Author Topic: Help me identify a vintage incandescent bulb?  (Read 1167 times)

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Offline cvanc

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Help me identify a vintage incandescent bulb?
« on: April 10, 2018, 03:17:16 pm »
Hi all-

So I'm working on a early 1970's era AKG studio reverb.  It has this 'somewhat European' indicator lamp in the control box.  There are no markings on the bulb and I am not familiar with the shape.  The voltage on it should be in the 24-30V range (I think - no schematics - will measure at the socket next time I'm near it)

Can any of you possibly suggest what this might be, and ideally tell me where they might still be available for purchase?

Many thanks.
 

Offline NiHaoMike

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Re: Help me identify a vintage incandescent bulb?
« Reply #1 on: April 10, 2018, 03:21:47 pm »
If it's only used as an indicator, once the bulb burns out, break out the glass and replace it with a LED and resistor.
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Offline Benta

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Re: Help me identify a vintage incandescent bulb?
« Reply #2 on: April 10, 2018, 03:33:31 pm »
It's called BA7S, very common in vintage cars (instrument panel). Never seen 24 V, though, only 6 V and 12 V in different wattages.
 
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Offline james_s

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Re: Help me identify a vintage incandescent bulb?
« Reply #3 on: April 10, 2018, 04:41:14 pm »
One of my cars uses a bulb like that to illuminate the ambient temperature gauge, it will be easier to find one now that I know what it's called.
 
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Offline factory

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Re: Help me identify a vintage incandescent bulb?
« Reply #4 on: April 10, 2018, 04:53:02 pm »
I picked up some that look like that one a few weeks ago, not sure what voltage they are, but some of the other lamps I bought with them are 28V (ex-military).

David
« Last Edit: April 10, 2018, 04:54:42 pm by factory »
 
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Offline Vtile

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Re: Help me identify a vintage incandescent bulb?
« Reply #5 on: April 10, 2018, 08:07:17 pm »
Google a list of light bulb bayonets (there is awfully lot of them) and start the hunt from there, you can find similar bulbs ie. from early 90s T&M equipments (ie. scope reticle illumination), many of them are still in production.
 
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Offline calexanian

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Re: Help me identify a vintage incandescent bulb?
« Reply #6 on: April 11, 2018, 05:55:28 pm »
24 volt versions of that bulb were common in diesel trucks and aircraft. Should not be a problem to find. A quick google search turned up many of them.
Charles Alexanian
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Offline factory

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Re: Help me identify a vintage incandescent bulb?
« Reply #7 on: April 11, 2018, 07:59:08 pm »
The lamps I got recently were 12V 2W. I also have a couple of 24V 3W but they are probably overkill for an indicator, I suspect they are intended for truck interior lights, ePay seems to have 24V lamps of this type from 0.6W to 3W, as well as 28V 2.8W and 30V 1.2W.
I found these by searching for BA7S & the voltage.

David
 

Offline cvanc

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Re: Help me identify a vintage incandescent bulb?
« Reply #8 on: April 11, 2018, 08:01:03 pm »
24 volt versions of that bulb were common in diesel trucks and aircraft. Should not be a problem to find. A quick google search turned up many of them.

Yeah, now that I know what they're called I'm finding tons of them.  Thanks everybody!
 


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