Author Topic: The Internet of Things comes to the Hermit Kimdom.  (Read 864 times)

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Offline cdev

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The Internet of Things comes to the Hermit Kimdom.
« on: December 08, 2018, 03:01:17 pm »
https://www.dailynk.com/english/tv-on-north-koreas-first-smart-house/

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In a video introducing the IoT-enabled smart house, a PhD student from the Kim Il Sung Research Center for Advanced Science and Technology, explains, “This smart house has been equipped with IoT and AI technology, enabling everything to be controlled through voice commands.”

The student then goes on to demonstrate turning on the lights, TV, and air purifier with voice commands.

As he gives the command, “Air purifier, turn on”, the power button switches on and an AI speaker responds that the “command has been completed”.
"What the large print giveth, the small print taketh away."
 

Offline tsman

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Re: The Internet of Things comes to the Hermit Kimdom.
« Reply #1 on: December 08, 2018, 03:10:02 pm »
An AI doing voice recognition or are the secret police listening in on you just toggling the switch?  :scared:
 
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Offline German_EE

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Re: The Internet of Things comes to the Hermit Kimdom.
« Reply #2 on: December 08, 2018, 08:21:30 pm »
How does their smart house deal with all of the power cuts?
Should you find yourself in a chronically leaking boat, energy devoted to changing vessels is likely to be more productive than energy devoted to patching leaks.

Warren Buffett
 
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Online Domagoj T

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Re: The Internet of Things comes to the Hermit Kimdom.
« Reply #3 on: December 08, 2018, 09:03:42 pm »
With all the Arduinos and RPis available these days, this project sounds like something a high school kid would tinker with in his spare time, not a PhD level research.
 
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Offline hermit

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Re: The Internet of Things comes to the Hermit Kimdom.
« Reply #4 on: December 09, 2018, 12:40:01 am »
Is this title meant to troll me?  ???
 
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Offline tsman

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Re: The Internet of Things comes to the Hermit Kimdom.
« Reply #5 on: December 09, 2018, 01:05:45 am »
 

Offline cdev

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Re: The Internet of Things comes to the Hermit Kimdom.
« Reply #6 on: December 09, 2018, 02:22:00 am »
You betcha!

I bet a RPi or similar SBC is what's inside the box.

With all the Arduinos and RPis available these days, this project sounds like something a high school kid would tinker with in his spare time, not a PhD level research.
"What the large print giveth, the small print taketh away."
 

Offline cdev

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Re: The Internet of Things comes to the Hermit Kimdom.
« Reply #7 on: December 09, 2018, 02:40:13 am »
I doubt it if they'd want to discuss it. But of course you're right.

"we just get by
however we can"


How does their smart house deal with all of the power cuts?

"What the large print giveth, the small print taketh away."
 

Online Halcyon

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Re: The Internet of Things comes to the Hermit Kimdom.
« Reply #8 on: December 09, 2018, 04:49:57 pm »
I suspect one day (soon), truly smart homes will be using 19th/20th century technology, press switch, light comes on. Press another switch, heating/cooling comes on. No need for internet connections, usernames/passwords, pairing and trouble shooting network issues when it ultimately fails to work.
 

Online Mr. Scram

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Re: The Internet of Things comes to the Hermit Kimdom.
« Reply #9 on: December 09, 2018, 05:30:18 pm »
With all the Arduinos and RPis available these days, this project sounds like something a high school kid would tinker with in his spare time, not a PhD level research.
I don't think the North Korean academia is recognised as such elsewhere.
 

Online bd139

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Re: The Internet of Things comes to the Hermit Kimdom.
« Reply #10 on: December 09, 2018, 09:27:29 pm »
In NK, house is telescreen.

In west, pocket contains telescreen.

I’m not sure who lost or won there.

Really NK are quite technically capable considering the trade embargoes and supply problems they have.

With all the Arduinos and RPis available these days, this project sounds like something a high school kid would tinker with in his spare time, not a PhD level research.
I don't think the North Korean academia is recognised as such elsewhere.

Yet. Remember eastern bloc.
 

Online ebastler

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Re: The Internet of Things comes to the Hermit Kimdom.
« Reply #11 on: December 09, 2018, 11:14:22 pm »
I suspect one day (soon), truly smart homes will be using 19th/20th century technology, press switch, light comes on. Press another switch, heating/cooling comes on. No need for internet connections, usernames/passwords, pairing and trouble shooting network issues when it ultimately fails to work.

I think the sweet spot is something that feels like 19th century technology, but has more flexibility in the background:

Instead of point-to-point wiring from switch to light outlet etc., use a bus which runs through the whole house or flat, and provides power and signalling. Each switch just sends a fixed signal to a central house controller, and each outlet comprises a solid state relay, addressable by the controller.

The controller should be configurable locally, without an internet connection. Users who don't care about gimmicks can let their electrician (or nerd friend) configure the controller once and then forget about it. If you like to play with the system, you can configure it yourself, via your computer or a permanently installed touch screen. Remote access via an internet connection could be optional, preferably with limited rights. (Don't switch on the kitchen stove while you are away...) And I very much agree with Halcyon that there is no reason why you would need an account somewhere if all you want to do is run the controller locally.

I am sure I did not just invent this, but such systems must already be available -- although potentially still expensive? Maybe there's even a signalling standard supported by multiple vendors? (Wired would be my preference over wireless optiones like Zigbee etc.)
 

Offline JPortici

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Re: The Internet of Things comes to the Hermit Kimdom.
« Reply #12 on: December 09, 2018, 11:52:21 pm »
I suspect one day (soon), truly smart homes will be using 19th/20th century technology, press switch, light comes on. Press another switch, heating/cooling comes on. No need for internet connections, usernames/passwords, pairing and trouble shooting network issues when it ultimately fails to work.

I think the sweet spot is something that feels like 19th century technology, but has more flexibility in the background:

Instead of point-to-point wiring from switch to light outlet etc., use a bus which runs through the whole house or flat, and provides power and signalling. Each switch just sends a fixed signal to a central house controller, and each outlet comprises a solid state relay, addressable by the controller.

The controller should be configurable locally, without an internet connection. Users who don't care about gimmicks can let their electrician (or nerd friend) configure the controller once and then forget about it. If you like to play with the system, you can configure it yourself, via your computer or a permanently installed touch screen. Remote access via an internet connection could be optional, preferably with limited rights. (Don't switch on the kitchen stove while you are away...) And I very much agree with Halcyon that there is no reason why you would need an account somewhere if all you want to do is run the controller locally.

I am sure I did not just invent this, but such systems must already be available -- although potentially still expensive? Maybe there's even a signalling standard supported by multiple vendors? (Wired would be my preference over wireless optiones like Zigbee etc.)

this has been tried for years, it never took off. When i was doing my electrician internships back in high school there was yet another wave of interest in domotics. This was 15 years ago, system was way too much expensive to lay down.
IOT is the way to go for the user because you don't have to redo all of your wiring, you can do it in small steps, one device at a time. It's also the way to go for developers because of all user data and of course subscription based services.

And now (OT), car makers offering subscription based optionals, car is going to be connected on the internet at some point (with the integrated modem, when you pair your phone or when you go to service) so you can't cheat it. Disgusting.
 

Online bd139

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Re: The Internet of Things comes to the Hermit Kimdom.
« Reply #13 on: December 09, 2018, 11:56:00 pm »
X10 was a thing in the 1990s for this stuff.
 
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Offline Bud

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Re: The Internet of Things comes to the Hermit Kimdom.
« Reply #14 on: December 10, 2018, 12:52:33 am »
and an AI speaker responds that the “command has been completed”.
[/quote]

Repeated dozens of times a day this alone will drive people crazy. Maybe it is ok for a person living alone, they do not mind talking to themselves, but for practical purpose a house with 4-5 people living in it will become a mad house.
 
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Offline cdev

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Re: The Internet of Things comes to the Hermit Kimdom.
« Reply #15 on: December 10, 2018, 01:10:38 am »
Thermostats, definitely are good candidates for some automation.

For almost everything thats usually switch-driven, I think I would likely prefer to have either a light that comes on when I come in to the room, or a nicely placed switch. The only places where I would like to have verbal control are places where my hands are typically busy. (scanning things or taking screen shots while typing, for example) I could also do them with a foot switch, though.

HVAC though, is a good candidate for automated operation.

Also maybe morning things. For people who get up to go to work early, having all the breakfast tasks done with automation might be helpful. (but perhaps might increase accidents because doing them is how many people wake up!)


I suspect one day (soon), truly smart homes will be using 19th/20th century technology, press switch, light comes on. Press another switch, heating/cooling comes on. No need for internet connections, usernames/passwords, pairing and trouble shooting network issues when it ultimately fails to work.
"What the large print giveth, the small print taketh away."
 

Offline cdev

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Re: The Internet of Things comes to the Hermit Kimdom.
« Reply #16 on: December 10, 2018, 01:16:48 am »
In NK, only a quarter to a third of the people in the country, basically the descendants of people who are related to the people who fought with Kim Il Sung before the Japanese were defeated, are allowed to go to college. As far as I know, it was never anything like that in any of the other Communist countries. (although 'family background' was important.) Other Communist countries all thought (think) that they are too extreme.

They divide the entire nation up into three main (core, wavering and hostile) groups and countless sub-groups based on a family's perceived loyalty. Only members of the 'core' group are allowed to go to college or get a decent job, even under the best of circumstances.

Its likely that access to the resources and skills required to perform any kind of technical profession would be limited to those in this core group. (And can easily be taken away if somebody's family member deviates even slightly from the officially sanctioned behavior, then the entire family has to suddenly move to a rural area.)

If somebody in the 'hostile' or 'enemies' group tried to quire such skills - not having any way to use them in any officially sanctioned good job, (one would also be stuck in a rural area, forbidden to travel to counties that contained the cities - the only places where stores exist where one could buy electronics parts) For learning those new things one would almost certainly come under suspicion for being up to ill good.

Recently a lot of North Korean defectors have written books - some of them are quite good, which explain how people live there.

Good description of the songbun system by Andrei Lankov.



In NK, house is telescreen.

In west, pocket contains telescreen.

I’m not sure who lost or won there.

Really NK are quite technically capable considering the trade embargoes and supply problems they have.

With all the Arduinos and RPis available these days, this project sounds like something a high school kid would tinker with in his spare time, not a PhD level research.
I don't think the North Korean academia is recognized as such elsewhere.

Yet. Remember eastern bloc.
« Last Edit: December 10, 2018, 01:32:01 am by cdev »
"What the large print giveth, the small print taketh away."
 


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