Author Topic: What's this please? (Component Advice)  (Read 537559 times)

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Offline wiss

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Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
« Reply #700 on: January 23, 2015, 06:45:03 pm »
Thanks!
Using the pinout of this: http://www.digikey.com/product-detail/en/ECS-100AX-500/X951-ND/827244
I made it work from about 3 V. Are they any good? Or just very convenient?

 

Offline elgonzo

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Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
« Reply #701 on: January 23, 2015, 07:20:47 pm »
Thanks!
Using the pinout of this: http://www.digikey.com/product-detail/en/ECS-100AX-500/X951-ND/827244
I made it work from about 3 V. Are they any good? Or just very convenient?

Mostly convenience. A crystal would need some circuity to turn the oscillating voltage from the crystal into a clock signal. Usually MCUs and such have such circuity integrated. An oscillator already provides a clock signal (TTL/CMOS/whatever) without requiring additional circuity somewhere else.

However, nowadays, crystals are preferred. Not only because the BOM will likely be cheaper, but also it is easier to realize low power applications (a MCU can easily shutdown its clock generator if it goes to sleep -- try to do this with an external oscillator...)
« Last Edit: January 23, 2015, 07:23:01 pm by elgonzo »
 

Offline Howardlong

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Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
« Reply #702 on: January 23, 2015, 07:29:38 pm »
Thanks!
Using the pinout of this: http://www.digikey.com/product-detail/en/ECS-100AX-500/X951-ND/827244
I made it work from about 3 V. Are they any good? Or just very convenient?

Mostly convenience. A crystal would need some circuity to turn the oscillating voltage from the crystal into a clock signal. Usually MCUs and such have such circuity integrated. An oscillator already provides a clock signal (TTL/CMOS/whatever) without requiring additional circuity somewhere else.

However, nowadays, crystals are preferred. Not only because the BOM will likely be cheaper, but also it is easier to realize low power applications (a MCU can easily shutdown its clock generator if it goes to sleep -- try to do this with an external oscillator...)

It depends on the requirements. For example, if you need an accurate oscillator, say 2ppm or better, you're going to need an external canned oscillator such as a TCXO.
 

Offline elgonzo

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Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
« Reply #703 on: January 23, 2015, 07:46:32 pm »
It depends on the requirements. For example, if you need an accurate oscillator, say 2ppm or better, you're going to need an external canned oscillator such as a TCXO.

You are right. TXCOs are also available in these 4-pin TH packages. But i guess they would be designated specifically on the package, hence my assumption that the SE-TIME osc. in the picture would not be a TXCO. Or are there TXCOs that are not marked as such?
« Last Edit: January 23, 2015, 08:15:57 pm by elgonzo »
 

Offline synapsis

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Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
« Reply #704 on: January 28, 2015, 01:42:11 am »
I figure this is the closest thread for this question, since I already know what it is. I just need to know where to get it. About 4 years ago, our EE sourced this pogo pin, and he's no longer with the company.

Thanks in advance!
 

Offline miguelvp

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Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
« Reply #705 on: January 29, 2015, 03:56:58 am »
... since I already know what it is. I just need to know where to get it....

If you already know what is it, why don't you share so others can help you find it instead of they having to figure that out first?
 

Offline Richard Crowley

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Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
« Reply #706 on: January 29, 2015, 04:04:49 am »
If you already know what is it, why don't you share so others can help you find it instead of they having to figure that out first?
He said what it is:  It is a pogo-pin.  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pogo_pin
He is asking about sourcing it.
Although one would need some Real World dimensions to do an accurate search.
 

Offline tsmith35

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Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
« Reply #707 on: January 29, 2015, 11:32:37 am »
Not exactly identical, but look up pogo pin masher. Round tip, but with knurling.
 

Offline mswhin63

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Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
« Reply #708 on: February 03, 2015, 01:34:06 pm »
I have a 6 Pin IC came from a Charger circuit Sennheiser but would like to get the datasheet. Anyone recognise the number on the components plus the other marking. I believe it belongs to a particular manufacturer but never seen this type before.

Sorry about the quality of the image, but it it was difficult to get the number and so I had to enhance it to see more clearly.

Cheers
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Online tautech

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Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
« Reply #709 on: February 03, 2015, 06:36:23 pm »
There are many hits for T1, can you identify the package?
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Offline Richard Crowley

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Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
« Reply #710 on: February 03, 2015, 10:45:48 pm »
Identifying the markings on tiny SMD packages requires more than just the mark and even the package.
It also requires the "context" of what is around it, the general historic era, what kind of circuit, etc. etc.
As tautech said, there are many different SMD parts, even in that package, marked "T1"
 

Offline maxinecoless

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Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
« Reply #711 on: February 10, 2015, 03:54:46 am »
I think ..it is a kind of IC( Integrated Circuits)
 

Offline mswhin63

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Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
« Reply #712 on: February 10, 2015, 04:28:36 am »
Identifying the markings on tiny SMD packages requires more than just the mark and even the package.
It also requires the "context" of what is around it, the general historic era, what kind of circuit, etc. etc.
As tautech said, there are many different SMD parts, even in that package, marked "T1"

As mentioned in the post it is from a Sennheiser charging cct. I cant elaborate further. I am not very experienced at identifying non common packages but to say it is extremely small. about 3mm x 1.5mm roughly.

I cant get a hold of the circuit, but I still have another board, I may consider reverse engineer it, just do have a lot of time at this stage. I will add to the forum later when I have the time.

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Online tautech

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Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
« Reply #713 on: February 10, 2015, 08:44:17 am »
Identifying the markings on tiny SMD packages requires more than just the mark and even the package.
It also requires the "context" of what is around it, the general historic era, what kind of circuit, etc. etc.
As tautech said, there are many different SMD parts, even in that package, marked "T1"

As mentioned in the post it is from a Sennheiser charging cct. I cant elaborate further. I am not very experienced at identifying non common packages but to say it is extremely small. about 3mm x 1.5mm roughly.

I cant get a hold of the circuit, but I still have another board, I may consider reverse engineer it, just do have a lot of time at this stage. I will add to the forum later when I have the time.
If you Google "smd package identification" and use Vernier calipers you'll have the answer.
Calipers are now "a must" for electronic work.
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Offline Terabyte2007

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Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
« Reply #714 on: February 17, 2015, 12:23:28 pm »
Sorting through a box of NOS parts I came across this. As far as I can tell it appears to be some sort of heating element or spark element possibly. Any help in correctly identifying this item would be greatly appreciated. It has about 95 Ohms across the two input terminals, no PN junctions detected so it's purely resistive. It also has on each end inside a pointed rather thick electrode of some sort.

Eric Haney, MCSE, EE, DMC-D
Electronics Designer, Prototype Builder
 

Offline mswhin63

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Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
« Reply #715 on: February 17, 2015, 01:32:13 pm »
Sorting through a box of NOS parts I came across this. As far as I can tell it appears to be some sort of heating element or spark element possibly. Any help in correctly identifying this item would be greatly appreciated. It has about 95 Ohms across the two input terminals, no PN junctions detected so it's purely resistive. It also has on each end inside a pointed rather thick electrode of some sort.

Could be a heating element to heat the fuel before arriving at the injection system, also has an inlet and outlet so it could also be a switch to disconnect the flow.
Can't imagine sparking the fuel before the cylinder.

Have you tried to connect the coil to 12V or lower to see what it does.
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Offline elgonzo

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Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
« Reply #716 on: February 17, 2015, 01:56:18 pm »
It looks like something related to low/high-pressure applications. Note on one end the large number of mounting holes and an indentation for what looks like an o-ring. The other end is just a flat surface with only four mounting holes. Could it be perhaps a part of something like a valve/emitter or fixture for some kind of measurement apparatus for a high/low-pressure chamber? (Not sure how the 95 Ohm would fit into that speculation, though...)
« Last Edit: February 17, 2015, 01:59:21 pm by elgonzo »
 

Offline SeanB

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Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
« Reply #717 on: February 17, 2015, 07:40:58 pm »
Magnetic polariser, it would be attached between a scalar ring set and the LNB of an older C band ( or other band of interest) dish, to enable you to select the polarisation, selecting the polarisation by passing a constant current ( 35mA IIRC or in that ballpark) through it. Was used in the old days before they could make low loss RF switches in a LNB, but a low loss ferrite that would skew polarisation depending on the magnitude and direction of a current in the coil wound around it was easy to do. Date code suggests it was made in December 1997.
 

Offline Terabyte2007

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Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
« Reply #718 on: February 17, 2015, 07:46:57 pm »
Magnetic polariser, it would be attached between a scalar ring set and the LNB of an older C band ( or other band of interest) dish, to enable you to select the polarisation, selecting the polarisation by passing a constant current ( 35mA IIRC or in that ballpark) through it. Was used in the old days before they could make low loss RF switches in a LNB, but a low loss ferrite that would skew polarisation depending on the magnitude and direction of a current in the coil wound around it was easy to do. Date code suggests it was made in December 1997.

Awesome! Thanks Sean...
Eric Haney, MCSE, EE, DMC-D
Electronics Designer, Prototype Builder
 

Offline mswhin63

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Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
« Reply #719 on: February 17, 2015, 10:50:31 pm »
Sorting through a box of NOS parts I came across this. As far as I can tell it appears to be some sort of heating element or spark element possibly. Any help in correctly identifying this item would be greatly appreciated. It has about 95 Ohms across the two input terminals, no PN junctions detected so it's purely resistive. It also has on each end inside a pointed rather thick electrode of some sort.

Do you want to clarify NOS acronym for us. I haven't used many waveguide so I think there is a bit of a misunderstanding. It does though resemble a waveguide but it also represents a pressure manifold of a Nitrious Oxide System albeit a large one.
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Online tautech

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Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
« Reply #720 on: February 18, 2015, 01:46:10 am »
Sorting through a box of NOS parts I came across this. As far as I can tell it appears to be some sort of heating element or spark element possibly. Any help in correctly identifying this item would be greatly appreciated. It has about 95 Ohms across the two input terminals, no PN junctions detected so it's purely resistive. It also has on each end inside a pointed rather thick electrode of some sort.

Do you want to clarify NOS acronym for us. I haven't used many waveguide so I think there is a bit of a misunderstanding. It does though resemble a waveguide but it also represents a pressure manifold of a Nitrious Oxide System albeit a large one.
Outside the Automotive high performance industry NOS is invaribly taken to mean "New, Old Stock"
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Offline mswhin63

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Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
« Reply #721 on: February 18, 2015, 05:00:52 am »
OK, thanks for the clarification  :palm:.
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Offline Terabyte2007

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Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
« Reply #722 on: February 18, 2015, 02:44:24 pm »
Part of the recently acquired NOS (New Old Stock) parts I gained a few crystal oscillators, good to have around! There is one in particular that I am interested in finding the datasheet for but can't seem to locate one. It's a Corning MC937X5-002W 155.520000 MHz oscillator which I am very interested getting some info on. I have attached some pics. Any help would again be greatly appreciated.

Eric Haney, MCSE, EE, DMC-D
Electronics Designer, Prototype Builder
 

Offline electr_peter

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Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
« Reply #723 on: February 18, 2015, 07:45:18 pm »
Component has markings "407J(M? symbol)41". It measures open circuit, has no significant capacitance. It is rectangular shaped and very thin, only 2-3mm.

It was used near a heated components. I guess it is a thermal switch, NO and closing at determined temperature. If the heater catches on fire, device will close, short out the supply, blow the fuse in a power supply and prevent power from reaching fire.

However, I could not confirm my guess after looking through thermal switch catalogues. Thermally operated switches usually use bimetallic strips which are much larger in size.

Any ideas?
« Last Edit: February 18, 2015, 08:31:25 pm by electr_peter »
 

Offline Richard Crowley

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Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
« Reply #724 on: February 18, 2015, 08:14:39 pm »
It could be a failed (open) RTC or thermistor(?)
Assuming that the scale in your photo is cm.
 


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