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General => General Chat => Topic started by: blueskull on April 14, 2018, 08:14:46 am

Title: Worldwide mains plug compatibility
Post by: blueskull on April 14, 2018, 08:14:46 am
I encountered some very similar, but different mains plugs from this document:

http://www.deltapsu.com/products/download/Datasheet/MDS-030AAC05 (http://www.deltapsu.com/products/download/Datasheet/MDS-030AAC05)

In that document, A-B (CN-US) plugs look almost identical, C-G-K (EU-KR-BR) plugs look similar, and E-J (AU-AR) plugs also look similar (despite reversed polarity, but for a 2-pin non-polarized power adapter, that won't matter).

If my understanding is correct, the only difference between Chinese plugs and non-polarized US plugs it that US plugs have a hole on each blade. The only differences between Korean, EU and Brazilian plug is the BR/KR ones are straight and the EU ones are slanted. The BR ones have thicker contact than the KR ones. The Argentina ones are visually identical to AU ones, with reversed polarity.

But I believe they all can plug into each other's sockets of the same group, and I've been mixing CN/US plugs for years without problems.

So my question is, will it be legal to distribute similar but not exact mains plugs with my product?
Title: Re: Worldwide mains plug compatibility
Post by: Edison on April 14, 2018, 02:19:00 pm
Attention to the two existing pin spacing  19 and 24 mm  :o
Title: Re: Worldwide mains plug compatibility
Post by: Edison on April 14, 2018, 02:32:07 pm
EU - WORLD and WORLD - EU
Title: Re: Worldwide mains plug compatibility
Post by: Nusa on April 14, 2018, 04:44:34 pm
I'd guess the answers are potentially different based on which governments you're dealing with, what the country of manufacture is, and where the point of sale is. And whether you are worried about your liability, the customers liability, or both?
Title: Re: Worldwide mains plug compatibility
Post by: Ampera on April 14, 2018, 06:13:43 pm
The regulations are likely on the books free for you to read. Each nation has it's own requirement for electronic devices to be sold.
Title: Re: Worldwide mains plug compatibility
Post by: Bratster on April 14, 2018, 06:44:36 pm
The simplest thing for you to do would probably just put an IEC socket on your piece of equipment, and have it rated to accept 100- 240 volts 50-60hz.

Then you can decide either Supply a power cord for whatever country you're sending it to or leave that up to the user to grab one.

Sent from my Moto x4 using Tapatalk

Title: Re: Worldwide mains plug compatibility
Post by: Ampera on April 14, 2018, 07:21:48 pm
The simplest thing for you to do would probably just put an IEC socket on your piece of equipment, and have it rated to accept 100- 240 volts 50-60hz.

Then you can decide either Supply a power cord for whatever country you're sending it to or leave that up to the user to grab one.

Sent from my Moto x4 using Tapatalk

Honestly, I believe this is how all appliances should come wired. Cheap and replaceable chords, global standard, and gives incentive to wire up homes with IEC style sockets.
Title: Re: Worldwide mains plug compatibility
Post by: blueskull on April 14, 2018, 08:08:23 pm
Thank you for all recommendations. Please note that the Delta PSU I posted has interchangeable input modules. I can simply swap in a new input module and that will be it.

The question is, can I only stock a few input modules?
Title: Re: Worldwide mains plug compatibility
Post by: Ampera on April 15, 2018, 02:32:14 am
I mean most UK appliances used to come without wall plugs, you had to wire your own.

It's still not hard. You can likely find a compliant cable with good ratings quite fine. For a charger like this, it's a bit different, but if you wanted to get fancy, you could just have a straight national mains to IEC adaptor. That way someone can even use a power cable if they wanted to.
Title: Re: Worldwide mains plug compatibility
Post by: vk6zgo on April 15, 2018, 02:55:14 am
I encountered some very similar, but different mains plugs from this document:

http://www.deltapsu.com/products/download/Datasheet/MDS-030AAC05 (http://www.deltapsu.com/products/download/Datasheet/MDS-030AAC05)

In that document, A-B (CN-US) plugs look almost identical, C-G-K (EU-KR-BR) plugs look similar, and E-J (AU-AR) plugs also look similar (despite reversed polarity, but for a 2-pin non-polarized power adapter, that won't matter).

If my understanding is correct, the only difference between Chinese plugs and non-polarized US plugs it that US plugs have a hole on each blade. The only differences between Korean, EU and Brazilian plug is the BR/KR ones are straight and the EU ones are slanted. The BR ones have thicker contact than the KR ones. The Argentina ones are visually identical to AU ones, with reversed polarity.

But I believe they all can plug into each other's sockets of the same group, and I've been mixing CN/US plugs for years without problems.

So my question is, will it be legal to distribute similar but not exact mains plugs with my product?

My understanding was that Chinese plugs were very similar to Australian ones, so maybe, anti-intuitively,
"CN" in that list means Canada, not China.
Of course, maybe there are several types in use in China, like some other countries.

Did you take notice of which plugs were most common when you were still in "the Old Country"?
Title: Re: Worldwide mains plug compatibility
Post by: blueskull on April 15, 2018, 03:11:48 am
My understanding was that Chinese plugs were very similar to Australian ones, so maybe, anti-intuitively,
"CN" in that list means Canada, not China.

Chinese state standard specifies 2 types of residential mains plugs, non-polarized 2-pin IEC type A (US/JP/TW) and grounded 3-pin IEC type I (AU/NZ/AR, China uses the same hot/neutral sequence as AU/NZ).
Canada uses exactly the same plugs as used in US, NEMA 1 (non-grounded) and NEMA 5 (grounded).

Did you take notice of which plugs were most common when you were still in "the Old Country"?

As I've said, there are only 2 types, one for each (grounded/non-grounded) application. There was, once a time, some type C plugs (EU/KR/BR) in China, but those were never standardized and were phased out.
Title: Re: Worldwide mains plug compatibility
Post by: vk6zgo on April 15, 2018, 03:42:10 am
I just checked on the IEC website, & found out what you just told me----I didn't get back to edit my post in time, so I'll just have to look like a dummy in perpetuity! ;D ;D
Title: Re: Worldwide mains plug compatibility
Post by: Towger on April 15, 2018, 05:34:54 am
Hong Kong, Singapore, Malaysia etc also use BS1363.
South Africa still uses the old 15 Amp BS546 plugs.

http://www.iec.ch/worldplugs/typeG.htm