Author Topic: What's this please? (Component Advice)  (Read 536975 times)

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Offline Majorstrain

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Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
« Reply #675 on: December 10, 2014, 01:57:13 pm »
Is that really a 1960 date code on the LM316D?
 

Offline amyk

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Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
« Reply #676 on: December 10, 2014, 04:17:49 pm »
Does anyone recognize the logo on these OPTO chips?
It's inside the pin one designation and looks like a laid back 4.

New old stoke that I procured and I haven't seen that logo before.

Cheers,
Phil
Fairchild FCD820/FCD820C.

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Is that really a 1960 date code on the LM316D?
No, more likely 1976/1977. National wasn't even making opamps in 1960.
 

Online PA0PBZ

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Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
« Reply #677 on: December 10, 2014, 08:53:17 pm »
Does anyone recognize the logo on these OPTO chips?
It's inside the pin one designation and looks like a laid back 4.

New old stoke that I procured and I haven't seen that logo before.

Cheers,
Phil
Fairchild FCD820/FCD820C.

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Offline Majorstrain

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Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
« Reply #678 on: December 11, 2014, 01:51:35 am »
Thanks guys,

The logo makes a lot more sense when you look at it the right way up. :palm:
Cheers for the date codes as well.

Phil
 


Offline Fig8man

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Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
« Reply #680 on: December 25, 2014, 10:12:20 pm »
Anyone know what this chip is? I've searched both lines separately and together but can't find any info on it.


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Online tautech

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Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
« Reply #681 on: December 25, 2014, 10:38:31 pm »
SOIC 14 Package?
Photo not quite shows the whole package.
Add the package description to your search.

There is an F183 PIC in 14 pin SOIC that my search revealed but dont't take it as the answer yet.
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Offline Fig8man

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Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
« Reply #682 on: December 26, 2014, 12:02:09 am »

SOIC 14 Package?
Photo not quite shows the whole package.
Add the package description to your search.

There is an F183 PIC in 14 pin SOIC that my search revealed but dont't take it as the answer yet.


The chip has 16 pins, trying to take a picture through a magnifying glass with an iphone is surprisingly hard.


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Offline Richard Crowley

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Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
« Reply #683 on: December 26, 2014, 06:42:18 am »
It is frequently helpful to know the CONTEXT here!  What kind of gadget is this?  What does the rest of the board look like?
From the partial photo, it looks like a really low-end, mass-produced consumer board, which makes it quite possible those are indecipherable house-numbers.
 

Offline firewalker

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Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
« Reply #684 on: January 03, 2015, 01:05:37 pm »
Does anyone recognize the type and the maker of the following pot? It is the focus control of a Hameg HM605 oscilloscope. The two pin are just for mounting purposes.

       

Alexander.
Become a realist, stay a dreamer.

 

Offline AndersAnd

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Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
« Reply #685 on: January 04, 2015, 01:54:21 pm »
Does anyone recognize the type and the maker of the following pot? It is the focus control of a Hameg HM605 oscilloscope. The two pin are just for mounting purposes.

       

Alexander.
Looks similar to the bushless version of Piher PC-16: http://www.piher.net/sensors/index.php?page=shop.product_details&flypage=flypage.tpl&product_id=26&category_id=1&option=com_virtuemart&Itemid=31
With the exception that the 2 mounting pins at the top are wider spaced than the outer 2 pins at the bottom.



You can download the manuals including schematics and PCB-layouts for all Hameg scopes here http://www.hameg.com/manuals.0.html?&no_cache=1
But please note, they do not include schematics in any non-German manuals. So you need to also download the German HM605 manual to get the schematics and PCB-layouts at the end of the manual.
The focus potentiometer in HM605 is part number VR601 and it's placed on the Z-board. It looks like it is connected to -1250V at through a 392k resistor at one side, so you might need a high voltage approved potentiometer to be safe.

But is the potentiometer broken? Usually it's one of the high value resistors in series with the focus potentiometer going open circuit that causes focus problems. That's a common problem with high value resistors. I've worked at a audio and television manufacturer that had a design rule to never use resistors above 1 Mohm (IIRC) for the same reason, because they often break by going open circuit. Something you usually don't learn while studying, but learn the hard way. At some point someone forgot this design rule in a product and it was overlook in design reviews. So this design made it all the way to production. And as a result a lot of products soon came if for repair with an open circuit high value resistor as a result. Actually I don't know if this is only a problem with high value carbon resistors, or if it's also a problem with metal film resistors. Anybody know or has any experience with this?
At least I do know from experience that regular 1/4W 5% carbon film resistors above 1 Mohm often break with a open circuit after only a short while for no apparent reason, so these high value resistors are very unreliable. So if someone needed >1 Mohm in a design, instead two or more <= 1 Mohm resistors in parallel or series should always be used for reliability reasons.
« Last Edit: January 04, 2015, 03:29:40 pm by AndersAnd »
 

Offline firewalker

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Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
« Reply #686 on: January 05, 2015, 08:23:30 am »
Looks similar to the bushless version of Piher PC-16: http://www.piher.net/sensors/index.php?page=shop.product_details&flypage=flypage.tpl&product_id=26&category_id=1&option=com_virtuemart&Itemid=31
With the exception that the 2 mounting pins at the top are wider spaced than the outer 2 pins at the bottom.



You can download the manuals including schematics and PCB-layouts for all Hameg scopes here http://www.hameg.com/manuals.0.html?&no_cache=1
But please note, they do not include schematics in any non-German manuals. So you need to also download the German HM605 manual to get the schematics and PCB-layouts at the end of the manual.
The focus potentiometer in HM605 is part number VR601 and it's placed on the Z-board. It looks like it is connected to -1250V at through a 392k resistor at one side, so you might need a high voltage approved potentiometer to be safe.

But is the potentiometer broken? Usually it's one of the high value resistors in series with the focus potentiometer going open circuit that causes focus problems. That's a common problem with high value resistors. I've worked at a audio and television manufacturer that had a design rule to never use resistors above 1 Mohm (IIRC) for the same reason, because they often break by going open circuit. Something you usually don't learn while studying, but learn the hard way. At some point someone forgot this design rule in a product and it was overlook in design reviews. So this design made it all the way to production. And as a result a lot of products soon came if for repair with an open circuit high value resistor as a result. Actually I don't know if this is only a problem with high value carbon resistors, or if it's also a problem with metal film resistors. Anybody know or has any experience with this?
At least I do know from experience that regular 1/4W 5% carbon film resistors above 1 Mohm often break with a open circuit after only a short while for no apparent reason, so these high value resistors are very unreliable. So if someone needed >1 Mohm in a design, instead two or more <= 1 Mohm resistors in parallel or series should always be used for reliability reasons.

Thanks you for you answer and you effort to help me! I already own the service manuals (German) for this oscilloscope. When the focus problem occurred I was sure that it was one of the resistors that went wrong (R609 to R613 or R615). Gut no. It was VR601. One of the pins wasn't making contact with the graphite inside. I replaced the pot with a 470k one (high voltage from an old CRT tv) and it works fine now. The problem is that the shaft for controlling the focus doesn't much. 

I want to buy a "non working" HM605 for spare parts, but usually the sellers don;t ship outside Germany.

Alexander.
Become a realist, stay a dreamer.

 

Offline AndersAnd

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Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
« Reply #687 on: January 09, 2015, 08:42:56 am »
I want to buy a "non working" HM605 for spare parts, but usually the sellers don;t ship outside Germany.
A lot of German eBay sellers will ship outside Germany if you ask them about the shipping costs to your country, even though the auction often states they don't ship outside Germany. But that's just because many won't go through the trouble of filling in shipping costs to several countries, unless someone is interested or because they don't think anyone is willing to pay for international shipping of the item they sell.
I've often experienced this myself when asking eBay sellers who doesn't list international shipping.

As an alternative you can use a German mail forwarder like, so you can send it to their German adress and they will forward it to your address abroad: http://mailboxde.com
« Last Edit: January 09, 2015, 08:45:49 am by AndersAnd »
 

Offline wiss

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Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
« Reply #688 on: January 09, 2015, 09:38:36 am »
I have noticed that you will not be able to bid on an item with "Germany Only"-shipping unless you set your country to Germany.
And it seems to be a total bitch to fill out the "More than one country"-shipping in the a no-initial-cost auction, and many sellers do not particularity enjoy reading/writing English...
 

Offline tsmith35

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Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
« Reply #689 on: January 09, 2015, 11:42:18 am »
It's not always because of any laziness on the seller's part... international shipping (at least here in the US) is a pain in the rear. The customs forms, invoices and all that combine to make international shipping a somewhat time-consuming activity. On top of that, the delays due to customs may be significant, leading to negative feedback while the item is in transit.
 

Offline wiss

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Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
« Reply #690 on: January 09, 2015, 01:29:07 pm »
It's not always because of any laziness on the seller's part...

Well, when you see an hour or two of work ahead of you to find and enter that information and give up, I would not call that lazy...

Quote
international shipping (at least here in the US) is a pain in the rear. The customs forms, invoices and all that combine to make international shipping a somewhat time-consuming activity. On top of that, the delays due to customs may be significant, leading to negative feedback while the item is in transit.

Compare:
Solartron 7075 within Germany: 6:99 EUR (DHL)
To normal EU: 21:99 EUR (DHL)
Sweden, domestic: 235 SEK (~24 EUR) (Posten)
Sweden to Germany: 685 SEK WTF!!

Within EU no customs or VAT.

 

Online Vgkid

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Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
« Reply #691 on: January 10, 2015, 06:28:14 pm »
Those shipping cost are atrocious, that is over 3x the amount to ship my 7065 across the country. Heck i could ship it to Canada cheaper.
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Offline AndersAnd

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Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
« Reply #692 on: January 11, 2015, 08:20:15 am »
It's not always because of any laziness on the seller's part... international shipping (at least here in the US) is a pain in the rear. The customs forms, invoices and all that combine to make international shipping a somewhat time-consuming activity.
As a private seller you don't have to fill out any custom forms or VAT forms when shipping abroad, at least here in Europe. You only have to attach a invoice, so customs in the receiving country can figure out the value and import duty and VAT if any. And auto creating a complete invoice from an eBay auction is very easy, you just have to hit a button once the auction has ended and print it. So this really isn't an issue at all.

And if you as a private person sell to another EU country there's no import duties or VAT involved at all. However if you are a business and sell over a certain amount annually to another EU country you have to charge the VAT rate of the receiving EU country. But this is not an issue as a private seller.
« Last Edit: January 11, 2015, 08:24:27 am by AndersAnd »
 

Offline janoc

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Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
« Reply #693 on: January 11, 2015, 09:10:59 pm »
As a private seller you don't have to fill out any custom forms or VAT forms when shipping abroad, at least here in Europe. You only have to attach a invoice, so customs in the receiving country can figure out the value and import duty and VAT if any. And auto creating a complete invoice from an eBay auction is very easy, you just have to hit a button once the auction has ended and print it. So this really isn't an issue at all.

This isn't completely true. It may depend on country, but when I was sending a small package to US from France, the post was demanding me to fill an entire customs declaration for it because it was going outside of the EU customs union. The paperwork can be pretty significant if sending anything worth more than about 100 euro outside of EU.

There is pretty much the same procedure if you are sending something by DHL or UPS. You must fill a ton of paperwork related to customs. The transporter will handle the actual customs for you (and the recipient pays for it!), but still. Oh and God protect you if the customs don't like something on the declaration, then the true nightmare starts.



 

Offline tsmith35

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Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
« Reply #694 on: January 12, 2015, 12:56:32 am »
As a private seller you don't have to fill out any custom forms or VAT forms when shipping abroad, at least here in Europe. You only have to attach a invoice, so customs in the receiving country can figure out the value and import duty and VAT if any. And auto creating a complete invoice from an eBay auction is very easy, you just have to hit a button once the auction has ended and print it. So this really isn't an issue at all.
This isn't completely true. It may depend on country, but when I was sending a small package to US from France, the post was demanding me to fill an entire customs declaration for it because it was going outside of the EU customs union. The paperwork can be pretty significant if sending anything worth more than about 100 euro outside of EU.
Yeah, same deal for me... full customs form filled out with copies, with signature and invoice. USPS doesn't provide tracking except for the higher-$ shipping tiers, and with eBay & PayPal rules, the purchaser can simply claim they didn't receive it and get a full refund.

I guess eBay may have improved the process, and shipping within the EU may be easier than shipping to the EU from outside, but time and risk typically increase with shipping distance. I'm a long way from Europe.
 

Offline IO390

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Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
« Reply #695 on: January 20, 2015, 12:05:08 pm »
I'm wondering what this part is. I've googled the part number but I've found nothing, which is odd as it is a TI part. It seems to be connected to the output of the fpga in a Siglent function generator. Here's a picture (not mine): http://sigrok.org/wimg/a/a6/Siglent_sdg1010_analog_ti_d85801.jpg
 

Online PA0PBZ

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Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
« Reply #696 on: January 20, 2015, 12:15:58 pm »
I'm wondering what this part is. I've googled the part number but I've found nothing, which is odd as it is a TI part. It seems to be connected to the output of the fpga in a Siglent function generator. Here's a picture (not mine): http://sigrok.org/wimg/a/a6/Siglent_sdg1010_analog_ti_d85801.jpg

DAC8580? http://www.ti.com/lit/ds/symlink/dac8580.pdf
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Offline IO390

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Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
« Reply #697 on: January 20, 2015, 12:22:27 pm »
I'm wondering what this part is. I've googled the part number but I've found nothing, which is odd as it is a TI part. It seems to be connected to the output of the fpga in a Siglent function generator. Here's a picture (not mine): http://sigrok.org/wimg/a/a6/Siglent_sdg1010_analog_ti_d85801.jpg

DAC8580? http://www.ti.com/lit/ds/symlink/dac8580.pdf

Yep, that's it. Thanks  :-+
 

Offline wiss

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Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
« Reply #698 on: January 23, 2015, 05:58:33 pm »
It's a crystal, but why 4 pins? Is it smart in any way? Does anyone know of a datasheet?
 

Offline elgonzo

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Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
« Reply #699 on: January 23, 2015, 06:17:59 pm »
It's a crystal, but why 4 pins? Is it smart in any way? Does anyone know of a datasheet?

It is an oscillator. Not sure whether it operates at 3.3V or 5V and what kind of output it has (TTL/CMOS/...).

Unless someone can find the datasheet for that specific SE-TIME oscillator, i would suggest to find out by experimentation (start with 3.3V to avoid magic smoke). Use datasheets from other oscillators as reference for the pinout and operational characteristics. I expect this oscillator to be compatible both in pins and operations with oscillators of the same type from other manufacturers.
 


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