Author Topic: Which multimeter to buy?  (Read 20382 times)

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Offline Simon

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Re: Which multimeter to buy?
« Reply #25 on: June 19, 2010, 02:04:47 pm »
what is the whole situation with K sensors and multimeter's, I discovered that the one from my VC99 works fine with our RS thermometer at work. can i buy a standard sensor that will work with any meter ?
 

Offline x0170Topic starter

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Re: Which multimeter to buy?
« Reply #26 on: June 19, 2010, 03:05:20 pm »
It's similar to this with two single banana jacks.



There is just a 15ohm when I measure the resistance, that is highly temperature addicted. If I calculate the temperature coefficient, I could build something myself by using a ntc/ptc resistor with the same coefficient right?
 

Offline Kiriakos-GR

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Re: Which multimeter to buy?
« Reply #27 on: June 19, 2010, 03:56:39 pm »
So I bought the Voltcraft VC 920 and I am quite satisfied with it yet...........................till now is that it can measure temperature up to 1000°C but the temperature sensor is only heat resistant to 125°C.
Is there anyway to get a sensor that can measure higher temperatures? What about compatibility of thouse sensors, how do they work? Can I built one by myself?


Read this ..  https://www.eevblog.com/forum/index.php?topic=448.0
 

alm

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Re: Which multimeter to buy?
« Reply #28 on: June 19, 2010, 05:41:47 pm »
That looks like a type K thermocouple, and works via the Seebeck effect. This means that the junction between to different metals will generate a voltage depending on the junction temperature. There are two wires of different metals, and these are welded at the end. This forms the junction. Any metal between the junction and the jacks (eg. plating) will create a new thermocouple, so if there's a temperature gradient, this will cause errors.

There are also resistive temperature sensors, these are actually superior, but more expensive. Type K (there's also a type J and a lot of others) is the cheapest and most common thermocouple.
 

Offline Kiriakos-GR

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Re: Which multimeter to buy?
« Reply #29 on: June 19, 2010, 06:21:26 pm »
For any Temp above the 600 Celsius ,  the solution called IR ...

Even if the probe can take the heat ,  the human body will have issues with the radiated heat.

Simple as that.
 

alm

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Re: Which multimeter to buy?
« Reply #30 on: June 19, 2010, 06:32:19 pm »
Depends on the application. If you want to monitor the temperature for some time, or inside box, attaching a sensor is easier than rigging up an IR thermometer. You may not want to hold the wire probe in your hand, but attach it before it heats up or use a different kind of probe. Radiated heat is only an issue if you get really close. Ever stood near a flame (eg. gas stove)? The temperature of the flame is much higher than 600 degC!
 

Offline Kiriakos-GR

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Re: Which multimeter to buy?
« Reply #31 on: June 19, 2010, 06:47:47 pm »
or use a different kind of probe.

Next stop = Bolt on probes ..  but here we talk about people , who had less experience in everything.

Even me,  just from ego , I wanted to see if my meter can count 1000 Celsius..
But even my own small kitchen goes max to 220 C ..  
And I never had considered the danger of the radiated heat , until I read something about it.
« Last Edit: June 19, 2010, 06:50:54 pm by Kiriakos-GR »
 


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