Author Topic: Will you call that ENIG?  (Read 1664 times)

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Offline blueskull

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Will you call that ENIG?
« on: September 02, 2016, 03:54:00 am »
Attached are 4 (supposed to be) "ENIG" copper blocks used as demonstration target of a kit of Nanofoil.
Seriously, Indium Corp. really wanted to skimp on ENIG cost? The kit of 10 bloody 1'' square 40um Nanofoil sheets costed me $193.5 plus shipping.
Keep in mind that one set is shiny, while the other set is dull, which means poor inventory management as well as the electroplating is not made of any noble metal.
The Nanofoil themselves, not shown in the pictures, are cut very roughly, definitely does not look like something comes from such an industrial leader.
They look like being cut with glass cutter by a pair of shaky hand. FFS using a carbide scriber/cutter I can cut even better than this.



I'll link the product page below: http://buy.solder.com/NanoFoil-Activation-Kit-Tin-Plated/P1111_1019/
 

Offline T3sl4co1l

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Re: Will you call that ENIG?
« Reply #1 on: September 02, 2016, 05:14:17 am »
So... did they work?  Because those don't look very solderable, and if it works, that's kind of neat, I guess...

If not, it would be rather "duh" of them to ship something that doesn't actually work.

Tim
Seven Transistor Labs, LLC
Electronic design, from concept to prototype.
Bringing a project to life?  Send me a message!
 

Offline blueskull

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Re: Will you call that ENIG?
« Reply #2 on: September 02, 2016, 05:25:41 am »
So... did they work?  Because those don't look very solderable, and if it works, that's kind of neat, I guess...

If not, it would be rather "duh" of them to ship something that doesn't actually work.

Tim

They do work. Of course nickel is solderable. But I do not like it because my intended target is ENIG and I want to collect data that resembles my target application.
Gold tin IMC can make reliability a completely different story.
 

Offline T3sl4co1l

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Re: Will you call that ENIG?
« Reply #3 on: September 02, 2016, 05:37:38 am »
Indeed.

Have to wonder about the reliability of a bonding agent that has to be cut with a carbide scribe, too...

On the other hand, maybe e.g. QFP joints will crack at the pin, not the solder... :-DD

The stuff looks to be Ni-Al, I suppose as an unreacted nano-powder composite that reacts to form the Ni-Al intermetallic.  FYI, it's extremely brittle, so don't expect miracles once the stuff has been lit off.  Au-Sn is surely the least of your worries in such a joint.

The Al presence might also be a chemical corrosion concern.  Not sure if it will be passivated (by aluminum or nickel; both have their advantages, alone, in that regard), or make one hell of a galvanic couple.  Definitely keep away from acid and base, though.

Tim
Seven Transistor Labs, LLC
Electronic design, from concept to prototype.
Bringing a project to life?  Send me a message!
 
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Offline blueskull

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Re: Will you call that ENIG?
« Reply #4 on: September 02, 2016, 05:50:40 am »
Indeed.

Have to wonder about the reliability of a bonding agent that has to be cut with a carbide scribe, too...

On the other hand, maybe e.g. QFP joints will crack at the pin, not the solder... :-DD

The stuff looks to be Ni-Al, I suppose as an unreacted nano-powder composite that reacts to form the Ni-Al intermetallic.  FYI, it's extremely brittle, so don't expect miracles once the stuff has been lit off.  Au-Sn is surely the least of your worries in such a joint.

The Al presence might also be a chemical corrosion concern.  Not sure if it will be passivated (by aluminum or nickel; both have their advantages, alone, in that regard), or make one hell of a galvanic couple.  Definitely keep away from acid and base, though.

Tim

It is not used to solder electronics parts. It is used to solder ENIG brass casing to its lid. Since I do not have ultrasonic or laser welding equipment, the only way to solder potted module will be using Nanofoil.
This stuff is brittle, even before lit. After lit, it is even more brittle that it can only be scraped away from soldering surface as a powder form. However, I am not worried about its reliability since the final module is not shock rated nor high temp cycle rated. In my final mass production, I would like to use normal SAC305 laser welding.
The finished product will be covered by layers of paint to seal from air, so I am not really worried about aluminum corrosion. Also, Nanofoil is vanadium stabilized with up to 5% vanadium.
 


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