Author Topic: What's this please? (Component Advice)  (Read 582204 times)

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Offline Deathwish

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Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
« Reply #825 on: September 05, 2015, 11:32:52 am »
  Thank you so much, you're my hero!

http://caxapa.ru/thumbs/588912/smd-codes.pdf ... in Russia smd codebook finds you!   :P
I didn't know there is even a difference between SOT-23-5 and SOT-25.

Thanks for helping me out, I almost gave up hope on this one. But most importantly, thank you for showing me how you did it.

Thanks for the link, I didn't have that one, now I do, see,  it all helps others out.
Electrons are typically male, always looking for any hole to get into.
trying to strangle someone who talks out of their rectal cavity will fail, they can still breath.
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Online Quarlo Klobrigney

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Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
« Reply #826 on: September 05, 2015, 11:33:54 am »
Pronounced Muh-shush-tah = Matsushita :-+
Voltage does not flow, nor does it go.
 

Offline Ysjoelfir

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Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
« Reply #827 on: September 06, 2015, 11:52:52 am »
Hello everyone!
I recently looked through a little pile of old stuff where I found some... interesting devices. Two of them I couldn't find anything about. One is a transistor in a "kind of TO-92 case". It is written C - A 6 16. Picture one.

The other one is another transistor in a rather unusual case that looks like a metal can TO-5 case, without a metal can.  It is written "SGS DW 6714 1818", picture two.

The last one is a NE540H. I found quite some information and some sort of a datasheet (attached). It is a integrated amplifier driver which should work with just two complementary output transistors and some peripheral attached. BUT: this datasheet-thingy isn't enough in my oppinion. It says what the pinout looks like, but it doesn't tell me anything about how to configure it and i would love to get more information about this things.
Greetings, Kai \ Ysjoelfir
 

Offline wiss

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Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
« Reply #828 on: September 06, 2015, 05:01:22 pm »
Hello everyone!
I recently looked through a little pile of old stuff where I found some... interesting devices. Two of them I couldn't find anything about. One is a transistor in a "kind of TO-92 case". It is written C - A 6 16. Picture one.

To me it looks like "C - A S 16", I have seen those somewhere, I didn't find any at home, maybe a thread about an old DDR-DMM in here then...
I think it is a DDR-era transistor, some guys at Chemnitz made a collection of datasheets for DDR-stuff:
https://www.tu-chemnitz.de/etit/zentral/ddr/

Didn't find your device there but this might help in further research!

Edit:

Maybe SC116? https://www.eevblog.com/forum/testgear/vintage-teardown-and-hopefully-repair-rft-g-1001-500-benchmultimeter/msg367219/#msg367219
« Last Edit: September 06, 2015, 06:46:41 pm by wiss »
 

Offline Richard Crowley

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Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
« Reply #829 on: September 06, 2015, 07:09:00 pm »
SGS was a European semiconductor manufacturer back in the day. That is probably an OEM "house number".  Quite possibly the same as a commodity transistor, but custom-labeled for a specific customer.  The $20 transistor tester would reveal exactly what kind of device and some key parameters (like gain/hFE, etc.)

Quote
SGS Semiconductor Ltd
Merged with STMicroelectronics in 1987, SGS Semiconductor was, at the time, ranked 14th in a list of top semiconductor suppliers. With annual sales exceeding $800 million, the company aggressively pursued a strategy of consolidation within the semiconductor industry. Known for a tireless dedication to innovation within their markets, SGS Semiconductor tasked over one-quarter of their employees and allotted over one-quarter of their annual revenue to research and development.
- See more at: http://www.aeri.com/mfg/sgs-semiconductor-ltd/#sthash.IUFVU7fs.dpuf
 

Offline uoficowboy

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Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
« Reply #830 on: September 06, 2015, 10:18:25 pm »
This is probably an easy one... I have some large capacitors, probably film, that are labeled:

W-F 225J
HF200V
:D.

There is also a logo of some sorts that is a M with a rounded box around it. I can post pics if needed. Capacitor is through hole, maybe 3cm pitch, 3.5cm long, 8mm thick, and maybe 1.5cm tall (all approximations, not measurements).

Anybody know what it is? It's from a fairly modern (10 years old maybe?) piece of Japanese test equipment.
 

Online Quarlo Klobrigney

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Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
« Reply #831 on: September 06, 2015, 11:11:32 pm »
From Matsushita aka Panasonic 200 Volt 2.2µF ±5% capacitor.

This is probably an easy one... I have some large capacitors, probably film, that are labeled:

W-F 225J
HF200V
:D.

There is also a logo of some sorts that is a M with a rounded box around it. I can post pics if needed. Capacitor is through hole, maybe 3cm pitch, 3.5cm long, 8mm thick, and maybe 1.5cm tall (all approximations, not measurements).

Anybody know what it is? It's from a fairly modern (10 years old maybe?) piece of Japanese test equipment.
« Last Edit: September 06, 2015, 11:20:30 pm by Quarlo Klobrigney »
Voltage does not flow, nor does it go.
 

Offline uoficowboy

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Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
« Reply #832 on: September 07, 2015, 12:02:31 am »
From Matsushita aka Panasonic 200 Volt 2.2µF ±5% capacitor.

This is probably an easy one... I have some large capacitors, probably film, that are labeled:

W-F 225J
HF200V
:D.

There is also a logo of some sorts that is a M with a rounded box around it. I can post pics if needed. Capacitor is through hole, maybe 3cm pitch, 3.5cm long, 8mm thick, and maybe 1.5cm tall (all approximations, not measurements).

Anybody know what it is? It's from a fairly modern (10 years old maybe?) piece of Japanese test equipment.
Yes, that's the logo! Thanks for the help!
 

Offline uoficowboy

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Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
« Reply #833 on: September 07, 2015, 12:47:51 am »
OK one more question for you all!

I have some Sanyo electrolytics on a board. Some are marked
10
---
25
and others are marked
4.7
---
25

Safe to assume these are 10uf/4.7uf 25V caps?
 

Online Quarlo Klobrigney

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Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
« Reply #834 on: September 07, 2015, 01:13:30 am »
Yes, but not at the same time!
Voltage does not flow, nor does it go.
 

Offline Ysjoelfir

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Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
« Reply #835 on: September 07, 2015, 07:00:05 am »
Thanks wiss and Richard Crowley for your informations about these devices!
Greetings, Kai \ Ysjoelfir
 

Online PA0PBZ

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Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
« Reply #836 on: September 11, 2015, 01:07:15 pm »
This is a little transformer (20x30x30mm) that gave up life in a Hirschmann cable TV amplifier. It's  230 to 15.5V/100mA
It's a PCB mount model, but the thing is that Hirschmann decided not to use a PCB for this one but used some hooks in the metal bottom an plastic top of the case to hold it in place and solder the wires directly to the transformer. I can find enough PCB mount transformers that can do the job, but they will never exactly fit, and I don't want to have the AC contacts rolling around... Apart from glue or tape my option is to find the exact thing, and of course there is no brand (I think...) and the various numbers did not do the job in Google.

TL;DR: Anyone can come up with a brand name for the transformer?





Keyboard error: Press F1 to continue.
 

Offline Richard Crowley

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Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
« Reply #837 on: September 11, 2015, 05:25:33 pm »
Even if you knew the brand name for the transformer, it seems quite likely it is an OEM part that you probably couldn't get at retail.
IME, your chances of finding a mechanical equivalent replacement range between slim and none.
Your best bet would be to find something with the same specs: 15.5V @ 100mA, that fits inside the case.
Or else just convert it to use a wall-wart which should be easy to find.
 

Offline Deathwish

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Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
« Reply #838 on: September 11, 2015, 05:29:06 pm »
Got a picture of the other side ?. it says 15,5V not 15.5V so is it a dual secondary
Electrons are typically male, always looking for any hole to get into.
trying to strangle someone who talks out of their rectal cavity will fail, they can still breath.
God hates North Wales, he has put my home address on the blacklist of all couriers with instructions to divert all parcels.
 

Offline wiss

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Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
« Reply #839 on: September 11, 2015, 05:32:56 pm »
Got a picture of the other side ?. it says 15,5V not 15.5V so is it a dual secondary
Or non english, German and Swedish and many other languages use decimal comma. It say "Sek", not "Sec", would make me guess non english.
 

Offline jitter

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Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
« Reply #840 on: September 11, 2015, 05:48:44 pm »
Yeah. That's probably a German made transformer.

15,5 V would be 15.5 V in English speaking countries.
Sek. is Sekundär and I'll let you guess what that might be in English  ;).

I would probably go and buy an off the shelf 15 V 100 mA transformer of similar or at least suitable dimensions. E.g. something like one of these.
« Last Edit: September 11, 2015, 06:00:45 pm by jitter »
 

Offline bktemp

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Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
« Reply #841 on: September 11, 2015, 05:58:40 pm »
This is a little transformer (20x30x30mm) that gave up life in a Hirschmann cable TV amplifier. It's  230 to 15.5V/100mA

TL;DR: Anyone can come up with a brand name for the transformer?
Hirschmann was a German manufacturer.

I can not see anything that looks like a manufacturer name.

All German made transformers I have seen (Block, era, Gerth) look different. It is probably a custom made part from China
 

Offline SeanB

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Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
« Reply #842 on: September 11, 2015, 06:22:57 pm »
Grab any replacement that fits, and glue it down in the housing with 2 part polyurethane epoxy. Will not melt with heat, and will never let go either. Done it plenty of times, and it works well.
 

Offline uoficowboy

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Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
« Reply #843 on: September 15, 2015, 05:18:14 am »
I have a blown glass, through hole diode. I believe it is a DO-35 package, but am not sure. I believe it says 18B2 on it. I believe it is a zener diode - probably between 12 and 22V (18V would make sense).

Anybody know what this is? I was hoping 18.2V was a standard zener voltage, but it doesn't seem to be.

It is out of some Japanese test equipment and they seem to mostly (only) use Japanese parts. So I would guess it's from a Japanese manufacturer, but am not positive.
 

Online Quarlo Klobrigney

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Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
« Reply #844 on: September 15, 2015, 10:26:17 am »
Should be just that 18.2V ZD. Why not test it. Look on Google for "how to test zener diodes"

I have a blown glass, through hole diode. I believe it is a DO-35 package, but am not sure. I believe it says 18B2 on it. I believe it is a zener diode - probably between 12 and 22V (18V would make sense).

Anybody know what this is? I was hoping 18.2V was a standard zener voltage, but it doesn't seem to be.

It is out of some Japanese test equipment and they seem to mostly (only) use Japanese parts. So I would guess it's from a Japanese manufacturer, but am not positive.
Voltage does not flow, nor does it go.
 

Offline max666

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Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
« Reply #845 on: September 15, 2015, 11:26:22 am »
Should be just that 18.2V ZD. Why not test it. Look on Google for "how to test zener diodes"

I have a blown glass, through hole diode. I believe it is a DO-35 package, but am not sure. I believe it says 18B2 on it. I believe it is a zener diode - probably between 12 and 22V (18V would make sense).
...

Language is a funny thing; I'm pretty sure uoficowboy meant "blown" as in defect and not "blown" as in glass blowing ;)
Or do you know more about testing deep fried diodes? I'd imagine they are delicious.
 

Offline Godzil

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Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
« Reply #846 on: September 15, 2015, 12:51:28 pm »
Deep fried diodes are quite good along a steak
When you make hardware without taking into account the needs of the eventual software developers, you end up with bloated hardware full of pointless excess. From the outset one must consider design from both a hardware and software perspective.
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Offline uoficowboy

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Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
« Reply #847 on: September 15, 2015, 03:25:59 pm »
Should be just that 18.2V ZD. Why not test it. Look on Google for "how to test zener diodes"

I have a blown glass, through hole diode. I believe it is a DO-35 package, but am not sure. I believe it says 18B2 on it. I believe it is a zener diode - probably between 12 and 22V (18V would make sense).

Anybody know what this is? I was hoping 18.2V was a standard zener voltage, but it doesn't seem to be.

It is out of some Japanese test equipment and they seem to mostly (only) use Japanese parts. So I would guess it's from a Japanese manufacturer, but am not positive.
As max666 pointed out - the diode is dead. Totally open.

I verified today with a microscope that it is indeed marked "18B2".

18.2V is not a standard zener voltage... Digi-Key doesn't stock a single one. So I think it's unlikely an 18.2V part.

Right now I'm guessing that it's an 18V, 2% zener. That's a pretty standard/common part. Thoughts?
 

Online Quarlo Klobrigney

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Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
« Reply #848 on: September 15, 2015, 03:47:13 pm »
PZU18B2 How about that part number as reference? I know that part number is SMD, but so is everything now. 
I understand what you meant a DO-35 glass.
To test a Zener is easy if you have a supply above the rated value.
There are also TVS diodes as well but I have never seen them in DO-35 glass.
I used to see these markings on a lot of Japanese electronics in the 80's & 90's. I just replaced them with common sense, a 1W @V Zener. My ECG BOOK for 18B2 says ECG5027 an 18V 1W Zener.
Even if it was 18.2V, an 18V Zener is in tolerance.
« Last Edit: September 15, 2015, 03:51:00 pm by Quarlo Klobrigney »
Voltage does not flow, nor does it go.
 

Offline uoficowboy

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Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
« Reply #849 on: September 15, 2015, 04:40:03 pm »
PZU18B2 How about that part number as reference? I know that part number is SMD, but so is everything now. 
I understand what you meant a DO-35 glass.
To test a Zener is easy if you have a supply above the rated value.
There are also TVS diodes as well but I have never seen them in DO-35 glass.
I used to see these markings on a lot of Japanese electronics in the 80's & 90's. I just replaced them with common sense, a 1W @V Zener. My ECG BOOK for 18B2 says ECG5027 an 18V 1W Zener.
Even if it was 18.2V, an 18V Zener is in tolerance.
Sounds like we're agreed - 18V zener. What's an ECG book?

I think you're missing the fact that the diode is dead. Big crack down the center. It measures open circuit both directions. I agree that testing a zener's voltage is easy - but it's only easy when the diode isn't dead :)
 


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