Author Topic: What's this please? (Component Advice)  (Read 554671 times)

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Offline AndersAnd

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Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
« Reply #800 on: August 12, 2015, 08:40:12 pm »
It can be a "Universal Keychain IR Remote TV Shutter" like https://www.eevblog.com/forum/chat/'tv-b-gone'-pic-based-tv-killer/
It's more likely a key fob wireless remote for a car or a garage port opener.
The PCB-track running all along the edge looks like the antenna.
The LED is probably just a red or green indicator LED which lights up every time the remote key is pressed. Had it been an IR-remote LED, it would have pointed forwards instead of upwards.

Here's one with interchangeable circuit board with and one of the numbers is the same ATCN-1 as printed on your PCB : http://www.ebay.com/itm/clicker-fob-keyless-remote-starter-entry-wireless-beeper-keyfob-Ford-GOHPCMINI-/231316246733

Quote
Interchangeable circuit board #s:
ATCD-1
ATCN-1
ATCD


« Last Edit: August 12, 2015, 09:06:04 pm by AndersAnd »
 

Offline unitedatoms

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Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
« Reply #801 on: August 12, 2015, 08:52:19 pm »
Right. The XTAL on silkscreen confused me, so I thought that the metal part is ordinary crystal. I see now, it has 8 legs, like possibly radio transmitter should.
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Offline kolonelkadat

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Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
« Reply #802 on: August 12, 2015, 09:19:42 pm »
Mystery solved! thanks AndersAnd. I never would have guessed that.
 

Offline LukeW

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Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
« Reply #803 on: August 14, 2015, 02:15:41 am »
See the photo of the cable on this page:

https://www.duniway.com/part/LEY-NT150-CBL

I'd like some sort of identification of the rectangular connector with the trapezoidal bit at one end.

Any suggestions for an equivalent connector?

The bit on the other end, that looks like a free-hanging octal valve socket on the cable with a backshell, looks like it might be fairly easy to source.
 

Offline G7PSK

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Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
« Reply #804 on: August 14, 2015, 08:19:33 am »
The rectangular plug looks like a modified Bell and Howell Used for all sorts of things other than projectors, my wife's wheel chair uses one for the main battery connection. The round one is an octal socket I have the plug version floating around somewhere in one of my bins.
 

Offline TheElectricChicken

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Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
« Reply #805 on: August 14, 2015, 10:58:47 am »
the link to duniway is very bad, it wont show me the image
 

Online PA0PBZ

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Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
« Reply #806 on: August 14, 2015, 11:29:56 am »
the link to duniway is very bad, it wont show me the image

Keyboard error: Press F1 to continue.
 

Offline AndersAnd

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Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
« Reply #807 on: August 14, 2015, 03:16:09 pm »
the link to duniway is very bad, it wont show me the image
Same cable here: http://www.pchemlabs.com/product.asp?pid=2880


@LukeW I guess you want to make your own cable? No wonder since the quoted prices for this simple 3 meter [10 feet] cable is $200-325 at the 2 links mentioned here, insane price for such a simple cable.  :bullshit:
 

Offline TheElectricChicken

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Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
« Reply #808 on: August 14, 2015, 03:59:08 pm »
is this cable used to test valves from old radios ?
 

Offline max666

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Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
« Reply #809 on: August 20, 2015, 09:02:31 pm »
Ok, I know this is a voltage regulator. But how do I find a datasheet?

It's a 5V SOT23-5 linear voltage regulator with standard pinout and marking says "16MX".
How do you guys search for something like this? "SOT23-5 16MX voltage regulator" got me nowhere; maybe I'm too stupid ...
 

Offline Godzil

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Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
« Reply #810 on: August 20, 2015, 09:37:13 pm »
I nearly forgot, I have a japanese battery charger that I mistakenly plugs on main 230V without really checking if it was an automatique switchable one, and in fact it was working (the output was correct) unless a big bang occurred somewhere, which was of course inside the charger, a cap inside just didn't liked to be plugged on 230V.

So as I wanted to repair this board and see if I could make it working on european main voltage without major changes, aka just change some component values, I started to look at the component and try to make a schematic of it. My main problem was that there is an IC where I can't find any data sheet,
I managed from the logo on it that the original company (Matsushita) was bought by Panasonic, and try to find on there website a reference for this component, I found that it exist, but there were no documentation on it. I filled a ticket requesting for the data sheet, at some point the ticket changed to

[Q&A Destination After Changing]
Interface & Communication / Analog / DC-DC Regulator / RF
Field : Analog ICs
Detail Field : Other Analog ICs

and I finally get a "old component, we don't give data sheet for old components"... Thanks panasonic.

So here is the board :
Front:
Back:

And the chip is the AN8171

If anyone have information about the chip, I would be thanksful :)
I suspect that this is mainly a controller for the battery change or something related to the AC to DC converter, I'm not sure.

(I know that if a Dave will look at the PCB for this charger he will just get a heart attack, there design is quite strange, pads or track that does nowhere, some clearance between main and low voltage are just... really tiny :D

And it was made by a bit japanese company, and not a small chinese one.. :D

By the way, the FR1/FR2 are high chance to be some sort of fuse resistors, but the value, if they follow the standard resistor colour band seems strange to me (Orange, White, Black Silver if I'm correct)
I may create a topic about this specific device if some people are interested, I'm trying to find the schematics I've done at that time, but it's currently nowhere to be found, anyway I know that most of it around the transformer is false
When you make hardware without taking into account the needs of the eventual software developers, you end up with bloated hardware full of pointless excess. From the outset one must consider design from both a hardware and software perspective.
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Offline AndersAnd

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Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
« Reply #811 on: August 23, 2015, 08:40:42 pm »
I managed from the logo on it that the original company (Matsushita) was bought by Panasonic,
No Matsushita has never been bought by Panasonic, in fact Panasonic was a just brand name for some products made by Matsushita, just like Technics. In 2008 Matsushita decided to change their company names from Matsushita Electric Industrial to Panasonic Corporation and Matsushita Electric Works to Panasonic Electric Works respectively, to conform with its global brand name "Panasonic".

Sanyo on the other hand has been acquired by Panasonic Corporation in December 2009. Fun fact: Sanyo, originally a competior of Matsushita/Panasonic was founded by Matsushita's brother-in-law, a former Matsushita employee.
[The electronics industry answer to Puma/Adidas I guess, as Puma and later Adidas, was founded by two rivalling brothers, after their relationship had deteriorated and they decided to split, after previously having worked together at what had become their common shoe factory].

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Panasonic
Quote
Panasonic Corporation, formerly known as Matsushita Electric Industrial Co., Ltd...

Name

From 1935 to October 1, 2008, the company name was "Matsushita Electric Industrial Co., Ltd."[3][4] On January 10, 2008, the company announced that it would change its name to "Panasonic Corporation", in effect on October 1, 2008, to conform with its global brand name "Panasonic".[5] The name change was approved at a shareholders' meeting on June 26, 2008 after consultation with the Matsushita family.[6]

Panasonic was founded in 1918 by Konosuke Matsushita as a vendor of duplex lamp sockets.

Matsushita's brother-in-law, Toshio Iue, founded Sanyo as a subcontractor for components after World War II. Sanyo grew to become a competitor to Panasonic, but was later acquired by Panasonic in December 2009.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Matsushita
Quote
Matsushita Electric Industrial, now Panasonic Corporation, a multinational electronics corporation based in Kadoma, Japan
Matsushita Electric Works, now Panasonic Electric Works, a lighting, building materials, and appliance manufacturer in Japan


« Last Edit: August 23, 2015, 09:17:23 pm by AndersAnd »
 

Offline Godzil

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Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
« Reply #812 on: August 25, 2015, 10:59:14 am »
Thanks about Matsushita, I was already aware about that, and honestly apart from beeing picky about how the name changes it did not help me on finding what this component is.
When you make hardware without taking into account the needs of the eventual software developers, you end up with bloated hardware full of pointless excess. From the outset one must consider design from both a hardware and software perspective.
-- Yokoi Gunpei
 

Offline dexters_lab

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Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
« Reply #813 on: August 29, 2015, 09:36:40 am »
i have seen these before but i dont recall what it is?

looks like a disc capacitor with two cylindrical bits on it... it's a 3 pin device
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Online PA0PBZ

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Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
« Reply #814 on: August 29, 2015, 10:16:46 am »
i have seen these before but i dont recall what it is?
looks like a disc capacitor with two cylindrical bits on it... it's a 3 pin device

LC filter, the cylinders are ferrite.
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Offline SeanB

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Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
« Reply #815 on: August 29, 2015, 11:00:00 am »
Pi filter, generally used on signal lines and power lines, depending on the capacitor value. 100p to 10n is common on signal lines and 100n to 220n for power rails. Ferrite beads are high loss and low inductance, giving good attenuation over around 100kHz.

Note if you accidentally apply too high a voltage ( or connect it to a 100W PA output by mistake) it does burn nicely.
 

Offline Godzil

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Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
« Reply #816 on: August 29, 2015, 11:02:49 am »
But what is this white stuff all around?
When you make hardware without taking into account the needs of the eventual software developers, you end up with bloated hardware full of pointless excess. From the outset one must consider design from both a hardware and software perspective.
-- Yokoi Gunpei
 

Offline SeanB

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Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
« Reply #817 on: August 29, 2015, 11:10:57 am »
Potting compound, probably there because the board handled high voltage and they wanted to keep surface leakage to a minimum.
 

Offline dexters_lab

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Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
« Reply #818 on: August 29, 2015, 11:33:20 am »
But what is this white stuff all around?

Thanks PA0PBZ & Sean

as Sean said, its potting compound and does handle high voltage, some of the components in there are rated to 6kV.

Its been sat in dichloromethane for 2 weeks, but i have run out!

"A common mistake people make when trying to design something completely foolproof is to underestimate the ingenuity of complete fools." - Douglas Adams
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Offline SeanB

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Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
« Reply #819 on: August 29, 2015, 11:46:57 am »
Funny enough just ordered 20l of something similar for work. But at 20 pounds per 500ml bottle I will not be using it as epoxy remover, though it will do the job. Linx solvent, used for an inkjet printer. Funny thing is it, along with the ink, has an expiry date. It also will diffuse through the HDPE bottle with time, the old expired ones I use at home ( still sealed, they expired in the service kit) have evaporated around half through the plastic.
 

Offline Cubdriver

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Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
« Reply #820 on: September 02, 2015, 08:17:31 am »
is this cable used to test valves from old radios ?

It looks like a drive cable for a turbomolecular (high vacuum) pump. The grey rectangular connector might be some sort of European type connector, though I'm not certain off the top of my head.  I think I remember seeing them on Balzers/Pfeiffer and Leybold turbo pump controllers, but it's been years since I've touched one.

-Pat
If it jams, force it.  If it breaks, you needed a new one anyway...
 

Offline jitter

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Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
« Reply #821 on: September 03, 2015, 04:50:31 pm »
Ok, I know this is a voltage regulator. But how do I find a datasheet?

It's a 5V SOT23-5 linear voltage regulator with standard pinout and marking says "16MX".
How do you guys search for something like this? "SOT23-5 16MX voltage regulator" got me nowhere; maybe I'm too stupid ...

No, not stupid, but some tings are not that easy to find. But not impossible.
I found this datasheet on a voltage regulator that I'm pretty sure is the one on your board.

First I searched for some smd codebooks and then searched inside them until I found one that listed "16M" (I left off the "X" as it's usually different between batches anyway). Hmm, a 5 V regulator, so far so good.
It describes it as a SOT-89, but hey, usually this stuff is available in different packages, so I looked for "XC6201P502PR" anyway and found the datasheet.
It's available as a SOT-25 too which looks quite like your picture (or perhaps SOT23-5 and SOT25 look so much alike that I don't see the difference).

Looking at the datsheet a bit better I find the pinout to be the same as your picture. Still on the right track!
Scrolling down (actually searching for "mark") I found the marking scheme:
16MX means:
1: XC6201xxxx-series
6: voltage 3.1-6 V
M: 5.0 V
X: lot number

P.S. This is my first post on this forum, just joined, but I've been following the EEVblog for quite a while. I am in the industrial electronics industry and testing, repairing and calibrating is my main responsibility.

Edit: corrected links and typos.

« Last Edit: September 03, 2015, 05:05:02 pm by jitter »
 

Offline vk6zgo

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Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
« Reply #822 on: September 04, 2015, 07:21:33 am »
is this cable used to test valves from old radios ?

It looks like a drive cable for a turbomolecular (high vacuum) pump. The grey rectangular connector might be some sort of European type connector, though I'm not certain off the top of my head.  I think I remember seeing them on Balzers/Pfeiffer and Leybold turbo pump controllers, but it's been years since I've touched one.

-Pat

I think that may be where I saw them!
I worked for a while as an Electronics Tech at the University of Western Australia Chemistry Department.
We had a pump that kept blowing up the drive circuitry----turned out to be a mechanical fault in the pump. |O
 

Offline max666

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Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
« Reply #823 on: September 04, 2015, 10:44:07 pm »
Ok, I know this is a voltage regulator. But how do I find a datasheet?

It's a 5V SOT23-5 linear voltage regulator with standard pinout and marking says "16MX".
How do you guys search for something like this? "SOT23-5 16MX voltage regulator" got me nowhere; maybe I'm too stupid ...

No, not stupid, but some tings are not that easy to find. But not impossible.
I found this datasheet on a voltage regulator that I'm pretty sure is the one on your board.

First I searched for some smd codebooks and then searched inside them until I found one that listed "16M" (I left off the "X" as it's usually different between batches anyway). Hmm, a 5 V regulator, so far so good.
It describes it as a SOT-89, but hey, usually this stuff is available in different packages, so I looked for "XC6201P502PR" anyway and found the datasheet.
It's available as a SOT-25 too which looks quite like your picture (or perhaps SOT23-5 and SOT25 look so much alike that I don't see the difference).

Looking at the datsheet a bit better I find the pinout to be the same as your picture. Still on the right track!
Scrolling down (actually searching for "mark") I found the marking scheme:
16MX means:
1: XC6201xxxx-series
6: voltage 3.1-6 V
M: 5.0 V
X: lot number

P.S. This is my first post on this forum, just joined, but I've been following the EEVblog for quite a while. I am in the industrial electronics industry and testing, repairing and calibrating is my main responsibility.

Edit: corrected links and typos.

  Thank you so much, you're my hero!

http://caxapa.ru/thumbs/588912/smd-codes.pdf ... in Russia smd codebook finds you!   :P
I didn't know there is even a difference between SOT-23-5 and SOT-25.

Thanks for helping me out, I almost gave up hope on this one. But most importantly, thank you for showing me how you did it.
 

Offline jitter

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Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
« Reply #824 on: September 05, 2015, 11:27:51 am »
:blush:

You're welcome!

A tip I can give is to search for the most recent datasheets at the manufacturer's websites rather than at datasheet websites like "alldatasheet" or similar.
I find that datasheets on those kinds of websites may not be up to date.

That recently presented a problem at work... a customer changed a part from manufacturer A to manuf. B. Manuf. B only made it in shape X according to the datasheet. Hmm... that no longer fits the pcb design... Then I searched for the datasheet at the manufacturer's website: hey... this one says it's available it in shapes X, Y and Z... => no problem.
« Last Edit: September 05, 2015, 11:32:54 am by jitter »
 


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