to look into? The module is from a nissan car so it must be a japanese connector.

What year Nissan is it from? One other tip is to try and find old copies of a connector manufacturer's catalogue, as their current ones may no longer list products that were contemporary with the vehicle. For example,  I was once looking for details on a Sumitomo connector that wasn't in their latest catalogue, but appeared in one dated 2009. But in such case, on the down side, this probably means the item is EOL, and not sold any more...
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Bendba on August 30, 2016, 01:58:38 pm
The third chip is a General Instrument ER2051, a "512 bit electrically alterable ROM". Datasheet attached.

Thanks a lot.

If I read the datasheet right,  basically, this is behaving like a static ram expect that it retains the data without need of power?
If I can get it off without damage, I have a perfect application for it.

I guess the of the national semiconductor parts are going to be near impossible to identify unless I could find a schematic of the organ or spend a very long time tracing the signals and extrapolate from the behavior.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: MatthewEveritt on September 22, 2016, 08:42:25 pm
Hi all,

I'm looking for leads on a SOT23-5 device marked aH4TY1 for a repair. Non of the SMD codebooks I know have anything like this.

I've attached a partial schematic - from experimentation it seems that it should produce a fixed 3.3V at ~250mA from 4 AA cells. I'd guess it's a fixed output buck converter, but I can't find any with a suitable looking pinout.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: amyk on September 23, 2016, 01:06:37 am
Hi all,

I'm looking for leads on a SOT23-5 device marked aH4TY1 for a repair. Non of the SMD codebooks I know have anything like this.

I've attached a partial schematic - from experimentation it seems that it should produce a fixed 3.3V at ~250mA from 4 AA cells. I'd guess it's a fixed output buck converter, but I can't find any with a suitable looking pinout.
BL3406 (http://www.belling.com.cn/2013p/BL3406B_Rev1.5.pdf), EUP3408 (http://www.bdtic.com/DataSheet/EUTECH/EUP3408.pdf), GS5578 (http://gs-power.com/db/pictures/modules/PDT/PDT060207001/DS_GS5578(F)_Rev%201.2.pdf), KB3426 (http://datasheet.eepw.com.cn/datasheet/down/id/688735), and RT8008 (http://www.richtek.com/assets/product_file/RT8008/DS8008-07.pdf) have that pinout. Of those, the EUP3408 seems to match the marking, with the unusual lower-case first letter. Here is a photo of a slightly different voltage (http://l.b2b168.com/2009/06/12/16/20090612164907655157.jpg) version.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: jitter on September 23, 2016, 04:41:39 am
I'm not too sure of that. It seems the datasheet has one less letter/digit in the code, and the code from Bendba Matthew contains letters/digits (i.e. "T" and "4") not used in that component's code.
I guess these are Chinese clones of some better known brand. So if the pinning and voltages seem compatible, I guess you might get away with using one of them. Usually Chinese designs follow the application examples in datasheets pretty closely.

Edit: name corrected.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: MatthewEveritt on September 23, 2016, 03:10:42 pm
BL3406 (http://www.belling.com.cn/2013p/BL3406B_Rev1.5.pdf), EUP3408 (http://www.bdtic.com/DataSheet/EUTECH/EUP3408.pdf), GS5578 (http://gs-power.com/db/pictures/modules/PDT/PDT060207001/DS_GS5578(F)_Rev%201.2.pdf), KB3426 (http://datasheet.eepw.com.cn/datasheet/down/id/688735), and RT8008 (http://www.richtek.com/assets/product_file/RT8008/DS8008-07.pdf) have that pinout. Of those, the EUP3408 seems to match the marking, with the unusual lower-case first letter. Here is a photo of a slightly different voltage (http://l.b2b168.com/2009/06/12/16/20090612164907655157.jpg) version.


I'm not too sure of that. It seems the datasheet has one less letter/digit in the code, and the code from Bendba contains letters/digits (i.e. "T" and "4") not used in that component's code.
I guess these are Chinese clones of some better known brand. So if the pinning and voltages seem compatible, I guess you might get away with using one of them. Usually Chinese designs follow the application examples in datasheets pretty closely.

That's brilliant, thank you. I'm sure I'll be able to find something close enough to get it going again.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Srbel on September 28, 2016, 05:36:28 am
What brand of caps are these?

(http://www.fudzilla.com/images/stories/2016/September/Gigabyte-AM4B350-2.jpg)
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: helius on September 28, 2016, 09:25:07 am
What brand of caps are these?
APAQ
http://capacitor.web.fc2.com/solidcapacitor.html#apaq (http://capacitor.web.fc2.com/solidcapacitor.html#apaq)
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Srbel on September 28, 2016, 12:12:48 pm
Thank you!

Are they good quality? Not as good as Japanese brands, obviously, but should be a lot better than Chinese ones?
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: gildasd on September 29, 2016, 06:16:20 pm
Thank you!

Are they good quality? Not as good as Japanese brands, obviously, but should be a lot better than Chinese ones?
Mistreated very badly a bunch of secondhand examples and they survived, so if you use them within spec, you should be fine.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: MasterTech on September 29, 2016, 06:27:29 pm
From an LED driver... I have a hard time finding info on it. Can anyone point me in the right direction?
The code reads "IAFSF".

Thanx...

Check if that could be a LM3880-1AF


Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: jitter on September 30, 2016, 04:38:25 am
From an LED driver... I have a hard time finding info on it. Can anyone point me in the right direction?
The code reads "IAFSF".

Thanx...

Check if that could be a LM3880-1AF

Thanks for coming back to this.
Marco (https://www.eevblog.com/forum/projects/modifying-led-lighting/msg1012795/#msg1012795) noticed the first symbol in the code actually wasn't an "I" or a "1" but just a vertical line (|). It turned out to be most likely a MP4026 (https://www.monolithicpower.com/DesktopModules/DocumentManage/API/Document/GetDocument?id=1306).
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: FrankBuss on October 01, 2016, 08:54:51 pm
What's this?

(http://i.imgur.com/Rg2lWId.jpg)

6 of it are soldered on a DYS XM20A (ESC, brushless motor controller, 20 A), 4 mm edge length. I guess it is a FET, but I can't find the datasheet for it.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Andy Watson on October 01, 2016, 09:21:48 pm
http://aosmd.com/res/data_sheets/AON7418.pdf (http://aosmd.com/res/data_sheets/AON7418.pdf)
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: gamalot on October 01, 2016, 09:23:06 pm
What's this?

(http://i.imgur.com/Rg2lWId.jpg)

6 of it are soldered on a DYS XM20A (ESC, brushless motor controller, 20 A), 4 mm edge length. I guess it is a FET, but I can't find the datasheet for it.

Alpha & Omega AON7418

http://aosmd.com/res/data_sheets/AON7418.pdf (http://aosmd.com/res/data_sheets/AON7418.pdf)
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: FrankBuss on October 01, 2016, 09:24:24 pm
Thanks!
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: FrankBuss on October 02, 2016, 03:37:24 pm
Ok, I have another one:

(http://i.imgur.com/dzfxhw6.jpg)

On the same DYS XM20A ESC. I guess some kind of FET driver. 3 of it are driving 6 FETs.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: gamalot on October 02, 2016, 04:52:29 pm
Ok, I have another one:

(http://i.imgur.com/dzfxhw6.jpg)

On the same DYS XM20A ESC. I guess some kind of FET driver. 3 of it are driving 6 FETs.

Not MCP3201, not THS3201, not ADuM3201, maybe LPD3201  :)

http://file1.dzsc.com/product/14/06/12/1014430_145049441.pdf (http://file1.dzsc.com/product/14/06/12/1014430_145049441.pdf)
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: FrankBuss on October 02, 2016, 05:09:12 pm
Not MCP3201, not THS3201, not ADuM3201, maybe LPD3201  :)

http://file1.dzsc.com/product/14/06/12/1014430_145049441.pdf (http://file1.dzsc.com/product/14/06/12/1014430_145049441.pdf)
This doesn't looks right, it is not a voltage regulator and I guess one IC will have 2 buffers to drive 2 FETs.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: gamalot on October 02, 2016, 05:31:00 pm
Not MCP3201, not THS3201, not ADuM3201, maybe LPD3201  :)

http://file1.dzsc.com/product/14/06/12/1014430_145049441.pdf (http://file1.dzsc.com/product/14/06/12/1014430_145049441.pdf)
This doesn't looks right, it is not a voltage regulator and I guess one IC will have 2 buffers to drive 2 FETs.

Try QM3201 or UM3201

http://www.1mos.com/upload/file/UBIQ/QM3201S.pdf (http://www.1mos.com/upload/file/UBIQ/QM3201S.pdf)

http://www.wggk.net/upload/product/file/UM3201.pdf (http://www.wggk.net/upload/product/file/UM3201.pdf)
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: FrankBuss on October 02, 2016, 06:28:56 pm
This looks better, but the pinout is wrong. Pins 2 and 3 is gate (or buffer input, directly connected to the microcontroller, all gates with a 10k pulldown to GND), all pin 4 are connected to GND, all pin 1 are connected to the output of a 78L12 (this means using it with 3S LiPos might be a bit of a stretch, and definitely not a good idea to use it with 2S). Bit difficult to trace the other side because it goes to the back of the PCB.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: gamalot on October 02, 2016, 06:55:22 pm
This looks better, but the pinout is wrong. Pins 2 and 3 is gate (or buffer input, directly connected to the microcontroller, all gates with a 10k pulldown to GND), all pin 4 are connected to GND, all pin 1 are connected to the output of a 78L12 (this means using it with 3S LiPos might be a bit of a stretch, and definitely not a good idea to use it with 2S). Bit difficult to trace the other side because it goes to the back of the PCB.

OK, hope this time is right IMP3201  :)

http://www.ds-imp.com.cn/pdf/IMP3201.pdf (http://www.ds-imp.com.cn/pdf/IMP3201.pdf)
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: FrankBuss on October 02, 2016, 08:14:29 pm
OK, hope this time is right IMP3201  :)

http://www.ds-imp.com.cn/pdf/IMP3201.pdf (http://www.ds-imp.com.cn/pdf/IMP3201.pdf)

Yes, this looks right, I can even measure the 0.5 V voltage drop of the diode and I can see the capacitors, thanks!  :)

Interesting chip. I don't understand C2. Is it kind of bootstrapping with the outputs of the FET for higher gate voltage, and with the diode initially using the 12 V supply? Looks tricky. And Google translate says for the Vcc pin 1 "Low side logic fixed power supply", but maximum rating says up to 25 V, so I guess this is ok.

Looks like there is even a shop in Shenzen where I can buy it:

http://www.jotrin.com/product/parts/IMP3201ESA_T (http://www.jotrin.com/product/parts/IMP3201ESA_T)

Too bad it is not listed in findchips.com or at Digikey.

Next up: an European company clones a Chinese ESC :-)
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: STMartin on November 10, 2016, 04:09:42 am
I'm repairing an Agilent E3646A that had a bad diode for the -15V bias supply. The case mark is C1J and I'm not sure exactly what it is.

Here's a portion of the schematic:

(https://www.eevblog.com/forum/chat/what's-this-please-(component-advice)/?action=dlattach;attach=269118;image)

It's component CR140.

Given the application and a google search, I believe it's a zener diode; although I've never seen that symbol used for it before. Is this right?

Also, the schematic has it marked as 5.6, which I assume means 5.6 V. However, since the purpose is to get -15 V from a -17.4 V rail, shouldn't it be a 2.4 V?

I soldered in a 2.4 V through-hole zener and measured the current at about 68 mA under full load. Could I just get any 'ol zener of the proper voltage and current capacity and slap it in there?
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: madires on November 10, 2016, 11:28:30 am
Given the application and a google search, I believe it's a zener diode; although I've never seen that symbol used for it before. Is this right?

Yes, it's a Zener. That symbol is used in the EU.

Also, the schematic has it marked as 5.6, which I assume means 5.6 V. However, since the purpose is to get -15 V from a -17.4 V rail, shouldn't it be a 2.4 V?

The diagram shows only a tiny part of the power supply circuit, so I can't say anything about that. Maybe someone else can provide an educated guess.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: salbayeng on November 10, 2016, 01:36:10 pm
Looking at the schematic the zener diodes are not to convert 17.4 to 15v. , That will be done by a LM7815 or LM7915 regulator (TO220, on a heatsink).
The zeners are there to ensure the voltage at power off across the regulator isn't excessive. Not sure why they use zeners, a normal diode would be sufficient.
If you are driving a load that goes between +15v andv -15 rails (like Opamps), it is possible that one regulator might shutdown during startup if it's output gets dragged past gnd the wrong way, the zeners might help getting the 15v rails up to ~ 12v so they start properly.

The C1J might just be a normal 1N4004 type diode , there are many simple diode numbers like S1J ,  G1J , where the "1" is 1Amp, and the "J" is 600v.

Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: vk6zgo on November 11, 2016, 12:38:56 am
HP/Agilent are fond of that symbol for zeners--I've seen it on quite a few of their schematics.

If you look at your circuit diagram ,you will notice that the part of the +15v circuit shown is exactly the same as that for -15v,except that it has the zener the other way round.( another thing they like to do)

CR140 & CR139 are the same part number,so if the positive 15v supply still works,all the voltages around the
1902-1698 (CR139) will be the same value,(but inverted in polarity) as the -15v one.

Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: STMartin on November 11, 2016, 01:46:06 am
Awesome, thanks for the information everyone.  :-+

I looked through the rest of the schematics, and found regulators for 15V rails, but they're marked as +15V2 and -15V2, rather than +15V1 and -15V1, which is what is connected to the zeners. Here's that circuit:

(https://www.eevblog.com/forum/chat/what's-this-please-(component-advice)/?action=dlattach;attach=269359;image)

I buzzed it out to be sure, and it doesn't appear to be the same 15V rail connected to the zeners. I'd kinda like to know if salbayeng is right about the zeners protecting the regulators/helping them start, or if they're meant to provide a voltage rail (or both?). Here's the rest of the bias supply circuit:

(https://www.eevblog.com/forum/chat/what's-this-please-(component-advice)/?action=dlattach;attach=269361)

If this is the wrong thread to ask that, then I apologize, and you can disregard.

In any case, I guess it's somewhat beside the point. I'll see if the 2.4 V zeners I've got in there are within Agilent's specs, then whack in a 5.6 V and see if that's better or worse. At least now I know I need a 1 amp zener.

Thanks again!

EDIT: I borked it and shorted the diodes together, because I'm good at what I do. :-BROKE Also managed to lift a trace in the process.  :palm: Going in for emergency surgery. Guess I won't be selling this one.

EDIT2: Voltage regulators on the main board check out OK. No display with two beeps means it can't communicate with the display board. Probably blew a regulator local to the display or PC board. Will test those and try to hot glue the lifted trace down to prevent any further damage.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: madires on November 11, 2016, 12:09:32 pm
I'd suggest to move that to the "Repair" section. For a 2-channel lab PSU I'd expect isolated power sections for each channel, hence the !5V1 and 15V2 (also PCOM1 and PCOM2).
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: salbayeng on November 12, 2016, 08:49:57 am
I'm with @maderes ,  probably two independent supplies.  (Or with power supplies sometimes the common of the floating power suppy rides with the positive terminal)
Pcom1 and pcom2 are dead giveaways.

Looking at the whole circuit now, my guess as to the role of the zener diodes is probably partly wrong.
CR139 is certainly a 5.6v zener, its probably biasing some transistors somewhere else, but with about 1mA , the voltage across it will be ~ 5v still nothing like 2.4v   
Maybe the 15V1 supplies get power fed from somewhere else most of the time? 
I'm guessing the +/-15V1 supplies are used by an opamp, and it doesn't care whether it gets 12v or 15v supply.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: salbayeng on November 12, 2016, 08:59:02 am
On closer inspection , the 15V1 supplies drive two opamps on this schematic  :palm: U124,U134
And note the clever use of U133  pretending to be a depletion mode MOSFET.
Given this supply works the fan, it probably also powers other non critical circuitry, so it should be eminently fixable.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: PointyOintment on November 15, 2016, 06:37:32 pm
Several months ago I found a low temperature gauge at the local government surplus store, and bought it, thinking it might be useful for cryo experiments. I disassembled it and looked at the circuit: it seems to be a Wheatstone bridge for use with RTDs (several RTDs, with a rotary switch to choose which one to read). However, there are resistors in it with strange color codes that have yellow at both ends. I didn't know what to make of these and didn't find anything helpful online. Any ideas?

The first picture is a crude schematic I drew when I disassembled it. I omitted the transformer, bridge rectifier, and smoothing cap. There was only the one PCB in the thing, which was mounted to the back of the panel meter's movement.

(https://i.imgur.com/Gh33e56.jpg)
(https://i.imgur.com/CpQUFqN.jpg)
(https://i.imgur.com/5fnIB9V.jpg)
(https://i.imgur.com/PB3YxdS.jpg)
(https://i.imgur.com/Ne1SLzF.jpg)

BTW, it's been quite an ordeal trying to post this. I tried to post these as attachments but it failed to post and sent me to the new topic posting form instead… Next I tried to post them externally hosted and it told me my attachments were too big! Then I tried to post again (having reloaded the posting form from scratch and pasted my post back in rather than using Lazarus) and it told me my last post was less than 60 seconds ago, even though it wasn't (because it failed). Then I waited more than 60 seconds, and clicked post again, only to be told that this post had already been submitted. This time I've deleted cookies, logged back in, and waited half an hour before trying again. Hopefully it works.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: PA0PBZ on November 15, 2016, 07:21:23 pm
The yellow band is temperature coefficient: https://www.eeweb.com/toolbox/6-band-resistor-calculator (https://www.eeweb.com/toolbox/6-band-resistor-calculator)
 
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: hipi66 on November 16, 2016, 08:02:08 am
This is a voltage to current transmitter. Input is 0-10V from pot wiper on A5. Output is 4-20mA on C1.
What's the purpose of 19C1 and 19C2 caps?

(http://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20161116/a62c7098f13faf76e26cf6d678f520dc.jpg)
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: salbayeng on November 19, 2016, 08:49:49 am
@pointyointment:
So from PaoPbz 's link that makes the resistors 470ohms , 5% tolerance with 25ppm tempco. (For comparison 1% metal film are typically 50ppm)
I think these are metal film , even though they look like carbon resistors.
Odd to have 25ppm with 5% tolerance , I'm guessing there must have been calibration somewhere else : VR2.
R7 seems unnecessary?
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: salbayeng on November 19, 2016, 09:06:03 am

What's the purpose of 19C1 and 19C2 caps?

Hi HiPi,
They are just for noise rejection.
Simple capacitors are quite effective noise filters on current mode signals.
The adjustment pot is probably in a noisy location.
Normally you would use a single capacitor to gnd 19C2.
The other one, 19c1, will couple power supply noise into the 4-20mA signal, it's not the way I would do it.
The capacitor should be as close as possible to the PLC inputs,
the way the schematic is drawn the gnd side of 19C2 , it seems to have multiple links on X31 , this is not particularly good practice as it gives scope for the installer to use a long loopy gnd return and hence pickup noise on that.
**edit changed to 19C2 in last sentence**
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: hipi66 on November 20, 2016, 09:52:39 am
Thanks salbayeng.
That's what I thought also but wasn't sure about that 19C1.

 :phew: :-+

Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: salbayeng on November 20, 2016, 09:06:30 pm
In the rare case where you had an analog or digital signal swinging from 0 to 24v AND you had a distant load across 0 to 24v that switched on and off, then you might argue the split capacitor scheme would be useful. But for av current mode signal, the best place for a capacitor is across the terminals at the receiver.
Looking at the schematic, and assuming a 250 \$\Omega\$ resistor inside the PLC, and the capacitors totalling 1\$\micro\$F, this forms a low pass filter at ~600Hz.  but, as drawn, it also forms a high-pass filter to couple power supply noise in above ~600Hz.
So above 600Hz, noise from your signal will be removed, but replaced with power supply noise.

If I were putting in split capacitors i would put them across the 3 pot wires (at the input to the 4-20 converter) , maybe that's what the designer said, and draftsmen mis-heard him??
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: vodka on December 01, 2016, 06:02:11 pm
A few years ago , i found a "thing" that it was stored a box on my garage . I think that the " thing" is a kind the inductance sensor  but  it only has one wire, when i tested  with the multimeter , it hasn't continuity neither resistance.

Do somebody know  what it's ?

 https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/0BzVlJNeWPQJzUDR6LVNQRkdMcVU?usp=sharing (https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/0BzVlJNeWPQJzUDR6LVNQRkdMcVU?usp=sharing)

Thanks for you help.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Fortran on December 01, 2016, 06:28:09 pm
It's a capacitor for magneto ignitions.
Outboards, lawnmowers.. That sort of thing.
The casing is the second wire.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: vodka on December 01, 2016, 07:00:24 pm
It's a capacitor for magneto ignitions.
Outboards, lawnmowers.. That sort of thing.
The casing is the second wire.


Thanks
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Cubdriver on December 01, 2016, 09:58:02 pm
That's a condenser for an old automotive breaker point ignition.

https://goo.gl/images/xRMbwy (https://goo.gl/images/xRMbwy)

-Pat
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: vodka on December 02, 2016, 05:59:00 am
That's a condenser for an old automotive breaker point ignition.

https://goo.gl/images/xRMbwy (https://goo.gl/images/xRMbwy)

-Pat

I am sure that the capacitor is the SEAT PANDA 40

https://www.elmuseodelrecambio.es/prod-4295-seat-condensador-seat-panda-todos-modelos-delco-femsa.php (https://www.elmuseodelrecambio.es/prod-4295-seat-condensador-seat-panda-todos-modelos-delco-femsa.php)

Thanks
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: HwAoRrDk on December 09, 2016, 06:03:51 pm
An acquaintance discovered this mystery box under the dashboard of his Porsche 911, but has no idea what it's for.

(https://www.eevblog.com/forum/chat/what's-this-please-(component-advice)/?action=dlattach;attach=276886;image)

Any thoughts?

I'm thinking it's quite old, as the blue cap is labelled in 'MFD', which I believe hasn't been common practice for a long time now.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: PA0PBZ on December 09, 2016, 06:06:56 pm
Looks like a filter for speakers, one input and outputs for high (tweeters) and low.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: gamalot on December 09, 2016, 07:01:44 pm
Looks like a filter for speakers, one input and outputs for high (tweeters) and low.

Yes, I think it is a 2 way frequency divider.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Cubdriver on December 09, 2016, 07:06:00 pm
As others have said, it looks like an audio crossover network.  The electrolytic cap appears to be a non-polarized one; note that it has crimps at both ends.

-Pat
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: HwAoRrDk on December 09, 2016, 07:48:02 pm
Ah, that makes sense, what with the 'hi' and 'low' terminals. Thanks everyone.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: SeanB on December 10, 2016, 10:12:00 am
In+ In- are the input from the amplifier. Low+ Low- are for the low frequencies ( the larger speaker) and Hi+ and Hi- are for the tweeter.

There should be another for the other side of the car.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: pas7680 on December 29, 2016, 01:31:17 am
i'm looking for help to identify this please, it appears to be a tos232 or very similar package but i've been unable to reference the value. All help appreciated.

it's marked BR (which is underscored) and has a small N in the bottom corner
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: salbayeng on December 29, 2016, 03:43:12 am
Hi Do you what size package it is?
SOT-23 is about an 0805 resistor
SOT-323 is a bit smaller
SOT-523 is smaller again

Is the part likely to be of European // Asian, // or American origin ( for transistors this means the first characters will likely be "B" // "2S" // "2N")

Is the part loose, or installed in something?

With a DMM on diode test , does it look like a PNP or NPN?

there's a few hits here:
http://www.s-manuals.com/smd/br (http://www.s-manuals.com/smd/br)
page 35 https://www.sos.sk/pdf/SMD_Catalog.pdf (https://www.sos.sk/pdf/SMD_Catalog.pdf)

Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: pas7680 on December 30, 2016, 10:35:26 am
As best as i can measure it is: 2.9x1.7x1.1mm

it comes from a NEC pc engine cdrom component number tr305 - can't find a service manual though.

it's a very early cd rom drive, which shares a lot in common with early sony drives.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: salbayeng on December 31, 2016, 11:56:41 am
OK The package size is either SOT-23   or  SC-59 , both are nearly identical in size ,  see page 5 of the datasheet I've attached (for a completely differnt transistor, it just happened to have a good drawing in it ).

The 2SC2412  is probably your transistor
(a) it is SC-59 size
(b) It's from a Japanese OEM manufacturer, hence will most likely be a 2SA or 2SC part.
(c) this part seems to be usually marked with "BQ" ,"BR", or "BS" , "BR" is the medium gain variety (hFE = 180-390)
(d) it's quite a common general purpose transistor.
Here is the datasheet :
http://www.s-manuals.com/pdf/datasheet/2/s/2sc1740s%2C_2sc2412k%2C_2sc4081%2C_2sc4617%2C_2sc5658_rohm.pdf (http://www.s-manuals.com/pdf/datasheet/2/s/2sc1740s%2C_2sc2412k%2C_2sc4081%2C_2sc4617%2C_2sc5658_rohm.pdf)








Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: pas7680 on December 31, 2016, 04:18:56 pm
thank you for all your help, i'll get one a give it a go.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: salbayeng on January 01, 2017, 12:54:27 am
As you are in the UK, you may find it easier to use a "pro-european" series transistor.
You can get these from RS , Farnell and probably a whole bunch of retail outlets.

The BC850C is probably closest to the 2SC2412

It is part of the BC846 series ,  the table on the first page shows the variations:
http://docs-asia.electrocomponents.com/webdocs/0b21/0900766b80b219a8.pdf (http://docs-asia.electrocomponents.com/webdocs/0b21/0900766b80b219a8.pdf)

The trailing letter "C" is the gain group this is hFE ~ 300 which is the same as gain group "R" of the 2SC2412
The BC849 and BC850 are the low noise variants ,  you would use these if the transistor is in an audio section.

Given your CD drive most likely runs off 12v, you could probably use the BC849 (30v variant) .

What does the transistor do in your device?
If it works a solenoid or something digital, and has failed due overload, you might be better off with a "higher current" transistor (MMBT2222, BC817-25 etc)  http://www.mouser.com/ds/2/308/BC817-16LT1-D-104560.pdf (http://www.mouser.com/ds/2/308/BC817-16LT1-D-104560.pdf)

Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: pas7680 on January 01, 2017, 02:36:37 pm
i was able to order the 2SC2412 from Rs so will give them a go, my electronics knowledge is basic i don't really know what it does but traces back to the dc in jack. I don't think it failed but was ripped off the board when clumps of glue were being removed. I'll give the first part a go, if that doesn't work i'll try the other - either way the board was only a parts board to begin with so no problem if i can't get it working.

Either way thanks for all your help.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: MasterTech on January 07, 2017, 01:26:32 pm
[Found, see below]This could be a double gate mosfet for rf Its a rf transistor (as it handles signals in the 300-400 Mhz), but probably bipolar with 2 emitter pins tied together with a characteristic printed "A" and a rounded protusion as a pin marking
Any ideas?

Actually the package thats soldered looks like the second image
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: MasterTech on January 07, 2017, 02:27:47 pm
Found it, its a Mini-Circuits MAV-11SM, MMIC amplifier in SOT86 package  :)


Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: salbayeng on January 07, 2017, 10:53:32 pm
Yep Mini-circuits makes a large variety
http://www.minicircuits.com/products/amplifiers_smt_gpw.shtml (http://www.minicircuits.com/products/amplifiers_smt_gpw.shtml)

It's usually a MAR-06 on the input and a MAV-11 on the output.
They are also made by other vendors, who keep the same trailing digits, and just change the prefix.

I have the mini-circuits 1992 printed handbook here, back then they just had MAR-1 through to MAR-8  and MAV-2, -3, -4, -11
(The MAV-x had larger transistors inside, and could dissipate more power)
The RAM-x is a ceRAMic package version of the plastic MAR-x.
Now the range has expanded.
The original MAR-x had leads that went straight out, so you needed to drill a small hole in the PCB to mount it, the SM suffix (MAR-xSM) just has kinked leads (gull wing) so it can be mounted with normal SMD assembly methods.
The VAM-x is a MAV-x in a SOT-143 package  (a bit like a SOT-23 with 4 legs) (dual gate MOS are usually packaged this way, and the BCV61 current mirror)
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: dexters_lab on January 18, 2017, 06:57:47 pm
Any ideas on these two IC samples from 1981?

logo looks a bit like linear technology?

there is an exact match on the DG528 of a analog multiplexer

Just want a 2nd opinion...
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Andy Watson on January 18, 2017, 07:14:57 pm
What makes you think it's not a DG528? The logo reminds me of Siliconix. http://www.logosdatabase.com/logo/si_78623276 (http://www.logosdatabase.com/logo/si_78623276)

Edit: Aside from a Temic datasheet, look what a a search for "siliconix DG528" dragged up:
http://www.desmoines-classifieds.com/Madison-County-/Automotive-/Engine-Parts-/Linear-DG528-siliconix-vintage-ic-sample-gold-package.SHTML (http://www.desmoines-classifieds.com/Madison-County-/Automotive-/Engine-Parts-/Linear-DG528-siliconix-vintage-ic-sample-gold-package.SHTML)
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: PA0PBZ on January 18, 2017, 07:23:05 pm
What makes you think it's not a DG528? The logo reminds me of Siliconix. http://www.logosdatabase.com/logo/si_78623276 (http://www.logosdatabase.com/logo/si_78623276)

Edit: Aside from a Temic datasheet, look what a a search for "siliconix DG528" dragged up:
http://www.desmoines-classifieds.com/Madison-County-/Automotive-/Engine-Parts-/Linear-DG528-siliconix-vintage-ic-sample-gold-package.SHTML (http://www.desmoines-classifieds.com/Madison-County-/Automotive-/Engine-Parts-/Linear-DG528-siliconix-vintage-ic-sample-gold-package.SHTML)

And here is a datasheet saying Vishay Siliconix: http://www.vishay.com/docs/70068/dg528.pdf (http://www.vishay.com/docs/70068/dg528.pdf)
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: dexters_lab on January 19, 2017, 04:39:33 pm
thanks guys!
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Sceptre on January 21, 2017, 03:27:14 am
Please help me identify the following LED driver IC from a head-mounted lamp:

1.  Package:  SOT23-6
2.  Top marking:  KAD4e
3.  Pinout:  1.  NC; 2.  GND; 3.  NC; 4.  LED - (through 1.3 \$\Omega\$ resistor); 5.  SWITCH; 6.  VCC (3x AAA cell)
4.  Function (per button press):  Bright, Dim, Flash, Off

I actually want to know the value of the input capacitor.  The ceramic 0805 SMD cap has a 1k \$\Omega\$ short, which drains the batteries if I leave them in.  Some driver chips that I found online take 10uF, others 0.1uF.

Thanks!
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: salbayeng on January 21, 2017, 05:31:53 am
Are there any inductors or diodes attached to the switch terminal?
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: SeanB on January 21, 2017, 05:44:48 pm
4V5 supply so not a switcher, so input capacitor can be pretty much any value from 100n to 100uF. Best is to use a 10uf ceramic in place of the existing one, or just use a 100uf 16V 85c electrolytic capacitor if there is space there to fit it in the housing. lot lower leakage, and will help with battery voltage droop on the dim setting where it is driving the led with a pulsed waveform to drop the brightness without influencing CRI.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: amyk on January 22, 2017, 05:10:04 am
Shouding(!?) SD3304 (http://shouding.w105.mydns114.net/down/html/?16.html).

Datasheet here (http://shouding.w105.mydns114.net/down/upload/20150322/1427016783.rar)
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: MasterTech on January 22, 2017, 07:33:17 am
This is an RF mixer, but cant find anything on it. The reference 0955-0525 seems an HP part, but no luck with that list.
Can anyone recognize the logo?

Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: PA0PBZ on January 22, 2017, 09:32:01 am
The pinout looks the same as the standard Mini-Circuits ones like the SBL-1 and such.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: MasterTech on January 22, 2017, 06:46:12 pm
That was a hard one, it was manufactured by a company named Adams-Russell.Still haven't found the part but I'm close...

Found this online:

"Adams-Russell was folded into M/A-COM a long time ago. M/A-COM was bought by AMP, which was bought by Tyco. Tyco then sold the M/A-COM division to Cobham, PLC"
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: PA0PBZ on January 22, 2017, 07:14:54 pm
The Keysight site(!) says 'U-WAVE MIXER 460MHz MAX 0.3WATT PC PINS'
Where is it from? Sometimes the CLIP manual contains an X-ref.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: MasterTech on January 22, 2017, 07:28:41 pm
From a 3588A, the thing is I got the CLIP pdfs half an hour ago, and theres no manuf X reference, but based on schematics it should be equal to a SBL1 as you mentioned
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: salbayeng on January 22, 2017, 10:10:16 pm
 The
Quote
MAX 0.3WATT
seems a bit high for a mixer, the mini-circuit mixers are typically +7dBm  (5mW) or 17dbM (50mW) on the LO , and RF usually lower. Perhaps the max 0.3watt (+25dBm) is a thermal limit??

Does your 3588A have a fried mixer on the input?
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: salbayeng on January 22, 2017, 10:49:01 pm
OK found a manual http://www.dennlec.com/images/manuals/hp-3588a-service-manual.pdf (http://www.dennlec.com/images/manuals/hp-3588a-service-manual.pdf)
on page 4.11 it says the LO level is 17dBm for the input mixer , so your part won't be a SBLxxx (only 7dBm)

OK given the input range of the HP3588  it is unlikely U803 is the input mixer,
(Or maybe the mixer is being used backwards  (RF goes into the IF port) in this case you would need to be careful of the pinout, you need a part with the IF on an end pin (not a middle pin) the SRA-2 and SRA-173H-1 has this arrangement I think)
However the second mixer also operates at 17dBm, and 300MHz

So a minicircuit similar part might be SRA-1H   17dBm
(or SRA-1WH, SRA-2H, SIMA-5H, SRA-173H)

if it really is 0.3W , then maybe a VAY-1  (27dBm )





Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: MasterTech on January 23, 2017, 06:25:17 am
It belongs to the A12 first conversion unit. The module has a weird 12dB loss in a certain range of frequencies, and this range is temperature dependent!, as the module warms up things change (I actually did identify the faulty module by putting one by one in the fridge and testing the results  ;D). Since I didn't have the schematics I did replace all active components of the board (around 10) but no luck. I was directing attention to passive components now.

But just yesterday I got the schematics from artekmanuals (had I known earlier) so I should figure out the problem quick now :-/O. Attached is mixer in the schematic
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Sceptre on January 24, 2017, 03:55:15 am
Shouding(!?) SD3304 (http://shouding.w105.mydns114.net/down/html/?16.html).

Datasheet here (http://shouding.w105.mydns114.net/down/upload/20150322/1427016783.rar)
That's the part, alright.  I note that the datasheet schematics don't show a cap.  It's just a cheapie headlamp, I'll see how it behaves without one.

Thanks!
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: cdev on January 24, 2017, 04:33:59 am
Does anybody have any idea what this little board is from/for? I got it as part of an electronics grab bag. I'm dating it at around mid 80s technology?


Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: salbayeng on January 24, 2017, 04:44:07 am
@ sceptre ,
OK I have looked at the datasheet ,  of the two figures on the first page, the top 1 is for 3 watts (3 bars as the first mandarin character), the lower is 1 watt.
The IC is just a simple chopper,  it varies the PWM to get an average current of 1A across 3v  for the 3W led (maybe 50% duty?), and ~ 300mA for the 3W led.

Given you have 1.5ohms already, this is much larger than any internal battery resistance, so the capacitor will have only a negligible effect, the symptoms that might indicate a capacitor is needed would be erratic brightness variations, or erratic timing on the flashing mode.

Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: salbayeng on January 24, 2017, 05:15:40 am
@CDEV :
Well you have something manufactured after 1994.
Has 74HC20= 2 x Quad NAND
64HC32 = 2 x quad OR
a pair of CD4051 8:1 multiplexer
A ?? pair of transistors for inverting of signals??
a ?? pair of opamps ?? (The motorola logo is upside down??) the "610" doesn't seem part of any motorola opamp in my 1976 databook, doesn't ring any bells either.
You have at least 6 laser trimmed resistors (possibly more under the chips).
Side 2 appears to have 4 NPO capacitors (lighter yellow colors) these would be typically 10nF or less and be 1% to 5% tolerance.
And its on a ceramic base, so probably from some mid to high end unit.

Given the presence of the mutiplexors, the circuit is most likely an input attenuator for a scope or multimeter ( I have seen similar PCB's in benchtop DMM's before).
Or it could possibly be a switchable frequency filter
or less likely some kind of switchable delay generator or frequency source.

You could probably figure out which pin goes where by simply buzzing with a DMM , most likely 4 or 5 of the pins are inputs to the '20 and '32.
The 74HC parts are 5v , while the 4051 may have dual analog supplies.

Happy hunting!


Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: timelessbeing on January 24, 2017, 07:08:39 am
I bought a replacement probe set (http://muellerelectric.com/product/premium-test-probe-kit/) for my DMM.
It comes with all sorts of doo-dads which slide onto the probe tips, one of which is this blade shaped thing which I don't recognise. It didn't come with any kind of documentation or even description of parts. You can see two metal plates sandwiched together, so my guess is some kind of thermocouple. But how would I use it? Just measure the voltage? What range and what is the temp correlation?  Any thoughts?

EDIT: something just occurred to me. I wonder if you're meant to slide it down between a battery and another battery or device terminal. I'll have to try that tomorrow...
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: electr_peter on January 24, 2017, 06:46:55 pm
I bought a replacement probe set (http://muellerelectric.com/product/premium-test-probe-kit/) for my DMM.
It comes with all sorts of doo-dads which slide onto the probe tips, one of which is this blade shaped thing which I don't recognise. It didn't come with any kind of documentation or even description of parts. You can see two metal plates sandwiched together, so my guess is some kind of thermocouple. But how would I use it? Just measure the voltage? What range and what is the temp correlation?  Any thoughts?

EDIT: something just occurred to me. I wonder if you're meant to slide it down between a battery and another battery or device terminal. I'll have to try that tomorrow...
It certainly looks like a current measurement adapter for measuring dry cells relatively easily. Metal plates should be insulated from each other. With such scheme current measurement is very easy from wiring point of view.

Similar DIY adapters were discussed on this forum https://www.eevblog.com/forum/projects/dry-cell-battery-monitor-adaptor-ultra-thin-pcb/msg541684/#msg541684 (https://www.eevblog.com/forum/projects/dry-cell-battery-monitor-adaptor-ultra-thin-pcb/msg541684/#msg541684)
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: salbayeng on January 24, 2017, 09:24:47 pm
I'd vote for the "slip between the battery and terminal" option, I've made a couple myself from brass shim and double sided tape, very useful, you can also use them to isolate the battery to inject external power.
Your's look to be made in the Middle Kingdom, someone's gone to the effort of squashing the strips twice to get a nice wedge effect.

Any other useful goodies in your probe kit?
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: amyk on January 25, 2017, 03:30:33 am
It's for Batteriser testing. :-DD
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: timelessbeing on January 26, 2017, 05:00:00 am
Indeed, there's no continuity between the two faces so it must be for batteries.

It's a nice kit. I got a pouch full of different clips, grabbers, needle points and such. The leads are very nice silicone rubber and the probe tips are very sharp. I can take a photo if you like. I'm quite happy with the quality and reasonable price. I'm not sure what Middle Kingdom refers to, but Mueller is based in Ohio.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Fortran on January 26, 2017, 11:51:06 am
What a simple and clever little probe!
I didn't realize how much I need one until I saw it :)

Luckily I have some thin PCB's laying around with plated borders. Making a bunch of them won't take more then a couple of minutes.  :-+
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: salbayeng on February 11, 2017, 06:46:40 am
It could possibly be an "electro-chemical fuse" (that's not quite the right name for it, but I can't remember the right name).
The device is connected in series with the battery via the two thick wires on the right.

It is intended as a last chance protection against over voltage or undervoltage to prevent the Li-ion cell exploding.

In the event of a serious fault that the BMS IC can't handle by shutting down the series mosfets (i.e. because they have shorted), the BMS applies power to the lead on the left, this heats up the little black bit, which sets off a chemical reaction that corrodes through a thin metal film (underneath the blue area) and isolates the battery permanently.
Note the series MOSFETs are under the chemi-fuse in your photo, so if they overheat, they will also fire off the fuse.

I've got a professional-grade cam-corder battery here, given to me when the chemi-fuse went off accidently? I now have 12 perfectly good 18650 cells that I removed from the pack!!.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: amyk on February 12, 2017, 04:06:37 am
That would be one of these: http://battery.newlist.ru/images2/Fuse.pdf (http://battery.newlist.ru/images2/Fuse.pdf)

And judging from your picture, it looks like it has already blown open (there shouldn't be gaps between the metal parts).
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: fubar.gr on February 13, 2017, 12:40:38 pm
This is a board from an elevator and controls the opening and closing of the sliding doors.

According to a technician who tested it, this 7 lead TO220 is faulty and has to be replaced, but the inscriptions are dremmeled off.

Any idea what this component might be?
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: bktemp on February 13, 2017, 12:55:12 pm
Looks like a H-bridge driver. TLE5206-2 seems to have a matching pinout.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: salbayeng on February 13, 2017, 10:06:20 pm
I'd vote with BK temp.
There aren't a lot of power devices in TO220-7
http://au.mouser.com/Semiconductors/Power-Management-ICs/_/N-wnwh?No=50&FS=True&P=1z0y1ic (http://au.mouser.com/Semiconductors/Power-Management-ICs/_/N-wnwh?No=50&FS=True&P=1z0y1ic)

The TLE5206-2 is the only one that is a full bridge and a motor driver, and the pin-out matches.

Note that if you have a bad connection to the motor, (e.g. it breaks contact due to vibration etc. ) the arcing across the bad connection will damage the H-bridge driver, the internal clamping diodes are not schottky, so the diodes will let through ~ 100ns of several hundred volts at every arc event.

The presence of some sloppy rework around the connector pins indicates a possible prior dry joint on the connectors.  It is more than likely that the wires on the connectors are probably too stiff, too heavy, and not properly supported. This will cause the solder on the connector pins to fatigue. When you repair and re-install the board, you should replace overly rigid wire with more flexible wire, and cable tie the wires to the spacers that support this PCB.

???? ????

Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: kostasb on March 06, 2017, 11:19:00 am
Hello,

Any ideas on this IC?

(https://image.ibb.co/m6Pvyv/K9GK.jpg)

Marking: "K9GK", "818"

Thank you
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: frozenfrogz on March 06, 2017, 12:25:18 pm
Hello,

Any ideas on this IC?

Marking: "K9GK", "818"

Thank you

MSOP10 (?) packaged might be a buck-converter.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: salbayeng on March 06, 2017, 12:45:28 pm
Looks like a switching regulator,  package probably a TDFN-10 or DFN-10 or VSON-10  , these are 3.0 x 3.0mm
looks like pin 1 is the input (output) and pin 10 is the output(input) , ground will be a big exposed pad underneath.

Can you determine what parts are hanging off which pins, there should be an inductor, and possibly a diode somewhere.

There might be a pair of resistors hanging off a pin too.

This should give some candidate parts: http://au.mouser.com/Semiconductors/Integrated-Circuits-ICs/Power-Management-ICs/Switching-Controllers/_/N-6j76j?P=1z0y2cyZ1yuy3t8Z1yzxi1hZ1z0jilt&Ns=ManufacturerPartNumber%7c0 (http://au.mouser.com/Semiconductors/Integrated-Circuits-ICs/Power-Management-ICs/Switching-Controllers/_/N-6j76j?P=1z0y2cyZ1yuy3t8Z1yzxi1hZ1z0jilt&Ns=ManufacturerPartNumber%7c0)
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: bktemp on March 06, 2017, 12:55:46 pm
It looks like pin 1 is connected to a mini/micro USB connector, so 5V is either input or output voltage. I don't see any inductor, so maybe a linear regulator, charge controller, load switch.
That marking style looks somehow familiar to me, but I don't recognize the manufacturer of hand. Could it be Monolithic Power System?
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: newc22 on March 06, 2017, 02:13:32 pm
Hello All!

I have got a video kard ASUS 7790 2 GB OC some days ago my win7 freeze... it has got a blue screen... :(  I take it and i saw one chip which gone.... (PC628)  anybody know what's this?! And it is going to fix it?! Thanx the reply!!!

<a href="http://www.kepfeltoltes.eu/view.php?filename=735vidkari.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="http://www.kepfeltoltes.eu/images/hdd1/20170222/735vidkari.jpg" alt="Korlátlan képfeltöltés ingyen - www.kepfeltoltes.eu (http://www.kepfeltoltes.eu)">[/url]




Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: PA0PBZ on March 06, 2017, 02:39:25 pm
Hello All!

I have got a video kard ASUS 7790 2 GB OC some days ago my win7 freeze... it has got a blue screen... :(  I take it and i saw one chip which gone.... (PC628)  anybody know what's this?! And it is going to fix it?! Thanx the reply!!!

It's just a capacitor like the ones next to it, probably somewhere between 0.5 - 2 uF.
I don't think replacing it will fix the card, it looks like a decoupling cap and the card should work without.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: newc22 on March 06, 2017, 04:08:48 pm
Yes it's working but unfortunatelly my pc get a blue screen death. I went to the service and they told me my video card bad and one small part broke it.... What can i do to fix this problem?! And where can i buy this capacitor?! Thx the reply!
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: kostasb on March 07, 2017, 04:37:59 pm
Hello,

Any ideas on this IC?

(https://image.ibb.co/m6Pvyv/K9GK.jpg)

Marking: "K9GK", "818"

Thank you


It is in a electronic cigarette mod.
It is used for charging a Lion battery at 890mA.
USB input (5V), 4.19V output.
The problem is that it gets extremely hot.
I can't see all the connections because there are 2 pcbs.
I must find a way to limit the charging current.

Pin-1 is the input (microUSB)
Pin-10 is the output (4.19V).
Pin-2 is connecting to microcontroller.
Between pin8 and ground there is a 20K resistor.
Between pin9 and ground there is a 1.9K resistor.
Between pin4 and 5 there is a resistor.
As I can see there is no voltage divider.
There is neither inductor nor diode.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: bktemp on March 07, 2017, 05:44:30 pm
It could be one of those:
https://www.monolithicpower.com/Products/Parametric-Search?categoryID=76/#filters= (https://www.monolithicpower.com/Products/Parametric-Search?categoryID=76/#filters=)
The package matches and also the pinout looks identical.
Unfortunally most datasheets don't have marking code information, but the ones with marking information show a 4 digit code.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: kostasb on March 08, 2017, 10:40:41 pm
Thank you!     Thank you!     Thank you! 

I'm not sure for the part, but all the connections and components it's like MP26023.
I replace the programing current resistor, and it works just like datasheet says.
From 890mA, reduced to 520mA.
But it is still very hot.
Only 2-3oC lower!   :-//
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: dexters_lab on March 15, 2017, 07:57:42 am
i am trying to identify the make and / or model of these LCD Pushswitches, we initially thought they were NKK SmartSwitch but i am not so sure, the footprint and construction don't match anything in their catalog. The only marking is a printed '47A' and a small logo (see pics)

There is a logo on them which seems to be either SD or DS

The pin footprint is completely different to anything in the SmartSwitch catalog but the pins do match the pin descriptions of the 36x24 SmartSwitch

Maybe these are discontinued models?

Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: dexters_lab on March 15, 2017, 08:18:28 am
no, but they did come from a company making broadcast & film production equipment, it seems they were popular for that
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: amyk on March 15, 2017, 10:27:56 am
Googling for the names marked on the pins lead me to this (currently) dead link (http://s1.nonlinear.ir/epublish/magazine/Circuit_Cellar/Circuit%20Cellar%5Bnonlinear.ir%5D%20020%201991.pdf) but that made me search for "Circuit Cellar 020 1991" and I found a working link (https://novafile.com/ysjvsvx7zqgj), on page 52 you may find the details: it is the "Pixie switch" from IEE (http://ieeinc.com/).

Another brief mention here (http://www.hpmuseum.org/cgi-sys/cgiwrap/hpmuseum/archv014.cgi?read=71441).

That and this brief mention (http://dl.acm.org/ft_gateway.cfm?id=259982&ftid=39068&dwn=1&CFID=605462802&CFTOKEN=36785495) are about all I can find about this part on the Internet.

Maybe if you ask IEE they might give you a datasheet?
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: dexters_lab on March 15, 2017, 11:47:16 am
that looks a perfect match for what i have here, thanks!!

i'll email them and see if i get anything back, given that article dates from 1991 i won't hold my breath!

i have about 40 of them here so would be nice if they could be used somehow



Googling for the names marked on the pins lead me to this (currently) dead link (http://s1.nonlinear.ir/epublish/magazine/Circuit_Cellar/Circuit%20Cellar%5Bnonlinear.ir%5D%20020%201991.pdf) but that made me search for "Circuit Cellar 020 1991" and I found a working link (https://novafile.com/ysjvsvx7zqgj), on page 52 you may find the details: it is the "Pixie switch" from IEE (http://ieeinc.com/).

Another brief mention here (http://www.hpmuseum.org/cgi-sys/cgiwrap/hpmuseum/archv014.cgi?read=71441).

That and this brief mention (http://dl.acm.org/ft_gateway.cfm?id=259982&ftid=39068&dwn=1&CFID=605462802&CFTOKEN=36785495) are about all I can find about this part on the Internet.

Maybe if you ask IEE they might give you a datasheet?
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Richard Crowley on March 23, 2017, 05:27:40 am
I bought some motor driver boards from Ebay. 
http://www.ebay.com/itm/272301540441 (http://www.ebay.com/itm/272301540441)

They claim they are "L298N", but the label on the chips are removed.
The apparent dentification of the input and output nodes does not appear to match L298N.
And the L298N does not even appear to be available in that package, either.
Anybody have a clue what these things could be?

(http://www.winddeal.net/image/097/05/47274/47274-1.jpg)
(http://www.winddeal.net/image/097/05/47274/47274-6.jpg)
(http://forums.parallax.com/uploads/attachments/50635/105523.jpg)
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: amb101 on March 23, 2017, 12:52:30 pm
When this happens I usually search for the same item from different buyers sellers and look for ones where you can read the chip.
This one's easy to read: http://www.ebay.com/itm/272470664807 (http://www.ebay.com/itm/272470664807)

Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Richard Crowley on March 23, 2017, 06:34:34 pm
Thank you.  So it is probably an MX1508. 
Now if I can only find some information about it that is not in Chinese.
It appears to have a max of 10V, but I'm not even sure what is the current rating?
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: gamalot on March 24, 2017, 01:12:05 am
Thank you.  So it is probably an MX1508. 
Now if I can only find some information about it that is not in Chinese.
It appears to have a max of 10V, but I'm not even sure what is the current rating?

Peak Current:

2A

Continuous Current?

 1.35A (One channel  only)

or

0.6A (channel 1) + 1.3A (channel 2)

or

0.8A (channle 1) + 1.2A (channel 2)
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: tsmith35 on March 24, 2017, 03:38:26 pm
I found more information here... (http://sales.dzsc.com/486222.html)

Google automatic translation of the text:

MX1508 SOP-16 Four-Channel Dual Brushless DC Motor Driver IC
Overview
The product provides an integrated brushless DC motor drive solution for battery-powered toys, low-voltage or battery-powered motion control applications
case. The circuit integrates two channels of N-channel and P-channel power MOSFET design of the H-bridge drive circuit, suitable for driving electric toy car steering
Wheel and rear drive, (drive brushless DC motor or drive two stepping motors). The circuit has a wide operating voltage range (from
2V to 9.6V), the maximum continuous output current of the steering wheel reaches 0.8A, and the maximum peak output current reaches 1.5A. Rear wheel drive maximum continuous output power
Flow reaches 1.5A, the maximum peak output current reaches 2A.
The drive circuit built-in thermal protection circuit. Through the drive circuit load current is much greater than the maximum circuit current, by the package cooling capacity
Limit, the internal chip chip temperature will rise rapidly, once more than the set value (typical 150 °C), the internal circuit will immediately turn off the output power
Rate, cut off the load current, to avoid the temperature continued to rise caused by plastic packaging smoke, fire and other security risks. Built-in temperature hysteresis circuit, indeed
After the circuit is restored to a safe temperature, the circuit is allowed to be re-controlled.
The
Features:
a. Low standby current (less than 0.1uA);
b. Low static operating current;
c. Integrated H bridge drive circuit;
d. Built-in anti-common conduction circuit;
e low conduction resistance of the power MOSFET;
F. Built-in overheat protection circuit (TSD) with hysteresis effect;
g. Antistatic rating: 3KV (HBM).
Typical applications
a. 2-6 AA / AAA battery powered motor drive;
b. 2-6 nickel-hydrogen / nickel-cadmium rechargeable battery-powered toy motor drive;
c. 1-2 lithium battery-powered motor drive
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: kostasb on March 29, 2017, 02:56:08 pm
Hello,

Any ideas on this IC?

(https://image.ibb.co/fvZYaa/EVOLV_charger_XL_chip.jpg)


It is in a USB charge & communication board.
Pin-2 is connecting to USB data-
Pin-3 is connecting to USB data+
Pin-6 is connecting to USB +5V
Pins 1, 4, 5 can be connected at ground or/and one an other.
It is in parallel with USB data pins.
It is not connecting as USB data filter.
The signals don't pass through IC.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: chicken on March 29, 2017, 04:59:07 pm
ESD protection? E.g. AOZ8881.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: gamalot on March 29, 2017, 05:16:35 pm
PUSBM12VX4-TL

http://assets.nexperia.com/documents/data-sheet/PUSBMXX4-TL_SER.pdf (http://assets.nexperia.com/documents/data-sheet/PUSBMXX4-TL_SER.pdf)
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: OiD on March 29, 2017, 05:40:22 pm
Hi all,

Any idea what this part from STMicroelectronics could be? "ST L6401ES" in a Multiwatt-11 package

Thanks!
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: tsmith35 on April 05, 2017, 01:29:54 pm
Where did you get the part number? What is this device used for?
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: frozenfrogz on April 07, 2017, 08:21:28 am
Any idea what this part from STMicroelectronics could be? "ST L6401ES" in a Multiwatt-11 package

Found you something: http://www.jotrin.com/product/parts/L6401 (http://www.jotrin.com/product/parts/L6401). There seems to be a datasheet downloadable, but you need a login to do so.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: tsmith35 on April 09, 2017, 01:21:40 am
Clicking the datasheet download link on that page (with an account) takes you to a search on the ST site for L6401. With no results...
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: frozenfrogz on April 09, 2017, 09:42:43 am
That’s unfortunate :/
Maybe contact ST directly (http://www.st.com/content/st_com/en/contact-us.html)?
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: PA0PBZ on April 15, 2017, 01:02:43 pm
This doide'ish thing, what is it? It is used in an induction stove, I guess to monitor the temperature of the plate. It has a voltage drop of 3V both ways so what part does that? The drop slightly decreases when I warm it up by hand.
First picture is how it sits in the stove against the bottom of the glass plate (separated by some kind of isolating plate), the 'diode' legs are downwards into the red rubber, the aluminium (?) 'flag' is touching the diode.

Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: oPossum on April 15, 2017, 01:14:50 pm
Looks like a thermistor. What is the resistance? Probably 10k or 100k.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: PA0PBZ on April 15, 2017, 01:25:05 pm
Looks like a thermistor. What is the resistance? Probably 10k or 100k.

You are probably right, if I measure the resistance it is around 100K but not stable at all, but the voltage drop is as stable as 2.995V, so that made me wonder.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Mr.B on April 16, 2017, 06:29:35 am
Looks like a silicon thermistor.

Picture has a basic match to this:
http://www.amwei.com/views.asp?hw_id=65 (http://www.amwei.com/views.asp?hw_id=65)
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: OiD on April 17, 2017, 08:16:14 pm
Where did you get the part number? What is this device used for?

I have a bag full of them along with other motor control IC's (three phase, Stepper, DC...) so it might be a control IC or similar.

That’s unfortunate :/
Maybe contact ST directly (http://www.st.com/content/st_com/en/contact-us.html)?

Elusive component! Guess I'll have to. Strange not to find any reference whatsoever...
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: daveshah on April 18, 2017, 10:02:56 am
I have a bag full of them along with other motor control IC's (three phase, Stepper, DC...) so it might be a control IC or similar.

Seems very probable - the L prefix seems to be used by ST for motor control stuff (as well as a few other oddities), there are even some other L64xx devices such as the L6470 microstepping driver. Perhaps ES indicates engineering sample, and the part never made it to market?
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: tsmith35 on April 18, 2017, 08:58:56 pm
That makes sense... from an ST datasheet:

"Parts marked as "ES", "E" or accompanied by an Engineering Sample notification letter, are not yet qualified and therefore not yet ready to be used in production and any consequences deriving from such usage will not be at ST charge. In no event, ST will be liable for any customer usage of these engineering samples in production. ST Quality has to be contacted prior to any decision to use these Engineering Samples to run qualification activity."
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: thomastheo on April 20, 2017, 11:16:46 am
I found these old relays, 12 individual silver-contact glass reed relays to one coil, which looks to be 12v nominal. They are marked as Elliott Brothers 'Sealed Contact Reed Relay' Type ERP. PT No. A. with the number 31262 on the outside, and '32232/105' on the side of the coil itself. According to wikipedia this company was in business in the fifties and sixties as a computer manufacturer. I am wondering whether anyone knows more about these 12 pole reed relays, and what they might have been used for, as google has not been very helpful. The picture shows two assembled units, and one that has been taken to bits.

Edit: It's hard to tell from the photo I posted, but the reed switches are quite large. The glass envelope is 5cm long, with a diameter of about 5mm.

Thanks!
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: dexters_lab on May 02, 2017, 04:48:13 pm
i found this the other day, it looked unusual...

it's a 30 pin sealed metal can with a ceramic hybrid inside containing 32 dies and the usual laser etched resistors and SMD caps

marked as ITT 5C1/137848 AAWJ 80/10B ISSB

any ideas? no purpose for knowing other than curiosity...
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: frozenfrogz on May 02, 2017, 09:12:56 pm
That hybrid circuit is a piece of art!
I do not know what its purpose is, but it looks kind of military. To my knowledge ITT industries (International Telephone & Telegraphs Corporation) did have and still has an aerospace and avionics department.
You could send a request via itt.com (http://itt.com), or ittaerospace.com (http://ittaerospace.com).

Here is a short article on hybrid circuits (http://www.wylie.org.uk/technology/computer/ICs/hybrid/hybrid.htm), featuring something in a similar package.

Thanks for the photos, it’s mesmerizing :)
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: TerraHertz on May 03, 2017, 09:07:02 am
Can anyone make out these hieroglyphics? (pic 1)

The IC is an 8 pin low-side regulator in a small charger for laptops.
The high-side controller markings are clear, and the data was easy to find. (pic 2, SG5842JASZ  http://datasheet.elcodis.com/pdf2/81/67/816778/sg5842ja.pdf (http://datasheet.elcodis.com/pdf2/81/67/816778/sg5842ja.pdf) )

The charger is 20V 2A output, and I hope to change it to 12V. And a bit more current. Hacking it because I need a physically SMALL power supply for this (pic 3).  Yes, I know I will have to rewind the transformer.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: PA0PBZ on May 03, 2017, 09:17:42 am
Can anyone make out these hieroglyphics? (pic 1)


L03AIW
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: TerraHertz on May 03, 2017, 09:56:05 am
Maybe "103AIW" ?
http://www.badcaps.net/forum/showthread.php?t=30723 (http://www.badcaps.net/forum/showthread.php?t=30723)

From its function-by-location it would be a comparator/op-amp and reference. But I'm not finding data yet.

Edit: Got it!  ST  TSM103. Dual op amp and voltage reference.

  http://pdf1.alldatasheet.com/datasheet-pdf/view/517784/STMICROELECTRONICS/TSM103AIDT.html (http://pdf1.alldatasheet.com/datasheet-pdf/view/517784/STMICROELECTRONICS/TSM103AIDT.html)

Edit 2: Now to see if I can dissolve the epoxy holding the transformer ferrite halves together.
Anyone recognize the make from the part number printed on it? Source? (assuming I break it.)
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: TerraHertz on May 03, 2017, 10:04:56 am
I found these old relays, 12 individual silver-contact glass reed relays to one coil, which looks to be 12v nominal. They are marked as Elliott Brothers 'Sealed Contact Reed Relay' Type ERP. PT No. A. with the number 31262 on the outside, and '32232/105' on the side of the coil itself. According to wikipedia this company was in business in the fifties and sixties as a computer manufacturer. I am wondering whether anyone knows more about these 12 pole reed relays, and what they might have been used for, as google has not been very helpful. The picture shows two assembled units, and one that has been taken to bits.

Edit: It's hard to tell from the photo I posted, but the reed switches are quite large. The glass envelope is 5cm long, with a diameter of about 5mm.

Thanks!

I've pulled apart old boards that had multi-reed relays like that in the past. I think they were used to select between several different cables, where a cable would have that many wires. Say 4 cables, use 4 of those blocks. Energise only one.
They were from the days when interfaces tended to have a lot of separate wires. So that was the only way to do it.

Anyway, now you have enough reed relays to put sensors on every door in a large house.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: corneliusnl on May 09, 2017, 02:03:32 pm
Looking for some help identifying these components, with the following smd marks:

transistors AB3, 1A3 (Complimentary?)

Z14F, Z16F ic's

transistor TEw


Thanking you in advance (and probably again later :)

Jeremiah
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: saposoft on May 10, 2017, 09:56:00 am
Hi everybody
Found this thing in a bunch of throw away from a company doing audio, looks like ceramic encased , quite heavy, no marking of any type beside a handwritten number serialized in all them.
my bet ? microphone capsule, but too many wires...
any info will be good
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: frozenfrogz on May 10, 2017, 10:10:03 am
Hi everybody
Found this thing in a bunch of throw away from a company doing audio, looks like ceramic encased , quite heavy, no marking of any type beside a handwritten number serialized in all them.
my bet ? microphone capsule, but too many wires...
any info will be good

There are ceramic pressure sensing capsules that look somewhat similar. https://www.sensorsone.com/ceramic-pressure-transducer-cells-for-oem-design/ (https://www.sensorsone.com/ceramic-pressure-transducer-cells-for-oem-design/)
Do not know much about these though...
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: djQUAN on May 13, 2017, 05:10:41 am
I found a bunch of these and initially thought they are a dual diode based on diode check but later found out that they might be something else as they have a zener like property on some of the pins. My Googling didn't turn up any useful result. Any help would be appreciated.

It is a SOT23  and device marking is 5A6i

Edit: tried the link in previous post and it didn't show any possible candidate.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: amspire on May 13, 2017, 06:41:55 am
It will be a 5A6 that is a NXP/Philips Dual Zener PZM5.6NB2A which is a dual 5.6V zener with common anodes.

http://www.s-manuals.com/pdf/datasheet/p/z/pzm-na_series_philips.pdf (http://www.s-manuals.com/pdf/datasheet/p/z/pzm-na_series_philips.pdf)

I suspect that "I" is actually an H on its side. Don't know what that means.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: djQUAN on May 13, 2017, 05:47:00 pm
It will be a 5A6 that is a NXP/Philips Dual Zener PZM5.6NB2A which is a dual 5.6V zener with common anodes.

http://www.s-manuals.com/pdf/datasheet/p/z/pzm-na_series_philips.pdf (http://www.s-manuals.com/pdf/datasheet/p/z/pzm-na_series_philips.pdf)

I suspect that "I" is actually an H on its side. Don't know what that means.

I measured with 5mA constant current and there it was, 5.6V exactly. What threw me off was the bi-directional breakdown voltage between pins 1-2. Looking at the datasheet internal connection, it made sense.  :palm:

Thanks for the wake up call. I tend to be good at this but today was not my day.  :phew:
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: behrang_dvb on May 16, 2017, 04:23:38 am
Looking for some help identifying these components, with the following smd marks:
s08040
s07040
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: daqq on May 16, 2017, 07:44:12 pm
behrang_dvb: It's almost certainly a 32.768kHz crystal.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Bendba on June 08, 2017, 02:34:58 am
Hi,

Would someone have any idea what this could be?
It comes out of a HF can from some medical equipment.
There is no continuity between any pads and I don't have any mean to measure capacitance.

(https://image.ibb.co/hQGXFv/20170607_231800.jpg)
(https://image.ibb.co/eQUV2a/20170607_231453.jpg)
(https://image.ibb.co/cRfg8F/20170607_231610.jpg)
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Cubdriver on June 08, 2017, 03:19:55 am
A crystal, perhaps?

-Pat
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Bendba on June 08, 2017, 05:25:00 am
Hi Pat,

I'm pretty sure it is not a crystal. My best guess is capacitor but I've never seen one like that.

Here is a photo of the board it come from.

(https://image.ibb.co/hM1AJF/20170608_151315.jpg)

The same component (different size) on the top left has a RF signal coming in on one of the small tab from outside the can. Something must come out the other small tab, it's connected to the rest of the circuitry inside the can. The outside of the component is connected to the ground plane.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: bktemp on June 08, 2017, 06:25:11 am
It is a coaxial ceramic filter. It is probably a bandpass filter.
They are often used for duplexer filters, because of their high Q.
http://www.mcv-microwave.com/ceramic-filters.html (http://www.mcv-microwave.com/ceramic-filters.html)
http://www.t-ceram.com/ENGLISH/filter-diplexer.htm (http://www.t-ceram.com/ENGLISH/filter-diplexer.htm)
http://www.lorch.com/ceramic.html (http://www.lorch.com/ceramic.html)
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Bendba on June 09, 2017, 05:16:52 am
Thanks a lot. Any idea which manufacturer that logo is from?
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: jonovid on June 10, 2017, 07:31:11 am
what type of USB is this?  is it a phone type mini B? is this a USB data interface ? not just 5volt.
has anyone used this chinese DROK 200119 timer

the DROK 200119 instructions do not say a lot about the USB port.
http://www.droking.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/200119_instruction.pdf (http://www.droking.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/200119_instruction.pdf)

what I do know about the DROK 200119 is-
DROK 200119 has its micro ic hidden under the 3 digit 7 segment display.
the programmable micro has 18 modes with 2 time settings  from 0.1 sec to hrs.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Bendba on June 10, 2017, 07:55:22 am
The datasheet says USB micro, 5V supply, same as a phone charger. Is hard to tell if there is any data supposed to go through it.

Is there any trace going somewhere from the two middle tabs of the connector? If not, definitely no data.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: jonovid on June 10, 2017, 09:23:53 am
The datasheet says USB micro, 5V supply, same as a phone charger. Is hard to tell if there is any data supposed to go through it.

Is there any trace going somewhere from the two middle tabs of the connector? If not, definitely no data.
need more time set up some 0.5mm test probes on a test jig.
as its hard to see without scratching for the traces.  |O ripping up the pcb.  :--  I was hoping for a USB data dock, so I can setup the timer without using the slow and clunky 3 digit 7 segment interface.  :-\
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Bendba on June 10, 2017, 09:33:27 am
From what you can see, I wouldn't up my hopes too much. on the front of the board, you can see a trace leaving the rightmost tab of the connector, go down and then left, leaving very little space for anything coming of the two middle tabs. And at the back of the board, there is only one via.

A quick test would be to plug it in the USB port of your computer. If the computer is showing signs of new hardware, there is a data connection.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: jonovid on June 11, 2017, 05:48:02 am
yes its micro usb   :palm: I was only familiar with the mini usb  and no its not a data port only a 5volt input.  :(
so its back to the 200119 instructions  ;D
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Gadgetman on June 13, 2017, 08:06:31 am
Hi All,
This board (see pictures) comes from the late 60's oscilloscope I am trying to repair.
I am confused when it comes to some components. I suspect they are capacitors (the silkscreen would suggest pF) but the marking on them is a bit confusing - 20M for 20p silkscreen, 10M for 10p, 510K for 500p, 2000K for 2000p...

I removed one "51K" (marked 50p on the board) and tested it. Capacitance jumps up and down crazily at the beginning and then it settles at steady "47pF". The resistance test shows "OL". This would suggest capacitors as marked on the board's silkscreen but I just wanted to make sure. Especially, that the symbol used on the silkscreen is very similar to the resistor (an empty rectange but a bit shorter than the resistor's).

Also, can I replace them with standard ceramic caps? They are all marked with "WV. 250", so should I assume "Working Voltage" 0.25V or 250V? I think 250V would be safer.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Bendba on June 13, 2017, 08:30:15 am
Hi,

They are polystyrene capacitors and the M and K are tolerance marking, not multiplier.
M for +- 20%
K for +- 10%

As far as I know, please someone correct me if I'm wrong, those capacitors are extremely reliable and unless physically damaged or sustained dielectric arcing, they shouldn't really need replacing. (Please get someone else to confirm this)

And yes, voltage in in V, not mV
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Gadgetman on June 13, 2017, 09:35:03 am
Thank you very much for confirmation and new info (tolerances). I learned something again :)
Yes, I read somewhere else, that polystyrene capacitors are very reliable and nowadays are used only for special applications. I will not replace them then  :-+
On the other hand, I think I will replace most (if not all) of electrolytic caps, as this is a very aged piece of equipment. I am not sure about oil capacitors though. I have no experience with them at all. Should they be treated as electrolytic caps?

Thank you for your help.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: madires on June 13, 2017, 09:36:17 am
As far as I know, please someone correct me if I'm wrong, those capacitors are extremely reliable and unless physically damaged or sustained dielectric arcing, they shouldn't really need replacing. (Please get someone else to confirm this)

Yup!
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: rsjsouza on June 15, 2017, 10:05:16 pm
Thank you very much for confirmation and new info (tolerances). I learned something again :)
Yes, I read somewhere else, that polystyrene capacitors are very reliable and nowadays are used only for special applications. I will not replace them then  :-+
On the other hand, I think I will replace most (if not all) of electrolytic caps, as this is a very aged piece of equipment. I am not sure about oil capacitors though. I have no experience with them at all. Should they be treated as electrolytic caps?

Thank you for your help.
"Oil capacitors" are usually the starter capacitors used with electric motors. In older radios and TVs, the capacitors are made of oiled paper (commonly called "paper capacitors"), which tend to dry over the years as well. In this case there is a chance you have to replace them as well.

https://antiqueradio.org/recap.htm


Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Gadgetman on June 16, 2017, 12:47:58 am
Hi rsjsouza,

First of all I like your avatar :) and thank you for your reply.

Attached is a photo of an oil capacitor I have in this old oscilloscope. My question remains: should I treat them like electrolytic capacitors or should I try to find an oil capacitor? As I explained before, I have no experience with them.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: rsjsouza on June 16, 2017, 07:24:10 pm
Thanks for the photograph. I now fully understand your question: I would replace them with modern ceramic or polyester film capacitors that will never go bad. Just watch the working voltage.

I found the other reference I couldn't find yesterday:
http://www.justradios.com/captips.html (http://www.justradios.com/captips.html)
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Cyberdragon on June 17, 2017, 11:22:48 pm
That's a bloody Nippon Chemicon! Check to see if it still works.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Gadgetman on June 18, 2017, 12:13:38 am
I will sure check, but being a novice, I am not sure if you mean they are "indestructible" or "gold plated"  ;) and if they work, should I leave them as they are because of their brilliant reputation; or should I replace them? Bear in mind that they are 50 years old and even if they still work, should I trust them to continue to work and for how long?
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: rsjsouza on June 18, 2017, 11:56:09 am
Nippon Chemi-chon capacitors have excellent reputation for durability. Despite this, the particular dielectric technology can have a limited lifespan regardless of the brand.

I hate replacing parts without need, but it is very difficult to properly test this capacitor throughout its voltage range of 1.5kV - you never know if it has a leak that manifests itself only after a specific voltage.

All in all, if you can spare the time you can leave the capacitor, repair everything else, reassemble the unit and test it - if it works well you leave it there but if it doesn't you have a suspect.
Title: What's this please? (Optocoupler)
Post by: nonsuchpro on June 28, 2017, 10:57:44 am
Hey all,
I was unsoldering some components off a board and "scored" 4 nice looking optocouplers while doing it. However, I'm having a hard time finding a data sheet for them. The numbers are easily readable but the only letter of the name I can clearly make out is the F at the beginning. It looks kinda like FyyD, FyyN, or from a distance it looks like Fury. The are all marked 735 in front and 6E in back. Anybody have any idea what they are? And maybe a data sheet or link to one? It would be much appreciated.
Thanks in advance!
Rob
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Bendba on June 28, 2017, 11:12:25 am
Hi.

Might be a silly question but, are you sure they are opto's?
Title: Re: What's this please? (Optocoupler)
Post by: Gromitt on June 28, 2017, 11:43:39 am
Hey all,
I was unsoldering some components off a board and "scored" 4 nice looking optocouplers while doing it. However, I'm having a hard time finding a data sheet for them. The numbers are easily readable but the only letter of the name I can clearly make out is the F at the beginning. It looks kinda like FyyD, FyyN, or from a distance it looks like Fury. The are all marked 735 in front and 6E in back. Anybody have any idea what they are? And maybe a data sheet or link to one? It would be much appreciated.
Thanks in advance!
Rob

Not an F, it's in japanese and says Moririca (Moririca Electronics Ltd) and according to Google it is a optocopler and called MCD735, but that is all I can find on the net with my five minute search.

/stefan
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: nonsuchpro on June 28, 2017, 11:43:53 am
Hi.

Might be a silly question but, are you sure they are opto's?

Yes without a doubt. I have other optos just like it. You can look at the legs and tell the LED on one side and the CDS on the other.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Optocoupler)
Post by: nonsuchpro on June 28, 2017, 11:46:24 am
Quote
Not an F, it's in japanese and says Moririca (Moririca Electronics Ltd) and according to Google it is a optocopler and called MCD735, but that is all I can find on the net with my five minute search.

/stefan

Ah OK. Thanks. I typed all kinds of things in google. I would have never thought it might be Japanese writing.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: IanMacdonald on June 28, 2017, 11:56:33 am
In every CRT monitor or TV I have taken apart, there was this odd inductor that has a permanent magnet glued to it. Is that to offset the magnetic field generated by a DC bias current so a cheaper core can be used?
Yes, that's what it's for, the permanent magnet biases the inductor to oppose the DC current so a smaller, cheaper core can be used.

Might be, but might also be line linearity correction. Magnet causes the inductor to saturate in one current direction only, giving more current on that side of  scan. Some have a rotatable magnet for adjustment.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Gyro on June 28, 2017, 12:05:12 pm
Those look like LDR (light dependent resistor) type, driven by a visible LED. The LED pins are the thick ones and the LDR the thin ones.

Try applying current to the LED (correct polarity) over a 0-20mA range and monitor the LDR pins on the Ohms range of your DMM. If you see a varying resistance which is the same when you reverse the connections then it is an LDR.

They're useful for control of AC signals, for instance, volume controls or amplitude feedback in a low distortion Wein Bridge oscillator. Here's a generic app note:

http://www.perkinelmer.com/CMSResources/Images/44-3429APP_AnalogOpticalIsolatorsAudioApps.pdf (http://www.perkinelmer.com/CMSResources/Images/44-3429APP_AnalogOpticalIsolatorsAudioApps.pdf)

Try looking up Vactrol too, I think they make them.


P.S. Once you have an idea of the resistance range then you probably don't care much about the specific datasheet. But don't go above 20mA on the LED.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: nonsuchpro on June 28, 2017, 12:47:22 pm
Yeah. Like I said I definitely know what it is. I have tested it. I just cant read the name so I can download the data sheet .pdf, that's all.
Thanks!
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: nonsuchpro on June 28, 2017, 12:50:43 pm
I forgot to mention the acronym LDR. LDR is a CDS Photoresister.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Bendba on June 28, 2017, 12:56:25 pm
Looks like you might have to do specs measurement yourself. Can't seem to find a readable datasheet either  |O



In every CRT monitor or TV I have taken apart, there was this odd inductor that has a permanent magnet glued to it. Is that to offset the magnetic field generated by a DC bias current so a cheaper core can be used?
Yes, that's what it's for, the permanent magnet biases the inductor to oppose the DC current so a smaller, cheaper core can be used.

Might be, but might also be line linearity correction. Magnet causes the inductor to saturate in one current direction only, giving more current on that side of  scan. Some have a rotatable magnet for adjustment.

What did I miss about this 6 years old post resurfacing?
Even though the comment is perfectly pertinent.

Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Bendba on June 28, 2017, 01:28:00 pm
There is a cross reference here

https://www.tube-town.net/ttstore/Parts-for-Amps/Optocoupler/Tesla-Optocoupler-3WK-163-40::7720.html?language=en&MODsid=7ecjqtf8cus0a47u8nc0mgu8d7 (https://www.tube-town.net/ttstore/Parts-for-Amps/Optocoupler/Tesla-Optocoupler-3WK-163-40::7720.html?language=en&MODsid=7ecjqtf8cus0a47u8nc0mgu8d7)

Google results for the cross reference

https://www.google.com.au/search?site=&source=hp&ei=jK5TWaHxJ4i30QT6h7ugAQ&q=vtl5c1+datasheet&oq=VTL5C1&gs_l=mobile-gws-hp.1.2.0l5.1625.1625.0.3705.3.2.1.0.0.0.263.263.2-1.1.0....0...1.2.64.mobile-gws-hp..1.2.312.3..35i39k1.GITtfNNTRuE#xxri=0 (https://www.google.com.au/search?site=&source=hp&ei=jK5TWaHxJ4i30QT6h7ugAQ&q=vtl5c1+datasheet&oq=VTL5C1&gs_l=mobile-gws-hp.1.2.0l5.1625.1625.0.3705.3.2.1.0.0.0.263.263.2-1.1.0....0...1.2.64.mobile-gws-hp..1.2.312.3..35i39k1.GITtfNNTRuE#xxri=0)

Direct link to a datasheet

https://www.google.com.au/url?sa=t&source=web&rct=j&url=http://logosfoundation.org/instrum_gwr/playerpiano/Optor_VTL5C1_87223.pdf&ved=0ahUKEwj8ndmT0uDUAhXMJpQKHTQHDlsQFggkMAA&usg=AFQjCNHQWDC5cWHVx0bgbrtn-8sv4cGE-A (https://www.google.com.au/url?sa=t&source=web&rct=j&url=http://logosfoundation.org/instrum_gwr/playerpiano/Optor_VTL5C1_87223.pdf&ved=0ahUKEwj8ndmT0uDUAhXMJpQKHTQHDlsQFggkMAA&usg=AFQjCNHQWDC5cWHVx0bgbrtn-8sv4cGE-A)
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: nonsuchpro on June 28, 2017, 02:19:30 pm
There is a cross reference here

https://www.tube-town.net/ttstore/Parts-for-Amps/Optocoupler/Tesla-Optocoupler-3WK-163-40::7720.html?language=en&MODsid=7ecjqtf8cus0a47u8nc0mgu8d7 (https://www.tube-town.net/ttstore/Parts-for-Amps/Optocoupler/Tesla-Optocoupler-3WK-163-40::7720.html?language=en&MODsid=7ecjqtf8cus0a47u8nc0mgu8d7)

Google results for the cross reference

https://www.google.com.au/search?site=&source=hp&ei=jK5TWaHxJ4i30QT6h7ugAQ&q=vtl5c1+datasheet&oq=VTL5C1&gs_l=mobile-gws-hp.1.2.0l5.1625.1625.0.3705.3.2.1.0.0.0.263.263.2-1.1.0....0...1.2.64.mobile-gws-hp..1.2.312.3..35i39k1.GITtfNNTRuE#xxri=0 (https://www.google.com.au/search?site=&source=hp&ei=jK5TWaHxJ4i30QT6h7ugAQ&q=vtl5c1+datasheet&oq=VTL5C1&gs_l=mobile-gws-hp.1.2.0l5.1625.1625.0.3705.3.2.1.0.0.0.263.263.2-1.1.0....0...1.2.64.mobile-gws-hp..1.2.312.3..35i39k1.GITtfNNTRuE#xxri=0)

Direct link to a datasheet

https://www.google.com.au/url?sa=t&source=web&rct=j&url=http://logosfoundation.org/instrum_gwr/playerpiano/Optor_VTL5C1_87223.pdf&ved=0ahUKEwj8ndmT0uDUAhXMJpQKHTQHDlsQFggkMAA&usg=AFQjCNHQWDC5cWHVx0bgbrtn-8sv4cGE-A (https://www.google.com.au/url?sa=t&source=web&rct=j&url=http://logosfoundation.org/instrum_gwr/playerpiano/Optor_VTL5C1_87223.pdf&ved=0ahUKEwj8ndmT0uDUAhXMJpQKHTQHDlsQFggkMAA&usg=AFQjCNHQWDC5cWHVx0bgbrtn-8sv4cGE-A)

Wow Awesome, You da man!
I make Vactrols, Optocouplers all the the time. I have way more of my own than bought because they are so easy to make.
For those who don't know, you just point a YELLOW LED (for best results) at a LDR (CDS Photoresister) and heat shrink tube it. Or find little things you can use like pens and such. I've hollowed out capacitors, round fuse holders, even just wrapping black electrical tape works in a pinch. Anything completely lightproof will work.
Thanks a million Bendba!
Rob
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Bendba on June 28, 2017, 08:55:14 pm
No worries, glad it helped.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: stennic on June 29, 2017, 09:23:10 pm
Hi!

Found the mystery component in an intercom system, and none of us could figure out what it is. The one we can't figure out is the 4-pin, white thing next to the 8-pin smd relay between the two resistors (the board has two identical setups on either side). The silver-colored stuff in the middle reminded me of an LED, with two asymmetrical halves separated by a narrow gap, but that wouldn't make sense. The function of the board is to switch a microphone signal and ptt-button signal from one input to one of two radios depending on the position of an external switch.

Hope my explanation is not too confusing, being quite exhausted after over 20 hours of work on the intercom system...
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: bktemp on June 30, 2017, 04:52:49 am
That is clearly a LED or some other opoelectric component.
OSRAM calls this package style SIDELED:
http://www.osram-os.com/Graphics/XPic3/00090950_0.pdf (http://www.osram-os.com/Graphics/XPic3/00090950_0.pdf)
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: stennic on June 30, 2017, 06:41:49 am
It quite clearly is, despite serving no apparent reason in there... Thank you!
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: bktemp on June 30, 2017, 06:55:50 am
Sometimes LEDs are used as low voltage zener diodes (zener diodes below 4V typically have a very soft transition, LEDs have a much steeper current slope).
But in this case based on the position next to the relay I would assume they show the active relay.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: stennic on June 30, 2017, 07:03:30 am
My guess was also to show which relay is active, but being mounted under another board in an IP67 box, they can't be seen once the box is mounted (which has to be done before connecting the external wiring). But then again this whole rats nest was made by a "professional" company specialized in communications systems, so who knows what they were thinking...   :-//
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: JPortici on June 30, 2017, 11:52:38 am
Being desperate to find spares for this

(https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4051/35239895580_1631cd5037.jpg) (https://flic.kr/p/VG2Fdy)
(https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4242/35239894600_6c57118602.jpg) (https://flic.kr/p/VG2EVE)

it's a dual gang potentiometer... with endless rotation! used in lecroy test equipment
Title: Re: What's this please? (Power Cable Safety Clip?)
Post by: nonsuchpro on July 06, 2017, 05:43:09 am
Hi all,
Everyone in the world has seen these but I've been googling stuff like "Power Cable' Safety Clip, Security Clip, Cable Stop, Pull Stop, etc. and can't find what I'm looking for. I've destroyed at least 50 of these with pliers and a flat head over the years. I'm kinda embarrassed I don't know what they are. (See pic)
So I got a couple questions:

1) What are they actually called?
2) Whats the best way to open/remove them?

Thanks in advance!
Rob
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Cubdriver on July 06, 2017, 05:46:33 am
They are called strain reliefs.  There are special pliers made for installing and removing them, though being cheap I've had success using a big end nipper.

-Pat
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Cubdriver on July 06, 2017, 05:53:01 am
Amazon links to examples of strain relief pliers:

https://www.amazon.com/Heyco-STANDARD-STRAIN-RELIEF-PLIERS/dp/B001BPY6KI/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1499320042&sr=8-2&keywords=strain+relief+pliers (https://www.amazon.com/Heyco-STANDARD-STRAIN-RELIEF-PLIERS/dp/B001BPY6KI/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1499320042&sr=8-2&keywords=strain+relief+pliers)

https://www.amazon.com/Pliers-ProsKit-Bushing-Assembly-Electrical/dp/B01N68Y9T8/ref=sr_1_3?ie=UTF8&qid=1499320042&sr=8-3&keywords=strain+relief+pliers (https://www.amazon.com/Pliers-ProsKit-Bushing-Assembly-Electrical/dp/B01N68Y9T8/ref=sr_1_3?ie=UTF8&qid=1499320042&sr=8-3&keywords=strain+relief+pliers)

https://www.amazon.com/Heyco-Strain-Relief-Bushing-Pliers/dp/B00DQN6LZ6/ref=sr_1_9?ie=UTF8&qid=1499320042&sr=8-9&keywords=strain+relief+pliers (https://www.amazon.com/Heyco-Strain-Relief-Bushing-Pliers/dp/B00DQN6LZ6/ref=sr_1_9?ie=UTF8&qid=1499320042&sr=8-9&keywords=strain+relief+pliers)

And my 'ersatz' strain relief pliers:

https://www.amazon.com/Channellock-148-10-10-Inch-Cutting-Nipper/dp/B000LEBRYI/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1499320342&sr=8-1&keywords=channellock+148-10 (https://www.amazon.com/Channellock-148-10-10-Inch-Cutting-Nipper/dp/B000LEBRYI/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1499320342&sr=8-1&keywords=channellock+148-10)

-Pat
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Richard Crowley on July 06, 2017, 05:55:47 am
They are called strain-relief bushings.  The prominent vendor (an inventor?) is Heyco.  https://www.heyco.com/Strain_Relief_Bushings/ (https://www.heyco.com/Strain_Relief_Bushings/)

They make literally hundreds of different styles and sizes of these things.

They also make special tools for installing (and removing) those things.

(https://www.heyco.com/Strain_Relief_Bushings/img/4-23draw.gif)
https://www.heyco.com/Strain_Relief_Bushings/product.cfm?product=Strain-Relief-Assembly-Tools&section=Strain_Relief_Bushings (https://www.heyco.com/Strain_Relief_Bushings/product.cfm?product=Strain-Relief-Assembly-Tools&section=Strain_Relief_Bushings)

But, like @Cubdriver said, I'm too cheap to buy one of those things for the occasional use I have for them.  So I just use a large pair of pliers.  Note that you have to squeeze the cord quite tightly to get the plastic piece out of the panel.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Nusa on July 06, 2017, 06:31:07 am
I've done it with generic pliers or narrow-nose vice grips. Just pad the tips with tape so you don't chew up the plastic or scratch the metal panel.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mI2srvj0yzA (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mI2srvj0yzA)
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: salbayeng on July 15, 2017, 08:57:01 am
I bought a kit of these in a plastic box (about 20yrs ago when in the US), including the special pliers, they were pretty cheap , just pressed metal , but they worked very well.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Sceptre on July 21, 2017, 12:52:04 pm
I would like to identify an IC on a toner cartridge reset module ('chip').  It's a 24-pin QFP labeled TN501 P1052 (the latter is presumably a date code).  The attached picture of the device is from a different model toner reset chip.

There are four large pads on the secondary side of the PCB for the printer interface, and six smaller pads for the programming/reset interface.  VCC and GND are routed to both sets of pads, so it appears that the programming is/can be performed using three dedicated signals to the IC (and not the SDA/SCL pair that connects to the printer).  Also note that Pin 4 is connected to GND through a cap, though it's possible that it's an additional power pin, connected to Pin 24 under the IC.

I want to reprogram this module from an Arduino, so need to figure out voltage compatibility (quick check on the printer pins indicates that it's 3.3V) and whether the I2C interface would work, or if I need to talk to the other device pins.

Thanks!
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Default Username on July 31, 2017, 06:12:42 am
I found this component inside a DAS E-2 amplifier and this was connected to the mute pin of the amps inside. 0.5mA is needed to be drawn from that pin and it doesn't seem to be happening. I kind of need to find what exactly this thing is to find the fault in my amp. any help would be appreciated. and google doesn't seems to be helping.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Richard Crowley on July 31, 2017, 06:26:19 am
Looks like an ordinary transistor.  It was (is) common to leave off the "redundant" first character of the component identifier for parts with small bodies.  My first guess would be a 2S170 transistor.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: madires on July 31, 2017, 09:26:17 am
More likely a BS170.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: salbayeng on July 31, 2017, 10:12:23 am
I tried a few part numbers like BFS170 , MPS170, BSS170,
 the only one that scored a hit was BS170 which is Fairchild's number for a 2N7000 N Channel Mosfet (these are very common, 60v, 200mA, about 2v thresh).

Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: jitter on August 30, 2017, 08:22:09 am
(http://i.imgur.com/S0I7PHU.jpg)

Inside the base of a Honeywell Chronoterm IV... any ideas what this metal cased thing might be?
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: salbayeng on August 30, 2017, 09:24:20 am
Might be a  thermal operated overload (bimetallic strip type)?
Is that a Y capacitor next to it or a MOV ?
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Cubdriver on August 30, 2017, 03:19:23 pm
The temperature sensor, perhaps?  If the unit is operational, try looking at the ambient temp that's displayed, then pop it open and either heat or cool (with your fingertip, a hair dryer or a piece of ice wrapped in plastic) that part, then quickly put it back together and see if the reading has changed.  (Or put an ohmmeter across it and heat or cool it while watching the reading.)

-Pat
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: rsjsouza on August 30, 2017, 06:38:07 pm
I recall that, when I disassembled my Chronotherm III, I could not find anything else that resembled the room sensor and therefore by exclusion this was the one - especially because it sits close to an opening on both the PCB and the thermostat housing. It is most probably manufactured by Honeywell.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: salbayeng on August 30, 2017, 08:22:42 pm
If it's the only part in there (excluding the capacitor), then it has to be the temperature sensor.
I've not seen a packaged sensor in a rectangular housing before, they are usually cylindrical.
https://sensing.honeywell.com/honeywell-sensing-temperature-sensors-line-guide-009033-4-en.pdf

If there are 3 wires going to the box (and two are connected together) then you will have an RTD , otherwise it will be a NTC thermister. Most probably your sensor will be 2000ohms or 10000ohms at ~ 25C . If you increase the temperature by 10C and the resistance approximately doubles then it is a thermistor.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: jitter on August 31, 2017, 05:00:12 pm
I had a closer look and a little test, and I think I found out what its purpose is.

If I take the unit out of the base and insert the batteries, it still displays a temperature, so it doesn't need the base for that.
I found the temp sensor, it's a part called "RT1", is stood off the pcb and looks like a glass diode (without the cathode mark). Most likely the "135 series" discrete thermistor from the guide linked to in salbayeng's post above.

The device in my photo is in parallel with the contacts of the relay inside the Chronoterm IV, and so is the yellow part (a 7N560K, a MOV).
Half obscured is the refdes "SW1" close to the component, so that would indicate a switch.

That got me thinking that this is some last resort frost protection, if the thermostat itself has failed (or its batteries completely drained) or removed from the base, and the temperature would drop below freezing.
And sure enough, if I blast it with freeze spray, it shorts itself, making the heater go on.

So most likely a bi metallic switch.
Perhaps the "+005" means +5 °C, and that would, IMHO, be a logical value.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice) Weird thingy
Post by: davidDac on September 08, 2017, 10:47:14 pm
Hi all, I'm wondering if anyone can help me identify this mystery component?

I attached a picture of the component, sorry it's blurry but my iphone isn't being very cooperative. The dimensions measure:

9x5x3 mm, with a bevel shown by how the light reflects off of it.

The red plastic looks like a sheath on top of something, and there is what appears to be an epoxy between the legs.

Outer two legs measure .5 ohms resistance between them.

The middle leg does not measure continuity to either outer leg, but does measure capacitance of .35nF against either outer leg.

Diode measurement of the legs registers a value only between the outer legs, and it is 0.00V in either orientation/direction.

It was put in an Epson ink cartridge detection spoofing circuit by a Chinese manufacturer. The integrated components of the ink cartridge which couple to 9 contacts in the printer when installed include;
1) a little circuit with a blob of black epoxy for hiding the component and that appear to use 7 of the 9 contacts (no picture attached for this one)
2) what appears to be some sort of ink sensor (see photo), using 2 of the remaining contacts/leads, integrated physically into a little ink reservoir, about 1 inch away from the cartridge "chip" itself. The two contacts meet at what appears to be a tiny gap, held in place by a thin membrane or film no larger than .5mm.

The mystery red component is integrated again into the Chinese spoofing system, soldered in place where the 2 leads from the ink sensor mates to the printer. But, the Chinese ink sensor has 3 connections, not 2 like the actual ink sensor it is spoofing.

I'm trying to identify this because the Chinese ink spoofing system won't work on my printer at the level of this ink sensor. The only difference I can find between readings I can make from the 2 leads of the actual ink sensor and the Chinese mystery component to spoof it is one of capacitance. The actual ink sensor measures .25nF, where as the Chinese one measures .35nF.

I've found information about capacitive fluid sensors online, so I know they exist. I can't reason why the Chinese component would require 3 legs, or why if my theory was right, that it is a capacative ink sensor, why they would have put a 3 leg component in place of what could be achieved with a 2 leg capacitor.

My lack of understanding of these issues is clearly not great, so I was hoping some folks out there might have an idea, or suggestions on what else to measure to try to identify what those Chinese folks were trying to do, and then I might be able to adjust the specs possibly to make it work in my situation.

Thanks All ! David
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: NivagSwerdna on September 10, 2017, 04:26:26 pm
Can anyone tell me what these are likely to be?  (Found whilst sorting)

Thanks
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: gamalot on September 10, 2017, 08:50:30 pm
MCP1640 step down up DC-DC converter, see page 21:

http://ww1.microchip.com/downloads/en/DeviceDoc/20002234D.pdf (http://ww1.microchip.com/downloads/en/DeviceDoc/20002234D.pdf)
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: NivagSwerdna on September 10, 2017, 09:12:02 pm
MCP1640 step down DC-DC converter
Awesome!  I wondered where I had put those!!! Brilliant!
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: tautech on September 10, 2017, 09:47:59 pm
MCP1640 step down DC-DC converter, see page 21:

http://ww1.microchip.com/downloads/en/DeviceDoc/20002234D.pdf (http://ww1.microchip.com/downloads/en/DeviceDoc/20002234D.pdf)
MCP1640 step up or down DC-DC converter.  ;)
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: gamalot on September 10, 2017, 11:33:42 pm
My bad, typo.  :-[
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: daveshah on September 13, 2017, 02:38:51 pm
At work a whole load of these weird red devices turned up in a draw, it's suspected they haven't been used for more than 20 years. They measure as a standard diode (tip negative), about 0.6V on a multimeter but I can't figure out anything more about them, or why they would be useful - it looks like they would plug into something else. My best thoughts are that either they needed to be replaceable for some reason, or would be configured by the user (diode ROM perhaps?).

See the attached picture which is the best I could get on my phone, it would be really interesting to know if anyone knows any more about these things?
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: PA0PBZ on September 13, 2017, 02:54:09 pm
(http://i36.tinypic.com/29paqfb.jpg)
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: d-chord on September 13, 2017, 03:53:21 pm
You sank my battleship!

Thanks for posting that picture -- I'm not the OP, but I learned something about Diode Matrix Arrays

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Diode_matrix

-David
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Richard Crowley on September 14, 2017, 04:18:39 am
Those things were pretty slick back in the day.
The plug-boards had separate row- and column-contact paths.
So when you plug in one of those "pegs" it interconnects a row with a column.
And the diode prevented unintended "back-circuit" connections.

They did a similar thing with mixing audio, using resistors instead of diodes.
For example....

(https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/1/1d/VCS3-Matrix.jpg/400px-VCS3-Matrix.jpg)
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: BU508A on October 02, 2017, 08:04:39 pm
I have received from Pollin  (http://www.pollin.de/ (http://www.pollin.de/)) some part, including these two golden 377 TO-3 from Motorola.

I have no idea, what they are. Any suggestions? (Yes, I thought they could be a LM377 voltage regulator, but I am not sure about this)

Picture:
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Nusa on October 03, 2017, 11:36:22 pm
While LM317 and LM337 are voltage regulators, LM377 is a 2-watt dual audio amp. Unless there's at least six pins on the other side, I'd rule that idea out.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: amspire on October 04, 2017, 02:53:57 am
I have received from Pollin  (http://www.pollin.de/ (http://www.pollin.de/)) some part, including these two golden 377 TO-3 from Motorola.

I suspect that the 377 is a date code (March 1977) and the part number is not there. Probably a special run for a big customer and perhaps they didn't want part numbers in the same way that companies grind the part numbers off the tops of ICs now.

You can check if it is a transistor, thyristor, triac, etc but you can do better with modern devices if you are building something.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: BU508A on October 04, 2017, 10:17:51 pm
While LM317 and LM337 are voltage regulators, LM377 is a 2-watt dual audio amp. Unless there's at least six pins on the other side, I'd rule that idea out.

You are of course right, I've messed it up with the the LM317.
My component tester wasn't able to identify this part ("unkown or damaged part") and yes, it has only 2 pins. Ordinary TO-3 case.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: BU508A on October 04, 2017, 10:25:16 pm
You can check if it is a transistor, thyristor, triac, etc but you can do better with modern devices if you are building something.

I did, it states "unkown or damaged part". These two thingies were a part of a variety of goods from Pollin.
Example: https://www.pollin.de/p/sortiment-transistoren-100-teilig-800445 (https://www.pollin.de/p/sortiment-transistoren-100-teilig-800445)
It is a kind of a lucky bag.  :)
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Cyberdragon on October 05, 2017, 05:37:00 pm
PFFT, sometimes those so-called "component testers" are useless. Try just a standard diode tester to find the junctions, but you'd need a curve tracer to really know more about it. If you don't see any junctions, it's either dead or it might not be a normal semiconductor and it could be some sort of sensor or switch like a thermal cutout.

EDIT: might be 2N3773
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: nowlan on October 31, 2017, 10:59:15 am
Heyas,

Slightly odd question  here, but wondering if any one can tell me what this is. Found under the house.

Think it is a battery? Thought maybe a leyden jar (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leyden_jar). Doesnt look like wikipedia.
There is a broken wire and some dead spiders inside.

(https://i.imgur.com/Iw3Kw8U.jpg)
(https://i.imgur.com/KPssGRBl.jpg)

Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: frozenfrogz on October 31, 2017, 11:23:02 am
My guess is, that someone built a lead acid battery.
The grayish silver rods should be lead.
Just like in this picture.

»Lead acid batteries in lab testing. Image: US National Institute of Standards and Technology«
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Nusa on October 31, 2017, 12:20:10 pm
Nope, not lead-acid, different chemistry. That bar should be zinc, not lead.

It's the original wet version of a Leclanché cell, used to power early telegraph and telephone systems. Probably over a century old. Probably worth some cash to a collector. How old is your house?

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leclanch%C3%A9_cell (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leclanch%C3%A9_cell)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QLFs8Uf70ko (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QLFs8Uf70ko)
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: TerraHertz on November 30, 2017, 05:39:14 am
I've seen these connectors plenty of times, but don't know what they are called or who makes them.

Hoping for a cheap Aliexpress source, since I'm after about 150 of the connector shrouds and pin sets to match these connectors on some stepper motors.
The motor connector pins are standard 0.1" spacing, pins are 0.6mm square. But the pin length is about 4mm. Much shorter than the usual 0.1" pin headers.

This is because I have about 130 of these stepper motors. http://everist.org/NobLog/20171004_buying_lathe.htm#steppers (http://everist.org/NobLog/20171004_buying_lathe.htm#steppers)

Edit: Wow, finding a 100+ year old leclanche cell under your house, in Australia, is awesome.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Richard Crowley on November 30, 2017, 05:43:38 am
Seems quite possible that it is a 2.50mm pitch JST connector

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/JST_connector
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: TerraHertz on November 30, 2017, 05:53:04 am
Looks possible, thanks.
I found some ebay photos of that stepper type, with mating connector. But they don't name the connector, of course. Anyway, some pics off ebay;

Edit: Hmm, looks like the EH variety might be it.  http://www.jst.com/home8.html (http://www.jst.com/home8.html)

 ... Oh FFS. Their catalog requires Adobe Flash. Which I very much prefer to not have. Sigh. Other PC...

Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: frozenfrogz on November 30, 2017, 09:38:59 am
Check out the JST PHR-6 connector housing and SPH-002T-P0.5S pins.
Socket on the motor would be JST S6B-PH-K-S-2.2 if my guess is correct.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Urs42 on December 24, 2017, 06:32:30 pm
Do you know what type of connector this is?  I'm looking for the connector on the PCB. The device was built in the year 1991 in germany, it was developed in denmark.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Richard Crowley on December 24, 2017, 09:13:18 pm
It is typically quite useful to include the PITCH (distance between pins in mm or inches) when asking questions about connectors.
If for no other reason than to provide some sort of scale so we know what we are looking at.
Withholding the identity of the "device" is not typically in your best interest.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Urs42 on December 25, 2017, 08:21:55 am
It is typically quite useful to include the PITCH (distance between pins in mm or inches) when asking questions about connectors.

I will measure that later, the pcb is part of the battery charger in a CityEL (electric vehicle) it has two big heatsinks that are connected to the battery voltage which means that i need to disconnect the batteries, bms e.t.c. before i can remove the board.  I Couldn't open  the vehicle this morning, the lock is frozen, i will try to do some measurements later.

If for no other reason than to provide some sort of scale so we know what we are looking at.
Withholding the identity of the "device" is not typically in your best interest.

I was hoping that someone knows which type of connector this is. It is easier to find a maching connector with some keywords like for example JST (which it isn't).  I've attached a bigger picture of all PCBs under the seat.

Top left: DC-DC step down converter for all devices that require 12V
Right side: Charger PCB with the connector i'm looking for
Bottom left: Part of the BMS (Power Supply, relais for controlling the charger, current limiter for the drive motor)

The connector on the bottom is not used anymore, it was used for the old current limiter board.

Edit:
I managed to find a similar conector in the pile of spare parts i got with the vehicle, the pitch is about 7mm, and the connector is about 5.5cm wide. Still can't open the vehicle i'm not sure if the connector does fit.



Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: cdev on January 02, 2018, 02:40:01 am
It looks like a Molex connector that I am not familiar with, but I might be wrong.

If you go to Digikey that brand name might be helpful in narrowing it down.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Urs42 on January 03, 2018, 12:53:05 pm
Ok, i did find the brand name hidden on the connector, the connector was made by AMP. The only other marking is O6 or 06, that dosn't help much  :( I will search on digikey and other places.

Edit:
This connector type is called Universal MATE-N-LOK it is available at mouser:

https://www.mouser.ch/productdetail/te-connectivity/1969816-1?qs=sGAEpiMZZMuzXLcWrSfMr6X%252bw6IrKcxj5f3brCwTO8zVAAreYhg1iA%3D%3D (https://www.mouser.ch/productdetail/te-connectivity/1969816-1?qs=sGAEpiMZZMuzXLcWrSfMr6X%252bw6IrKcxj5f3brCwTO8zVAAreYhg1iA%3D%3D)
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Yansi on January 25, 2018, 10:29:04 am
Hi!
Plowing through the pile of RF junk, I have stumbled upon these. Could you please help me identify those two suckers?

The first one is the AD42866. The only mention of them is on this fake datasheet site (http://datasheet.icfull.com/AD4/), where you can only read it is (probably) a "Serial Input 16-Bit 4 mA-20 mA, 0 mA-20 mA DAC" - which mght be true. The 9752 is the date code, definitely not a part no. Looking for a datasheet seem like looking for unobtanium.

The second chip is  really I-don't-have-any-clue-what-that-is-or-does type. There is an RF output at the bottom going to the MMIC amplifier, input at the top. There are also four digital lines going to the chip. The best of my guess is a programmable gain amplifier or attenuator. Is the last part in the IF receiver chain, the IF being likely 13.0MHz (?!), as it goes through a "E13.0A" ceramic filter before this IC.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: amyk on January 25, 2018, 12:02:20 pm
I can't find any useful information on the AD42866 either.

The full part name of the W1466C is likely the ATTW1466/W1466, which according to  http://www.itfind.or.kr/Report/200301/IITA/IITA-1280/IITA-1280.pdf (http://www.itfind.or.kr/Report/200301/IITA/IITA-1280/IITA-1280.pdf) is a general-purpose IF amp for telecom applications. LUC indicates Lucent, who split off from AT&T. That document is from 1994 but I couldn't find it in https://archive.org/details/bitsavers_attdataBooectionGuide_6940311 (https://archive.org/details/bitsavers_attdataBooectionGuide_6940311) from 1995, so it might've been a really obscure/limited-production part. If you're really curious, you could try asking them...
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: Yansi on January 25, 2018, 01:35:25 pm
I have quite a lot (~10pcs) of these same RF boards, all of them contain the W1466 IC, but only some of them contain the AD42866. I was just curious if those ICs are any kind of interesting to reuse in some projects.

Anyway not that curious that I would write emails to the companies that made them. They would not tell me anything about it either. Such big corporates doesn't give rat's ass about nosy people like me.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: IanMacdonald on February 02, 2018, 05:17:56 pm
Leclanche would make a cool USB charger with a step-up converter. Just kidding. Was likely for an early phone system.
Title: Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
Post by: @rt on February 10, 2018, 06:12:40 pm
Hi Guys :)
I picked these up in an op shop of all places.
I assume they are supposed to be like pogo pins, but they aren’t spring loaded,
and I can’t find anything similar by Googling.

They are a bit wider than DIP pitch which seem