Author Topic: What's this please? (Component Advice)  (Read 556229 times)

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Offline Terabyte2007

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Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
« Reply #575 on: August 03, 2014, 11:42:04 am »
Great info! Thanks much! A little embarrassed though that I did not even think to check for a diode. Trying to cram too much into my day and not taking the time!  :palm:
Eric Haney, MCSE, EE, DMC-D
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Offline Electronics

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Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
« Reply #576 on: August 18, 2014, 07:41:10 pm »
I happened to get this board when I bought a HV powersupply for radar. I can identify all the pieces other than these black components. They're all mounted on a central metal bar which has connections at either end. The resistance between the two connections on the side is almost nothing (<0.5 Ohms). Anyone got any ideas?
 

Offline Richard Crowley

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Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
« Reply #577 on: August 18, 2014, 07:53:42 pm »
I strongly suspect those are mechanical (magnetostrictive) delay lines.  Was this by any chance a phased-array radar?

EDIT: On second thought, with only two terminals, it seems more likely they are inductors.  Although I wonder about the use of that common bolt through the center of all the devices. It seems like that would constitute a "secondary turn" that couples them all together. Or maybe not, if it is not a complete turn/loop.

You see warnings with modern torrodial power transformers to NOT create an unintentional "shorted turn" by using a metallic bolt with both ends in contact with the  chassis, etc.

« Last Edit: August 19, 2014, 06:31:31 am by Richard Crowley »
 

Offline sunnyhighway

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Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
« Reply #578 on: August 18, 2014, 08:42:11 pm »
The number on top looks like a NATO stock number, which can be broken down.

5950-99-523-4132

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_NATO_Supply_Classification_Groups
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/NATO_Stock_Number

59xx: Electrical and Electronic Equipment Components
99: United Kingdom

The first three segments can be found here:
http://www.abtus.com/assets/downloads/2008/12/Abtus_Nato_List.pdf

523: Some sort of transformer?
 

Offline Alexei.Polkhanov

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Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
« Reply #579 on: August 19, 2014, 03:34:25 am »
Wow that looks like some old equipment! What year is that radar from?
 

Offline Alexei.Polkhanov

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Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
« Reply #580 on: August 19, 2014, 03:36:50 am »
I would be curious to know what material those spacers (disks) made from?
 

Offline IO390

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Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
« Reply #581 on: August 19, 2014, 05:56:19 pm »
Image credit goes to Robrenz. It's from the PSU thread but I can't find many pictures of these things...

Those number selector things, where do you get them and what is the proper name? I've also seen one where it has a sort of notched wheel sticking out and you can turn that, as opposed to buttons.

 

Online PA0PBZ

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Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
« Reply #582 on: August 19, 2014, 06:10:02 pm »
Keyboard error: Press F1 to continue.
 

Offline Richard Crowley

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Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
« Reply #583 on: August 19, 2014, 06:12:05 pm »
Those are pushbutton-actuated "thumbwheel switches".
In the example above, it is quite probable the switches and the "fine control" pot at the right are logically connected together as a simple potentiometer in an analog circuit.
They commonly used 1-2-4-8 stepped resistors wired to the BCD-encoded switch segments.
 

Offline Alexei.Polkhanov

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Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
« Reply #584 on: August 22, 2014, 01:52:34 am »
I am still puzzled by those black components from radar's power supply. Hate mysteries :-) If Richard's theory that these are inductors is right then I wonder why they market pins as "S" and "F"? For inductor it should not matter right? Also I don't understand how exactly such delay line would work? Metal bar in the center is connected which means it is not just for mounting.

 

Offline Rufus

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Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
« Reply #585 on: August 22, 2014, 02:50:02 am »
I am still puzzled by those black components from radar's power supply. Hate mysteries :-) If Richard's theory that these are inductors is right then I wonder why they market pins as "S" and "F"?

The electrical connections to the rod going through the middle suggests the rod is a single turn primary of a toroidal transformer with the blocks being multiple secondary windings. S and F is likely Start and Finish of the winding, the phase being important.

The devices on the aluminum brackets look like they could be dual diodes in TO220 packages. It could be 6 separate supplies but it looks more like some kind of multiplier stack producing a single high voltage output. I would not be surprised if it is a pulse supply with a capacitor being discharged into the primary periodically.

Having searched the web a bit dumping a capacitor into the primary of a pulse transformer the secondary of which powers a magnetron seems to be a common way of generating short radar pulses.
 

Offline Richard Crowley

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Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
« Reply #586 on: August 22, 2014, 04:13:39 am »
I am still puzzled by those black components from radar's power supply. Hate mysteries :-) If Richard's theory that these are inductors is right then I wonder why they market pins as "S" and "F"?
Start and Finish (the two ends of the winding).
Quote
For inductor it should not matter right?
Theoretically. But if there were some intended interaction along that magnetic shish-kabob, then they would probably want the physical windings "in-phase".
Quote
Also I don't understand how exactly such delay line would work? Metal bar in the center is connected which means it is not just for mounting.
Maybe it is just grounded. Especially if it is subject to some high-level RF fields, etc.  Hard to believe it is intended to be a "winding" of the composite inductor. It would be extraordinarily low impedance. Unless they were running some high-current signal through it, but I would expect heavier wiring.   :-//
 

Offline Alexei.Polkhanov

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Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
« Reply #587 on: August 22, 2014, 05:06:45 am »
Then pulse will be for a pulse TWT tube or Klystron like on photo but smaller. I am not sure if those things can be called "magnetron". It must have been pretty small radar then. :-\ Sources I found on internet like this http://www.aps.anl.gov/Accelerator_Systems_Division/Radio_Frequency/Presentations_and_Lectures/Cross_Training/Documents/Cours_Presentation%203-7-08.pdf show that inductors used to make the pulse shaped more uniformly square, not to generate delay.
« Last Edit: August 22, 2014, 05:09:40 am by Alexei.Polkhanov »
 

Offline Alexei.Polkhanov

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Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
« Reply #588 on: August 22, 2014, 07:07:10 am »
I think I found complete description of that entire assembly!

Look at this document on page 70 where they talk about "output stalk": http://www.lle.rochester.edu/media/publications/lle_review/documents/v133/133_07_Solid.pdf. Center rod is output. So it is a HV pulse transformer and that thing is called "pulser stack". Design described in the paper is pretty cool - they used METGLAS cores and 90 $80 RF  MOSFETs.  :D
(http://canada.newark.com/ixys-rf/ixzr08n120a/mosfet-n-rf-isoplus247/dp/42M1935?ost=IXZR08)

So those black components are definitely inductors and they most likely have high-permeability core inside.

Edit: I think it is essentially non-destructive version of flux compression generator (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Explosively_pumped_flux_compression_generator). I sooo want to build one now >:D.
« Last Edit: August 22, 2014, 07:14:12 am by Alexei.Polkhanov »
 

Offline Electronics

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Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
« Reply #589 on: August 22, 2014, 01:14:06 pm »
The devices on the aluminum brackets look like they could be dual diodes in TO220 packages. It could be 6 separate supplies but it looks more like some kind of multiplier stack producing a single high voltage output.
The TO220 packages are BT151's - SCRs
 

Offline Alexei.Polkhanov

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Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
« Reply #590 on: August 22, 2014, 05:31:53 pm »
The devices on the aluminum brackets look like they could be dual diodes in TO220 packages. It could be 6 separate supplies but it looks more like some kind of multiplier stack producing a single high voltage output.
The TO220 packages are BT151's - SCRs
Looking at the schematics from the document I linked see it is almost exactly same except SCRs are used instead of MOSFET and also I don't see any charge storage capacitors and clamping diodes. Those big blue components on the left look like HV capacitors but they are not connected to inductors directly?
 

Offline TheBorg

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Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
« Reply #591 on: August 23, 2014, 03:33:56 am »
Any idea what these connectors are? I commonly see them on laptops (mostly Apple devices). Looks like I need to repair a few and can't seem to find anywhere to buy them...


Edit: been searching some more and it might be the Pico-EZ mate connector series. Though if anyone thinks otherwise, please feel free to tell me!
http://www.digikey.com/product-detail/en/0781710002/WM4459CT-ND/2424928
« Last Edit: August 23, 2014, 04:30:11 am by TheBorg »
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Offline ablacon64

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Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
« Reply #592 on: August 24, 2014, 01:44:25 am »
Any idea what these connectors are? I commonly see them on laptops (mostly Apple devices). Looks like I need to repair a few and can't seem to find anywhere to buy them...

I believe those are Apple proprietary connectors since I only see them on Apple's laptops. Once I had one like those broken, it was for the cooler fan, since I couldn't find a replacement just desoldered it and soldered the cooler fan wires directly to the motherboard pads.

Edit: See this: http://www.digikey.com/product-detail/en/0781710004/WM4460CT-ND/2424929
« Last Edit: August 24, 2014, 02:51:30 am by ablacon64 »
 

Offline d-chord

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Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
« Reply #593 on: August 24, 2014, 05:06:28 am »
Hi,

I'm not sure that this is the appropriate thread for this, but here goes.

I've got an LG OS-5020 oscilloscope that I recently purchased (my first scope).  It apparently had a blown channel 2.  I did a little poking around and decided to swap what I'm pretty sure is a JFET between channels 1 and 2.  After swapping this component (labeled "304 E7G" - photo attached), channel 1 worked and channel 2 didn't.  The channel that doesn't work doesn't have a trace at all.  I don't have a schematic, but there is one available for a similar scope, the OS-9020G.  This schematic lists a part "2SK304E" and is the only FET in the parts list.

It doesn't seem like this part is available anymore, so I bought an ON Semi "MFP4393" which seemed to be fairly similar.  The pinouts are different, so I had to do some creative bending of the legs to make sure the S/G/D pins are in the right holes (marked on the circuit board even, which is nice).  There's no change with this part in place; the failed channel still doesn't display.  And yes, I checked and the legs weren't shorted against each other.  I even tried a MOSFET (Fairchild BS170) to no avail.  I guess there's no standard pinout for FETs because the BS170 actually does have the same pinout as the supposed original.

One other piece of information is that I measured the resistance between legs of each of the two components.  Assuming I have the pinouts correct, the bad one measures:  S-D: 204 Ohms, S-G and D-G are both about 10K.   The good one measures: S-D: about 60K and S-G and D-G are open.

I was hoping that someone might be able to confirm that this part is in fact a JFET.

If anyone has any other advice on what might be a good replacement, it would be appreciated.

-David
 

Offline Richard Crowley

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Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
« Reply #594 on: August 24, 2014, 05:48:04 am »
Google says that "Buy-Transistors" has 7 of them for sale at £1.44 each.
http://www.buy-transistors.com/transistors/2sk304e.html
 

Offline amyk

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Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
« Reply #595 on: August 24, 2014, 11:53:25 am »
Any idea what these connectors are? I commonly see them on laptops (mostly Apple devices). Looks like I need to repair a few and can't seem to find anywhere to buy them...


Edit: been searching some more and it might be the Pico-EZ mate connector series. Though if anyone thinks otherwise, please feel free to tell me!
http://www.digikey.com/product-detail/en/0781710002/WM4459CT-ND/2424928
You might want to check the schematic... at least I know that J6500 on an M51 board is a Foxconn HS8804F-B. Not surprising as Foxconn make much of Apple's boards.
 

Offline d-chord

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Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
« Reply #596 on: August 24, 2014, 12:58:46 pm »
Thanks Richard!  I've got two of those JFETs on the way (one spare just in case).

-David
 

Offline TheBorg

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Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
« Reply #597 on: August 26, 2014, 02:24:29 am »
Any idea what these connectors are? I commonly see them on laptops (mostly Apple devices). Looks like I need to repair a few and can't seem to find anywhere to buy them...


Edit: been searching some more and it might be the Pico-EZ mate connector series. Though if anyone thinks otherwise, please feel free to tell me!
http://www.digikey.com/product-detail/en/0781710002/WM4459CT-ND/2424928
You might want to check the schematic... at least I know that J6500 on an M51 board is a Foxconn HS8804F-B. Not surprising as Foxconn make much of Apple's boards.

Yikes, thats a very close part! I can't find a schematic for it dang it. However I think it is the EZ mate, the text in the corner as well as height matches on a similar board. I would check the pin to pin distance but I don't trust my calipers down at 0.05mm difference.
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Offline IO390

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Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
« Reply #598 on: September 03, 2014, 01:36:03 pm »
I've found some old panel meters and the manufacturer's name is in some sort of italics so I can't read it. Does anyone recognise it?
Cheers
 

Offline ElektroQuark

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Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
« Reply #599 on: September 03, 2014, 01:40:53 pm »
Ernest Turner instruments


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