Author Topic: Why little math required for electronics?  (Read 4251 times)

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Online nctnico

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Re: Why little math required for electronics?
« Reply #75 on: May 03, 2019, 11:19:42 pm »
If you are interested in good books on engineering maths then I can recommend the books 'Modern engineering mathematics' and 'Advanced modern engineering mathematics'.
I went looking at Alibris.com for both books and it seem like Glyn James should be the author except that I see another author for an identically named book and the cost is way up there!

https://www.alibris.com/booksearch?keyword=modern+engineering+mathematics

I thought I would add them to the library but I want to get the right book(s).
I have the books written by Glyn James. I didn't know there where other books with the same title.
There are small lies, big lies and then there is what is on the screen of your oscilloscope.
 

Offline CatalinaWOW

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Re: Why little math required for electronics?
« Reply #76 on: May 04, 2019, 01:54:03 am »
Once you sign on to the math train you will find there are innumerable nooks and crannies to dive into.  There are purely theoretical approaches (theory of functions and others) and more directly practical approaches (perturbation methods and others).  All find their occasional application in solving what would be an otherwise tough problem.

A book I have found useful when reminding myself of terrain that I haven't been over for a while is:

Handbook of Applied Mathematics, Edited by Carl E Pearson.

There are always two problems in using mathematics in engineering.  The first is formidable - knowing and remembering that there is a tool available which has bearing on the problem at hand.  This book is helps with this, and also aids in the second problem - actually using the tool which is usually a more straightforward problem of looking up and absorbing or reabsorbing the information on the method.

There is a third problem - recognizing that a given tool can apply to a given problem.  That is usually beyond the province of us mere mortals.  The guys who solve these third problems have names like Maxwell, Heaviside and Dirac.
 
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Offline rstofer

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Re: Why little math required for electronics?
« Reply #77 on: May 04, 2019, 03:09:38 pm »
If you are interested in good books on engineering maths then I can recommend the books 'Modern engineering mathematics' and 'Advanced modern engineering mathematics'.
I went looking at Alibris.com for both books and it seem like Glyn James should be the author except that I see another author for an identically named book and the cost is way up there!

https://www.alibris.com/booksearch?keyword=modern+engineering+mathematics

I thought I would add them to the library but I want to get the right book(s).
I have the books written by Glyn James. I didn't know there where other books with the same title.

Thanks!  I have ordered both.
 

Offline mathsquid

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Re: Why little math required for electronics?
« Reply #78 on: May 05, 2019, 04:36:12 pm »
Just my little grumpy bit to the plenum: Math is just a tool (one of many) universities use to fuck students with and kick them out of the school (...as soon as possible, because they get payed by the number of students applied to the school - many apply multiple times).

I'm not sure which universities you are talking about (your country isn't showing), but that's not how it works for public universities in the USA. The vast majority of the budget for teaching comes from state funding and tuition.

Offline rstofer

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Re: Why little math required for electronics?
« Reply #79 on: May 16, 2019, 04:00:11 pm »
If you are interested in good books on engineering maths then I can recommend the books 'Modern engineering mathematics' and 'Advanced modern engineering mathematics'.
I went looking at Alibris.com for both books and it seem like Glyn James should be the author except that I see another author for an identically named book and the cost is way up there!

https://www.alibris.com/booksearch?keyword=modern+engineering+mathematics

I thought I would add them to the library but I want to get the right book(s).
I have the books written by Glyn James. I didn't know there where other books with the same title.

Thanks!  I have ordered both.


OK, I now have both volumes and I have spent some time going over the first book.  It is EXCELLENT!  The best book on math EVER!  In my unqualified opinion...  Great discussion, good examples and relevant problems. 

The authors recommend MATLAB or Maple for certain problems and provide code for both tools.  Both of these tools cost money, even for the student editions.  Perhaps GNU Octave is a workable substitute for MATLAB and there are others.

The 4th Edition books, in paperback, are pretty cheap at Alibris

Even though I have multiple books on the subjects, these are going to become my 'go-to' books.
 

Online coppice

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Re: Why little math required for electronics?
« Reply #80 on: May 16, 2019, 07:03:03 pm »
The authors recommend MATLAB or Maple for certain problems and provide code for both tools.  Both of these tools cost money, even for the student editions.  Perhaps GNU Octave is a workable substitute for MATLAB and there are others.
GNU Octave is an excellent tool, but its not 100% compatible with MATLAB. If you are writing your own Octave scripts you'll be pretty happy with the results. If you try to run other people's MATLAB scripts using Octave. you'll often get different results from using MATLAB.
 

Online 0culus

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Re: Why little math required for electronics?
« Reply #81 on: May 17, 2019, 03:31:54 am »
One of my current favorite books for getting a "one stop shopping" review of mathematics relevant to EE topics is Kreyszig's Advanced Engineering Mathematics. This is from the perspective of having a degree in math and reviewing to recover knowledge, however. It might be a little too terse for someone without some background already.
 

Online coppice

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Re: Why little math required for electronics?
« Reply #82 on: May 17, 2019, 05:24:30 am »
One of my current favorite books for getting a "one stop shopping" review of mathematics relevant to EE topics is Kreyszig's Advanced Engineering Mathematics. This is from the perspective of having a degree in math and reviewing to recover knowledge, however. It might be a little too terse for someone without some background already.
Kreyszig's Advanced Engineering Mathematics has been the standard undergraduate text in many engineering departments for decades. Its good if you like pure maths. Its not so good if you like your maths linked to the real world, so you can see some relevance to the maths. In our course we were taught maths very much in a pure maths way. The relevance was given later in the engineering courses which used that maths.
 

Online 0culus

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Re: Why little math required for electronics?
« Reply #83 on: May 18, 2019, 02:09:50 pm »
That's what I said. I have a BS in math, so I enjoy the format of the book for reviewing key concepts.
 


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