General > General Technical Chat

Wouldnt wave function collapse allow for instant information transfer?

(1/8) > >>

ELS122:
Wouldnt the wave function collapse allow for instant information transfer over any distance? or am I misunderstanding how it works?
And for example allow for us to see if the wave function of some particle has already been collapsed, hinting towards it being observed by some alien?

BU508A:

--- Quote from: ELS122 on May 16, 2024, 05:51:00 am ---Wouldnt the wave function collapse allow for instant information transfer over any distance?

--- End quote ---

No.

AVGresponding:
Waveform function collapse does not generate "new" information; it merely reveals existing but previously hidden information

switchabl:
No, and this is known as the No-Communication Theorem (NCT) in quantum information theory.

Let's say Alice prepares pairs of entangled photons, keeping one and sending the other out into space. When Alien-Bob performs measurements on those, this changes the overall quantum state. But the NCT shows that it doesn't change the statistics of any measurement Alice can do on her photons. No experiment she can do would allow her to know if Alien-Bob ever detected the other half.

It is only when they finally get to talk over a normal communication channel and compare notes that they will find their measurements are correlated.

HuronKing:

--- Quote from: AVGresponding on May 16, 2024, 11:21:46 am ---Waveform function collapse does not generate "new" information; it merely reveals existing but previously hidden information

--- End quote ---

It's doubtful there is 'hidden' information because of Bell's Theorem and the issue of non-locality being required to conform to quantum mechanics - which I think the OP is getting at. Not the creation of 'new' information, but the encoding of information when entangled particles are created and then separated.

switchabl's explanation is correct in referencing the No-Communication Theorem.

In my goofier imaginations, I've wondered if a resolution to the apparent paradox is that light speed really is anisotropic and the entangled particles DO change instantaneously... in one direction, but it all averages out to speed c in the wash whenever anyone tries to confirm the transmission thus still obeying relativity which is built around the two-way speed of light.  ::)

Navigation

[0] Message Index

[#] Next page

There was an error while thanking
Thanking...
Go to full version
Powered by SMFPacks Advanced Attachments Uploader Mod