Author Topic: What's this please? (Component Advice)  (Read 384428 times)

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Offline Nusa

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Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
« Reply #1250 on: October 03, 2017, 11:36:22 pm »
While LM317 and LM337 are voltage regulators, LM377 is a 2-watt dual audio amp. Unless there's at least six pins on the other side, I'd rule that idea out.
 

Offline amspire

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Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
« Reply #1251 on: October 04, 2017, 02:53:57 am »
I have received from Pollin  (http://www.pollin.de/) some part, including these two golden 377 TO-3 from Motorola.

I suspect that the 377 is a date code (March 1977) and the part number is not there. Probably a special run for a big customer and perhaps they didn't want part numbers in the same way that companies grind the part numbers off the tops of ICs now.

You can check if it is a transistor, thyristor, triac, etc but you can do better with modern devices if you are building something.
 

Online BU508A

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Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
« Reply #1252 on: October 04, 2017, 10:17:51 pm »
While LM317 and LM337 are voltage regulators, LM377 is a 2-watt dual audio amp. Unless there's at least six pins on the other side, I'd rule that idea out.

You are of course right, I've messed it up with the the LM317.
My component tester wasn't able to identify this part ("unkown or damaged part") and yes, it has only 2 pins. Ordinary TO-3 case.
« Last Edit: October 04, 2017, 10:19:38 pm by BU508A »
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Online BU508A

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Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
« Reply #1253 on: October 04, 2017, 10:25:16 pm »
You can check if it is a transistor, thyristor, triac, etc but you can do better with modern devices if you are building something.

I did, it states "unkown or damaged part". These two thingies were a part of a variety of goods from Pollin.
Example: https://www.pollin.de/p/sortiment-transistoren-100-teilig-800445
It is a kind of a lucky bag.  :)
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Offline Cyberdragon

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Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
« Reply #1254 on: October 05, 2017, 05:37:00 pm »
PFFT, sometimes those so-called "component testers" are useless. Try just a standard diode tester to find the junctions, but you'd need a curve tracer to really know more about it. If you don't see any junctions, it's either dead or it might not be a normal semiconductor and it could be some sort of sensor or switch like a thermal cutout.

EDIT: might be 2N3773
« Last Edit: October 05, 2017, 05:50:11 pm by Cyberdragon »
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Offline nowlan

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Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
« Reply #1255 on: October 31, 2017, 10:59:15 am »
Heyas,

Slightly odd question  here, but wondering if any one can tell me what this is. Found under the house.

Think it is a battery? Thought maybe a leyden jar. Doesnt look like wikipedia.
There is a broken wire and some dead spiders inside.




 

Offline frozenfrogz

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Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
« Reply #1256 on: October 31, 2017, 11:23:02 am »
My guess is, that someone built a lead acid battery.
The grayish silver rods should be lead.
Just like in this picture.

»Lead acid batteries in lab testing. Image: US National Institute of Standards and Technology«
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Offline Nusa

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Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
« Reply #1257 on: October 31, 2017, 12:20:10 pm »
Nope, not lead-acid, different chemistry. That bar should be zinc, not lead.

It's the original wet version of a Leclanché cell, used to power early telegraph and telephone systems. Probably over a century old. Probably worth some cash to a collector. How old is your house?

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leclanch%C3%A9_cell

 
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Offline TerraHertz

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Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
« Reply #1258 on: November 30, 2017, 05:39:14 am »
I've seen these connectors plenty of times, but don't know what they are called or who makes them.

Hoping for a cheap Aliexpress source, since I'm after about 150 of the connector shrouds and pin sets to match these connectors on some stepper motors.
The motor connector pins are standard 0.1" spacing, pins are 0.6mm square. But the pin length is about 4mm. Much shorter than the usual 0.1" pin headers.

This is because I have about 130 of these stepper motors. http://everist.org/NobLog/20171004_buying_lathe.htm#steppers

Edit: Wow, finding a 100+ year old leclanche cell under your house, in Australia, is awesome.
« Last Edit: November 30, 2017, 05:46:30 am by TerraHertz »
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Offline Richard Crowley

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Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
« Reply #1259 on: November 30, 2017, 05:43:38 am »
Seems quite possible that it is a 2.50mm pitch JST connector

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/JST_connector
 

Offline TerraHertz

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Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
« Reply #1260 on: November 30, 2017, 05:53:04 am »
Looks possible, thanks.
I found some ebay photos of that stepper type, with mating connector. But they don't name the connector, of course. Anyway, some pics off ebay;

Edit: Hmm, looks like the EH variety might be it.  http://www.jst.com/home8.html

 ... Oh FFS. Their catalog requires Adobe Flash. Which I very much prefer to not have. Sigh. Other PC...

« Last Edit: November 30, 2017, 06:11:58 am by TerraHertz »
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Offline frozenfrogz

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Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
« Reply #1261 on: November 30, 2017, 09:38:59 am »
Check out the JST PHR-6 connector housing and SPH-002T-P0.5S pins.
Socket on the motor would be JST S6B-PH-K-S-2.2 if my guess is correct.
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Offline Urs42

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Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
« Reply #1262 on: December 24, 2017, 06:32:30 pm »
Do you know what type of connector this is?  I'm looking for the connector on the PCB. The device was built in the year 1991 in germany, it was developed in denmark.
 

Offline Richard Crowley

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Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
« Reply #1263 on: December 24, 2017, 09:13:18 pm »
It is typically quite useful to include the PITCH (distance between pins in mm or inches) when asking questions about connectors.
If for no other reason than to provide some sort of scale so we know what we are looking at.
Withholding the identity of the "device" is not typically in your best interest.
 
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Offline Urs42

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Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
« Reply #1264 on: December 25, 2017, 08:21:55 am »
It is typically quite useful to include the PITCH (distance between pins in mm or inches) when asking questions about connectors.

I will measure that later, the pcb is part of the battery charger in a CityEL (electric vehicle) it has two big heatsinks that are connected to the battery voltage which means that i need to disconnect the batteries, bms e.t.c. before i can remove the board.  I Couldn't open  the vehicle this morning, the lock is frozen, i will try to do some measurements later.

If for no other reason than to provide some sort of scale so we know what we are looking at.
Withholding the identity of the "device" is not typically in your best interest.

I was hoping that someone knows which type of connector this is. It is easier to find a maching connector with some keywords like for example JST (which it isn't).  I've attached a bigger picture of all PCBs under the seat.

Top left: DC-DC step down converter for all devices that require 12V
Right side: Charger PCB with the connector i'm looking for
Bottom left: Part of the BMS (Power Supply, relais for controlling the charger, current limiter for the drive motor)

The connector on the bottom is not used anymore, it was used for the old current limiter board.

Edit:
I managed to find a similar conector in the pile of spare parts i got with the vehicle, the pitch is about 7mm, and the connector is about 5.5cm wide. Still can't open the vehicle i'm not sure if the connector does fit.



« Last Edit: December 25, 2017, 09:51:01 am by Urs42 »
 

Offline cdev

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Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
« Reply #1265 on: January 02, 2018, 02:40:01 am »
It looks like a Molex connector that I am not familiar with, but I might be wrong.

If you go to Digikey that brand name might be helpful in narrowing it down.
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Offline Urs42

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Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
« Reply #1266 on: January 03, 2018, 12:53:05 pm »
Ok, i did find the brand name hidden on the connector, the connector was made by AMP. The only other marking is O6 or 06, that dosn't help much  :( I will search on digikey and other places.

Edit:
This connector type is called Universal MATE-N-LOK it is available at mouser:

https://www.mouser.ch/productdetail/te-connectivity/1969816-1?qs=sGAEpiMZZMuzXLcWrSfMr6X%252bw6IrKcxj5f3brCwTO8zVAAreYhg1iA%3D%3D
« Last Edit: January 03, 2018, 02:11:19 pm by Urs42 »
 

Offline Yansi

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Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
« Reply #1267 on: January 25, 2018, 10:29:04 am »
Hi!
Plowing through the pile of RF junk, I have stumbled upon these. Could you please help me identify those two suckers?

The first one is the AD42866. The only mention of them is on this fake datasheet site, where you can only read it is (probably) a "Serial Input 16-Bit 4 mA-20 mA, 0 mA-20 mA DAC" - which mght be true. The 9752 is the date code, definitely not a part no. Looking for a datasheet seem like looking for unobtanium.

The second chip is  really I-don't-have-any-clue-what-that-is-or-does type. There is an RF output at the bottom going to the MMIC amplifier, input at the top. There are also four digital lines going to the chip. The best of my guess is a programmable gain amplifier or attenuator. Is the last part in the IF receiver chain, the IF being likely 13.0MHz (?!), as it goes through a "E13.0A" ceramic filter before this IC.
 

Offline amyk

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Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
« Reply #1268 on: January 25, 2018, 12:02:20 pm »
I can't find any useful information on the AD42866 either.

The full part name of the W1466C is likely the ATTW1466/W1466, which according to  http://www.itfind.or.kr/Report/200301/IITA/IITA-1280/IITA-1280.pdf is a general-purpose IF amp for telecom applications. LUC indicates Lucent, who split off from AT&T. That document is from 1994 but I couldn't find it in https://archive.org/details/bitsavers_attdataBooectionGuide_6940311 from 1995, so it might've been a really obscure/limited-production part. If you're really curious, you could try asking them...
 

Offline Yansi

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Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
« Reply #1269 on: January 25, 2018, 01:35:25 pm »
I have quite a lot (~10pcs) of these same RF boards, all of them contain the W1466 IC, but only some of them contain the AD42866. I was just curious if those ICs are any kind of interesting to reuse in some projects.

Anyway not that curious that I would write emails to the companies that made them. They would not tell me anything about it either. Such big corporates doesn't give rat's ass about nosy people like me.
 

Offline IanMacdonald

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Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
« Reply #1270 on: February 02, 2018, 05:17:56 pm »
Leclanche would make a cool USB charger with a step-up converter. Just kidding. Was likely for an early phone system.
 

Offline @rt

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Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
« Reply #1271 on: February 10, 2018, 06:12:40 pm »
Hi Guys :)
I picked these up in an op shop of all places.
I assume they are supposed to be like pogo pins, but they aren’t spring loaded,
and I can’t find anything similar by Googling.

They are a bit wider than DIP pitch which seems pretty useless.

Are they definitely for the same purpose?
and has anyone seen any that aren’t spring loaded before?

Cheers :)



« Last Edit: February 11, 2018, 03:17:29 am by @rt »
 

Offline Nusa

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Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
« Reply #1272 on: February 10, 2018, 06:53:16 pm »
Had no clue what an "op shop" was, so looked it up. Around here they're called thrift stores.

So what is the measured pitch? Perhaps it's mean to plug into a connector? Or to contact some springy battery pack connectors?

It occurs to me that it may not be electrical at all. It could be someones bending jig for jewelry wire or spring making.
 

Offline Yansi

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Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
« Reply #1273 on: February 10, 2018, 09:35:20 pm »
Hi Guys :)
I picked these up in an op shop of all places.
I assume they are supposed to be like pogo pins, but they aren’t spring loaded,
and I can’t find anything similar by Googling.

They are a bit wider than DIP pitch which seems pretty useless.

Are they definitely for the same purpose?
and has anyone seen any that aren’t spring loaded before?

Cheers :)


Your image does not get displayed.
 

Offline Cyberdragon

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Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
« Reply #1274 on: February 11, 2018, 12:33:25 am »
Hi Guys :)
I picked these up in an op shop of all places.
I assume they are supposed to be like pogo pins, but they aren’t spring loaded,
and I can’t find anything similar by Googling.

They are a bit wider than DIP pitch which seems pretty useless.

Are they definitely for the same purpose?
and has anyone seen any that aren’t spring loaded before?

Cheers :)


Your image does not get displayed.

 :wtf: It was working earlier! It says edited, did the OP break it?
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