Author Topic: Wreckage of MH370 washing up on Reunion Island?  (Read 25825 times)

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Offline pickle9000

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Re: Wreckage of MH370 washing up on Reunion Island?
« Reply #75 on: August 03, 2015, 08:30:41 am »
Define fire, and ruling it out without seeing it?

Cockpit fire same aircraft. Same masks? Possible fire on mh370, of course. Need not be the same cause.

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Offline wasyoungonce

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Re: Wreckage of MH370 washing up on Reunion Island?
« Reply #76 on: August 03, 2015, 09:03:23 am »
True...I've seen Aircraft fires (or the aftermath)...the Aircraft do not fly for long, short minutes at best if not seconds, to be true they were not civil aircraft.  Suffice to say, there is no way if they had a fire MH370 battery or other, that the Aircraft would return to Penang do a wing over then fly off do a couple of more course changes and then fly to southern ocean.  These are known's not circumstantial.

A fire is a possibility, circumstantial, but there is no way an airliner could have stayed aloft do these course changes and fly on for hrs and hrs from a fire that incapacitated all on board.  It would engulf the rest of the airframe, rapidly causing catastrophic break-up.  Just like the Helderberg.

Oh I should have also said...MH370 flew pretty much over the old RAAF Butterworth Penang Radar station (Primary) which was real odd then did course changes that appeared to be avoiding radar, this is known but the intent is speculation.
« Last Edit: August 03, 2015, 09:13:16 am by wasyoungonce »
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Offline kosmonooit

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Re: Wreckage of MH370 washing up on Reunion Island?
« Reply #77 on: August 03, 2015, 01:48:07 pm »
Butterworth has an air navigation waypoint (VBT) that would explain why they routed overhead, and I am suggesting that keypoints were being keyed into the Autopilot (just a case of selecting or entering the  letter codes and then GOTO) by a pilots who were perhaps loosing conciousness (that's how these aircraft are flown nowadays) the final one was perhaps on the other side of the earth that why it flew the track it did.

http://ourairports.com/navaids/VBT/Butterworth_VORTAC_MY/#lat=5.476309776306152,lon=100.39399719238281,zoom=10,type=Satellite


In terms of defining 'fire' that would suggest an open flame, which is ignited from combustible (and toxic) fumes, once that starts it spreads rapidly but it this case it could have started in some way, maybe it was contained or extinguished, but continued to out gas toxic fumes, maybe the skin on the fuselage was compromised  causing decompression, whether that  Li Ion cargo had anything to do with that, who knows. As far as I know they only really start misbehaving when over loaded and not cooled (let's get Elon Musk's opinion on this)  not just spontaneous combusting with no load. There could have been an electrical fault that caused wiring to start burning. Lots of maybes here.

About the Helderburg, there was a lot of speculation about its cargo, at that time there was a lot of covert shipping of arms and ammo (and rockets fuel) to SA which was under sanctions, some of the manifest was dodgy and unaccounted for if I remember correctly. It was a Cargo Combo 747, the pax all rushed forward to escape the fumes, some were found three up on the seats.
« Last Edit: August 03, 2015, 02:11:19 pm by kosmonooit »
 

Offline AG6QR

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Re: Wreckage of MH370 washing up on Reunion Island?
« Reply #78 on: August 03, 2015, 05:08:21 pm »
Exactly...the Helderberg, a SA 747 airliner & cargo plane, crashed ~ 1987 from an onboard fire (from cargo area).  Once fire detected....it didn't stay flying for long.  There have been a few Aircraft fires, suffice to say, they burn pretty rapidly.

Yes, but there are also numerous documented instances of pilot suicides.  Once the pilot took action to commit suicide, the plane didn't stay flying for long.

Whatever happened to MH370, it was significantly different from any previous event.

It's not impossible to imagine a pilot pointing the plane out into the middle of the ocean.  But it's also not impossible to imagine a fire that extinguished itself once it breached the pressure vessel and caused decompression, which would cool things, "blow out" a small fire, and/or starve it for oxygen.
 

Offline pickle9000

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Re: Wreckage of MH370 washing up on Reunion Island?
« Reply #79 on: August 03, 2015, 06:05:58 pm »
Helios Airways Flight 522 is similar enough (loss of cabin pressure) that could account for the course change and extended flight.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Helios_Airways_Flight_522

Excessive smoke in the cockpit could easily cause the same issue and flight path. It's not like you can open the windows and the system can only handle so much volume. Not to mention the toxicity.

An electrical fire need not have spread through the plane and could have self extinguished after the crew and passenger where incapacitated.

Could it have been some sort of a hijacking or suicide. An Egyptair flight was certainly suspect when you consider suicide and hijacking happens. Can't rule it out, a weapon fired on board is also a possibility and that would also cause a similar issue with loss of pressurization.

Basically I like to let the evidence lead the way and there is little there at this point.
 

Offline SeanB

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Re: Wreckage of MH370 washing up on Reunion Island?
« Reply #80 on: August 03, 2015, 06:12:26 pm »
Cargo of used lithium cells, and one in the middle is almost at failure. At take off it is fine, but as the hold depressurises to cabin cruise pressure it expends slightly, then this triggers the cell to short internally.  It heats up from the stored energy, and heats up the other used cells in the same pack. The cell protection will not prevent this, as the cell is failing internally. The failing cell eventually bursts and the vapour released catches fire, fuelled by the heat and the ambient air and the hot cells around it. This then triggers the other cells, and they also start to vent and burn the plastic housings. The smoke released, along with the CO and other toxic chemicals in the smoke are circulated by the plane's AC system, and as the first vents are the cockpit the CO starts to build up. The pilots might then notice smoke in the cockpit, and  start to initiate a RTO immediately, programming in the waypoints in reverse order to get there. By now the smoke probably has triggered a loud cargo hold smoke alarm, a fire warning alarm and a few caution warnings as the smouldering fire starts to burn cargo hold wiring. The pilots, thoroughly confused, wearing possibly masks, are trying to contain and triage this sudden unexpected pattern of events, not covered fully in the simulator, where an engine fire is the most common simulation. Thus one or the other mistypes a waypoint, and confirms without checking, setting the autopilot on a track to some far off waypoint via a great circle. Fire by now has burnt through control wiring for the cabin entertainment, and trips breakers, taking out at the same time one AC bus and one DC bus. Aircraft systems reconfigure to a failed state but keep running in degraded mode, and there are suddenly a whole load of new warnings on an already overloaded crew.  fire burns through control wiring and half the cabin instrumentation goes dead, and kills the comms systems and radios. Fire burns through bottom of cargo hold, and vents cabin pressure at a rapid rate, dumping the smoke, but the crew have already lost consciousness from the sudden pressure loss popping the masks off them, and they fall down unconscious.

Plane flies to waypoint on autopilot, then turns and attempts to follow to the other waypoints programmed in by the pilots by error. In all this fuel management and trim keeps the aircraft in balance, transferring fuel as needed from tanks to keep the aircraft balanced at the optimum flight attitude for the altitude and speed. Plane flies till autopilot detects low fuel, and it gives strident warnings to the cabin, then eventually degrades to attitude hold as the engines run dry. Last engine runs out, and suddenly the AC busses disappear, and the DC battery is called on to supply all power. RAT is deployed automatically by the failed AC bus and DC bus monitor, and provides emergency power and hydraulics, and autopilot stops attitude hold and does minimum airspeed management in a long glide. No ground warning, no power for the radio altimeter, though the air data system would be triggering warnings about level.

Impact.

 

Offline pickle9000

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Re: Wreckage of MH370 washing up on Reunion Island?
« Reply #81 on: August 03, 2015, 06:22:57 pm »
I would love to hear what was in the successfully transmitted data packets. They say normal, but what items where recorded and what are capable of being recorded.
 

Offline pickle9000

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Re: Wreckage of MH370 washing up on Reunion Island?
« Reply #82 on: August 03, 2015, 06:24:27 pm »
Cargo of used lithium cells, and one in the middle is almost at failure. At take off it is fine, but as the hold depressurises to cabin cruise pressure it expends slightly, then this triggers the cell to short internally.  It heats up from the stored energy, and heats up the other used cells in the same pack. The cell protection will not prevent this, as the cell is failing internally. The failing cell eventually bursts and the vapour released catches fire, fuelled by the heat and the ambient air and the hot cells around it. This then triggers the other cells, and they also start to vent and burn the plastic housings. The smoke released, along with the CO and other toxic chemicals in the smoke are circulated by the plane's AC system, and as the first vents are the cockpit the CO starts to build up. The pilots might then notice smoke in the cockpit, and  start to initiate a RTO immediately, programming in the waypoints in reverse order to get there. By now the smoke probably has triggered a loud cargo hold smoke alarm, a fire warning alarm and a few caution warnings as the smouldering fire starts to burn cargo hold wiring. The pilots, thoroughly confused, wearing possibly masks, are trying to contain and triage this sudden unexpected pattern of events, not covered fully in the simulator, where an engine fire is the most common simulation. Thus one or the other mistypes a waypoint, and confirms without checking, setting the autopilot on a track to some far off waypoint via a great circle. Fire by now has burnt through control wiring for the cabin entertainment, and trips breakers, taking out at the same time one AC bus and one DC bus. Aircraft systems reconfigure to a failed state but keep running in degraded mode, and there are suddenly a whole load of new warnings on an already overloaded crew.  fire burns through control wiring and half the cabin instrumentation goes dead, and kills the comms systems and radios. Fire burns through bottom of cargo hold, and vents cabin pressure at a rapid rate, dumping the smoke, but the crew have already lost consciousness from the sudden pressure loss popping the masks off them, and they fall down unconscious.

Plane flies to waypoint on autopilot, then turns and attempts to follow to the other waypoints programmed in by the pilots by error. In all this fuel management and trim keeps the aircraft in balance, transferring fuel as needed from tanks to keep the aircraft balanced at the optimum flight attitude for the altitude and speed. Plane flies till autopilot detects low fuel, and it gives strident warnings to the cabin, then eventually degrades to attitude hold as the engines run dry. Last engine runs out, and suddenly the AC busses disappear, and the DC battery is called on to supply all power. RAT is deployed automatically by the failed AC bus and DC bus monitor, and provides emergency power and hydraulics, and autopilot stops attitude hold and does minimum airspeed management in a long glide. No ground warning, no power for the radio altimeter, though the air data system would be triggering warnings about level.

Impact.

Fits perfectly.
 

Offline donotdespisethesnake

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Re: Wreckage of MH370 washing up on Reunion Island?
« Reply #83 on: August 03, 2015, 07:49:53 pm »
Cargo of used lithium cells, and one in the middle is almost at failure. ...

This is something like my best guess scenario too. There have certainly been lithium fires, and also depressurization events where the plane continues to fly (e.g. Helios). Although it is unlikely the two combine in such a way, MH370 is also a rare event.

However, professional pilots suggest a cargo fire or depress should cause the pilots to descend immediately, either to land ASAP or increase cabin pressure. But pilots do not always follow the book, and in the case where they were already hypoxic, may not have been able to think normally.

The potential search area is huge though, I am not sure they will ever find it to resolve the mystery.
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Offline tom66

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Re: Wreckage of MH370 washing up on Reunion Island?
« Reply #84 on: August 03, 2015, 07:55:29 pm »
SeanB's scenario seems quite plausible. An example of cockpit confusion due to fire is the case of Swissair 111. The pilots are confounded by systems failing one by one as the fire destroys wiring and system avionics. The autopilot fails and they have to take control, but the fire begins destroying the mechanical control cables and control of the aircraft is lost. If the fire began near the aft electronics bay, it's quite possible that the only initially noticeable symptom would be gradual loss of key systems. I'm not sure where the transponder system is, but perhaps if this is located in the aft electronics bay this could be one of the first systems to fail.

One question - is there any fire suppression system for the cargo hold or aft electronics bay, and if so is this sufficient to extinguish a lithium battery fuelled fire?
 

Offline kosmonooit

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Re: Wreckage of MH370 washing up on Reunion Island?
« Reply #85 on: August 03, 2015, 08:01:42 pm »
But aren't  the hold and the cabin pressures linked always? I think generally set to 6000' equiv at altitude, so how could there be a big differential  in cargo - cabin pressures & temps?

Aren't most Li Ion cells protected with a small circuit board ? I've seen 'em smoking / exploding on YouTube but only once the protection is removed, and after a serious 'battering'.
« Last Edit: August 03, 2015, 08:14:08 pm by kosmonooit »
 

Offline pickle9000

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Re: Wreckage of MH370 washing up on Reunion Island?
« Reply #86 on: August 03, 2015, 08:18:14 pm »
Electrical /chemical fires need to have the sources removed. Turn off the power or remove the fuel. Breakers and fusible links are there for a reason.
 

Offline kosmonooit

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Re: Wreckage of MH370 washing up on Reunion Island?
« Reply #87 on: August 03, 2015, 08:21:42 pm »
SeanB's scenario seems quite plausible. An example of cockpit confusion due to fire is the case of Swissair 111. The pilots are confounded by systems failing one by one as the fire destroys wiring and system avionics. The autopilot fails and they have to take control, but the fire begins destroying the mechanical control cables and control of the aircraft is lost. If the fire began near the aft electronics bay, it's quite possible that the only initially noticeable symptom would be gradual loss of key systems. I'm not sure where the transponder system is, but perhaps if this is located in the aft electronics bay this could be one of the first systems to fail.

One question - is there any fire suppression system for the cargo hold or aft electronics bay, and if so is this sufficient to extinguish a lithium battery fuelled fire?

There are also many other instances with pilot confusion in the midst of a panic and wrong waypoints entered (like in Columbia where the aircraft flew into a mountain)  - there must be clues in what worked and what didn't in terms of circuits failure, I think there is triple redundancy on the 777?

In terms of fire suppression I think there is lots in the cargo hold, but not much you can do about the toxic smoke. Also that was the problem the Helderburg 747 Combi, inadequate fire   suppression in the cargo section of the main cabin.
« Last Edit: August 03, 2015, 08:23:43 pm by kosmonooit »
 

Offline SeanB

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Re: Wreckage of MH370 washing up on Reunion Island?
« Reply #88 on: August 03, 2015, 08:43:55 pm »
You have pressurised and unpressurised cargo areas, the pressurised cargo shares the cabin air and ventilation, as it is often used for transporting livestock, fish and pets.. Thus a fire there will lead to smoke in the cabin, followed by equipment failures as it typically is just behind the avionics bays, or even between them for certain things like gyro's, which have to be mounted at the mass centre of the aircraft. The cargo holds also have the main wiring and hydraulic lines running through them, in bundles either under the floor in a cable tray or in loops of wiring bundled up and laced hanging from the support structure of the floor above.

Fire protection used to be a remote discharge halon unit, but they have had to change them out, so now it is only possible to have a dry powder or a CO2 canister, and the main fire suppression method is to depressurise the cabin and close of the air input, to starve it of O2 while aiming for the nearest runway at speed. seeing as the Lithium cells are capable of burning even in low oxygen conditions and they will continue to generate toxic gas so long as they have charge, and thus will fill the interior with toxic or irritating gas for a long time, even if you stop the fresh air inlet, which will prevent the gas from being removed by the cabin purge valves.

Triple redundancy does not protect against physical damage, only that the software, firmware is not all going to fail at the same time. Note as well the tiny matter of the firmware counter being found to have a time dependant bug which caused it to fail had after being powered for a few months when an internal counter would overflow and crash. Reboot fixes it till next time, but you really do not want to reboot on approach or take off.

The protection circuit may protect against overcharge, but it doers nothing about internal cell failure. Sony and others had massive recalls of battery packs that had a ferrous contaminant in them from the sealing process, which led to some rather spectacular battery fires in laptops. A cell in the pack may short to another if the casing is damaged, and this would be enough to trigger a fire in the pack, just from the connector tabs getting red hot within seconds.
 

Offline AG6QR

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Re: Wreckage of MH370 washing up on Reunion Island?
« Reply #89 on: August 03, 2015, 08:47:51 pm »
But aren't  the hold and the cabin pressures linked always? I think generally set to 6000' equiv at altitude, so how could there be a big differential  in cargo - cabin pressures & temps?

Yes, the fuselage of the aircraft is one big pressure vessel, and that's why it's roughly cylindrical in shape with rounded ends.   Pressure vessels require significant reinforcement (meaning significant weight) to make sharp corners, or even flat surfaces.

The floor of the cabin is not capable of sustaining a significant pressure differential between the cabin above and the hold below.  There is enough ventilation to insure that no big pressure differences build up.  Temperature differences aren't always so well controlled.

You have pressurised and unpressurised cargo areas, the pressurised cargo shares the cabin air and ventilation, as it is often used for transporting livestock, fish and pets..

There is NO unpressurized cargo area in a modern airliner.  There are areas that lack forced-air ventilation, with no temperature control, and these areas are unsuitable for pets and other live animals.  But they are at the same pressure as the cabin.
 

Offline wasyoungonce

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Re: Wreckage of MH370 washing up on Reunion Island?
« Reply #90 on: August 03, 2015, 09:24:55 pm »
Cargo of used lithium cells, and one in the middle is almost at failure. At take off it is fine, but as the hold depressurises to cabin cruise pressure it expends slightly, then this triggers the cell to short internally.  It heats up from the stored energy, and heats up the other used cells in the same pack. The cell protection will not prevent this, as the cell is failing internally. The failing cell eventually bursts and the vapour released catches fire, fuelled by the heat and the ambient air and the hot cells around it. This then triggers the other cells, and they also start to vent and burn the plastic housings. The smoke released, along with the CO and other toxic chemicals in the smoke are circulated by the plane's AC system, and as the first vents are the cockpit the CO starts to build up. The pilots might then notice smoke in the cockpit, and  start to initiate a RTO immediately, programming in the waypoints in reverse order to get there. By now the smoke probably has triggered a loud cargo hold smoke alarm, a fire warning alarm and a few caution warnings as the smouldering fire starts to burn cargo hold wiring. The pilots, thoroughly confused, wearing possibly masks, are trying to contain and triage this sudden unexpected pattern of events, not covered fully in the simulator, where an engine fire is the most common simulation. Thus one or the other mistypes a waypoint, and confirms without checking, setting the autopilot on a track to some far off waypoint via a great circle. Fire by now has burnt through control wiring for the cabin entertainment, and trips breakers, taking out at the same time one AC bus and one DC bus. Aircraft systems reconfigure to a failed state but keep running in degraded mode, and there are suddenly a whole load of new warnings on an already overloaded crew.  fire burns through control wiring and half the cabin instrumentation goes dead, and kills the comms systems and radios. Fire burns through bottom of cargo hold, and vents cabin pressure at a rapid rate, dumping the smoke, but the crew have already lost consciousness from the sudden pressure loss popping the masks off them, and they fall down unconscious.Impact.

Good points...but any fire that takes out comms and NAV would have disable all Inmarsat systems (no handshake pings), avionics and flight controls.   Swiss AIR 111 is a typical example, though fire was near cockpit.
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Offline kosmonooit

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Re: Wreckage of MH370 washing up on Reunion Island?
« Reply #91 on: August 03, 2015, 09:57:06 pm »
Like I suggested earlier it could be partial avionics and power circuits failure due to thermal stresses  - cutting out the comms, leaving some instruments on line, source could be a dodgy connection, chaffed live, whatever, has happened before, electrical fires are hectic. Details can only be pure speculation, but have 'they' been looking at possible scenarios? But its this vs the suicide plane, that I have difficulty with. As any student of aviation safety will know, expect the unexpected, in terms of things going wrong, how humans react, most of the accidents are not due to one single cause, but a number of smaller things, that in themselves would not be significant or fatal.

Li Ion cargo sounds more like a conspiracy theory, yes there have been issues in the past, but surely aviations authorities would not be complacent about that if there were indeed tangible dangers for them as cargo? Beside the overheating due to over charging, which is well know, and also temp problems with high/ long current drain like Solar Impulse recently experienced (Tesla has a liquid cooling system in their battery pack) Remember the Dreamliner Li Ion problems? they just did workarounds "The causes of the battery failures are still unknown"

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Boeing_787_Dreamliner_battery_problems

But batteries in the hold, out of any circuit ...? hmmmm (as Dave would say)

 

Offline Wytnucls

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Re: Wreckage of MH370 washing up on Reunion Island?
« Reply #92 on: August 03, 2015, 11:32:07 pm »
Lithium ion batteries are not allowed in the cargo holds of airliners anymore.
The 777 has class C cargo holds with smoke detection and halon fire suppression.
« Last Edit: August 03, 2015, 11:47:13 pm by Wytnucls »
 

Offline cimmo

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Re: Wreckage of MH370 washing up on Reunion Island?
« Reply #93 on: August 04, 2015, 02:39:15 am »
There is NO unpressurized cargo area in a modern airliner.  There are areas that lack forced-air ventilation, with no temperature control, and these areas are unsuitable for pets and other live animals.  But they are at the same pressure as the cabin.

Exactly. In point of fact, there were a few accidents involving cargo door failures (DC10s mostly) that depressurised the cargo area so quickly that the cabin floor failed due to the differential pressure. In one case the failing floor cut (or jammed) flight surface control cables and the aircraft was lost (Turkish DC10).

That is why in newer designs (and retrofitted to older aircraft) there are now weakened blow out panels or vents in the floor that allow the pressure differential to quickly equalise to avoid further structural damage.

BTW, typical pressure differentials are around 8-9PSI (~0.6Bar) - I'll leave it as an exercise to calculate the total forces involved for a large airliner fuselage.
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Offline wxm145

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Re: Wreckage of MH370 washing up on Reunion Island?
« Reply #94 on: August 04, 2015, 02:44:30 am »
feel very sad for mh 370 :'(
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Offline tom66

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Re: Wreckage of MH370 washing up on Reunion Island?
« Reply #95 on: August 04, 2015, 08:17:36 am »
Good points...but any fire that takes out comms and NAV would have disable all Inmarsat systems (no handshake pings), avionics and flight controls.   Swiss AIR 111 is a typical example, though fire was near cockpit.

Depends where the fire begins. Could a slow burning fire take out the radio/comms systems without the crew noticing?  Perhaps inmarsat stuff is located nearer the cockpit? Or could the aircraft remain flying with all flight controls at neutral, say if key avionics systems were lost?  I have a feeling the fire would compromise the airframe before this would happen.
« Last Edit: August 04, 2015, 08:19:46 am by tom66 »
 

Offline John_ITIC

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Re: Wreckage of MH370 washing up on Reunion Island?
« Reply #96 on: August 09, 2015, 09:51:45 pm »
That plane is the only 777 to have gone down over that ocean. It's a damn fine plane.
A fine plane might not have picked up the nickname cripple seven.

I just came back from vacation in Europe on a 777-200. Flew from London on Friday morning but had to turn back due to short circuits in (two separate) entertainment centers that caused smoke in the cabin. We dumped fuel and made an uneventful emergency landing. The airline paid for hotel, dinner, breakfast etc so not too bad. But the next morning, we boarded another 777-200 for another attempt just to find out that the co-pilot's instruments didn't match the pilot's. This wasn't detected until pre-flight check. The mechanics were called in and a bunch of things were replaced including the co-pilot's seat (apparently electronics built-in) before we could get on our way. Then we were told that the pilots' maximum wake/work time would be exceeded if we went all the way back to Los Angeles. This was "solved" by making an extra stop in Washington DC for crew change. I think the total trip took some 18 hours...

Not sure if we were double-unlucky but I'll remember Boing 777-200 and United Airlines for a while...
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Offline pickle9000

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Re: Wreckage of MH370 washing up on Reunion Island?
« Reply #97 on: August 09, 2015, 10:24:10 pm »
That plane is the only 777 to have gone down over that ocean. It's a damn fine plane.
A fine plane might not have picked up the nickname cripple seven.

I just came back from vacation in Europe on a 777-200. Flew from London on Friday morning but had to turn back due to short circuits in (two separate) entertainment centers that caused smoke in the cabin. We dumped fuel and made an uneventful emergency landing. The airline paid for hotel, dinner, breakfast etc so not too bad. But the next morning, we boarded another 777-200 for another attempt just to find out that the co-pilot's instruments didn't match the pilot's. This wasn't detected until pre-flight check. The mechanics were called in and a bunch of things were replaced including the co-pilot's seat (apparently electronics built-in) before we could get on our way. Then we were told that the pilots' maximum wake/work time would be exceeded if we went all the way back to Los Angeles. This was "solved" by making an extra stop in Washington DC for crew change. I think the total trip took some 18 hours...

Not sure if we were double-unlucky but I'll remember Boing 777-200 and United Airlines for a while...

Double unlucky would be not finding the problem. Funny how stuff like that doesn't even rate a mention on the news. You'd think the reporters would be looking for every little incident and making a big deal out of it.



 
 

Offline amyk

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Re: Wreckage of MH370 washing up on Reunion Island?
« Reply #98 on: August 10, 2015, 01:13:34 am »
Funny how stuff like that doesn't even rate a mention on the news. You'd think the reporters would be looking for every little incident and making a big deal out of it.
It does get mentioned on the aviation news; he was probably talking about this one: http://avherald.com/h?article=48a78266&opt=0

(MH370 is there too.)
 

Offline ccs46

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Re: Wreckage of MH370 washing up on Reunion Island?
« Reply #99 on: August 10, 2015, 02:12:46 am »
BTW, typical pressure differentials are around 8-9PSI (~0.6Bar) - I'll leave it as an exercise to calculate the total forces involved for a large airliner fuselage.
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