Author Topic: Why do we need two toroidal cores?  (Read 3309 times)

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Offline onemilimeter

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Why do we need two toroidal cores?
« on: February 17, 2011, 11:16:39 pm »
I read somewhere that two or more cores are stacked together to design an inductor or transformer. What is the reason to stack two or more cores?
 

Offline Time

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Re: Why do we need two toroidal cores?
« Reply #1 on: February 18, 2011, 12:12:22 am »
Thats not common.  Might have just been application specific.  Ideally you would want one solid core with no breaks or air gaps for the best Q.
-Time
 

Offline tecman

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Re: Why do we need two toroidal cores?
« Reply #2 on: February 18, 2011, 03:37:57 am »
Stacking cores and winding through both increases inductance and power.  Disadvantage is greater losses from leakage inductance, which is the benefit of toroids.

This is usually done as a quick fix.

paul

 

Offline onemilimeter

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Re: Why do we need two toroidal cores?
« Reply #3 on: February 18, 2011, 09:10:18 am »
Stacking cores and winding through both increases inductance and power.  Disadvantage is greater losses from leakage inductance, which is the benefit of toroids.

This is usually done as a quick fix.

One of the parameters given in a toroidal datasheet is AL. When two toroidal cores are stacked together, do you think the effective AL of stacked cores is equivalent to double of the individual core's AL? Thanks.

 


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