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General => General Chat => Topic started by: Circlotron on September 05, 2020, 01:38:33 pm

Title: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: Circlotron on September 05, 2020, 01:38:33 pm
Here we have a headline that reads:
Black hole 142 times heavier than the Sun discovered
and further along in the article we read
GW190521 weighs in at 142 times the mass of our Sun

https://alkhaleejtoday.co/international/5038560/Black-hole-142-times-heavier-than-the-Sun-discovered.html (https://alkhaleejtoday.co/international/5038560/Black-hole-142-times-heavier-than-the-Sun-discovered.html)

Which is of course, plainly contradictory.
If it were 142 times heavier than our sun it would be 143 times the mass of our sun, not 142. This kind of thing seems to be popping up more and more lately.

What other things are there?
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: JackJones on September 05, 2020, 01:47:56 pm
People saying MOSFET and a transistor. What do they think the T stands for? grumble grumble

I hear a lot of people saying that, they think BJTs are transistors and FETs something else.  :-//
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: Circlotron on September 05, 2020, 02:22:00 pm
And back in the 1960s the general public would often call a portable radio a transistor.  |O
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: GlennSprigg on September 05, 2020, 02:30:22 pm
I KNOW how it works, but I HATE it when we refer to past dates, like the 17th Century!!
I prefer the likes of the 1600's to define a date !!!   8)
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: HobGoblyn on September 05, 2020, 03:56:08 pm
The saying used by many UK retailers "when it's gone, it's gone"



Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: free_electron on September 05, 2020, 04:02:39 pm
People saying MOSFET and a transistor. What do they think the T stands for? grumble grumble

I hear a lot of people saying that, they think BJTs are transistors and FETs something else.  :-//
pin numbers and atm machines >:)
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: Siwastaja on September 05, 2020, 04:07:31 pm
If it were 142 times heavier than our sun it would be 143 times the mass of our sun, not 142. This kind of thing seems to be popping up more and more lately.

NOOOoooooooooooooo!

My pet peeve are people who say that.

Years ago, I found a very detailed and nice article going hundreds of years back in records to prove you totally wrong. Although, that was regarding Finnish language where the exact same stupid discussion has been seen over and over again (popping up more and more lately!). The construct, and argumentation are exactly the same. So I don't know if you are actually wrong in English. But I'm 99% sure you are. And I'm sure it goes back for much longer than in Finnish. After all, correctness of language is not defined by some arbitrarily chosen pedantic (on surface) logic (defined by YOU in this case), but by actual usage, and the actual usage of "x times heavier" goes back for the long time.

This is easy, just laborious to research. Just get as much material as possible from as long period of time as possible, find usages of the "x times heavier" pattern, pick those where the meaning can be inferred from the context or otherwise (for example, both numbers are well known or verifiable from other sources), and see which was the intended meaning. Let me guess: it will be 100% of the "x times heavier" = "x times as heavy" meaning, the other, your "correct one", "x times heavier" = "x+1 times as heavy" only seen in meta-discussions like this.

If you want to be extra careful, you avoid the whole "x times heavier" construct just to avoid one of the nitpickers "misunderstanding" on purpose; this is what I try to do, preferring exactness whenever it's possible.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: free_electron on September 05, 2020, 04:11:30 pm
a few of mine

- bootup / time from disc-in to movie start times of blu-ray and dvd players. i have an old ( made in october 2000 ) daewoo dvd player with a hard mechanical on/off switch. click the switch and within a second the menu is ready. pop in a disc and within another second or two the disc menu appears. Try that with a modern player. they sit there chewing and chewing on the disc and then frequently come up with 'this disc needs a firmware update in order to play'. you want a quiet comfy movie night and the whole experience is ruined because you can spend half an hour installing four or five firmware updates to these fuckers. i stopped buying discs yeara ago. i'm tired of that nonsense.

- ANY programming language that requires semicolons to denote end of statements. there is a cr or cr/lf pair in the file already. use that. and , in case a line really is too long you should either : rewrite the code , or have a line continuation character. there are much less cases where you need to split a long line.
- Any programming language that makes a difference between uppercase and lowercase for statements and variable names.
- Any programming language using whitespace for flow control
- Any programming language that cannot understand when = means 'assign' and when it means 'compare'. This problem was solved in the 60's. And we are still fucking around with things like := and == because the parsers writers are stupid.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: joseph nicholas on September 05, 2020, 04:15:45 pm
People who believe that Bible stories actually happened.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: Siwastaja on September 05, 2020, 04:16:59 pm
- ANY programming language that requires semicolons to denote end of statements. there is a cr or cr/lf pair in the file already. use that. and , in case a line really is too long you should either : rewrite the code , or have a line continuation character. there are much less cases where you need to split a long line.
- Any programming language using whitespace for flow control

These two are conflicting. Which one do you want? I agree with the latter, and for that exact reason, disagree with the first.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: mark03 on September 05, 2020, 04:21:35 pm
Ha... these are kind of cute (although the example cited by the OP is, in fact, correct).  How about something genuinely annoying:

People who fail to reach cruising speed before merging onto the freeway (or equivalent in your country), and people who drop below cruising speed before having fully exited the freeway.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: Siwastaja on September 05, 2020, 04:29:02 pm
People who fail to reach cruising speed before merging onto the freeway (or equivalent in your country), and people who drop below cruising speed before having fully exited the freeway.

Oh, traffic!

People who drive their toy SUVs (mostly white Kia, for some strange reason! I have no opinion about this brand except this real-life observation) 85km/h in perfectly optimum conditions, when the limit is 100km/h (and would be 110km/h in most European countries in similar conditions/roads), right next to the center line, even on the top of the center line wearing off the line, making it much more difficult to take over. If there is a (limited-length) passing lane, they will immediately speed up to 105km/h overspeed to prevent law-abiding citizens taking over (so most in the long jam caused by them), then slow back to 85 km/h. They fail to see what they do is actual criminal offence on at least two or three different counts. You often need some serious speeding to get past the jams they produce. Or, you just finally fall asleep in the jam. They think they are good drivers, yet they have 5-second reaction times and cause most of the accidents (not counting alcohol related), while people driving normally pay most of the fines by driving 87 km/h - 200€ a pop - or oh my god, 105km/h - easily 10000€/pop - on a 100-80-100-80-100-80-100-80 camera trap road that would be solid 110km/h in almost any other European country.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: Siwastaja on September 05, 2020, 04:38:13 pm
And back in the 1960s the general public would often call a portable radio a transistor.  |O

This is a good example case of one of the pet peeves of mine, shortening multi-word concepts that consist of attribute + base term, to the attribute only. This makes for great obfuscated professional jargon. The key is, shortening it to the base term only is correct, but loses information. Shortening it to the attribute only, provides a hilariously ridiculous and totally wrong word, but if the receiving part can guess the base term, then the information is preserved: great compression ratio.

This also works if the users of the words do not know what the attribute means, and would only use it in this single phrase. Then, the base term becomes redundant for them. This is the case for "transistor radio".

A ridiculous example would be "bus stop". Would you call it a "bus"?

Regarding the traffic theme, police here call drivers under influence of alcohol... drumroll: "steering wheels". Example usage: "We caught a steering wheel." Because it's literally, and semi-officially called "wheel-drunkenness". Remove the base term, drunkenness, leave the attribute, the steering wheel. That's it!
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: Tomorokoshi on September 05, 2020, 04:49:38 pm
And back in the 1960s the general public would often call a portable radio a transistor.  |O

This is very common. A key point here is "general public"; inherent in that description is they would not have a need to know or understand the vagaries of electronic components. Consider that people going to the beach or whatever would be unlikely to bring any other kind of transistorized device, so in that case "transistor" would imply that the device in question is a radio.

For a long time in America televisions were generally known as "tubes", even though it was understood that "tubes" were also the functional components within the device.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: SpecialK on September 05, 2020, 04:58:11 pm
Using the term "hydro" to mean "electricity".  Some of our electricity is hydro-electric.  Much of it isn't.  It's throwing out the significant term and keeping the insignifcant detail.  It's like calling a pneumatic tire automobile a "pneumo" or something.

Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: Tomorokoshi on September 05, 2020, 04:59:34 pm

I have a couple disagreements with what is asserted by grammarian or scientist pedants:

1. I use the phrase, "this data is..." as opposed to "these data are...". From my point of view, the data set is a unitary collection; therefore it is a single item. Even if the data set were multiple, independent items, the conclusion would still be based on the unified collection of the data sets. Alternatively, if some amount of the data were removed, the implication is the conclusion would also be different.

2. The location of the period within a quotation. I move it to the outside of the quote. For instance:
And then he said, "My transistor is broken".

as opposed to:
And then he said, "My transistor is broken."

which would imply:
And then he said, "My transistor is broken.".
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: Bud on September 05, 2020, 05:23:33 pm
Any kickstarter that claims "Our product will revolutionize the industry !"
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: ebastler on September 05, 2020, 05:56:31 pm
- ANY programming language that requires semicolons to denote end of statements. there is a cr or cr/lf pair in the file already. use that. and , in case a line really is too long you should either : rewrite the code , or have a line continuation character. there are much less cases where you need to split a long line.
- Any programming language using whitespace for flow control

These two are conflicting. Which one do you want?

He wants BASIC.
(And has not realized that carriage return is a white-space character.)
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: joseph nicholas on September 05, 2020, 06:06:50 pm
People who put the em fa sis on the wrong syll a ble.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: floobydust on September 05, 2020, 06:27:42 pm
The dork "Fetlington" (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2N7000) label used for a 2N7000 MOSFET. Actually a JFET+BJT is a compound-Darlington for that label.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: magic on September 05, 2020, 07:22:14 pm
If it were 142 times heavier than our sun it would be 143 times the mass of our sun, not 142.
:wtf:

I guess one could prove it by induction by starting from "one time heavier", but FFS |O
I have never heard anyone saying it that way.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: TimFox on September 05, 2020, 07:24:37 pm
My pet peeve is treating "data" as singular.  A "data set" is singular, and "datum" (a member of that set) is singular, but put a few together and you have "data", which is plural.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: schmitt trigger on September 05, 2020, 07:44:11 pm
The verb: to Google

Such as: "Google the Battle of Kursk". Rather than: "Search the web for the Battle of Kursk".
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: Circlotron on September 05, 2020, 10:49:27 pm
“Fully imported”
= better than local people could produce.

“Export quality”
= better than local people deserve.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: eti on September 06, 2020, 01:05:31 am
This is the internet, when you ask for "advice"  ;D

(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/FJQrzBzCtA6YrkTQLINOveegoI6dYwpsxsjRXdy17CpIUPGonXmsjgF_mrxj5URkV1YuNkHvZpVkRS024KwE_UkyN59QMZ6F_Sv9PvWSEZB8MGWAVfazj9ctjvHlhFFks5ph64fQEcMWk27yCc0pa_4bzhE4QYYc_HzV_B3QxMAKFSXUqivnFD-qj2m0ah236d-I-_p2FpkskBZCTo-28p17aZlpgVBhyjIk3XC-hTKwEaH0rieJQp_qqxbVHgVsCo9y1JFCjcXGOBvmCV0j4LSnZ6LPtYbqKRmydm0MQrPURTic5rFWPP_1WILb7r61YNACzLJVFOuy9UhKn4eUzQMqnfKp0FPbtWOIFmmB_xwXg_Rq43KgrC0TKiwy_oVrH6k9hmtFbfEYZdBHOJXtlfQeT2DjX81OuiiGMDlR8jQBd-VCFErg4FYvWVwe8Qhw4kxnCzav6YEqEbRODPJH9lUdgU6x_DvT-4KRws3_NqFafFfBGpuw4NR8Mwa5QP6tWYHgS9wY2vK6To7A4wZwUohXVDygElbfpSUHP9GIK5RZxtRKlCVs15PgGR4TKkc1lt2uXMsaxBtDPb6dAFx2j6DJmuozW8aepGCpbfpxA6k9MxPmu4m9XwTuGcl_Pm2QWu9cx0sN8GNFGUzB_bnHGlSxIq7RRZuVaEOxfrAqPS2_itH0zEMBm_RG8mo1D44=w787-h590-no?authuser=0)
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: bsfeechannel on September 06, 2020, 01:28:59 am
Engineers, when they forget they are essentially half-assed physicists.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: basinstreetdesign on September 06, 2020, 02:01:11 am
People who claim that the century/millennium starts at year XX00 not XX01.  I guess they forget that there was never a year 0000.  :scared:
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: AlfBaz on September 06, 2020, 02:03:53 am
Somebody puts up a post that they discovered a worm hole into another dimension, with a video to prove it and the thread derails into an argument about the wrong ISO settings on the camera :palm:
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: Circlotron on September 06, 2020, 02:42:31 am
When people call a generic tablet an iPad.
Or call any old vacuum cleaner a Hoover.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: TimFox on September 06, 2020, 02:48:28 am
People who claim that the century/millennium starts at year XX00 not XX01.  I guess they forget that there was never a year 0000.  :scared:
Damned right!  The last year of the Twentieth Century was twenty-hundred, just as the last year of the First Century was one hundred.  Year one through year 100 is 100 years, a century.  When this was defined, the Church used Roman numerals, which do not contain zero.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: themadhippy on September 06, 2020, 03:06:40 am
Ring main when describing socket circuits,its a ring final circuit,or even ring final will do,a ring mains belongs  in the world of high voltage distribution  or is  something to do with water.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: magic on September 06, 2020, 03:37:19 am
People who claim that the century/millennium starts at year XX00 not XX01.  I guess they forget that there was never a year 0000.  :scared:
People who came up with there not being a year 0.

People who think all dates are four digits long :)
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: helius on September 06, 2020, 03:49:56 am
NOOOoooooooooooooo...
Let me guess: it will be 100% of the "x times heavier" = "x times as heavy" meaning

He is correct: 142 times is 14200 percent. Suppose for purposes of discussion that the subject is only 50% heavier than the mass of the Sun. If "50% heavier than" actually means "50% as heavy", we have the curious conclusion that it is both heavier and lighter at the same time.

The multiplicand of the relative amount is always the object of the comparison, and comparative adverbs like "heavier" or "cheaper" always refer to differences (subtraction).

To put it simply, "A is X% [comparative] than B" --> \$ A - B = \frac X {100} \cdot B \$

Taking a popularity contest will not establish correctness, because it's been shown that the majority of people are innumerate.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: bsfeechannel on September 06, 2020, 03:56:24 am
People who came up with there not being a year 0.

That would be the ancient Romans. They didn't have the number zero. When counting time they considered the present time as 1. So, when you were born you already were in your first year. On your first birthday, you were in your second year and so on. If an ancient Roman told you something would happen in two days, that'd be tomorrow, because the present day would be counted as the first day.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: Bassman59 on September 06, 2020, 04:53:01 am
When people call a generic tablet an iPad.
Or call any old vacuum cleaner a Hoover.

Did you Xerox your TPS report?
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: Bassman59 on September 06, 2020, 04:54:37 am
Here we have a headline that reads:
Black hole 142 times heavier than the Sun discovered
and further along in the article we read
GW190521 weighs in at 142 times the mass of our Sun

https://alkhaleejtoday.co/international/5038560/Black-hole-142-times-heavier-than-the-Sun-discovered.html (https://alkhaleejtoday.co/international/5038560/Black-hole-142-times-heavier-than-the-Sun-discovered.html)

Which is of course, plainly contradictory.
If it were 142 times heavier than our sun it would be 143 times the mass of our sun, not 142. This kind of thing seems to be popping up more and more lately.

What other things are there?

AAPL just did a 4:1 split.

A lot of people had no idea how many shares of stock they'd have after the split was complete.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: Bassman59 on September 06, 2020, 04:56:11 am
Many people like to say things like, "I am loving this new thing," instead of saying, "I love this new thing."

Or "I am wanting a new thing" instead of "I want a new thing."

I don't get it.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: helius on September 06, 2020, 05:28:22 am
Many people like to say things like, "I am loving this new thing," instead of saying, "I love this new thing."

Or "I am wanting a new thing" instead of "I want a new thing."

I don't get it.
In the 2000s there was a cultural appreciation of poorly translated sentences found in video games from Japan. "All your base are belong to us" from Zero Wing, and the like. A particular feature of these Engrish utterances are a tense shift from present to imperfect ("am wanting"), which I surmise reflects differences of Japanese sentence structure. Many people found it funny, and started using these forms as an attempt at humor; others copied it, without knowing why it was humorous. This is how many language trends develop.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: Circlotron on September 06, 2020, 05:34:00 am
It annoys me when shareholders supposedly get paid a dividend.
No they don’t!
They get paid a quotient.
A dividend is the total amount to be divided up.
And the divisor is now many parts it is separated into.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: Ed.Kloonk on September 06, 2020, 06:13:51 am
Somebody puts up a post that they discovered a worm hole into another dimension, with a video to prove it and the thread derails into an argument about the wrong ISO settings on the camera :palm:

Nar, those who video in portrait mode. Firing squad's to good for them.

Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: eti on September 06, 2020, 06:16:28 am
Somebody puts up a post that they discovered a worm hole into another dimension, with a video to prove it and the thread derails into an argument about the wrong ISO settings on the camera :palm:

Nar, those who video in portrait mode. Firing squad's to good for them.

I do agree, in the "traditional" sense, but I think you're a little behind the times me old friend - most people watch video on mobile, now, and for the most part, and for *what* they are watching (their friend digging a hole or singing) the portrait mode suffices, and also, it's more comfortable to hold.

Let's be honest - NO ONE SANE watches anything more than that, on a mobile! TV or film HAVE to be on a TV!
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: eti on September 06, 2020, 06:18:25 am
When people call a generic tablet an iPad.
Or call any old vacuum cleaner a Hoover.

But you DO KNOW what they mean, and calling any old vacuum "Hoover" is decades old... so you DO KNOW, you just choose to be a right old pedant, eh?  :-DD

Lest you forget, not everyone's life revolves around eating, sleeping and being knee-deep in tech - it's pretty easy to forgive!
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: Siwastaja on September 06, 2020, 06:30:01 am
If "50% heavier than" actually means "50% as heavy"

"x% heavier" is obviously a completely different expression from "x times heavier".

He is wrong, so are you.

There is no mathematical definition for the word "times", so you can't solve this with mathematical logic alone. You need to look at the language.

Quote
Taking a popularity contest will not establish correctness

In language, in long term, it really does.

You can't arbitrarily choose to define the language against the actual usage everybody has followed for centuries.

Further, AFAIK, no "official" language body has ever took your stance. So it's just your internet opinion.

If you were right, expression like "1 times heavier" (or "1 time heavier") would make sense, and would exist. Have you seen that?
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: Circlotron on September 06, 2020, 06:32:41 am
When people call a generic tablet an iPad.
Or call any old vacuum cleaner a Hoover.

and calling any old vacuum "Hoover" is decades old...
And when people call a vacuum cleaner a vacuum!!!
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: magic on September 06, 2020, 06:32:51 am
He is correct: 142 times is 14200 percent. Suppose for purposes of discussion that the subject is only 50% heavier than the mass of the Sun. If "50% heavier than" actually means "50% as heavy", we have the curious conclusion that it is both heavier and lighter at the same time.
You make an erroneous assumption that "heavier" is continuous. It's not.

It works how you described up to 1x heavier, and for more than 1x heavier it's as simple multiplication.
0.5 heavier = 1.5 heavier = 1.5 the original weight.

Simple :phew:
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: Ed.Kloonk on September 06, 2020, 06:33:38 am
Hey.

What gets easier to pick up the heavier it gets?

A woman.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: vk6zgo on September 06, 2020, 12:51:03 pm
One delight that seems to have become endemic is the following:-
Say a company has a deal where they are selling something for half price, if you buy two.

This often was advertised as "Buy one, get one free!", which is silly in itself, but recently  has been replaced by the totally nonsensical "Buy one, get one!", which makes me want to say, "Well, duhh, If I didn't get one, I'd stop payment!"

Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: MosherIV on September 06, 2020, 09:34:13 pm
Linux fan boys  :palm:
Such arogant arses. Think they know everthing. Always telling everyone how better linux is better than Windows (fyi I hate all computers and operating systems with equal venom)
Sure linux has good points but it has bad points as well. It is not the best os at everything, Windows has a far better/freindly gui for starters.
Insisting that having to type long command line as part of code development is NOT better, it is complete waste of (my) time. Modern IDEs were developed for a reason - to make life easier!
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: Refrigerator on September 06, 2020, 09:55:48 pm
My pet peeve is two wires of opposing polarity touching no matter how hard i try to keep them apart, it's like if i look away then the moment i turn back they've shorted out.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: Circlotron on September 06, 2020, 10:03:35 pm
Annoys me when you see an ad for something, and they say “limited stock, selling fast! Don’t miss out!” Two things, 1/ if there really is limited stock then somebody is always going to miss out and them advertising it is only going to make things worse in that more people are going to be disappointed. And especially 2/ if whatever they are advertising is selling fast and almost run out then why the need to further advertise it???
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: NiHaoMike on September 06, 2020, 10:20:26 pm
Why do some call a 1nF capacitor 1000pF or 0.001uF? Is there some "nanophobia" that I'm not understanding?
Hey.

What gets easier to pick up the heavier it gets?

A woman.
Heavier because of more fat or more muscle?
Windows has a far better/freindly gui for starters.
The surprisingly useful "always on top" button still seems to be missing from Windows. Linux had that when I started using it 20 years ago.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: Ed.Kloonk on September 07, 2020, 12:28:46 am
Linux fan boys  :palm:
Such arogant arses. Think they know everthing. Always telling everyone how better linux is better than Windows (fyi I hate all computers and operating systems with equal venom)
Sure linux has good points but it has bad points as well. It is not the best os at everything, Windows has a far better/freindly gui for starters.
Insisting that having to type long command line as part of code development is NOT better, it is complete waste of (my) time. Modern IDEs were developed for a reason - to make life easier!

Mhmm, what's worse are linux fanboys who are determined to prove their dip into the scrabble bag of commandline options is better than anyone else's

 ;D

Command line phobics. Because the winders registry is some much more superior.

Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: Tomorokoshi on September 07, 2020, 01:05:03 am
Engineers, when they forget they are essentially half-assed physicists.

Managers, when they try to be half-assed engineers.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: Tomorokoshi on September 07, 2020, 01:10:46 am
Many people like to say things like, "I am loving this new thing," instead of saying, "I love this new thing."

Or "I am wanting a new thing" instead of "I want a new thing."

I don't get it.
In the 2000s there was a cultural appreciation of poorly translated sentences found in video games from Japan. "All your base are belong to us" from Zero Wing, and the like. A particular feature of these Engrish utterances are a tense shift from present to imperfect ("am wanting"), which I surmise reflects differences of Japanese sentence structure. Many people found it funny, and started using these forms as an attempt at humor; others copied it, without knowing why it was humorous. This is how many language trends develop.

Japanese is very flexible when structuring sentences. There can be difficulty when translating from Japanese to English because English grammar and structure is an amalgam of languages over the centuries. Additionally, English is relatively limited in some ways, which means that for someone translating from Japanese to English there can be difficulty in reaching the exact structure that is necessary to make the sentence sound natural.

This is why it's easy to identify material translated from Russian, Chinese, Japanese, etc. that was not done by someone intuitively familiar with English.

The above expressions, "I am wanting a new thing" instead of "I want a new thing.", are a perfect place to start.

A few notes:
1. Grammar is not the same across all languages. The rules in one may not transfer exactly to the rules of another. Consider that C and Python, while they have similarities, can’t be translated exactly without significant interventional engineering.

2. Japanese writing uses English letters, Katakana (consider them to be phonetic or UPPER CASE, although that isn’t an exact way to describe it), Hiragana (consider them to be phonetic or lower case, along with completion of Kanji words or as simplified substitution of Kanji characters), and Kanji (carried over from China around 1000 years ago. They generally have several readings, such that there is a “Chinese” set of one-syllable readings, and an equivalent reading for the traditional Japanese word of the same meaning that may be multi-syllable and that will have additional Hiragana attached to it to continue the exact usage. Compare to how Greek is used in English.)

3. In general spaces aren’t necessary between words in Japanese. The delineation between words is understood in the transition between various word endings, particles, context, etc. In the Hiragana-only part I will use spaces to distinguish between the various words.

4. This post includes Japanese characters, and may not render properly if Unicode isn’t supported completely.

I will structure the examples in the form of:

Romaji = Hiragana = Kanji = Direct complete translation to English (with implied words) along with [commentary, explanation, or a long English translation in parenthesis because it's difficult to go in that direction.]

Let’s start with a verb that means, “to want”:

hoshii = ほしい = 欲しい = (I) want (that). [I want..., I want it, I am wanting it. The item that is wanted is understood by both parties. The subject is the speaker, the object is whatever is known, the verb is “to want”. It is a complete sentence from the English point of view.]

kore hoshii = これ ほしい = これ欲しい = (I) want this (thing that is closer to me). [The item “near me” is specified. Using a pronoun.]

sore hoshii = それ ほしい = それ欲しい = (I) want that (thing that is closer to you). [Now the item “near you” is specified. Using a pronoun.]

are hoshii = あれ ほしい = あれ欲しい = (I) want that (thing that is far away from us). [Now the item “far away” is specified. Using a pronoun.]

Now let’s cover another word and construction:

morau = もらう = 貰う = (I) will get/receive (it). [I will receive (from you) the thing.]

moraitai = もらいたい = 貰いたい = (I) want to get/receive (it). [The “tai” ending indicates “want to”.]

So we can also make this in the same pattern:

*hoshitai = ほしたい = 欲したい = (I) want to want (it). [While grammatically this is correct, it isn’t proper usage. It would either sound “cute” or obnoxious. Imagine a child wanting a toy, or a teenage girl wanting a fan with a picture of the latest Korean group.]

So now let’s start with a reasonable translation for "I want a new thing", however, let’s make it definite. In this case, how about a digital multimeter, or DMM, for “I want a new DMM”.

Using “hoshii”, “want”:
atarashii DMM hoshii = あたらしい DMM ほしい = 新しいDMM欲しい = (I) want (a) new DMM. [“I want a new DMM”. However, in Japanese it sounds a little immature. See the ‘hoshitai” example.]

Using “morau”, “get/receive”:
atarashii DMM wo moraitai = あたらしい DMM を もらいたい = 新しいDMMを貰いたい = (I) would like to get a new DMM. [“I want a new DMM”. For instance, the old one doesn’t have enough digits, so I want to get an HP 3458A.]

Finally, let’s cover how "I am wanting a new thing", or “I am wanting a new DMM” might translate:

Using “hoshii”, “want”:
atarashii DMM wo hosite imasu = あたらしい DMM を ほして います = 新しいDMMを欲しています = (I) am wanting a new DMM.

Using “morau”, “get/receive”:
atarashii DMM wo moraitakute imasu = あたらしい DMM を もらいたくています = 新しいDMMを貰いたくています = (I) am wanting to get a new DMM.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: pidcon on September 07, 2020, 05:30:55 am
Programming language that considers double quotes and single quotes as the same, and consistency has to be maintained by programmers with opinions.

Also, "You should build me X for free to test the market, because building stuff is easy and free."
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: Refrigerator on September 07, 2020, 05:50:30 am
When people say HERT instead of HERTZ.
Like one megahert, one kilohert.
Everytime you say Hert instead of Hertz, Rudolph Hertz makes a single revoliution in his grave.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: AlfBaz on September 07, 2020, 06:01:07 am
... Rudolph Hertz makes a single revoliution in his grave.
Now that's definitely a hert :-+ :popcorn:
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: Siwastaja on September 07, 2020, 06:01:12 am
Linux fan boys  :palm:

A subgroup: "it's not a bug, it's a feature" boys, where each serious defect in linux/distro/documentation/linux-related applications is "between the chair and computer". Luckily, Linus Torvalds himself has a solid opinion here; if it doesn't work, it doesn't work, and it's a bug, and should be fixed. This is why such arrogancy is rarely seen in kernel, would be nice if this would be the case in userland as well.

Also, Windows fanboys to equal degree. Surprisingly similar dynamics. If Windows crashes or is being impossible to use, the problem is always "between the chair and computer", and "I never have any problem".

Catch these "I'm always fine" guys having a problem pants down and don't let it slip through unnoticed, funny times.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: winniethepooh_icu on September 07, 2020, 06:19:06 am
People who call themselves "makers" and/or "hackers".

Have yet to encounter one who actually can make(i.e. design) or hack something.  Have only encountered ones who copy/mimic.

Makers: Show them a cool project that you built, they ask for layout, schematics, code.  Offer instead to explain the architecture and help them understand it and design their own, no interest, and they are likely to ask for the layout, schematics, and code again.  Refuse: They sulk away and don't talk to you anymore.  Pathetic mindset, not willing to learn, only willing to mimic and then celebrate this mimic as if it is an actual accomplishment.

Hackers: Apply someone else's instructions for "hacking" an item and declare themselves the hacker.  Worse yet, modify something that has been modified a million times over on the internet in the past, do a write up on this, and have other "hackers" celebrate their "hack".  This site "hack per day" comes to mind.  Pathetic mindset, no ingenuity, when faced with an unknown system or device to be hacked they would lose interest.

"Makers" seems to be a more recent thing, born from hordes of people who wanted to create things but were too lazy to learn how to do it on their own.  "Hackers" is another thing, this used to be a very proficient group of people which has now been diluted by mimics and by those who seem to have no understanding of what it means to "hack" something.

 :blah:

Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: bsfeechannel on September 07, 2020, 01:48:55 pm
... Rudolph Hertz makes a single revoliution in his grave.
Now that's definitely a hert :-+ :popcorn:

Only if he does that once in a second.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: bsfeechannel on September 07, 2020, 01:52:44 pm
I decided to restore this old radio that was laying around in the shop.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: Siwastaja on September 07, 2020, 02:55:29 pm
Saying, or even more weirdly, writing "enään" instead of "enää" in the Finnish language. English translation would be somewhat like "anymoregh" instead of the expected "anymore".
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: SerieZ on September 07, 2020, 03:16:57 pm
Backseat drivers.  :horse:
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: Labrat101 on September 07, 2020, 04:50:05 pm
Here we have a headline that reads:
Black hole 142 times heavier than the Sun discovered
and further along in the article we read
GW190521 weighs in at 142 times the mass of our Sun

https://alkhaleejtoday.co/international/5038560/Black-hole-142-times-heavier-than-the-Sun-discovered.html (https://alkhaleejtoday.co/international/5038560/Black-hole-142-times-heavier-than-the-Sun-discovered.html)

Which is of course, plainly contradictory.
If it were 142 times heavier than our sun it would be 143 times the mass of our sun, not 142. This kind of thing seems to be popping up more and more lately.

What other things are there?
I think that they pull the numbers out of a hat ..
  This only happened   Seven Billion Years ago   . Some what old news  :-DD
     It may only have the mass of a pea now .
       that's about twice the size of all there brains combined .

 I don't see how you can measure the mass of something that one does not know what
 it is made up of for sure .  They think they know because they get paid to come up
 with an answer to account for all the time and money they spent on research etc.
   So it's a large jelly with a hole in the middle . Prove me wrong .
       with valid samples only .
      I can wait 14 billion years for the answer.   ( 1 round trip )

Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: CatalinaWOW on September 07, 2020, 05:54:36 pm
Just a thought experiment for the OPs interpretation of mass ratios.

So I have a one kg weight, and another that is 142 times as heavy.  By the OPs logic this second weight comes in at 143 kg

Lets try one that is twice as heavy.  3 kg. 

Now 1.5 times as heavy.  2.5 kg.

Now 1.001 times as heavy.  2.001 kg.

You apparently can't do ratios for masses that are close to the original mass.

I'll stick with the news stories interpretation.  I think nearly identical masses do exist and need a way to be described as a ratio.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: Labrat101 on September 07, 2020, 06:16:33 pm
Just a thought experiment for the OPs interpretation of mass ratios.

So I have a one kg weight, and another that is 142 times as heavy.  By the OPs logic this second weight comes in at 143 kg

Lets try one that is twice as heavy.  3 kg.   .. 1 + 1 = 3    :-DD  Just love your Maths .

Now 1.5 times as heavy.  2.5 kg.

Now 1.001 times as heavy.  2.001 kg.

You apparently can't do ratios for masses that are close to the original mass.

I'll stick with the news stories interpretation.  I think nearly identical masses do exist and need a way to be described as a ratio.
You forgot to add the cream topping into the equation
 Mass is only heavy if it has Gravity  .
  You will have to check your fingers or buy a calculator
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: andy3055 on September 07, 2020, 07:03:42 pm
Overtaking me and slowing down for no apparent reason while the road is clear ahead.

Toilet paper roll inserted in the wrong direction!
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: Tomorokoshi on September 07, 2020, 07:08:05 pm
...

Toilet paper roll inserted in the wrong direction!

I blame Benjamin Franklin for that one.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: Tom45 on September 07, 2020, 07:31:34 pm
Toilet paper roll inserted in the wrong direction!

Ah, but what is the "right" direction?  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Toilet_paper_orientation (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Toilet_paper_orientation)
 ;D
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: CatalinaWOW on September 07, 2020, 09:41:25 pm
Just a thought experiment for the OPs interpretation of mass ratios.

So I have a one kg weight, and another that is 142 times as heavy.  By the OPs logic this second weight comes in at 143 kg

Lets try one that is twice as heavy.  3 kg.   .. 1 + 1 = 3    :-DD  Just love your Maths .

Now 1.5 times as heavy.  2.5 kg.

Now 1.001 times as heavy.  2.001 kg.

You apparently can't do ratios for masses that are close to the original mass.

I'll stick with the news stories interpretation.  I think nearly identical masses do exist and need a way to be described as a ratio.
You forgot to add the cream topping into the equation
 Mass is only heavy if it has Gravity  .
  You will have to check your fingers or buy a calculator

Sarcasm is lost on many.  You have much company.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: CatalinaWOW on September 07, 2020, 09:46:50 pm
By the way I think the original posters problem stems from confusion with the construction "Object A weighs X again as much as Object B" which does mean something quite different from "Object A weighs X times as much as Object B".  The first form is usually used with fractional values for X, while the news article clearly used the second form and a large integer.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: srb1954 on September 07, 2020, 09:52:47 pm
When people say HERT instead of HERTZ.
Like one megahert, one kilohert.
Everytime you say Hert instead of Hertz, Rudolph Hertz makes a single revoliution in his grave.

Or maybe he makes a single cycle in his grave.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: ChristofferB on September 07, 2020, 09:54:59 pm
oh I've got a good one. One thing is people who empty lab/shop consumables and dont restock. The worst is people who leave a microscopic amount, so that they wont be the one emptying the thing.

I even do it to myself sometimes. It must be a deep seated glitch of the human psyche
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: Circlotron on September 07, 2020, 10:11:40 pm
Just a thought experiment for the OPs interpretation of mass ratios.

So I have a one kg weight, and another that is 142 times as heavy.  By the OPs logic this second weight comes in at 143 kg
No. I would call that one 142kg. 142x1
If it was 142 times heavier it would be 143kg.  1+(142x1)
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: Circlotron on September 07, 2020, 10:18:11 pm
... Rudolph Hertz makes a single revoliution in his grave.
Now that's definitely a hert :-+ :popcorn:

https://dilbert.com/strip/2004-07-28 (https://dilbert.com/strip/2004-07-28)
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: CatalinaWOW on September 07, 2020, 10:25:49 pm
Just a thought experiment for the OPs interpretation of mass ratios.

So I have a one kg weight, and another that is 142 times as heavy.  By the OPs logic this second weight comes in at 143 kg
No. I would call that one 142kg. 142x1
If it was 142 times heavier it would be 143kg.  1+(142x1)

And there it is from the horses mouth.  times heavier = again as heavy.   times heavier <> times as heavy.

Those equalities and inequalities don't exist in my mind.  I suspect it is one of those English language foibles like the meaning of "tabling a motion"  which has exactly opposite meanings in England and the USA.  There is no absolutely correct answer, the answer depends on where you are.  If you are one of those snobs who says England and only England defines the English language I will just stop speaking English and speak American.  And the Australians can speak Australian and the Indians can speak Indian English.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: Circlotron on September 07, 2020, 11:47:18 pm
It could be worse. Imagine if pre 1974 an Englishman said to an American "I say, old chap, is this thing a *billion times more than that, or is it a *billion times as much as that?"

* https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Billion (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Billion)
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: vk6zgo on September 08, 2020, 12:21:39 am
Why do some call a 1nF capacitor 1000pF or 0.001uF? Is there some "nanophobia" that I'm not understanding?
Hey.

What gets easier to pick up the heavier it gets?

A woman.
Heavier because of more fat or more muscle?
Windows has a far better/freindly gui for starters.
The surprisingly useful "always on top" button still seems to be missing from Windows. Linux had that when I started using it 20 years ago.

The capacitor thing is mainly just a historical curiosity.
People weren't as invested in Engineering Notation, whereas Decimals were pretty much mainstream.
Also, 1nF/1000pF/0.001uF were pretty much in the "sweet spot" of common usage.

In audio, 0.001uF was getting towards the low end of commonly used values, all of which where widely referred to in Decimal parts of a uF,  & towards the high end of commonly used values in RF, where, to fit in with other values like 220pF, 470pF,etc, 1000pF just seems easier.

Even now, I have to think twice, & mentally translate, when I see higher values in nF.
It only takes a second, but it is there.
On the other hand, it takes a second to relate ".001uF",(without the leading zero, as it was often printed) with "1000pF"! ;D
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: Siwastaja on September 08, 2020, 07:14:50 am
Just a thought experiment for the OPs interpretation of mass ratios.

So I have a one kg weight, and another that is 142 times as heavy.  By the OPs logic this second weight comes in at 143 kg

Lets try one that is twice as heavy.  3 kg. 

Now 1.5 times as heavy.  2.5 kg.

Now 1.001 times as heavy.  2.001 kg.

You apparently can't do ratios for masses that are close to the original mass.

I'll stick with the news stories interpretation.  I think nearly identical masses do exist and need a way to be described as a ratio.

You missed the (flawed) point of the OP.

Their idea is that there are two different phrases, "x times as heavy", and "x times heavier", with the different meanings. Obviously, as seen in real usage through centuries, these phrases do have the exact same meaning (the former one, not the +1 one).
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: richard.cs on September 08, 2020, 08:03:56 am
As a native English speaker in the southern UK I would interpret both of the OP's constructs as a multiplication rather than 1+. We do have a 1+ construct with again: "half as heavy again" would be 1.5x and "as heavy again" = 2x, but it would sound very weird to use it for any larger numbers. It also feels a little archaic to my ears, like something my grandparents would say or I'd read in an older book.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: TimFox on September 08, 2020, 01:46:18 pm
In the US, I believe normal usage is "half again as heavy", but it still sounds quaint.  However, "50% more" always means x1.5, and "200% more" means x3.0.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: free_electron on September 08, 2020, 03:48:01 pm

“Export quality”

if it comes from alibaba/dealextreme : ok if it falls apart upon opening the box
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: free_electron on September 08, 2020, 03:48:56 pm
When people call a generic tablet an iPad.
Or call any old vacuum cleaner a Hoover.
i'm still taking pictures with my canon kodak !
let me grab a cola  ( grabs pepsi , or that cheap no-name brand from aldi / costco / walmart )
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: TimFox on September 08, 2020, 04:24:29 pm
Sloppy, careless use of non-synonymous verbs:  e.g.,  imply and infer, comprise and constitute.
In patent law, proper use of comprise is vital:  if an invention X comprises A, B, and C, that does not preclude adding D.
Yes, I know that there is historical precedent for the inappropriate use of these words, but we are all technical people and should be careful when communicating. 
If imply and infer become synonymous, how can we distinguish between the two meanings?
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: Tomorokoshi on September 08, 2020, 05:00:48 pm
Sloppy, careless use of non-synonymous verbs:  e.g.,  imply and infer, comprise and constitute.
In patent law, proper use of comprise is vital:  if an invention X comprises A, B, and C, that does not preclude adding D.
Yes, I know that there is historical precedent for the inappropriate use of these words, but we are all technical people and should be careful when communicating. 
If imply and infer become synonymous, how can we distinguish between the two meanings?

There is a regional language pattern around here that follows this style:
* "Will this transistor work or no?"

as opposed to:
"Will this transistor work or not?"
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: TimFox on September 08, 2020, 05:19:36 pm

There is a regional language pattern around here that follows this style:
* "Will this transistor work or no?"

as opposed to:
"Will this transistor work or not?"

I grew up in Northern Minnesota, where there is a strong Scandinavian background, and I found that many local English idioms were literal translations from Scandinavian languages.  In fact, I didn't learn that "Are you coming with?" (as opposed to "coming along") was incorrect English until we got in trouble in high-school German, when we translated "Kommen Sie mit?" (which is correct German) accordingly.  Your example may be the same effect.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: Tomorokoshi on September 08, 2020, 05:51:55 pm

There is a regional language pattern around here that follows this style:
* "Will this transistor work or no?"

as opposed to:
"Will this transistor work or not?"

I grew up in Northern Minnesota, where there is a strong Scandinavian background, and I found that many local English idioms were literal translations from Scandinavian languages.  In fact, I didn't learn that "Are you coming with?" (as opposed to "coming along") was incorrect English until we got in trouble in high-school German, when we translated "Kommen Sie mit?" (which is correct German) accordingly.  Your example may be the same effect.

That's very interesting. Specifically, I notice it north of a boundary line at approximately Interstate 694.

To me, both "Are you coming with?" and "Are you coming along" sound natural. I never would have noticed that the "coming with" form has grammatical issues.

The perceived correctness or incorrectness may have to do with which unsaid, yet implied, words would be filled in by the listener. For instance, a Minnesotan, don'cha know, would fill in with "me", resulting in:
"Are you coming with me?"

while someone else might expect the element that is to be brought would be clearly specified:
"Are you coming with a pack of beer?"
"Are you coming with a multimeter?"
"Are you coming with Dave from EEVblog?"

Such that their angst would result in a feeling of, "What is it! I have no idea! Finish the sentence for sake of Ole and Lena!"
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: mathsquid on September 09, 2020, 12:54:34 am
So many people don't know the difference in its and it's.

it's is a contraction. It usually means it is, but can also mean it has, as in "It's been an hour since I got home."

its is the possessive pronoun.

Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: basinstreetdesign on September 09, 2020, 05:54:30 am
How about those who still do not know the distinction between
"there"
"their"
and "they're"

or between
"your"
"you're"
and not to mention "yore" ?

And one thing I cannot listen to for more than 3 minutes is someone who MUST start every sentence with "So..."

These drive me nuts.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: rdl on September 09, 2020, 06:47:57 am
I was watching a movie or something recently and one line of dialog was "Coming with?". If I happen to remember what the title was I'll add it.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: free_electron on September 09, 2020, 11:38:36 am
english is a very complicated language !

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RAGcDi0DRtU (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RAGcDi0DRtU)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=igh9iO5BxBo (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=igh9iO5BxBo)
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: HobGoblyn on September 09, 2020, 05:20:56 pm
How about those who still do not know the distinction between
"there"
"their"
and "they're"

or between
"your"
"you're"
and not to mention "yore" ?

And one thing I cannot listen to for more than 3 minutes is someone who MUST start every sentence with "So..."

These drive me nuts.

Aoccdrnig to a rscheearch at Cmabrigde Uinervtisy, it deosn’t mttaer in waht oredr the ltteers in a wrod are, the olny iprmoetnt tihng is taht the frist and lsat ltteer be at the rghit pclae. The rset can be a toatl mses and you can sitll raed it wouthit porbelm. Tihs is bcuseae the huamn mnid deos not raed ervey lteter by istlef, but the wrod as a wlohe.


I was unlucky enough to start school in 1969 and be part of a stupid experiment where they taught my class ITA (both my sisters escaped this madness).

I was being taught to read in a way that bears no resemblance to English, for example

[attachimg=1] See pic at bottom of post

Then I was going home and my mum was trying to get me to read from a normal English Ladybird book and couldn’t understand why I couldn’t read a word. 

End result, like many others taught this way, I remained in the bottom group of English throughout my entire school life and still can’t spell or grasp the rules 50 years later. The greatest help for me was when MS Word first started underlining misspelt words, over time words I continually used, I began to memorise. But rarely a week goes by without me having to ask my wife (or children when they were still at home) how you spell xyz.



Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: eugenenine on September 09, 2020, 06:26:26 pm
And back in the 1960s the general public would often call a portable radio a transistor.  |O

I've heard them called transistor radio, maybe someone just shortened it.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: eugenenine on September 09, 2020, 06:28:30 pm
- ANY programming language that requires semicolons to denote end of statements. there is a cr or cr/lf pair in the file already. use that. and , in case a line really is too long you should either : rewrite the code , or have a line continuation character. there are much less cases where you need to split a long line.


ANY programing language that requires ; for some statements but lets them be optional for others
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: eugenenine on September 09, 2020, 06:35:11 pm
Wndows has a far better/freindly gui for starters.


I've never found Windows GUI better/friendly.  I much prefer Workbench 1.3
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: Tom45 on September 09, 2020, 08:21:23 pm
And back in the 1960s the general public would often call a portable radio a transistor.  |O

I've heard them called transistor radio, maybe someone just shortened it.

No, that started in the '50s. Transistor radios were becoming very common and "in". But hardly any non-technical people had seen a transistor (the device) let alone knew what it was. So this new word "transistor" obviously referred to the newly common small battery powered radio.

I vaguely remember telling a classmate I had lost a transistor when I dropped it and it fell into a crack, or something like that. She was astonished that I had managed to lose an entire transistor just by dropping it. Back then, and being a student, losing one transistor depleted my stock by a significant percentage.

A CK722 was about a dollar 60 years ago. Equivalent to $9 now.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: Bassman59 on September 09, 2020, 08:36:30 pm
I was watching a movie or something recently and one line of dialog was "Coming with?". If I happen to remember what the title was I'll add it.

This is a variation on the "You're from Place X? I've never been," with an implicit "there" at the end of the sentence.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: Nominal Animal on September 09, 2020, 08:52:40 pm
My pet peeves fill a frigging zoo.  The biggest is probably people who refuse to acknowledge errors or mistakes they have made, because of their ego or insecurities; leading others astray. :rant:

In Finnish, one of my pet peeves is missing the possessive suffix in formal contexts.  (I don't mind everyday speech, I consider it something like an accent.)

One of the most annoying cases of that was a series of advertisements by the Sonera (now Telia) phone company, and their "Minun Sonera" ad campaign.
(The possessive suffix, and the correct form, is "Minun Sonerani".  The difference is something like my/me in English to my ear; analogous to pirate speech in English: "me Sonera, arrr!".)

If they had used any of the local dialects in Finland, like "Mun Sonera" (which would match common spoken Finnish), then I'd be okay with it, but butchering proper Finnish like that to avoid a suffix in the trade name just grinds my gears.  It sounds fake and contrived!

And one thing I cannot listen to for more than 3 minutes is someone who MUST start every sentence with "So..."
I apologise.  I do not do it in speech, but in writing, I too often start a sentence with "So," or "Thus," to indicate the following paragraph is based on the axioms/facts/assumptions/preliminary conclusions stated in previous paragraphs.  (Me fail English. Any and all suggestions on how to do better are very welcome! :))
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: Circlotron on September 09, 2020, 09:25:53 pm
News agencies, when reporting an event, use the same word or phrase over and over and over again. Several examples, during the 1991 Gulf War our ears got worn off hearing again and again about “columns” of tanks. And 9/11 getting continually referred to at the time as “ground zero.” And now whenever something happens, reporters are not “at the scene”, they are “on the ground.”
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: eugenenine on September 09, 2020, 10:37:34 pm
So around here :)  everyone adds s to the end.  I'm going to Krogers or I'm going to Meijers.  Some say they are making it possessive but even then they are using it wrong.

Or referring to a driver's license as they, I always ask where their other one is from.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: free_electron on September 09, 2020, 11:33:26 pm

[attachimg=1] See pic at bottom of post

what the hell is this monstrosity ?
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: Sredni on September 10, 2020, 12:55:56 am
Wide and ultrawide monitors and laptop displays.
Yeah, I know most of the customers are using their computers to watch movies, but if you have to work with the darn thing, you'll be better off with more vertical real estate.
There's a reason books have had that format since before Gutenberg.

And then there are applications - browsers, wordprocessing tools, etc. - that add a giant overhead at the top because they need to have stilish buttons or tabs (Firefox for one) so that you are left with a handful of looong lines to read (especially on website that are not adapting to the browser's width).

Bring back the 4:3 laptops!
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: NiHaoMike on September 10, 2020, 01:10:36 am
Wide and ultrawide monitors and laptop displays.
Yeah, I know most of the customers are using their computers to watch movies, but if you have to work with the darn thing, you'll be better off with more vertical real estate.
There's a reason books have had that format since before Gutenberg.

And then there are applications - browsers, wordprocessing tools, etc. - that add a giant overhead at the top because they need to have stilish buttons or tabs (Firefox for one) so that you are left with a handful of looong lines to read (especially on website that are not adapting to the browser's width).

Bring back the 4:3 laptops!
Use half the screen for one app, use the other half for another app. Very handy for development to have the datasheet and code in view at the same time.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: Sredni on September 10, 2020, 01:23:28 am
Wide and ultrawide monitors and laptop displays.
Use half the screen for one app, use the other half for another app. Very handy for development to have the datasheet and code in view at the same time.

The problem is that a 15 inch widescreen laptop is now equivalent to two 9 inch 4:3 laptops side by side.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: Circlotron on September 10, 2020, 02:12:38 am
And then there are applications - browsers, wordprocessing tools, etc. - that add a giant overhead at the top
Yep. Reminds me of this I posted once before:
"Turn on the TV news and so often there is this stupid banner across the bottom of the screen, actually blocking something that you want to see. Even more stupid, this banner is often raised from the bottom somewhat so it blocks even more of the screen than it's vertical size would dictate."

This kind of thing ->

(https://i.ytimg.com/vi/2cgvh0WjJUs/maxresdefault.jpg)
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: vk6zgo on September 10, 2020, 03:44:46 am
News agencies, when reporting an event, use the same word or phrase over and over and over again. Several examples, during the 1991 Gulf War our ears got worn off hearing again and again about “columns” of tanks. And 9/11 getting continually referred to at the time as “ground zero.” And now whenever something happens, reporters are not “at the scene”, they are “on the ground.”


"Columns of tanks" is how a lot of tanks in single file have been described ever since there were tanks.
Before that, we had "columns of cavalry", & "columns of infantry."
That said, journalists really do like to overuse terms.

Two that freak me out are :

"In country".

and

"Ahead of" instead of "prior to", or if they really have to be elephantine, "in the leadup to".










Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: Circlotron on September 10, 2020, 04:50:12 am
"up to 50% or more"  :palm:
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: Tomorokoshi on September 10, 2020, 12:38:42 pm
"up to 50% or more"  :palm:

https://www.digikey.com/products/en?keywords=338-3575-ND (https://www.digikey.com/products/en?keywords=338-3575-ND)
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: GlennSprigg on September 10, 2020, 02:19:52 pm
The verb: to Google

Such as: "Google the Battle of Kursk". Rather than: "Search the web for the Battle of Kursk".

(Yea, it was pages ago, sorry...)
Humans like to re-invent words/meanings. That's just like saying we need to 'Hoover' the carpet. (Brand name).
Or to take a 'Zerox' (copy) of that document. (Brand name, but less used these days).
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: TimFox on September 10, 2020, 04:20:50 pm
Well, at least "Zerox" is not a registered trademark of the Xerox corporation.  The word "xerography", from the Greek word for dry, is not intellectual property.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: HobGoblyn on September 10, 2020, 05:09:11 pm

[attachimg=1] See pic at bottom of post

what the hell is this monstrosity ?

Believe it or not, it was how I was taught to read and spell at infant school (aged 5 years +)

 [url=http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/uk/1523708.stm]http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/uk/1523708.stm (http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/uk/1523708.stm)[/url]
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: Sal Ammoniac on September 10, 2020, 06:03:22 pm
Pet peeves? I have many. Here are a few:

Technical documentation. Much of it is poorly written and does not convey a complete and accurate description of the part. This is especially true for complex parts like microcontrollers, and the "remedy" often suggested is to look at the example code or use the vendor libraries. This is nonsense--the documentation itself should be complete and accurate without recourse to other materials like source code. A related peeve is that often these manuals are written by someone for whom English is not their first language. The result is a mess of typos and confusing phrasing. Sometimes these issues even obscure the meaning of the text, or make it incorrect. Many of these companies have offices in the US and should have a native English speaker go over the documents and correct the mistakes. ST is a big offender here--some of their technical documentation reads like it was written by an eight-year-old.

Chip errata. Some vendors don't mind releasing parts with dozens and dozens of nasty errata. A good example was the Microchip PIC32MZ EC. The errata sheet for this part was almost eighty pages long and even fundamental things like the crystal oscillators didn't work. Took Microchip a year to fix some (but not all) of these bugs and release the EF parts. Some vendors never fix certain errata--stepping after stepping of the part gets released with the same errata there year after year.

Vendor websites. Some of these make you jump through hoops to download datasheets and other documentation, sometimes to the point of requiring you to wait for an email from them containing a download link. Others (like Broadcom) won't provide documentation at all, or require NDAs. Oftentimes these sites are so poorly organized as to make it very difficult to find information on their products.

Development Boards. Some vendors like to put too many external peripherals on their boards (accelerometers, SDRAM, LCD displays, microphones, audio codecs, etc) to the point where it's difficult to find a combination of free pins to implement something you need. Some of these vendors don't even bother to break out all of an MCU's port pins on accessible connectors, or, in many cases, only have "Arduino compatible" connectors on the board. Many MCUs have a separate power domain intended to be powered by a battery in case of a power failure, but most vendors don't bother making the Vbat pin accessible to users. ST has the right idea with their STM32 Nucleo boards. These typically only have a few LEDs and a button, but every port pin is broken out to a connector. Another peeve related to dev boards: vendors never seem to provide enough ground and Vcc connection points on their boards.

IDEs. Many of these are based on Eclipse, which in and of itself is okay, but vendors can't resist adding every plug-in and add-on under the sun, and the effect of this crud is to slow everything down to a crawl. Another IDE peeve is the "wizards" often provided to create new projects. There never seems to be an option to create a bare-bones project with nothing except the start-up code--the only options create projects that pull in lots of unwanted crap that needs to be deleted. Do vendors think professional embedded developers always start a new project as a "blinky" app? Hint: we don't.

Some general peeves:

DVDs and Blu-rays that have previews that can't be skipped or fast-forwarded through. People who create these should be boiled in oil.

Drivers who don't indicate when turning or changing lanes. Drivers who use their windshield washers in moving traffic (this usually happens right after I get my car washed). Drivers who throw burning cigarettes out the window.

People who don't use its/it's and your/you're properly in a sentence.

Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: DimitriP on September 11, 2020, 12:37:27 am
Wide and ultrawide monitors and laptop displays.
Use half the screen for one app, use the other half for another app. Very handy for development to have the datasheet and code in view at the same time.

The problem is that a 15 inch widescreen laptop is now equivalent to two 9 inch 4:3 laptops side by side.

...and at super high resolution everything becomes tiny.
Then you have go into windows to magnify it.
Madness!
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: DimitriP on September 11, 2020, 12:39:38 am
4K resolution on small screens (ie smaller than a ping pong table  )
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: Ground_Loop on September 11, 2020, 08:11:29 pm
Try to explain to a cop that traveling at a 'high rate of speed' is not illegal or measurable with his equipment.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: floobydust on September 11, 2020, 08:33:39 pm
The diode symbol getting bastardized like this:
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: joeqsmith on September 12, 2020, 01:12:24 am
What other things are there?

I saw your post and wasn't planning to respond but I'm done with this POS set of calipers.   They use a single LR44.  There is no power switch and they run 24/7.   A battery will last maybe 6 months or so.  I go to use them and they are dead.  Peeves me right off.  Ran out of button batteries tonight, so I fit it with some AAs and a couple of Si diodes. 
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: srb1954 on September 12, 2020, 01:47:51 am

I saw your post and wasn't planning to respond but I'm done with this POS set of calipers.   They use a single LR44.  There is no power switch and they run 24/7.   A battery will last maybe 6 months or so.  I go to use them and they are dead.  Peeves me right off.  Ran out of button batteries tonight, so I fit it with some AAs and a couple of Si diodes.

Sometimes the manufacturers are stupid enough to install the batteries in these before shipping. You take home what you think is a brand new set of calipers from the shop, open up the battery compartment and find it is already heavily corroded from battery leakage.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: Zbig on September 13, 2020, 01:49:36 pm
Any product made of, or featuring, silver-colored or silver-painted plastic. To me, nothing screams cheap and nasty as loud as a silver-colored plastic crap. It makes decent products look like crap and crap products 10 times more crappy (see what I did here?). Any designer who ever thought "let's make this plastic thing silver as it makes it look more premium, metal-like" should have their head examined. Seriously, it should be penalised.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: TimFox on September 13, 2020, 02:00:25 pm
Worse than silver for actual use:  black lettering on black background for connectors, etc., on electronic gear.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: vk6zgo on September 13, 2020, 02:22:44 pm
Any product made of, or featuring, silver-colored or silver-painted plastic. To me, nothing screams cheap and nasty as loud as a silver-colored plastic crap. It makes decent products look like crap and crap products 10 times more crappy (see what I did here?). Any designer who ever thought "let's make this plastic thing silver as it makes it look more premium, metal-like" should have their head examined. Seriously, it should be penalised.
Yeah, chrome inside door handles on Hyundai Accents from a few years back--------the chrome layer started to peel off within a year.

The chrome layer is actually electroplated on plastic using a graphite layer, so is an interesting technique, which I remember seeing on toys when I was a kid--------they peeled off, too!

Hyundai changed to a dull metallic surface on the later Accents.

In the late 1960s, early 1970s, some car manufacturers used a metallic layer inside a transparent plastic external trim.
Over time, UV would make the plastic break down, water would enter & corrode the thin metallic layer, & the trim would look like junk!
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: sweatybetty on September 13, 2020, 07:56:57 pm
I have no idea why anyone in their right mind would waste hard earned money on a "hot water heater"
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: Sredni on September 13, 2020, 10:33:57 pm
I saw your post and wasn't planning to respond but I'm done with this POS set of calipers.   They use a single LR44.  There is no power switch and they run 24/7.   A battery will last maybe 6 months or so.  I go to use them and they are dead.  Peeves me right off.  Ran out of button batteries tonight, so I fit it with some AAs and a couple of Si diodes.

I have a set of remote controlled mains switches, whose remote control used to drain its 9V battery in no time when sitting idle on my desktop. It fell down once and the plastic bent enough to keep the battery from making contact unless I squeezed it in my hand before pressing the buttons. It's been years since I replaced the battery.

Enabling the battery only before use should be mandatory in all handheld devices of this kind.
A thin isolated support with both faces metallized should go between one pole of the battery and the battery holder's contact, the terminals should be connected to a switch that gets automatically closed when the remote is held. Works a charm with my remote.


EDIT: I don't know how, but I managed to put in more typos than lines.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: Bassman59 on September 14, 2020, 03:27:42 am
Try to explain to a cop that traveling at a 'high rate of speed' is not illegal or measurable with his equipment.

"You were accelerating at a rate of XYZ miles."

Do I have the stones to tell the cop that the derivative of acceleration is jerk?
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: Ed.Kloonk on September 14, 2020, 03:45:34 am
Try to explain to a cop that traveling at a 'high rate of speed' is not illegal or measurable with his equipment.

"You were accelerating at a rate of XYZ miles."

Do I have the stones to tell the cop that the derivative of acceleration is jerk?

Don't argue with the Cop. Save it for the judge.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: joeqsmith on September 14, 2020, 10:45:47 am
Best not to argue with a judge as well. 
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: Bassman59 on September 14, 2020, 05:19:39 pm
Best not to argue with a judge as well.

The attorney argues in front of the judge.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: Bassman59 on September 14, 2020, 05:23:11 pm
Here's the worst: Learning curve.

"This program has a steep learning curve!"

Yes, that means it's easy to learn.

"No, I mean that it's hard to learn."

Plot knowledge vs time. If it takes a long time to acquire a particular level of knowledge, the slope of that line will be shallow. If knowledge is acquired in a short time, the slope will go upward sharply.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: TimFox on September 14, 2020, 05:45:39 pm
Best not to argue with a judge as well.

The attorney argues in front of the judge.

That’s why it is a bad idea to argue with the judge, lest you be found in contempt.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: CatalinaWOW on September 14, 2020, 05:48:26 pm
Here's the worst: Learning curve.

"This program has a steep learning curve!"

Yes, that means it's easy to learn.

"No, I mean that it's hard to learn."

Plot knowledge vs time. If it takes a long time to acquire a particular level of knowledge, the slope of that line will be shallow. If knowledge is acquired in a short time, the slope will go upward sharply.

Quick and easy are different things.

Climb the Burj Dubai on the outside.  You get very high, very quickly.  But it isn't easy.

Climb to the height of the Burj Dubai by walking up the Mississippi River, the Amazon River, or the Nile.  Each step will be easy but you will walk thousands of kilometers before you get the altitude.

So something with a steep learning curve may reward those who are successful quickly, but many may find the journey impossible.  The shallow path has its own pitfalls. 
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: Siwastaja on September 17, 2020, 07:23:49 am
Here's the worst: Learning curve.

"This program has a steep learning curve!"

Yes, that means it's easy to learn.

"No, I mean that it's hard to learn."

Plot knowledge vs time. If it takes a long time to acquire a particular level of knowledge, the slope of that line will be shallow. If knowledge is acquired in a short time, the slope will go upward sharply.

I disagree. The saying is quite OK, but you are misunderstanding it.

There is a logic behind this saying:

Steep learning curve means, you need to acquire new knowledge at a massive rate, all the time, and as a result, cannot get any work done. All your effort is going into the learning process.

Flat learning curve means, you slowly acquire some new knowledge as you go, getting better with the tool, while still getting work done.

Finally, whether it's finally easy or difficult to fully learn, the slope of the curve is irrelevant. The height of the required target level is; the amount of knowledge that needs to be acquired. The saying (and your version of just inverting it) completely ignores this aspect.

"Steep learning curve" saying doesn't focus on the total complexity, but it describes the initial amount of involvement that's needed to be able to do anything with the tool: you are learning the tool quickly, but only because you have to. The opposite is the flat learning curve: you are not learning the tool, you are just using it (and doing the work).

That's why it's called "learning curve", not "getting work done curve". Learning isn't always a positive; you have limited resources for learning and people hate to spend time learning tools when they want to use the tools for the job.

Given that people have some limited rate of putting effort into a project per time, this defines a maximum slope. If you plot two curves, "learning curve for the tool" and "advancing the actual project", the sum of their slopes is somewhat constant. If the learning curve is steep, the "advancing the project" curve has to be flat, and vice versa.

The massively important distinction is, whenever the "learning" part is really important, then it has to be done, and having a steep curve is acceptable. Still, having it too steep may cause psychological problems of totally losing focus of the problem. Whenever the "learning" part is unintended - for example, you definitely do not plan to be a PCB designer, yet have to use a PCB EDA tool for some weird reason for a small project - this steep learning curve is pretty much unwanted.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: Halcyon on September 17, 2020, 09:23:00 am
Micromanagers.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: eugenenine on September 17, 2020, 03:55:39 pm
Whomever it was at the bakery who put the twist tie on the bread bag lefty tighty instead of righty tighty; you had one job.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: Tomorokoshi on September 17, 2020, 04:10:30 pm
Micromanagers.

You know, if we had a thread titled, "Your personal hell, technical or otherwise" then this could be:

"Micromanagers, who use Agile."
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: Nominal Animal on September 17, 2020, 04:29:08 pm
Micromanagers.
Non-technical micromanagers who don't trust you because you were born at the wrong time (age, horoscope sign or some such).

One boss I worked for in my early twenties was a "lady" who wouldn't trust me at all, because she had a worthless idiot son of about my age.  Not even when I had successful technical projects completed in her department.  A big part of why I broke myself later, too; I was too socially stupid to see how sick that sort of stuff is.  :palm:
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: AlfBaz on September 18, 2020, 12:32:47 am
"It is what it is"
 :horse:
(Replace dead horse with person that said it) :palm:
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: Circlotron on September 18, 2020, 01:19:07 am
"We are one of the top fifteen companies..."

I wonder which one they are? Number one? Number two?
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: Zbig on September 19, 2020, 02:16:42 pm
People who keep saying "I'll go ahead and <do X>" instead of just straight up saying "I'll do X".
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: dunkemhigh on September 19, 2020, 02:59:00 pm
Online purchasing where, the moment you complete checkout and pay, you're presented with a list of similar - if not the exact same - items, at least one of which will be cheaper then you just paid. Thanks for rubbing salt into the wound Aliexpress, Ebay, Amazon et al.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: joeqsmith on September 19, 2020, 04:28:28 pm
People who keep saying "I'll go ahead and <do X>" instead of just straight up saying "I'll do X".

I was waiting for people who don't say anything and just do X and present the data.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: Labrat101 on September 19, 2020, 06:24:14 pm
"We are one of the top fifteen companies..."

I wonder which one they are? Number one? Number two?
Number 15 for Shore ..  Left out on the beach
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: MrMobodies on September 19, 2020, 07:37:06 pm
Marketing material addressed to me in the post that; misses out important bits of information, bends to the truth regarding my rights and contradicts what's in the advert in the small print. With trendy pretty wording in the advert, "most powerful router" with pictures on looks but lacks the specifications about the hardware for me to compare. They think by making it look pretty and trendy like that is going to make feel happy and content when it makes feel insulted and angry like I am somewhat stupid and confused and don't know what I am doing.

I see this abstract crap but maybe it us just an illusion of my own when I read things that make me annoyed that I find patronising and insulting: "Most powerful wifi super router hub for your whole house" to boost your PC/tablet/phone and broadband from in a tiny box but because it looks pretty that means it is super smart and intelligent and will add to the performance and be better than any other router out there and for any problems it will wake up compensate and sort it self out." I think: Bugger off!
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: Siwastaja on September 25, 2020, 01:25:52 pm
Websites that claim I'm signed in, yet when I try to do anything, they require me to sign in. Examples: Digikey, Ebay.

I can accept that they require new sign-in every 5 minutes if that's what they want to do, but why lie in the first place? That's like lying you have an 8-inch device; when the device is needed, the truth is exposed creating an immediate, awkward dissatisfaction.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: Sal Ammoniac on September 25, 2020, 03:41:07 pm
Here's another peeve of mine... I have an Amazon FireTV that I use to watch streaming content. The remote has a pause button, but the "pause" function times out after about four minutes and the display goes back to the home screen, forcing me to find what I was watching and resume it. Sometimes what I was watching will show up in "Recents", but sometimes not, forcing me to search for it in other places.

Hey Amazon--when I hit the Pause button, I want it to stay paused indefinitely! If I hit Pause and come back a week later, I want the movie to immediately start from where I left off then I hit Play.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: rdl on September 25, 2020, 04:57:11 pm
"Recommended for you" on web sites that have no real idea of who I am, Youtube in particular. Even when they know what I just watched Youtube's recommendations of what I should watch next often seem oddly random.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: nali on September 25, 2020, 05:17:42 pm
That soft-grip stuff they put on electronic goods and some tools which after a couple of years de-vulcanizes or decomposes to a sticky goo.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: Circlotron on September 26, 2020, 01:01:01 am
When a micro has several byte-wide ports with multi purpose pins and for whatever reason you want to read or write entire parallel bytes from the outside world. The trouble is, one special function pin will be in port A, another special function pin in port B etc and if you also need that special function you cant use the entire width of the port for a byte. It’s fine to have these special function pins of course, by but WHY do they have to scatter them around and ruin the usefulness of different ports so you end up having to use a much larger package with extra pins??? Just concentrate them all in one or two ports and leave the rest alone for goodness sake!!!
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: vk6zgo on September 26, 2020, 01:51:16 am
Websites that claim I'm signed in, yet when I try to do anything, they require me to sign in. Examples: Digikey, Ebay.
Or sometimes, eevblog!
Quote
I can accept that they require new sign-in every 5 minutes if that's what they want to do, but why lie in the first place? That's like lying you have an 8-inch device; when the device is needed, the truth is exposed creating an immediate, awkward dissatisfaction.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: vk6zgo on September 26, 2020, 01:52:58 am
That soft-grip stuff they put on electronic goods and some tools which after a couple of years de-vulcanizes or decomposes to a sticky goo.

What a delight!  >:(
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: Ed.Kloonk on September 26, 2020, 03:00:36 am
That soft-grip stuff they put on electronic goods and some tools which after a couple of years de-vulcanizes or decomposes to a sticky goo.

What a delight!  >:(

I've got a rechargeable torch/emergency light that has that going on.

Does anyone know what solvent might dissolve it without causing too much electronic upheaval?
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: nali on September 26, 2020, 08:05:56 am
I've got a rechargeable torch/emergency light that has that going on.

Does anyone know what solvent might dissolve it without causing too much electronic upheaval?

I've got one of those wind-up torches with the same, also had a camera and one of those cheap USB microscopes suffer from it; in both cases some wiping with cloth & IPA got rid of it which leaves the shiny ABS or whatever plastic lies underneath.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: tom66 on September 26, 2020, 09:20:57 am
When you drive on a two-lane highway/motorway/dual-carriageway  and two trucks try to overtake each other, one going 55 mph and the other going 56 mph, only for the overtaking truck to hit a hill and maintain its position and make no progress for the next two minutes.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: temperance on September 26, 2020, 12:38:03 pm
Webshops with a "Customers also bought" section. The Customers also bought section is pretty useless on website like Farnell, Mouser,... if the only thing it can show you are completely unrelated things.

You put the housing for a connector for which you also need crimp terminals in the shopping basket on the Farnell website. Guess what I will need next dear website? Crimp terminals of course and perhaps the PCB part for that same connector series in whatever orientation and maybe crimping tools and perhaps some stranded wire. I do know other people are buying screws, soldering stations, semiconductors...Otherwise they would be bankrupt.

Other things:
Conspiracy channels on YT and people believing what's being said on those channels who go off like a raging bull when you try to explain them where they are wrong.
People with backwards logic. You can't change how they think.
YT channels with people who speak slow because it makes them sound like an expert giving opinions and advise on something they clearly don't know anything about.
Engineers with an ego problem. Every tech company has at least one or two.


Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: Bud on September 26, 2020, 01:25:07 pm
Man made climate change.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: joseph nicholas on September 26, 2020, 01:45:53 pm
American Plumbing
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: E-Design on September 26, 2020, 01:51:33 pm
In the checkout line and the person in front of you pulls out a checkbook and proceeds to fill it out to pay.  :=\
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: Sal Ammoniac on September 27, 2020, 11:25:04 pm
In the checkout line and the person in front of you pulls out a checkbook and proceeds to fill it out to pay.  :=\

The person ahead of you in line at a fast food place takes ten minutes to get to the front of the line and only then looks at the menu and takes a few minutes to decide what to order.  :palm:
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: Halcyon on September 28, 2020, 06:56:55 am
That soft-grip stuff they put on electronic goods and some tools which after a couple of years de-vulcanizes or decomposes to a sticky goo.

What a delight!  >:(

I've got a rechargeable torch/emergency light that has that going on.

Does anyone know what solvent might dissolve it without causing too much electronic upheaval?

Orange Power air freshener (https://shop.coles.com.au/a/alexandria/product/orange-power-air-freshener-spray) from your local supermarket. Honestly, it's been my go-to sticky stuff remover for years. It absolutely strips anything sticky or gooey (be careful on labels as it will probably take the printing off as well). I use this stuff to get the bulk of whatever substance off, then finish it off with some IPA, you don't need much at all.

I have a microphone stand with those "rubberised" adjustment knobs and the Orange spray (a combination of orange oil and ethanol) stripped it right back.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: Ed.Kloonk on September 28, 2020, 07:49:57 am
That soft-grip stuff they put on electronic goods and some tools which after a couple of years de-vulcanizes or decomposes to a sticky goo.

What a delight!  >:(

I've got a rechargeable torch/emergency light that has that going on.

Does anyone know what solvent might dissolve it without causing too much electronic upheaval?

Orange Power air freshener (https://shop.coles.com.au/a/alexandria/product/orange-power-air-freshener-spray) from your local supermarket. Honestly, it's been my go-to sticky stuff remover for years. It absolutely strips anything sticky or gooey (be careful on labels as it will probably take the printing off as well). I use this stuff to get the bulk of whatever substance off, then finish it off with some IPA, you don't need much at all.

I have a microphone stand with those "rubberised" adjustment knobs and the Orange spray (a combination of orange oil and ethanol) stripped it right back.

Good to know.

 :)
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: KL27x on September 28, 2020, 10:48:03 pm
People who take the exit lane as soon as it appears and then speed up to pass traffic on the left.

Some exits lanes go for half a mile or more before they split off, and not everyone else is keyed up on coke watching and waiting for the instant that exit lane appears.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: Circlotron on September 29, 2020, 12:32:45 am
Websites that make no sense.

Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: james_s on September 29, 2020, 01:27:12 am
I have so many pet peeves I could probably write a book about them.

One I came across lately, when somebody painting a room, exterior wall, etc spends a ton of effort masking around an electrical fitting, invariably making a mess and getting paint on the thing anyway instead of simply removing a couple of screws and getting it out of the way. A couple years ago and elderly family friend nearly had her house burned down because the painters wrapped plastic around a halogen motion sensor flood on the side of the house and taped it up, then when the sun set something triggered the light and it set the plastic and then the wall on fire.

Magically shrinking products and deceptive packaging to try to hide cost increases, for example a "gallon" of ice cream is nowhere near an actual gallon anymore. Especially when they try to spin it as something good for the consumer ("These candy bars are now only 100 calories, they're healthier!")

Outsourced tech support handled by people who have thick accents that are difficult to understand. Nothing against folks who don't speak my language fluently but when your entire job is to have a spoken conversation with me it is really an important skill for that particular job.

When software tries to guess what I want and be helpful, more often than not it is wrong and creates additional work rather than saving me work.

When software updates are automatic and rigidly enforced and nag Nag NAG NAG or even auto-reboot regardless of what I'm doing.

When software is excessively buggy, half baked, shipped half finished on the pretense that it will be updated "later" and I am expected to be the QA of a product that I'm paying for.

When a device containing a battery is sealed such that it is difficult or impossible to replace said battery.

People who ride my bumper when I'm driving, then aggressively pass me only to drive slower than I was going when they were behind me.

When people can't figure how how to get up to speed and merge onto the highway, making me either stomp on the brakes or floor it to get out of their way before they run out of onramp.

When I am not allowed to do something because some other idiot did it, found a way to hurt themselves and then sued over it.

When I hear of companies throwing good equipment into the scrap bin instead of making it available to someone who can use it.

When software moves to a subscription model in place of the option of a perpetual license.

Robocalls. I don't think I need to explain that one.

Excessive political correctness, the euphemism treadmill, people going out of their way to find something to be offended about or outraged over.

Corporate HR that actively filters out so many excellent candidates, passing along all the ones who's greatest skill seems to be gaming the system and sprinkling their resume with all the right keywords.

Well-meaning but poorly thought through regulations that invariably come loaded with unintended consequences.

I could go on but this is probably enough, contrary to how it may appear I am not an angry old geezer whose favorite pastime is yelling at neighborhood kids to get off my lawn.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: TimFox on September 29, 2020, 02:59:48 am
Plastic "clamshell" packaging without tabs or cutouts to facilitate unwrapping without using a box-cutter knife.  They are downright dangerous, since the edges of the plastic can be sharp as you try to rip off the remaining package to get at what you spent your money on.  I'm surprised there have not been liability lawsuits reported for cut fingers.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: Circlotron on September 29, 2020, 03:38:57 am
Technical drawings labelled "Rev 1" when they really mean "Version 1", which would actually be "Revision 0", which is grammatically ridiculous.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: vk6zgo on September 29, 2020, 04:06:11 am
Technical drawings labelled "Rev 1" when they really mean "Version 1", which would actually be "Revision 0", which is grammatically ridiculous.
The "mirror image" of that is when people designate, in this case, RF amplifiers, amp 0, amp 1, amp 2, & so on.
We had some transmitters from the PRC, where the documentation was very sketchy, with some acronyms reversed, & so on.

When the LCD display came up with "OI" fault", we thought it was another one like that, & embarked upon a wild goose chase for a "IO" fault.(the display used capital "O" for zero).

In fact, the fault was that the low value series resistor for indicating the first ("number 0") amplifier supply current had gone high, triggering an alarm.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: Ed.Kloonk on September 29, 2020, 04:23:54 am
Websites that make no sense.

Thank you, Gerry Harvey.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: vk6zgo on September 29, 2020, 05:43:00 am
Google search results, where the brief resume' on the search page includes something about the subject of your search, then when you go to the website, there in nothing, nada, zilch, about it.

Searching Jaycar website----- a couple of things that match the search criteria, then lots of stuff which don't match at all!
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: james_s on September 29, 2020, 06:05:03 am
That soft-grip stuff they put on electronic goods and some tools which after a couple of years de-vulcanizes or decomposes to a sticky goo.

What a delight!  >:(

I've got a rechargeable torch/emergency light that has that going on.

Does anyone know what solvent might dissolve it without causing too much electronic upheaval?

Uhg, I hate that stuff! My laptop is covered with that so I know it's only a matter of time, at least it's only on the outside. I have an old 486 laptop that was entirely covered in it and it became sticky all over like it was dipped in honey. My IR thermometer had it on the grip and around the nose and did the same thing. I found that isopropyl alcohol and a lot of elbow grease will take it off, but nothing I've found wipes it off easily without damaging the plastic.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: Tomorokoshi on September 29, 2020, 09:41:46 pm
Jira, Confluence, or any other rancid software produced by Atlassian.

Case in point:

I search for "blocking". Not "block", not "blocks"; "blocking". Everything with "block" or "blocks" shows up, and they can't be filtered out.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: dunkemhigh on September 29, 2020, 09:54:56 pm
Getting home with shopping to find some git has already opened and sampled an item.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: NiHaoMike on September 29, 2020, 10:26:16 pm
Getting home with shopping to find some git has already opened and sampled an item.
That was a problem with ice cream a year or two ago, I think a lot of manufacturers now added some sort of seal to the containers.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: Circlotron on September 29, 2020, 11:04:06 pm
Keeping something for forty years then finally throwing it out, then needing it in a week’s time so you have to go buy another.  |O
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: Tomorokoshi on September 30, 2020, 02:07:55 pm
1. Altium changing the user interface every time they do an update. Moving options and features around. It's like they keep hiring new UI "experts" who can't help but to tinker and dabble with how it works.

2. "Engineers" who do everything on a 10 mil grid instead of 100 mil.

3. Cisco Webex.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: steviefaux on September 30, 2020, 04:11:45 pm
Anyone that says "To be honest" in a sentence.

What? So normally you're not honest?
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: james_s on September 30, 2020, 05:27:13 pm
Anyone that says "To be honest" in a sentence.

What? So normally you're not honest?

There are many times when it is the socially accepted norm to not be honest. For example if your wife says "Do you like my new haircut?" and you think it looks awful, it is probably not in your best interest to be completely honest.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: AlfBaz on October 01, 2020, 03:19:05 am
SWMBO!!

There, I said it and all you were thinking it :-DD
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: vk6zgo on October 01, 2020, 10:36:25 am
Facebook!
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: Tomorokoshi on October 01, 2020, 02:35:41 pm
Animated banner ads.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: Circlotron on October 01, 2020, 11:32:59 pm
When you go to a large department store and get a pair of pants that finally fit just perfect and the price is right, so you decide to go again next week and get one or two more pairs and you find they are sold out, and worse still, it was a line they only carried just once, never to be seen again. Of course, nobody else has them.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: Kasper on October 02, 2020, 06:06:09 am
When people standing behind you in a line get so close that they bump into you.  Luckily that happens less now thanks to covid.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: KL27x on October 02, 2020, 06:52:54 am
I actually have a whole list of things where the popular opinion is wrong. Here's an example that applies to almost no one here, but it might be interesting. And I have plenty more.

"Annealing." After welding high carbon steel, you have to "anneal" it. But you aren't actually annealing. If it's made of high carbon steel, it is hardened; that's why it's made of high carbon steel to begin with. And after welding it, you still want it to be hardened. The reason you are reheating it to cherry red is not to anneal it.

When you weld on this high carbon steel, you are hardening it (which is what you want), but you are exceeding the critical temperature by a large margin. When the steel cools (from air and the rest of the metal drawing the heat out) it hardens, but the excessive temperature increases the grain size, making the steel lose toughness. It is prone to cracking. If you wanted to make this steel softer, you could just temper it all the way to dead soft. But that wouldn't fix the grain structure.

When you reheat the steel to just slightly glowing, you are not doing it to soften or anneal the steel. You do it to re-harden the steel, properly. By heating it to just barely reach critical temp, the grain structure is fine as you can make it. When you harden steel (whether you quench it with oil or just let it air harden), you want to barely reach glowing, and it's best to do it indoors. In direct sunlight, you can't see where the steel starts to glow, and you will reach an excessive temperature by the time you can detect the glow. Like what happens when you weld on it.

This is not simply semantics. Because people think this is actually annealing/softening the steel, they think you don't have to temper the steel after. You don't have to do anything but die and pay taxes. But you should temper, because you didn't anneal the steel. You re-hardened it, properly. And it will still be suspect to internal stress fracture until it has been tempered.

Likewise, if you braze high carbon steel. You are re-hardening it. You didn't use excessive temp; you just barely got it beyond critical. So you don't have to anneal the steel, after. But you should still temper it.

Even if the result after annealing/brazing is softer than you would like, you should still temper. Otherwise the steel will be prone to spontaneous breakage after repeated bend cycles, even if you keep the bending in the elastic limit, well below the yield point of the steel.

The easy way to remember this is anytime you get high carbon steel to glow red, and you don't get the entire piece to glowing and then let it cool over a period of at least 12 hours in a sealed oven, you haven't fully annealed it. You will get various formations of steel. And if you let it cool fast enough, even by room temperature air, many alloys will harden to some degree (martensenite? formation) even without quenching. And whether or not it is softer than it was before, you still have residual stress in the newly formed martensenite and should temper it. But because in the english language we have to call everything backwards, we call this "annealing," even it cases where it's not.

;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;
More forum related:
A lot of people on this forum know my pet peeve about aquarium bubbler "cupric chloride" etching.
But there's not too many electronics related things I can think of, where the general opinion is so wrong. I guess we're not that dumb, on average.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: David Aurora on October 02, 2020, 09:18:35 am
Techs who lose/incorrectly replace bolts. There are some absolute fucking butchers here in Melbourne, and it’s a bit like the Van Halen brown M&Ms thing- as soon as I inspect a piece of gear for repair and see missing/stripped/incorrect fasteners I know immediately that I have to press pause on the repair job and first idiot check the last guys work. So on one hand it’s a good warning sign, but overall it just drives me mental. How goddamn hard is it to keep track of a handful of bolts and put them back where they came from??!! Ugh.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: Tomorokoshi on October 02, 2020, 01:39:01 pm
I actually have a whole list of things where the popular opinion is wrong. Here's an example that applies to almost no one here, but it might be interesting. And I have plenty more.
...

Specifically relevant to your post about welding terminology:

Power panels that have no empty spaces for dual breakers.

I moved a couple years ago and I can't use my welder yet. Installing a 60A circuit for is difficult because I will have to rearrange a bunch of other circuits.

More cogent as an actual issue is hack "electricians" leaving behind a trail of poorly-installed and mis-wired code violations with missing covers...

AND THE CORRUPT "INSPECTORS" WHO CLEARLY EITHER NEVER INSPECTED IT OR WERE PAID OFF BECAUSE THE ORIGINAL OWNER OF THE HOUSE WAS A BUILDING CONTRACTOR.

Any number of the animatronic emoticons would apply here.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: eugenenine on October 02, 2020, 07:45:33 pm
Techs who lose/incorrectly replace bolts. There are some absolute fucking butchers here in Melbourne, and it’s a bit like the Van Halen brown M&Ms thing- as soon as I inspect a piece of gear for repair and see missing/stripped/incorrect fasteners I know immediately that I have to press pause on the repair job and first idiot check the last guys work. So on one hand it’s a good warning sign, but overall it just drives me mental. How goddamn hard is it to keep track of a handful of bolts and put them back where they came from??!! Ugh.

Years ago my grandfather told a story of rebuilding a carb on an old 50's Ford.  He claims it wouldn't start afterward and he realized there were some bolts left over on his workbench.  So he pull off the air cleaner cover, dumped the bolts in and put the cover back on and then it was able to start and run,

I figure he was either drunk when he did that or drunk when he was telling the story (or both).
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: andy3055 on October 02, 2020, 09:32:53 pm
My daughter was once watching me take her Laptop apart and asked me how any tech can remember where each screw and wire went in! I told her that it comes with what is called experience  ;D
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: Ed.Kloonk on October 02, 2020, 10:39:23 pm
My daughter was once watching me take her Laptop apart and asked me how any tech can remember where each screw and wire went in! I told her that it comes with what is called experience  ;D

And hiding the one or two left-over screws will always remain the master magician's magic trick!

Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: andy3055 on October 02, 2020, 10:57:03 pm
My daughter was once watching me take her Laptop apart and asked me how any tech can remember where each screw and wire went in! I told her that it comes with what is called experience  ;D

And hiding the one or two left-over screws will always remain the master magician's magic trick!

One can always give them as spares to the owner  :-DD
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: james_s on October 02, 2020, 11:01:44 pm
My daughter was once watching me take her Laptop apart and asked me how any tech can remember where each screw and wire went in! I told her that it comes with what is called experience  ;D

My friend worked as a computer technician when we were in highschool. I remember him telling me that the tech that worked on laptops would shake the machine when he was finished putting it back together and if nothing rattled he would throw away the leftover screws.

Laptops can be tricky, but I've gotten in the habit of sorting the screws by type into little baggies and marking what they were for.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: aargee on October 02, 2020, 11:10:56 pm
Ice cube trays are good for sequential disassembly fasteners.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: Ed.Kloonk on October 03, 2020, 08:00:29 am
Youtubers with two cameras for multi angle. (why?)

If that's not bad enough, not bothering to align the color balance.

Annoying and distracting.

Look at the color of their shirts..

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o1-vexPmFeI (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o1-vexPmFeI)
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: Siwastaja on October 03, 2020, 02:41:44 pm
Idiots naming things with very frequently used English words, making the names unsearchable through all the noise. Example: CAN.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: Labrat101 on October 03, 2020, 04:12:48 pm
Idiots naming things with very frequently used English words, making the names unsearchable through all the noise. Example: CAN.
SOWHATDOESITMEAN.!
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: bsfeechannel on October 03, 2020, 04:32:43 pm
Ice cube trays are good for sequential disassembly fasteners.

Egg cartons too.

(https://cdn.vox-cdn.com/uploads/chorus_image/image/66555147/2007_09_TOH_ATH_525_2001.0.jpg)
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: Nominal Animal on October 03, 2020, 05:23:37 pm
Anyone that says "To be honest" in a sentence.

What? So normally you're not honest?
I admit, I do this from time to time.  Me fail English.

In my defense, I always used it in the sense of "To be direct", or "To be blunt" (which I will be using in the future).
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: james_s on October 03, 2020, 05:30:05 pm
I admit, I do this from time to time.  Me fail English.

In my defense, I always used it in the sense of "To be direct", or "To be blunt" (which I will be using in the future).

There's nothing wrong with saying "to be honest", the fact that it is one person's pet peeve doesn't mean that it is not proper English or in common use.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: Siwastaja on October 03, 2020, 05:42:58 pm
I admit, I do this from time to time.  Me fail English.

In my defense, I always used it in the sense of "To be direct", or "To be blunt" (which I will be using in the future).

There's nothing wrong with saying "to be honest", the fact that it is one person's pet peeve doesn't mean that it is not proper English or in common use.

Agreed, just don't overuse / seriously misuse (compare to over-mis-use of "literally").

IMHO, use it whenever it's completely normal and socially acceptable norm to omit some information, and you, for some reason, want to reveal a bit more than people often would. For example, an opinion which strictly isn't needed but you feel it adds to the discussion.

Example: to be honest, I don't like the color of your bikeshed.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: Electro Fan on October 03, 2020, 05:57:25 pm
Keeping something for forty years then finally throwing it out, then needing it in a week’s time so you have to go buy another.  |O

Probably at least a 50% chance of this happening, might be even higher if you kept it longer.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: E-Design on October 03, 2020, 10:54:30 pm
Ice cube trays are good for sequential disassembly fasteners.

Egg cartons too.

(https://cdn.vox-cdn.com/uploads/chorus_image/image/66555147/2007_09_TOH_ATH_525_2001.0.jpg)

Now this is a pet peeve of mine also. Ghetto solutions to things where it doesn't make sense.. like egg cartons to store parts.. yeah, somebody can spend many dollars on hardware / parts but cant spend the money for proper cheap plastic drawers.. Eeek GADS... for crying out loud.. egg cartons.. really!
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: andy3055 on October 03, 2020, 11:51:20 pm
YouTube with no talking but sickening loud music.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: Bud on October 04, 2020, 12:13:43 am
Keeping something for forty years then finally throwing it out, then needing it in a week’s time so you have to go buy another.  |O

Probably at least a 50% chance of this happening, might be even higher if you kept it longer.

So help me formulate a law here, something along the lines "How soon you will need that old item is inversely proportional to how long you kept it before finally throwing out".
I feel it should be inverse square or inverse logarithmic function perhaps?
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: basinstreetdesign on October 04, 2020, 02:19:47 am
Ice cube trays are good for sequential disassembly fasteners.

Egg cartons too.

(https://cdn.vox-cdn.com/uploads/chorus_image/image/66555147/2007_09_TOH_ATH_525_2001.0.jpg)

Yeah, but label each of the pockets as to where the item is used!  Put the egg carton on a piece of 8 1/2 x 11 and write a label beside each.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: E-Design on October 04, 2020, 12:15:52 pm
Ice cube trays are good for sequential disassembly fasteners.

Egg cartons too.

(https://cdn.vox-cdn.com/uploads/chorus_image/image/66555147/2007_09_TOH_ATH_525_2001.0.jpg)

Yeah, but label each of the pockets as to where the item is used!  Put the egg carton on a piece of 8 1/2 x 11 and write a label beside each.

Yes and be sure to write those labels in crayon with a backwards N thrown in for a professional look.

Here is another peeve: Software that doesn't give you a choice where to install it. It forces itself into the C drive.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: SpecialK on October 05, 2020, 12:50:20 am
Websites that won't allow backwards navigation.  Let me explain:

You are search for a widget, but don't know the classification.  So instead of starting at the beginning and branching ou to the product you use the search function, and find one such eaxample of a widget.  But from the product page, you can't click on the category/subcategory to look at similar items. Like the tree should look like "Toyota - 2010 - power train - fuel delivery". Such that I could click on fuel delivery and see other related parts.

Also, websites where adding more terms to the string broadens the search rather than narrowing. Like searching for "2010 Toyota Corolla gas tank" returns every Toyota part, every tank (regardless of make), everything related to gas, plus every 2010 part in the inventory.  WTF is the use?

Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: eugenenine on October 05, 2020, 01:59:16 pm
Thats because a Toyota Corolla is disposable, you're not supposed to replace parts  :-DD
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: TimFox on October 05, 2020, 10:15:54 pm
Recently, I have seen several Acopian power supplies on eBay, where the seller lists them as “250 V”, instead of the actual voltage (usually 24 V or other common DC Voltage).  Looking at the photos, it’s obvious that the “250 V” is the fuse rating on the nameplate, clearly labeled as such.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: newbrain on October 05, 2020, 10:59:22 pm
I know it's not totally rational, but I hate that every piece of fruit must have a sticker on its skin.
Yes, I know about PLU-codes.

More a pet peel than a pet peeve.
(I'll show myself out)
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: Circlotron on October 05, 2020, 11:10:20 pm
Traffic lights that decide whether or not to use the green turn arrow WAY before the main light turns green. You could arrive at the lights, be waiting for 5 or 10 seconds and then when the lights turn green you should also get the turn arrow because you are sitting there waiting. No, it made up it's mind depending on whether a car was present or not 30 seconds ago.  |O
-----
Something else that used to be a pet peeve of mine but not any more is long long traffic turn lanes controlled by a green arrow. They build this long turn lane in anticipation of much traffic but the arrow duration is never long enough to let very much of this long line through. Then I realised that it is also a slowing down lane so you can pull into it at full speed and slow down to a stop rather than slow down in the main straight ahead lane and then finally pull into the beginning of a short turn lane.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: SilverSolder on October 05, 2020, 11:10:29 pm
I know it's not totally rational, but I hate that every piece of fruit must have a sticker on its skin.
Yes, I know about PLU-codes.

More a pet peel than a pet peeve.
(I'll show myself out)

Hahaha I can't believe it, I came to this thread specifically with that in mind...   Synchronicity, or what?  :D

Why do they do that?   I've just peeled the stickers off a dozen apples.  What a @#$!@$ waste of my time!
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: EvilGeniusSkis on October 06, 2020, 12:00:27 am
Ha... these are kind of cute (although the example cited by the OP is, in fact, correct).  How about something genuinely annoying:

People who fail to reach cruising speed before merging onto the freeway (or equivalent in your country), and people who drop below cruising speed before having fully exited the freeway.

Even worse is when you end up having a sort of passing leap-frog with someone, while you are on cruise control, going the speed limit, as in, they are going slower than the speed limit, sou you pass them, but they won't be passed by a {whatever you are driving, usually happens with something like a minivan or station wagon} so they pass you, then slow down, so you driving with cruise control on, pass them again, and the cycle repeats.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: james_s on October 06, 2020, 12:04:33 am
Even worse is when you end up having a sort of passing leap-frog with someone, while you are on cruise control, going the speed limit, as in, they are going slower than the speed limit, sou you pass them, but they won't be passed by a {whatever you are driving, usually happens with something like a minivan or station wagon} so they pass you, then slow down, so you driving with cruise control on, pass them again, and the cycle repeats.

That happens to me all the time. As soon as I get the cruise control dialed in just right, some idiot decides to pass me, and then goes slower than I was going when they were back behind me. I do drive a station wagon so that could be part of it.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: vk6zgo on October 06, 2020, 03:38:44 am
Thats because a Toyota Corolla is disposable, you're not supposed to replace parts  :-DD

I'm willing to bet that Corolla will still be hanging in there when most of its contemporaries have gone to the "Happy recycling ground".
I own a 21 year old Camry, which looks rough, but still drives like new.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: vk6zgo on October 06, 2020, 03:40:56 am
Ha... these are kind of cute (although the example cited by the OP is, in fact, correct).  How about something genuinely annoying:

People who fail to reach cruising speed before merging onto the freeway (or equivalent in your country), and people who drop below cruising speed before having fully exited the freeway.

Even worse is when you end up having a sort of passing leap-frog with someone, while you are on cruise control, going the speed limit, as in, they are going slower than the speed limit, sou you pass them, but they won't be passed by a {whatever you are driving, usually happens with something like a minivan or station wagon} so they pass you, then slow down, so you driving with cruise control on, pass them again, and the cycle repeats.

Easy, turn off your cruise control, & drive as Nature intended! ;D
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: vk6zgo on October 06, 2020, 03:55:25 am
Websites that won't allow backwards navigation.  Let me explain:

You are search for a widget, but don't know the classification.  So instead of starting at the beginning and branching ou to the product you use the search function, and find one such eaxample of a widget.  But from the product page, you can't click on the category/subcategory to look at similar items. Like the tree should look like "Toyota - 2010 - power train - fuel delivery". Such that I could click on fuel delivery and see other related parts.

Also, websites where adding more terms to the string broadens the search rather than narrowing. Like searching for "2010 Toyota Corolla gas tank" returns every Toyota part, every tank (regardless of make), everything related to gas, plus every 2010 part in the inventory.  WTF is the use?

You could try searching for "Fuel tank" instead!

I do feel your pain, though, I tried to find a 100nF Mylar capacitor (Yaesu specified them for an AF filter in one of their radios.) on Jaycar's website.
On the first try, it hit me with every 100nF cap they had in stock, plus some other values.

OK, I will just search fot "Mylar capacitors".
This got me all those, plus a whole lot of other things, either made of that material, or having a name a "bit like" that word.

So I Googled, & found that Mylar, which I had known as sheets of insulating material used in various applications at my old jobs, is the same stuff used in "common or garden" Polyester caps, so all is good!
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: dunkemhigh on October 06, 2020, 12:19:15 pm
Just had this on the RS website. Did a google for a part and found the link direct to the RS page, but from there can't find similar parts. Worse, starting afresh on RS and even knowing what the page has on it, can't do a search that would turn up the part (other than using the RS ID, of course). Can't navigate the product tree to reach the part either.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: SilverSolder on October 06, 2020, 02:08:30 pm
Ha... these are kind of cute (although the example cited by the OP is, in fact, correct).  How about something genuinely annoying:

People who fail to reach cruising speed before merging onto the freeway (or equivalent in your country), and people who drop below cruising speed before having fully exited the freeway.

Even worse is when you end up having a sort of passing leap-frog with someone, while you are on cruise control, going the speed limit, as in, they are going slower than the speed limit, sou you pass them, but they won't be passed by a {whatever you are driving, usually happens with something like a minivan or station wagon} so they pass you, then slow down, so you driving with cruise control on, pass them again, and the cycle repeats.

Easy, turn off your cruise control, & drive as Nature intended! ;D

Set the cruise control 20% above the prevailing speeds, and you never run into those kinds of problems!  :D
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: CatalinaWOW on October 06, 2020, 03:16:20 pm
Ha... these are kind of cute (although the example cited by the OP is, in fact, correct).  How about something genuinely annoying:

People who fail to reach cruising speed before merging onto the freeway (or equivalent in your country), and people who drop below cruising speed before having fully exited the freeway.

Even worse is when you end up having a sort of passing leap-frog with someone, while you are on cruise control, going the speed limit, as in, they are going slower than the speed limit, sou you pass them, but they won't be passed by a {whatever you are driving, usually happens with something like a minivan or station wagon} so they pass you, then slow down, so you driving with cruise control on, pass them again, and the cycle repeats.

Easy, turn off your cruise control, & drive as Nature intended! ;D

Set the cruise control 20% above the prevailing speeds, and you never run into those kinds of problems!  :D

You don't even have to keep it at 20%.  Just long enough for the bonehead to disappear over the rear horizen.  Without your carrot to goad them they quickly revert to their slow pace.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: Sal Ammoniac on October 16, 2020, 08:23:42 pm
Here's another pet peeve: The annoying "modern" trend of using of hand-held cameras to film Hollywood movies. I get vertigo just watching some of these abominations. I guess some people consider their use to be "edgy" and modern, but I think it makes a movie look amateurish--sure, that may have been okay for something like The Blair Witch Project, but for movies with an eight or nine digit budget it's just stupid.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: Ground_Loop on October 16, 2020, 08:28:11 pm
I know it's not totally rational, but I hate that every piece of fruit must have a sticker on its skin.
Yes, I know about PLU-codes.

More a pet peel than a pet peeve.
(I'll show myself out)

Same here.  I hate those things.  All it means is that there is a roll of stickers at the packaging plant.  About as useful as prop 65 notices.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: Red Squirrel on October 17, 2020, 12:59:36 am
One of my big tech related pet peeves is the fact that so many products require you to have an account and register it now days, and rely on outside servers to even work.  Game consoles, phones, practically anything that has a phone app such as drones, action cams, home auytomation etc... there is zero reason why an app can't rely only on wifi to work, and be stand alone.   I know WHY they do it (to spy on you) but I absolutely hate it.  I have a bad feeling we are going to see this being the norm with cars too.  Tesla already does it.   Overall it's just happening everywhere and I absolutely hate it.

Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: AlfBaz on October 17, 2020, 05:48:02 am
Facebook telling me as of 2023 my oculus rift cant be used without logging in with them :rant:

In the meantime oculus server sends packets upon packets of encrypted data to facebook owned ip addr with the thing just laying there off and unused  :palm:
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: BravoV on October 17, 2020, 05:53:30 am
The annoying type ahead "smart"  ::) at the browser before striking the Enter key, like when I typed in the search dialog box, sometimes it made the browser or keyboard stuttered, and it doesn't "smartly" clear the keyboard buffer hence the typing went crazy, really hate that.  >:( >:( >:(
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: Ed.Kloonk on October 17, 2020, 08:02:38 am
Radio stations that chop the guitar solo so they can squeeze in a few more ads.

 :rant:
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: SilverSolder on October 17, 2020, 03:27:09 pm
One of my big tech related pet peeves is the fact that so many products require you to have an account and register it now days, and rely on outside servers to even work.  Game consoles, phones, practically anything that has a phone app such as drones, action cams, home auytomation etc... there is zero reason why an app can't rely only on wifi to work, and be stand alone.   I know WHY they do it (to spy on you) but I absolutely hate it.  I have a bad feeling we are going to see this being the norm with cars too.  Tesla already does it.   Overall it's just happening everywhere and I absolutely hate it.

Agree 100% -  I simply don't buy those products unless I'm absolutely forced to.  There are usually alternatives, if you look hard enough.  Instead of buying a new car that spies on you, buy a used Corvette or Porsche that doesn't!  -  All round winner!  :D
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: bsfeechannel on October 17, 2020, 06:48:24 pm
Now this is a pet peeve of mine also. Ghetto solutions to things where it doesn't make sense.. like egg cartons to store parts.. yeah, somebody can spend many dollars on hardware / parts but cant spend the money for proper cheap plastic drawers.. Eeek GADS... for crying out loud.. egg cartons.. really!

So I presume you'll be particularly annoyed to know that you can build an entire parts cabinet out of used matchboxes.

(https://i.ytimg.com/vi/h1NCKUx0i_s/maxresdefault.jpg)
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: eugenenine on October 17, 2020, 06:59:43 pm
I think the parts in egg cartons is just temp storage while you disassemble, fix and reassemble something.

I do use peanut butter and butter jars/tubs for long term storage though.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: TimFox on October 17, 2020, 08:54:35 pm
Egg cartons, muffin tins, and similar informal fixtures were common when sorting the components out of a bag to assemble a Heathkit.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: james_s on October 18, 2020, 12:39:10 am
I've used all sorts of recycled containers for various things, what's wrong with it? I could afford to buy new containers but why do that when I've already got something I can use? If you want to be wasteful and throw something away then buy something else just so the peanut gallery doesn't think that you're ghetto then go right ahead, I'll continue to use what I already have when possible. Egg cartons aren't good for long term storage, but they work great when you need to temporarily organize the pieces of something. I mean why buy a storage cabinet every time I need to take something apart if I can pull an egg carton out of the recycle bin and use that? I frequently reuse prescription pill bottles too, they're great for keeping screws and other small parts together while I'm waiting for parts I need to show up.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: Red Squirrel on October 18, 2020, 06:52:03 am
One of my big tech related pet peeves is the fact that so many products require you to have an account and register it now days, and rely on outside servers to even work.  Game consoles, phones, practically anything that has a phone app such as drones, action cams, home auytomation etc... there is zero reason why an app can't rely only on wifi to work, and be stand alone.   I know WHY they do it (to spy on you) but I absolutely hate it.  I have a bad feeling we are going to see this being the norm with cars too.  Tesla already does it.   Overall it's just happening everywhere and I absolutely hate it.

Agree 100% -  I simply don't buy those products unless I'm absolutely forced to.  There are usually alternatives, if you look hard enough.  Instead of buying a new car that spies on you, buy a used Corvette or Porsche that doesn't!  -  All round winner!  :D

The issue is often you don't now of this until AFTER you buy it.  And sometimes there really is no alternative. Like with phones.  There's basically Apple, and Android.  Both require you to have an account and tie it to the cloud.  There is zero technical reason for that, I should be able to use the phone as a stand alone device and the only "account" should be with the provider, for the actual cell service.  Everything else is just a computer.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: dunkemhigh on October 18, 2020, 02:49:58 pm
Quote
I should be able to use the phone as a stand alone device

Fairly sure you can do that with Android (can't check since all my phones are already enslaved). Indeed, with some you cannot access, for instance, the Play store even if you wanted to. Can you recall what stops you just putting a SIM in and making a call?
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: E-Design on October 18, 2020, 03:04:25 pm
I've used all sorts of recycled containers for various things, what's wrong with it? I could afford to buy new containers but why do that when I've already got something I can use? If you want to be wasteful and throw something away then buy something else just so the peanut gallery doesn't think that you're ghetto then go right ahead, I'll continue to use what I already have when possible. Egg cartons aren't good for long term storage, but they work great when you need to temporarily organize the pieces of something. I mean why buy a storage cabinet every time I need to take something apart if I can pull an egg carton out of the recycle bin and use that? I frequently reuse prescription pill bottles too, they're great for keeping screws and other small parts together while I'm waiting for parts I need to show up.

There is of course, nothing wrong with this practice.

I guess for me, its a little OCD and a little of the right tool (or container) for the job. Sure you *CAN* use egg cartons to hold parts but I like proper container for the particular parts. You can sometimes use coins as a screwdriver too. Re purposing plastic bottles is a little less ghetto.. pet peeves are very subjective..

Each to their own!  :-+
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: Red Squirrel on October 18, 2020, 06:40:56 pm
Quote
I should be able to use the phone as a stand alone device

Fairly sure you can do that with Android (can't check since all my phones are already enslaved). Indeed, with some you cannot access, for instance, the Play store even if you wanted to. Can you recall what stops you just putting a SIM in and making a call?

When you first turn on a phone for the first time, one of the first things it wants is a google account.  There is no way around this, well nothing easy anyway.  I'm sure people who are deeply into phones like rooting etc might be able to bypass that process.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: themadhippy on October 18, 2020, 07:04:38 pm
Quote
I should be able to use the phone as a stand alone device
In that case don't buy a smart phone,dumb phones are still available regardless of what the salesbod tries to tell you.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: Red Squirrel on October 18, 2020, 07:22:22 pm
Quote
I should be able to use the phone as a stand alone device
In that case don't buy a smart phone,dumb phones are still available regardless of what the salesbod tries to tell you.

I absolutely HATE arguments like that.  No, I want a smart phone, but I don't want all the other crap like spying or being forced to make an account. Is that so hard to ask for?  There is no technical reason for all the other crap.    I hate people who just say "Well don't buy it" when it comes to any product that comes with "frills" that are unwanted.  No, how about they actually make it the way we want.  THAT is how it should work.

As a side note my phone recently got hacked and I realized they split up security updates from regular updates, I had been getting regular updates but not security updates since they purposely stop those to force you to buy another phone.   So I actually DID start looking at dumb phones for fun, but there is really not much.   I want something that has a full keyboard (touch screen or physical works), and a good camera that compares to a smart phone camera.   But there is not much as far as that goes.

At one point there was an Ubuntu based phone called Open Moko, wish there were more options like that.  These are proper stand alone devices that don't need to tie into any sort of cloud or require any kind of account to use.   
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: SilverSolder on October 18, 2020, 07:56:03 pm
Quote
I should be able to use the phone as a stand alone device

Fairly sure you can do that with Android (can't check since all my phones are already enslaved). Indeed, with some you cannot access, for instance, the Play store even if you wanted to. Can you recall what stops you just putting a SIM in and making a call?

When you first turn on a phone for the first time, one of the first things it wants is a google account.  There is no way around this, well nothing easy anyway.  I'm sure people who are deeply into phones like rooting etc might be able to bypass that process.

I use a disposable email address, that I then don't ever bother monitoring or reading again.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: pwlps on October 18, 2020, 08:30:19 pm
People propagating myths about Tesla's supposed secret and forbidden free energy technologies.  It really upsets me seeing this poor man being credited with inventing most of this kind of BS.   
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: eugenenine on October 19, 2020, 01:32:11 am
Quote
I should be able to use the phone as a stand alone device

Fairly sure you can do that with Android (can't check since all my phones are already enslaved). Indeed, with some you cannot access, for instance, the Play store even if you wanted to. Can you recall what stops you just putting a SIM in and making a call?

When you first turn on a phone for the first time, one of the first things it wants is a google account.  There is no way around this, well nothing easy anyway.  I'm sure people who are deeply into phones like rooting etc might be able to bypass that process.
It depends on the phone.  Stock Android you can run without a google account, but a lot of the manufacturers add on their own UI front end and setup apps that require it.  So you have to search out the phones with the least manufacturer addons.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: james_s on October 19, 2020, 06:27:26 am
There is of course, nothing wrong with this practice.

I guess for me, its a little OCD and a little of the right tool (or container) for the job. Sure you *CAN* use egg cartons to hold parts but I like proper container for the particular parts. You can sometimes use coins as a screwdriver too. Re purposing plastic bottles is a little less ghetto.. pet peeves are very subjective..

Each to their own!  :-+

But if you're taking apart a laptop for example and this is something you do only on occasion when you need to upgrade or repair it, does it make sense to go out and buy some kind of storage container to keep track of the hardware until you have it back together then have a random container sitting around? Or just use an egg carton, sort the bits into it, then throw it away when you're finished with it. We're not talking long term storage of inventory or someone whose job involves repairing laptops or similar devices every day, the idea is to fulfill a temporary need.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: HobGoblyn on October 19, 2020, 11:18:09 am
When you fill out a web form, leaving it nicely formatted, spaces, paragraphs etc, and when it's submitted, it turns into a single wall of text
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: E-Design on October 19, 2020, 11:25:31 am
There is of course, nothing wrong with this practice.

I guess for me, its a little OCD and a little of the right tool (or container) for the job. Sure you *CAN* use egg cartons to hold parts but I like proper container for the particular parts. You can sometimes use coins as a screwdriver too. Re purposing plastic bottles is a little less ghetto.. pet peeves are very subjective..

Each to their own!  :-+

But if you're taking apart a laptop for example and this is something you do only on occasion when you need to upgrade or repair it, does it make sense to go out and buy some kind of storage container to keep track of the hardware until you have it back together then have a random container sitting around? Or just use an egg carton, sort the bits into it, then throw it away when you're finished with it. We're not talking long term storage of inventory or someone whose job involves repairing laptops or similar devices every day, the idea is to fulfill a temporary need.

Well, I do take things apart on occasion as well, so yes it does make sense for me to buy a little parts tray that I keep around for exactly that purpose. Its not like its very much cost. I could have used egg cartons, but I chose to use something a little more suitable. Since it holds electronic components occasionally, it is also ESD safe, and durable. Again, right tool / container for the job. No point to discussing the views of each opinion - like I said, there is nothing wrong with it and your view is perfectly legit. - but for me, too many pill bottles, egg cartons, peanut butter jars etc.. Im sorry, I say it looks ghetto. Sounds like that's not what you do, but some people do. Its not for me, It just an opinion.
 :-+
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: E-Design on October 19, 2020, 11:26:37 am
When you fill out a web form, leaving it nicely formatted, spaces, paragraphs etc, and when it's submitted, it turns into a single wall of text

Yes! This.

Also, on a similar note, when you have to go back to the page and of course, it has wiped out all your information and you have to re fill in EVERYTHING. Ughh!
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: dunkemhigh on October 19, 2020, 11:39:49 am
Quote
it has wiped out all your information

For Firefox there is an addon - Textarea Cache - that keeps a copy of any text boxes you've filled in. If you do lose stuff due to a refresh or whatever, a copy of the lost content is a click away.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: AlfBaz on October 19, 2020, 09:48:03 pm
Websites that have pictures of a product with the enlarge button, you click it and the same size image appears in a new window :palm:
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: Sal Ammoniac on October 19, 2020, 10:03:17 pm
Websites that have pictures of a product with the enlarge button, you click it and the same size image appears in a new window :palm:

I've seen sites that have this "feature" and when you click the enlarge button a smaller image pops up.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: Red Squirrel on October 19, 2020, 10:15:07 pm
When you fill out a web form, leaving it nicely formatted, spaces, paragraphs etc, and when it's submitted, it turns into a single wall of text

Yes! This.

Also, on a similar note, when you have to go back to the page and of course, it has wiped out all your information and you have to re fill in EVERYTHING. Ughh!

My keyboard had this back/forward button right on the palm rest area.  Been burned so many times by my hand, or cat's paw accidentally hitting back and losing everything.  There is probably a way to disable that in the OS but did not want to be bothered trying to figure out how to do that in Linux so I just ripped out the buttons with pliers and filled the hole with caulking lol.  I always prefer hardware fixes, they are permanent even between reinstalls. :P
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: Red Squirrel on October 19, 2020, 10:18:49 pm
To add another pet peeve of mine... sites that are suppose to be selling a product, but yet don't have any option to shop, see prices, or buy.  I think this is more a Canada thing because I find plenty of American sites willing to sell me whatever I am looking for but it's so hard to find sites here where I can actually shop, see the product, and buy.   When I was trying to buy solar panels for example it was like pulling teeth.  I see so many Facebook ads that are the same, they refuse to tell you pricing.   If someone asks they are just asked to contact them.  What is the point of advertising a product or service if you're not willing to disclose the price?

I even got a flyer in the mail once for prefab steel buildings.  Given I want to eventually buy off grid property I got curious and went through it.  Not a single price mentioned.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: AlfBaz on October 19, 2020, 10:34:38 pm
Websites that have pictures of a product with the enlarge button, you click it and the same size image appears in a new window :palm:

I've seen sites that have this "feature" and when you click the enlarge button a smaller image pops up.
:-DD
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: james_s on October 20, 2020, 01:05:48 am
To add another pet peeve of mine... sites that are suppose to be selling a product, but yet don't have any option to shop, see prices, or buy.  I think this is more a Canada thing because I find plenty of American sites willing to sell me whatever I am looking for but it's so hard to find sites here where I can actually shop, see the product, and buy.   When I was trying to buy solar panels for example it was like pulling teeth.  I see so many Facebook ads that are the same, they refuse to tell you pricing.   If someone asks they are just asked to contact them.  What is the point of advertising a product or service if you're not willing to disclose the price?

I even got a flyer in the mail once for prefab steel buildings.  Given I want to eventually buy off grid property I got curious and went through it.  Not a single price mentioned.

My assumption is that if they won't show me the price, they're asking too much, I leave and look elsewhere.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: Ed.Kloonk on October 20, 2020, 02:01:58 am
To add another pet peeve of mine... sites that are suppose to be selling a product, but yet don't have any option to shop, see prices, or buy.  I think this is more a Canada thing because I find plenty of American sites willing to sell me whatever I am looking for but it's so hard to find sites here where I can actually shop, see the product, and buy.   When I was trying to buy solar panels for example it was like pulling teeth.  I see so many Facebook ads that are the same, they refuse to tell you pricing.   If someone asks they are just asked to contact them.  What is the point of advertising a product or service if you're not willing to disclose the price?

I even got a flyer in the mail once for prefab steel buildings.  Given I want to eventually buy off grid property I got curious and went through it.  Not a single price mentioned.

My assumption is that if they won't show me the price, they're asking too much, I leave and look elsewhere.

If you have to ask how much, you prolly can't afford it.

 ;)
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: Red Squirrel on October 20, 2020, 02:31:10 am
To add another pet peeve of mine... sites that are suppose to be selling a product, but yet don't have any option to shop, see prices, or buy.  I think this is more a Canada thing because I find plenty of American sites willing to sell me whatever I am looking for but it's so hard to find sites here where I can actually shop, see the product, and buy.   When I was trying to buy solar panels for example it was like pulling teeth.  I see so many Facebook ads that are the same, they refuse to tell you pricing.   If someone asks they are just asked to contact them.  What is the point of advertising a product or service if you're not willing to disclose the price?

I even got a flyer in the mail once for prefab steel buildings.  Given I want to eventually buy off grid property I got curious and went through it.  Not a single price mentioned.

My assumption is that if they won't show me the price, they're asking too much, I leave and look elsewhere.

If you have to ask how much, you prolly can't afford it.

 ;)

Yeah that's pretty much what I go by too.  If they refuse the show the price I will just assume it's overpriced and move on. 
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: vk6zgo on October 20, 2020, 03:43:45 am
To add another pet peeve of mine... sites that are suppose to be selling a product, but yet don't have any option to shop, see prices, or buy.  I think this is more a Canada thing because I find plenty of American sites willing to sell me whatever I am looking for but it's so hard to find sites here where I can actually shop, see the product, and buy.   When I was trying to buy solar panels for example it was like pulling teeth.  I see so many Facebook ads that are the same, they refuse to tell you pricing.   If someone asks they are just asked to contact them.  What is the point of advertising a product or service if you're not willing to disclose the price?

I even got a flyer in the mail once for prefab steel buildings.  Given I want to eventually buy off grid property I got curious and went through it.  Not a single price mentioned.

Car sales yards where the used cars have signs attached to their windshields, which, instead of having the price, just say "for sale".
Well, duhhh, fancy that! I thought it was just a parking area! :palm:

Or cars being sold privately on the side of the road, with no price, just a mobile phone number. |O
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: Circlotron on October 20, 2020, 04:10:44 am
#blessed hashtag  :palm: :palm: :palm:

https://www.nytimes.com/2014/05/04/fashion/blessed-becomes-popular-word-hashtag-social-media.html (https://www.nytimes.com/2014/05/04/fashion/blessed-becomes-popular-word-hashtag-social-media.html)
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: Nominal Animal on October 20, 2020, 07:52:32 am
#blessed hashtag  :palm: :palm: :palm:
Maybe it's just that they got saved by BLES, Breast Lesion Excision System?  Breast cancer awareness isn't too bad, methinks.

:-/O :palm:
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: Ed.Kloonk on October 20, 2020, 08:13:56 am
Blessed are the cheese makers.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: Nominal Animal on October 20, 2020, 11:35:21 am
or, quite literally, #brianblessed.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: duckduck on October 21, 2020, 09:47:50 pm
Many people like to say things like, "I am loving this new thing," instead of saying, "I love this new thing."

Or "I am wanting a new thing" instead of "I want a new thing."

I don't get it.

Ooh, this one gets me. I'm so sick of the -ing-ing of colloquial American English.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: SilverSolder on October 21, 2020, 10:54:25 pm
Many people like to say things like, "I am loving this new thing," instead of saying, "I love this new thing."

Or "I am wanting a new thing" instead of "I want a new thing."

I don't get it.

Ooh, this one gets me. I'm so sick of the -ing-ing of colloquial American English.

F*k-ing annoy-ing!   :D
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: eugenenine on October 21, 2020, 11:33:04 pm
Could be worse, you could be in Ohio where everything is plural.  "I had to renew my driver's licneses, because of COVID I'll have to  get them online" or  "I  went to WalMarts", or "I got it at WalMarts"
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: Circlotron on October 22, 2020, 12:03:09 am
Could be worse, you could be in Ohio where everything is plural.  "I had to renew my driver's licneses, because of COVID I'll have to  get them online" or  "I  went to WalMarts", or "I got it at WalMarts"
Similar to company names with apostrophe and plural.
National's Semiconductors makes it sound like a mum and dad operation.
National Semiconductor sounds much better.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: james_s on October 23, 2020, 03:22:41 am
I suspect it's historical, coming from a time and region where most businesses WERE small "mom & pop" operations with apostrophe'd (possessive) names. "Frank's General Store" might be locally referred to just as "Frank's", if most businesses were traditionally named that way I could see people habitually pronouncing others in that manner. It's not something I recall hearing around here though.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: Diaphanous on October 23, 2020, 04:13:57 pm
Can't decide which concrete sealer you will choose? Check this concrete sealer review https://bestdrivewaysealers.org/best-concrete-sealer/, it talks about the best brands you could ever have!
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: dunkemhigh on October 23, 2020, 04:31:54 pm
You put full stops at the end of your sentences;
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: SilverSolder on October 23, 2020, 04:44:01 pm
My pet peeve is any programming language that requires semicolons to denote end of statements.

It allows putting several statements on one line;  this can be useful at times.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: Siwastaja on October 23, 2020, 05:02:18 pm
Being explicit and clear is must in programming. This is science and/or engineering.

Whitespace delimitation is a great idea every newbie gets but fails miserably in real world. Programming languages have evolved from early simple BASIC style languages into using more explicit and visible delimiters and this is only good. Yes, Python is crap, but it's crap anyway because you can't know whichever version of language happens to work for whatever program. It isn't supposed to be stable, robust or do what you expect it to do, so whitespace control of program flow is just OK for that mindset anyway.

Suck it up and grow up, you'll get used to it in, what, 10 minutes. I had zero problems accepting ; as a 11-year old when I started with C.

Use the same idea whenever designing any ASCII based protocol. Oh lord the time wasted fighting with stupidly designed / buggy whitespace parsers in commercial / industrial equipment such as programmable power supplies and measurement devices, expecting exact combination of \n, \r, \n\r, \r\n or who knows what, coupled with implicit conversions no one wants. The ones designed by me just work because commands and replies are delimited by ; or something else and \r and \n totally ignored, but I'm sure you would hate to use them having to type ; for "do it!" explicitly.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: TimFox on October 23, 2020, 05:02:39 pm
E-mails from vendors stating that “your order has shipped”, when the shipping company’s tracking indicates that “the label has been created” or “cannot find number”.  In extreme examples, there were one week delays until the delivery company physically received the item.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: Ed.Kloonk on October 23, 2020, 05:12:16 pm
E-mails from vendors stating that “your order has shipped”, when the shipping company’s tracking indicates that “the label has been created” or “cannot find number”.  In extreme examples, there were one week delays until the delivery company physically received the item.

Ebay's "The item is in transit"

 >:(
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: Nominal Animal on October 23, 2020, 06:15:40 pm
The ones designed by me just work because commands and replies are delimited by ; or something else and \r and \n totally ignored, but I'm sure you would hate to use them having to type ; for "do it!" explicitly.
Whenever I have to read line-based input (molecule data, for example), I use the equivalent of /[\t\v\f ]*(\r\n|\n\r|\r|\n)[\t\v\f ]*/ regular expression as the separator.  Essentially, I ignore leading and trailing whitespace on every line, and accept LF, CR, CR LF, and LF CR as the newline itself.  I learned to do this when I had users running Windows (98 era), Mac (PowerPC pre-OS X), and Linux (myself); it just cut down the issues altogether.  I also did Win-1252/Latin1/Latin9/MacRoman/UTF-8 pseudo-autodetection on web forms prior to browsers honoring accept-charset, because us Finns love our ä and €.

It is annoying to have to do this, but it was so long ago, and browsers have come so much further together (fewer browser-specific workarounds), that it isn't a peeve for me anymore.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: Calambres on October 25, 2020, 11:40:07 am
My pet peeve: I simply cannot stand blue LEDs.

I run from appliances having those like the plague. Bad times for me in the 2000's..
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: Siwastaja on October 25, 2020, 12:22:22 pm
My pet peeve: I simply cannot stand blue LEDs.

I run from appliances having those like the plague. Bad times for me in the 2000's..

I just recently designed in a blue LED as power indicator.

For the first time in history, I'm really feeling the idea is getting so old it's almost retro now.

Really cool products did it in some early years of 2000's. Around 2005, it was in each and every product; couldn't stand it.

Now, nobody does it any more, we have got over it as a human society. Good riddance.

So, I figured, why not!? If nothing else, for trolling purposes.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: Calambres on October 25, 2020, 01:03:44 pm
Now, nobody does it any more, we have got over it as a human society. Good riddance.
Can't agree. Most if not ALL appiances from china have those highly offending blue hi-power LEDs... and we're plagued with chinese stuff!

For some reason, hi-power blue LEDs make my eyes ache and it's not an exaggeration.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: Siwastaja on October 25, 2020, 01:32:00 pm
Don't worry, they'll be gone soon from the products copying trends.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: SilverSolder on October 25, 2020, 03:07:37 pm

The problem is how bright the blue LEDs often are...  not so much the fact that they are blue!

The best devices have an ambient light sensor so they can adapt to the environment they are in...
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: Calambres on October 25, 2020, 04:36:37 pm

The problem is how bright the blue LEDs often are...  not so much the fact that they are blue!
Maybe, but my eyes don't ache with red, green, yellow, etc. hi-power LEDs. Just whith those horrible blue ones.

It may be just me but they bother me big time.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: SilverSolder on October 25, 2020, 05:41:55 pm

The problem is how bright the blue LEDs often are...  not so much the fact that they are blue!
Maybe, but my eyes don't ache with red, green, yellow, etc. hi-power LEDs. Just whith those horrible blue ones.

It may be just me but they bother me big time.

I don't know why equipment for household use need high power LEDs at all...  I agree that blue is the worst, but who wants a 10 million lumen indicator light of any kind in a dark bedroom?
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: Bud on October 25, 2020, 05:48:18 pm
The gamers do!  :box: Long live RGB lighting on every stupid gaming accessory, chairs included!
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: james_s on October 25, 2020, 06:20:51 pm

The problem is how bright the blue LEDs often are...  not so much the fact that they are blue!
Maybe, but my eyes don't ache with red, green, yellow, etc. hi-power LEDs. Just whith those horrible blue ones.

It may be just me but they bother me big time.

Our eyes have difficulty focusing on the blue light, I don't remember the exact reason for this but I think it's something to do with the way the different wavelengths behave when passing through the lens. CRT projection TVs used to slightly defocus the blue gun, I believe for a similar reason.

For decades there were no blue LEDs at all, the closest you could get was a sickly green. Then when they first appeared they were exotic and very expensive, prices dropped a bit and I bought one that I think was $10 and used it as the power indicator in my PC. Then they got cheap and suddenly EVERYTHING was using them, always with the brightness dialed up to 11 and I quickly tired of them. For some reason the Chinese seem to feel that when it comes to indicator lights, brighter is better. Countless times I've had to stick bits of tape over blinding surface mount LEDs on various development boards or replace resistors with something nearly an order of magnitude higher to knock the brightness down to something I could actually look at. I've modified several pieces of consumer equipment by replacing blue LEDs with less irritating colors.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: Bud on October 25, 2020, 07:12:57 pm
I use craft dot stickers over the blue LEDs on the front panels, a dollar  for a hundred or so. sometime it takes two stickers on top of each other to bring the insane brightness down. Works great.

Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: rdl on October 25, 2020, 10:18:01 pm
Not only are indicator LEDs often too bright, but on top of that they will use clear lens (point source) type which make them even more annoying.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: Syntax Error on October 25, 2020, 10:18:52 pm
Hole dots, genius!  :-+

Trouble is most LEDs are 0805 or smaller SMDs on the end of a glued-in-place light pipe; replacing them is not straight forward. But for the sake of sanity, replacement HAS to be done.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: Siwastaja on October 26, 2020, 09:24:01 am
Our eyes have difficulty focusing on the blue light, I don't remember the exact reason for this but I think it's something to do with the way the different wavelengths behave when passing through the lens.

Human eye has this fairly simple single lens optical path, and the problem with single-lens optics is they focus different wavelengths to different planes, hence causing "chromatic aberration". Camera optics get around this by using combination of lenses. Human vision system implements a very complex AI algorithm instead, but there are limits what that can do. Light blue targets contain enough green so human brain can use high-resolution data from green receptors, combined with the color obtained from the blue receptors.

You can actually try this out: sometimes you can see company logo signs that contain deep blue color (it needs to be very deep blue!) which, as a result, looks blurred at night, while adjacent other colors look sharp. You can actually force your eye to focus on that blue (you know, by forcing your eye muscles to defocus the image); then the blue suddenly looks focused, but red and green becomes clearly defocused. This test confirms the weakest link in human vision regarding blue is in the lens, not the receptors (although it is also true the number of blue receptors is lowest; obviously it would be a waste having more!)

Quote
CRT projection TVs used to slightly defocus the blue gun, I believe for a similar reason.

No, the reason here isn't similar, but instead about chemistry of the phosphors. In order to compensate for the effect in eye, they would need to project blue to actually different distance, which would be nearly impossible. Defocusing is done on tube (adjusting the electrostatic/electromagnetic focusing), not even on the lens. The reason is that the blue phosphors used in the tube are quite weak and can't produce high illumination level; similarly the blue tube is the first one to wear out. But by defocusing the gun, tiny bright spots can utilize a larger area of phosphor, reducing peak intensity, utilizing more phosphor to emit the light. The obvious problem is, the resolution suffers. But lo and behold, didn't we just describe that the human eye sucks on blue resolution (because our eyes focus based on green and red)? So we can accept that defocused blue tube.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: Syntax Error on October 26, 2020, 09:49:08 am
The CCIR (rough) rule of thumb for converting colour images to monochrome, whilst preserving visual 'luminance' is :
1Y = 0.3R + 0.6G + 0.1B

The blue end of the spectrum holds very little 'information' or importance for mammals living in sunlight. It's the green shades our ancestors needed to distinguish when swinging from tree to tree. Maybe this is why blue LEDs just do not look natural?

If you are a Bee 1Y = 0R + 0.1G + 0.3B + 0.6U and violet LEDs are the coolest colour ever.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: Nominal Animal on October 26, 2020, 12:40:00 pm
Psychovisual models show that bright blue light in otherwise not predominantly blue nor extremely brightly lit environment is "unnatural" to the human visual processing facilities.

This is the reason emergency vehicles have bright blue flashing lights, and why they are usually banned for other vehicles.

Having a bright blue LEDs in a dimly lit room, say a bedroom or a livingroom when reading a book or something, is a distraction to the human visual processing facilities: it will always "label" that bright blue light as an anomaly.  How the rest of the being reacts to that label, varies.

Siwastaja, have you considered using one of those fast color-changing LEDs as a power indicator? :-X
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: NiHaoMike on October 26, 2020, 01:15:29 pm
One trick I found for way too bright blue LEDs is to put a piece of fluorescent paper in front of it, dramatically cuts down on brightness and changes the color. Or if the actual problem is the LED being too directed, sand it to diffuse the light.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: CatalinaWOW on October 26, 2020, 03:51:57 pm
I have used nail polish.  You can adjust attenuation will thickness.  Wife doesn't mind since it justified more purchases.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: Sal Ammoniac on October 26, 2020, 05:25:13 pm
I'm not bothered by blue LED indicator lights at all. In fact, I quite like them as they tend to be more visible than other colors. I can understand the issue with indicator lights in general in the bedroom, and would probably cover them with black tape, but I don't have any electronics in my bedroom, so no issue there.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: Fixpoint on October 26, 2020, 07:28:37 pm
- Any programming language that cannot understand when = means 'assign' and when it means 'compare'. This problem was solved in the 60's. And we are still fucking around with things like := and == because the parsers writers are stupid.

Hm. This is now the second time I read this from you ... in how many threads are you actually spreading this bunkum?

Maybe my pet peeve is comments like that above.

So, I will explain everything again:

No, this "problem" was not "solved" in the 60s. That's simply because it never was a problem. It is *trivial* to make this distinction in a parser. Again: It is a DESIGN decision. There is a mathematical difference between *statements* and *expressions* and some people deem it a good idea to make this difference explicit in the syntax. Some people agree with that, others don't. It's as simple as that.

Yes, yes, the "parser writers" are "stupid". Oh dear. Know what? Oftentimes, parsers are not even written but defined in a formal grammar which is then used to generate the actual parser implementation. So, implementing the difference between ":=" and "==" can be as quick as changing some lines of declarations.

I know, I am boring you. You don't want to know any of this. You just want to retain your belief system.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: rdl on October 26, 2020, 07:53:09 pm
I see often videos, which are not actually 16x9 or whatever (most frequently see this with those dumb ass vertical format phone videos) where what would/should just be black bars is filled with some distorted/stretched/blurred extension of the original video. I find this more distracting than useful. I've wondered if this is done on the fly (by some algorithm) or baked into the video file itself. Either way I wish it would go away.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: TimFox on October 26, 2020, 08:23:34 pm
Besides that, I often see wide-screen broadcast of still photos, either portrait or 3:2 landscape, with the sides filled in by distortion of the original image.  Luckily, my local TV station that shows local photography during the weather report has stopped this barbarism and now fills the sides with neutral padding.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: Circlotron on October 26, 2020, 09:06:51 pm
The rare times that drag races are on tv, or worse still, you are at a live event and you have some donkey commentator that just won’t shut up. The cars are tearing down the strip and he drowns out the whole show with a foghorn voice telling you something completely obvious like “Look! Fred Bloggs is pulling ahead of Bill Sykes!” Just shut up and let me hear the machinery! Edit - similar to various example on YouTube of monster trucks ploughing through neck deep mud at ridiculous speeds and there is some commentator jibbering and hyperventilating with some “c’mon c’mon c’mon c’mon c’mon c’mon” nonsense like an auctioneer playing on 78. I’ll try and find some examples later on.  |O
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: KL27x on October 26, 2020, 09:25:10 pm
^ Commentators!
If I could watch sports on TV without the commentating, I would probably pay extra. Yeah, there's a mute button, but I want to hear the game. The crowds, the hits. What penalty just happened.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: Sal Ammoniac on October 26, 2020, 10:18:26 pm
Ditto with space launches. I'd rather listen to Mission Control than the clueless network commentators.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: Microdoser on October 26, 2020, 10:42:12 pm
- Any programming language that cannot understand when = means 'assign' and when it means 'compare'

I would like to add a subset of this peeve which is when the coders know what you mean and raise an error telling you that is what you mean but make it a fatal error instead of just a warning

"Error 42: You typed = when you mean =="
"Error 43 you typed == when you mean ="

If the parser is smart enough to know that is the error you made and also what you intended then ask the user if they want to change "=" to "==" (or vice versa)

If a parser is smart enough to parse:
if UserIsPresent:
    DoAction()

and know that you are actually asking:
if UserIsPresent==True:
    DoAction()

then it is just lazy coding to not include:

if UserIsPresent=True:
    DoAction()

as valid syntax and instead to make this a fatal error, not a warning.

EDIT: It would seem my peeve is against the DESIGN decision and the inability of the implementers of the DESIGN decision to make a parser for humans instead of just blindly implementing the DESIGN decisions without any thought for usability.

God forbid a parser might be made to make the user experience better or easier. All hail the DESIGN decision, it rules over all.  |O
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: CatalinaWOW on October 27, 2020, 12:37:23 am
Telling the user he doesn't really want what he wants is not unique to compiler writers.  Sometimes it is arrogance.  Detroit automakers sacrificed a dominant worldwide position to this.  Sometimes it is just that the user represents a small, unimportant market.  It sucks to have unique needs.  Sometimes it is just a failure to communicate with both sides sharing the blame.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: james_s on October 27, 2020, 03:00:30 am
I forgot a big one for me, those stupid logos that every TV channel has floating in the corner of the screen at all times. It is incredibly distracting, like a smudge on the screen that I can't wipe off. It's so annoying that it drove me to completely stop watching any form of broadcast TV and go to 100%  discs and streaming.

Even worse are the stupid animated banners and graphics at the bottom of the screen advertising some other show, some of them even make sounds. It obscures the content that you're trying to watch! Whoever decided any of this stuff was a good idea should have been fired 20 years ago. Modern TV has had digital channel guides for years, there is NO reason to continuously remind everyone what channel they're watching or what's on next. Perhaps it deters piracy to some extent but only by degrading the content such that I don't want it even if it's free.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: james_s on October 27, 2020, 03:02:44 am
Human eye has this fairly simple single lens optical path, and the problem with single-lens optics is they focus different wavelengths to different planes, hence causing "chromatic aberration". Camera optics get around this by using combination of lenses. Human vision system implements a very complex AI algorithm instead, but there are limits what that can do. Light blue targets contain enough green so human brain can use high-resolution data from green receptors, combined with the color obtained from the blue receptors.

You can actually try this out: sometimes you can see company logo signs that contain deep blue color (it needs to be very deep blue!) which, as a result, looks blurred at night, while adjacent other colors look sharp. You can actually force your eye to focus on that blue (you know, by forcing your eye muscles to defocus the image); then the blue suddenly looks focused, but red and green becomes clearly defocused. This test confirms the weakest link in human vision regarding blue is in the lens, not the receptors (although it is also true the number of blue receptors is lowest; obviously it would be a waste having more!)

Ah, yes chromatic aberration, I knew there was a word for it but I couldn't think of it at the time. I'm curious though why deep red doesn't have a similar issue, are we just optimized for that end of the spectrum and blue is the extreme other end?
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: SilverSolder on October 27, 2020, 03:40:13 am
I forgot a big one for me, those stupid logos that every TV channel has floating in the corner of the screen at all times. It is incredibly distracting, like a smudge on the screen that I can't wipe off. It's so annoying that it drove me to completely stop watching any form of broadcast TV and go to 100%  discs and streaming.

Even worse are the stupid animated banners and graphics at the bottom of the screen advertising some other show, some of them even make sounds. It obscures the content that you're trying to watch! Whoever decided any of this stuff was a good idea should have been fired 20 years ago. Modern TV has had digital channel guides for years, there is NO reason to continuously remind everyone what channel they're watching or what's on next. Perhaps it deters piracy to some extent but only by degrading the content such that I don't want it even if it's free.

We threw out the TV 20 years ago, never looked back - the best family decision ever! :D

Unfortunately the sum of our sins is a constant, so all kinds of other time wasting activities popped up to replace the time gained!
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: Tomorokoshi on October 27, 2020, 04:20:24 am
- Any programming language that cannot understand when = means 'assign' and when it means 'compare'

I would like to add a subset of this peeve which is when the coders know what you mean and raise an error telling you that is what you mean but make it a fatal error instead of just a warning

"Error 42: You typed = when you mean =="
"Error 43 you typed == when you mean ="

If the parser is smart enough to know that is the error you made and also what you intended then ask the user if they want to change "=" to "==" (or vice versa)

...

Somewhat related  is the use of "or", where in general English usage it means "exclusive OR" (Latin "aut") while in computer usage it means "inclusive OR" (Latin "vel").

The trouble with using "=" to mean both assignment and comparison is that within English, the term "equals" is, as it were, overloaded with both "is equal to" and "is assigned to" even though there is no need for it. In essence it's a homonym with the same spelling. Computer languages that separate out the two, whether by "=" and "==", ":=" and "=", or some other method, are getting past the unfortunate limitation in English of not having separate common usage terms.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: dunkemhigh on October 27, 2020, 05:29:18 am
Visual Studio.

During install you can tell it to install to whatever folder you want, and since I try to keep C: to absolute minimum, to enable fast and efficient disaster recovery, I put dev tools on G:. So this goes in G:/VisualStudio right? Wrong. It puts a few MB there and dumps GBs, and we're talking tens of same, on C:.

It's because of lazy programmers that my C: drive is 100GB with only 10GB free. And, no, Linux isn't any better - you don't get a choice where to install anything. Unless you compile from source yourself, everything gets dumped together. But Microsoft should know a lot better, and did at one time.

Also hate the tool IDEs that don't tell you what fun you're about to have until you see the bloody VS installer starting up...
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: Ed.Kloonk on October 27, 2020, 05:33:46 am
Visual Studio.

During install you can tell it to install to whatever folder you want, and since I try to keep C: to absolute minimum, to enable fast and efficient disaster recovery, I put dev tools on G:. So this goes in G:/VisualStudio right? Wrong. It puts a few MB there and dumps GBs, and we're talking tens of same, on C:.

It's because of lazy programmers that my C: drive is 100GB with only 10GB free. And, no, Linux isn't any better - you don't get a choice where to install anything. Unless you compile from source yourself, everything gets dumped together. But Microsoft should know a lot better, and did at one time.

Also hate the tool IDEs that don't tell you what fun you're about to have until you see the bloody VS installer starting up...

Symbolic links?

But yeah, hard coding storage locations is sloppy.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: Circlotron on October 27, 2020, 05:55:28 am
^^ Like some older stuff from P&E Micro that gives you the option of where you want to install it but won't actually work unless you install in the default location.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: dunkemhigh on October 27, 2020, 05:57:29 am
I think you can (temporarily) move program files to wherever you want. So it should be possible to move it, install, put it back. I've heard there can be problems doing that, though.

I used symbolic links for C++Builder and some years later figured they were a fatal error waiting to be tripped over. But thanks for reminding me that the option is there  :-+
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: dunkemhigh on October 27, 2020, 05:59:12 am
Quote
but won't actually work unless you install in the default location

Oh, that's a cruel one!
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: Siwastaja on October 27, 2020, 10:32:14 am
I would like to add a subset of this peeve which is when the coders know what you mean and raise an error telling you that is what you mean but make it a fatal error instead of just a warning

It's an error, not a warning because the compiler really doesn't know. It's a GUESS. For example: gcc nowadays prints those "helpful" "did you mean" suggestions. Guess what? Some 10% of the time for me, they are completely wrong. Thank god they are errors, not warnings.

Grow up, you are not an end consumer looking for the greatest "user experience", you are a programmer, be thankful that your tools catch your errors and don't produce random crap for you.

In C, for example, the following construct is used all the fucking time:
Code: [Select]
if( (retval = do_thing()) == SUCCESS)
    do_something_with(retval);

Explicit over implicit any day. Erroring out istead of "guessing" the intent, any day, for robust programming, and programs that work as expected.

You don't even save any significant time by guessing! Maybe some 0.001%, all of which is instantly wasted if the guess is wrong even once.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: dunkemhigh on October 27, 2020, 01:05:14 pm
I wish to associate myself with the comment by Siwastaja  :-+
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: eugenenine on October 27, 2020, 07:39:22 pm
Linux isn't any better - you don't get a choice where to install anything. Unless you compile from source yourself, everything gets dumped together. But Microsoft should know a lot better, and did at one time.


Some Linux aren't any better you mean.  Other Linux let you pass a basedir= to the Slackbuild specifying where you want the install.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: dunkemhigh on October 27, 2020, 11:39:31 pm
Can't they just have a dialog with "Install folder: " and point/click selection of destination?
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: rdl on October 28, 2020, 01:21:06 pm
That's the way games do it. I've never had any problems. As a matter of fact, I've moved entire game folders from drive to to drive after installing and they still work fine. Maybe Windows 7 takes care of everything behind the scenes, I don't know but it's a non-issue.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: Siwastaja on October 28, 2020, 02:02:27 pm
That's the way games do it. I've never had any problems. As a matter of fact, I've moved entire game folders from drive to to drive after installing and they still work fine. Maybe Windows 7 takes care of everything behind the scenes, I don't know but it's a non-issue.

It doesn't (take care of anything behind the scenes), but clearly the games are properly designed.

My pet peeves are programs that pollute the file tree or operating system in one way or another and are unable to work without "installation" which does random, unwanted and undocumented things to the system, and if you move the folder, they stop working.

Surprisingly many Windows programs are designed to just work putting the files somewhere, installers doing just that; cheers to them.

This being said, dynamic linking hell seems to apply to both Windows and linux distros.

On the unix tradition, this works in a completely different manner; so different that it isn't very fruitful to try to compare directly. The one which you are used to "feels" the only right way to do it. Strangely, I feel both are viable ways.

The very classic Windows way, "everything in one folder per program, including config" is quite good, but it has been broken a long time ago when programmers were encouraged to use The Registry for config storage; not that different from the unix tradition "put all config under /etc/", resulting in a strange mix of traditional Windows and Unix ways. In Unix, the idea is that all binaries of all programs are in one place, all config of all programs are in another place, all documentation of all programs in yet another... Which is again broken by the fact that there are multiple such places, think about /bin/, /usr/bin/, /usr/local/bin; and by the fact you have to come up with a place for files not easily classified under those traditional types.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: rdl on October 28, 2020, 02:43:39 pm
I have an entire folder called "portable" and almost every program I use is in there. None have ever been installed. Games however often require their own specific version of the MSVC++ runtime. I think there's around 15 copies on my game machine. It would be nice if these were contained in the game folder without requiring installation. But yeah, most Windows software will just run, no install needed.

I used to create a restore point, install something, then restore and see if it still worked. Almost always it did. One way to keep the registry unpolluted I guess.

Interestingly, writing to the registry seems built-in or maybe done by Windows itself in some cases, because it will happen even if a program folder is copied from a completely different machine once the executable is run.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: Nominal Animal on October 28, 2020, 08:20:10 pm
Note that in most Linux distributions, the package manager not only forces a specific location, but it tracks them too.

For example, on Debian or Debian-derivatives like Ubuntu or Mint using Debian packaging, one can say for example
    dpkg-query -L $(dpkg-query -S $(which foo) | cut -d ':' -f 1)
to find out what other files are in the same package that provided command foo; or just
    dpkg-query -S $(which foo)
to find the names of the package(s) that provide existing command foo.

However, you most definitely can create Debian (and RPM) packages that use only the libraries provided within the package, in the same directory (or more preferably, a subdirectory), wherever it is compiled or installed to.  In fact, it is trivial for non-SUID, non-filesystem-capability-using binaries; and you don't even have to recompile the libraries.  All you need is to write a small wrapper that extracts its own absolute path, set the LD_LIBRARY_PATH to that directory (or suitable subdirectory), containing the libraries needed, and then execute the actual binary.  (Privileged programs that change UIDs or use filesystem capabilities do need to be relinked, with DT_RUNPATH ELF dynamic section attribute naming the correct location, and -z nodeflib option so that standard ELF cache locations are not used as a back-up location to search in.)
(I've ranted before about how it is possible and not difficult to make portable Linux applications – that Just Work across most/all Linux distributions –, so I won't repeat that here.  If anyone wants a practical example, though, just ask.)

You can also run binaries in a chroot environment (even bind-mounting existing filesystems or their leaf-parts to the chroot), but overall, a virtual machine is a better choice for that use case (since you probably want to protect the "parent" system from any shenanigans those binaries might do).

It is the same old story: with Linux, you can do whatever you want, but either you do it yourself, or you get someone to do it for you.  Ain't no free lunch.
By this I mean that if you want to use Linux as a tool in a production environment, you should have someone – paid, contracted, whatever – to do your support for you.
In an optimum situation, that someone or those someones also continually optimize the Linux environment you use for your workflow(s), too.

But try and get pointy-haired bosses to go for this!  At least, I myself am not enough of a salesman to get through the PHBs, even showing past proof of it working.
It seems like whenever you mention Linux, they think "no cost".  No, there is always a cost, and one should compare the cost to the tool you get for that (ongoing) cost, in terms longer than a quarter year.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: Ed.Kloonk on November 11, 2020, 08:12:53 am
Web 2.0 text that you can't select and copy, at least in part.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: SilverSolder on November 11, 2020, 03:13:08 pm
Web 2.0 text that you can't select and copy, at least in part.

Be grateful that you can still do screen shots...
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: eugenenine on November 11, 2020, 08:58:20 pm
or the web sites that now prevent cursor key scrolling
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: james_s on November 11, 2020, 09:24:04 pm
Web sites that nag you to install the app EVERY SINGLE TIME you visit with a mobile browser, even if the app is not supported on your version of the mobile OS.

Apps that drop support for older versions of iOS even when they were working perfectly. I do not need or want my phone to be updated to a newer, slower operating system with new bugs every year, and I an ticked off that ebay blocked their perfectly working app requiring a new version that requires a new OS. The effect is I spent a lot less time browsing ebay, save a lot of money, and sell much less on there too since these activities are much less convenient now. I used to browse the ebay app any time I was waiting somewhere and had time to kill, the mobile web experience is crap.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: Red Squirrel on November 12, 2020, 06:16:18 am
I realized I've been agreeing with pretty much all web related stuff people say, so to cover all bases:

Web 2.0.

That's my pet peeve.     Seriously though, Most modern designs just simply suck, they are less usable and more annoying than the more old school counterparts, while also taking up way more resources.   So many websites now are just filled with annoyances and every time they update they only make it worse.  Just look at Digikey.  it's a disaster now.

If you really want to push your system to it's limits try opening more than one Facebook tab.   If I can manage to do Alt F1 to get into a console and killall firefox I can recover, but usually once the cursor starts to feel like molasses, it's game over and I have choice but to do a hard reboot.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: SilverSolder on November 12, 2020, 01:55:03 pm
Basically, the Javascript engine in modern browsers is now so powerful that it acts like a virtual machine, running programs locally in your browser.   That is the real problem, because now we have a lot of bad programmers writing terrible code that executes inefficiently,  compared to old style HTML.

It isn't just the web designers that are the problem.   We also have companies like Adobe that have to justify their cloud subscriptions...  so they develop and sell web design tools that create reams of Javascript to turn a 100 byte web page into a 10 terabyte monstrosity, which can only be maintained using their tools. 

There is no cost to either the web designers or Adobe for doing this,  since it is us, the poor sap users, that have to pay the price of under-performing web sites.  If customers protest (e.g. like they do with the new Digikey site) the management is told that the web designers are professionals that use all the latest tools, and the customers are a bunch of old fuddy duddys that are fondly remembering the days of their youth around a no longer permitted camp fire...    Then they show the manager how easy it is to like their company on Facebook when using Digikey on a tiny screen phone, and the manager goes away again, pacified, thinking about his/her next promotion.

Of course, it needn't be like this.   There is no law of nature that says you can't make an excellent and well performing web site even if the tools have too much unsaturated fat in them...   So the main blame goes to the web designers that are slaves to modern fashion and don't bother to understand how the site is actually used and how their technology works, followed by tool makers like Adobe that tend to fool people into thinking that their tools are so good that the designers no longer have to think about how they work...    And of course a dunce prize for company management teams that let all this happen on their watch.

Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: james_s on November 12, 2020, 05:00:57 pm
I bristle every time I hear someone say that a website needs updating because it looks dated. To me "dated" means it is clean and functional, and a redesign now inevitably means it will be bloated and buggy with half the information density and a bunch of useless crap that nobody asked for. I hate fashion because it overrides logic. You can watch the evolution of any product, it will start out primitive and then keep getting better and better until the development peaks, all the real problems have been solved and it is as close to perfection as it's going to get. But development doesn't just stop, they keep finding ways to screw with it in order to justify their own existence and inevitably it gets worse from all this constant tinkering and meddling. We use Slack for communication at work and it was mature and fully developed years ago and worked almost perfectly. This has not stopped them from constantly tinkering and making changes, moving things around in the UI for no apparent reason, adding annoying features that nobody asked for and then occasionally changing them again some months later after everyone complains. It drives me crazy, it's a tool, once it works just leave it alone and stop screwing with it. Some people can never just finish a project and go make something else, they have their one pet project that is always a project because they can never make up their minds and just call it finished.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: SilverSolder on November 12, 2020, 06:11:28 pm
Consider what would happen if a car maker decided to reverse the position of the gas pedal vs. the brake in their cars...  because their designer thought it looks better with the skinny pedal on the other side!  It would be pandemonium.

But in the software / web industry, making major changes to the GUI is considered cost free - and it pretty much is, to the people making the changes...

Some industries won't accept it.  If you change the GUI on a financial trading workstation, the sales manager will be phoned the next day and asked to remove this useless garbage from their premises!
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: dunkemhigh on November 12, 2020, 09:47:05 pm
Quote
Consider what would happen if a car maker decided to reverse the position of the gas pedal vs. the brake in their cars

Not a lot, really. First, that's essentially what it was like here in Britland in the 70's and 80's when we have British bikes (Triumph, BSA, etc) with the gearshift on the right, and Jap bikes (Honda, Yamaha, etc) with the gearshift on the left. Only a couple of times did I try to brake with the gearshift, and maybe once changed gear with the brake. But at that age I would have done stupid things like that anyway :)

Second, it's only because it's always like it is that there's a problem for anything different. If the norm were to be random then it would just be the norm and no-one would blink at it.

I am not saying that standardisation isn't desirable, just noting that we have survived without, and whilst it would be a bugger, it wouldn't be such a big one as might be imagined.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: CatalinaWOW on November 12, 2020, 10:02:59 pm
I bristle every time I hear someone say that a website needs updating because it looks dated. To me "dated" means it is clean and functional, and a redesign now inevitably means it will be bloated and buggy with half the information density and a bunch of useless crap that nobody asked for. I hate fashion because it overrides logic. You can watch the evolution of any product, it will start out primitive and then keep getting better and better until the development peaks, all the real problems have been solved and it is as close to perfection as it's going to get. But development doesn't just stop, they keep finding ways to screw with it in order to justify their own existence and inevitably it gets worse from all this constant tinkering and meddling. We use Slack for communication at work and it was mature and fully developed years ago and worked almost perfectly. This has not stopped them from constantly tinkering and making changes, moving things around in the UI for no apparent reason, adding annoying features that nobody asked for and then occasionally changing them again some months later after everyone complains. It drives me crazy, it's a tool, once it works just leave it alone and stop screwing with it. Some people can never just finish a project and go make something else, they have their one pet project that is always a project because they can never make up their minds and just call it finished.

This is inevitable, because it is far easier to tinker with something that is working and desirable than it is to invent something new that is desirable.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: SilverSolder on November 12, 2020, 10:21:16 pm
Quote
Consider what would happen if a car maker decided to reverse the position of the gas pedal vs. the brake in their cars

Not a lot, really. [...]

Maybe if you are designing a new Edsel...   :D
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: james_s on November 13, 2020, 12:34:48 am
Quote
Consider what would happen if a car maker decided to reverse the position of the gas pedal vs. the brake in their cars

Not a lot, really. First, that's essentially what it was like here in Britland in the 70's and 80's when we have British bikes (Triumph, BSA, etc) with the gearshift on the right, and Jap bikes (Honda, Yamaha, etc) with the gearshift on the left. Only a couple of times did I try to brake with the gearshift, and maybe once changed gear with the brake. But at that age I would have done stupid things like that anyway :)

Second, it's only because it's always like it is that there's a problem for anything different. If the norm were to be random then it would just be the norm and no-one would blink at it.

I am not saying that standardisation isn't desirable, just noting that we have survived without, and whilst it would be a bugger, it wouldn't be such a big one as might be imagined.

I suppose it depends on how ingrained something is. Muscle memory is very hard to override, for a while my brother had a car that was almost identical to mine except his had an automatic and mine had a manual gearbox. I drove his a few times and had to wedge my left foot behind my right leg to keep from reflexively stabbing for the clutch, which results in catching the edge of the wide brake pedal used in slushbox equipped cars and slamming on the brakes.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: dunkemhigh on November 13, 2020, 01:41:03 am
Quote
Muscle memory is very hard to override

Sure is! And you really want muscle memory when driving so you're not half-focused on how to operate it.

Periodically I drive a motor with a push-button parking brake. Often it is only overnight but nevertheless it doesn't catch me out very often. But get back in my own motor and I'm forever trying to find the parking brake button! I think it's the strangeness of the different motor that keeps one mentally awake, but get back into familiar surroundings and you kind of relax your guard, but something at a low level is still saying 'that control is the other way around'.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: JohnPen on November 13, 2020, 11:08:29 am
Two experiences with different vehicles that caused some confusion.  Many years back in the UK  I purchased a Simca 1500. This had a different gear change to the normal in the UK as the original french version was a column change.  In the UK it had been changed to a floor change but  a different gear change order it was reversed  I cant remember where reverse gear was.
----------1 3--------------------3 1
----------2 4   ----------------  4 2 .
Being a lot younger then I did not find it a problem and fortunately it had a Porsche type gearbox that the recommended check for it's condition was to drive at 30 mph in a higher gear and then quickly change in to first  gear keeping the clutch disengaged. >:D   Yes it really worked with no problem but I wouldn't recommend that as a habit it did however protect one from possible gear change errors while adapting.   My second  confusion was arriving to pick up an American hire car (automatic) in Ottowa at night and being unable to release the handbrake or even find it.  I had not come across the 'Foot operated' version before and it was pitch black in the car park so I could not even see it.  A quick visit back to the pick up office and all became clear.  Nowadays electric handbrakes are automated as well but I do miss the option of using a handbrake manually especially when parking on steep inclines. Perhaps I will eventually trust them. :)
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: SilverSolder on November 13, 2020, 03:24:09 pm

Some cars with the automatic handbrakes let you activate them manually by pushing/pulling the release button.  It can increase the trust factor when parking on a hill!  :D
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: Sal Ammoniac on November 13, 2020, 06:31:48 pm
Frameless windows, like Windows Explorer windows on the latest version of Windows 10, that blend into white backgrounds so that you can't tell where one window ends and another begins.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: eugenenine on November 13, 2020, 11:11:03 pm
Quote
Consider what would happen if a car maker decided to reverse the position of the gas pedal vs. the brake in their cars

Not a lot, really. First, that's essentially what it was like here in Britland in the 70's and 80's when we have British bikes (Triumph, BSA, etc) with the gearshift on the right, and Jap bikes (Honda, Yamaha, etc) with the gearshift on the left. Only a couple of times did I try to brake with the gearshift, and maybe once changed gear with the brake. But at that age I would have done stupid things like that anyway :)

Second, it's only because it's always like it is that there's a problem for anything different. If the norm were to be random then it would just be the norm and no-one would blink at it.

I am not saying that standardisation isn't desirable, just noting that we have survived without, and whilst it would be a bugger, it wouldn't be such a big one as might be imagined.

I suppose it depends on how ingrained something is. Muscle memory is very hard to override, for a while my brother had a car that was almost identical to mine except his had an automatic and mine had a manual gearbox. I drove his a few times and had to wedge my left foot behind my right leg to keep from reflexively stabbing for the clutch, which results in catching the edge of the wide brake pedal used in slushbox equipped cars and slamming on the brakes.

it was many years after I was married that my arm would still reach for the non existent gearshift in my wife's car when I felt the rpm at certain speeds.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: Ed.Kloonk on November 13, 2020, 11:41:57 pm


it was many years after I was married that my arm would still reach for the non existent gearshift in my wife's car when I felt the rpm at certain speeds.

When I put my car in park after driving home, my poor car's windscreen wiper/washer wand wishes that I would stop forgetting that I'm not driving my truck with it's column shift.

One of these days, it will have had enough..

Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: Circlotron on November 15, 2020, 12:41:40 am
When some kind of draggable border in a window is only *one* pixel wide and you need hands as steady as a surgeon to get the mouse right on it to drag it to a new position...  :--
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: MathWizard on November 16, 2020, 12:33:36 am
My win10 PC falls asleep, and often when it wakes, my 155Hz monitor is only at 60Hz, and I can notice the diffrence right away in windows, let alone in a fast game
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: Red Squirrel on November 16, 2020, 04:09:03 am
I don't know why but in Linux I can never go even to 60hz on my two 4ks.  One of them will go to 60 but if I try to do the other, all hell breaks loose.  So I ended up just putting both to 30 to be safe.  It's oddly not really noticeable though...  back in CRT days even 60hz felt like a strobe light.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: AUSSIE on November 16, 2020, 08:11:12 am


it was many years after I was married that my arm would still reach for the non existent gearshift in my wife's car when I felt the rpm at certain speeds.

When I put my car in park after driving home, my poor car's windscreen wiper/washer wand wishes that I would stop forgetting that I'm not driving my truck with it's column shift.

One of these days, it will have had enough..

Done that in the past, broken off indicator stalk as well.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: SilverSolder on November 16, 2020, 01:39:37 pm


it was many years after I was married that my arm would still reach for the non existent gearshift in my wife's car when I felt the rpm at certain speeds.

When I put my car in park after driving home, my poor car's windscreen wiper/washer wand wishes that I would stop forgetting that I'm not driving my truck with it's column shift.

One of these days, it will have had enough..

Done that in the past, broken off indicator stalk as well.

When I need to remember something about my car, I put an elastic band over the rear view mirror as a flag...   can't avoid seeing that several times during the journey, and it reminds me "There is something you need to remember that you are sometimes an idiot with".   For example, towing a small trailer...   The experience of forgetting you are towing a trailer is memorable!  :D
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: GlennSprigg on November 19, 2020, 11:56:12 am
Those damn TV Ads here in Australia, where they all get the SAME narrators/readers!!!
Some regular 'Aussies' but often American, who drone on in the same mind destroying voices,
like "But WAIT, there's MORE !!" etc etc...  Bloody hell.  Even when/if there is something/product that I
REALLY liked, or REALLY needed, I would not buy it ever, just because of those bloody voices!!   >:D
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: CatalinaWOW on November 19, 2020, 03:21:51 pm
Those damn TV Ads here in Australia, where they all get the SAME narrators/readers!!!
Some regular 'Aussies' but often American, who drone on in the same mind destroying voices,
like "But WAIT, there's MORE !!" etc etc...  Bloody hell.  Even when/if there is something/product that I
REALLY liked, or REALLY needed, I would not buy it ever, just because of those bloody voices!!   >:D

Funny.  Here in the US we get the same annoying ads, but more than half of the announcers have accents from various parts of the British Empire.

Must be something to do with being run out of town at home.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: Sal Ammoniac on November 19, 2020, 04:53:40 pm
We get a lot of annoying TV ads here for prescription drugs that are 2-3 minutes in length, with the last minute or two consisting of a long list of all of the side effects of the drug.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: Ed.Kloonk on November 19, 2020, 04:55:34 pm
We get a lot of annoying TV ads here for prescription drugs that are 2-3 minutes in length, with the last minute or two consisting of a long list of all of the side effects of the drug.

May cause spontaneous, explosive anal leakage.

Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: TimFox on November 19, 2020, 06:26:47 pm
A few years ago, there was a parody where the side effects included “possession by the Prince of Darkness”.  This was in an ad for a stockbroker who specialized in after-hours trading, allowing the lady watching the drug ad to dump her stock in that drug company promptly.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: james_s on November 19, 2020, 06:43:11 pm
We get a lot of annoying TV ads here for prescription drugs that are 2-3 minutes in length, with the last minute or two consisting of a long list of all of the side effects of the drug.

I remember the ads for that drug to help you stop smoking, the guy rattles on and on at an auctioneer pace with a list of potential side effects that include hallucination, suicidal thoughts and tendencies and a bunch of other stuff. The side effects sound worse than smoking.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: SpecialK on November 20, 2020, 03:45:06 am
We get a lot of annoying TV ads here for prescription drugs that are 2-3 minutes in length, with the last minute or two consisting of a long list of all of the side effects of the drug.

I remember the ads for that drug to help you stop smoking, the guy rattles on and on at an auctioneer pace with a list of potential side effects that include hallucination, suicidal thoughts and tendencies and a bunch of other stuff. The side effects sound worse than smoking.

Yeah. Bear in mind hey are obligated to list the side-effects, but that doesn't mean you will get all or even a single one of them. 

I like the disclaimer, don't take "x" if you are allergic to "x". Huh?
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: Labrat101 on November 20, 2020, 12:11:49 pm
Being a smoker myself . I still think that if you worry about all
The side effects and the odds that can kill you . The distraction worry & life in general will be more dangerous.  And just reading all the small print . May damage your eye sight . 🤪
Update .. This new vaccine 4bug 19  .. Its 94% affective . But in the small print .   They don't know if there will be side affects in the future ..     Extra eye's or the odd finger dropping off .   :scared:
       what does the extra 6% not included !!.
         Yes I know the flue vaccine is only apx 45% .
 
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: SilverSolder on November 20, 2020, 02:41:01 pm
Being a smoker myself . I still think that if you worry about all
The side effects and the odds that can kill you . The distraction worry & life in general will be more dangerous.  And just reading all the small print . May damage your eye sight . 🤪
Update .. This new vaccine 4bug 19  .. Its 94% affective . But in the small print .   They don't know if there will be side affects in the future ..     Extra eye's or the odd finger dropping off .   :scared:
       what does the extra 6% not included !!.
         Yes I know the flue vaccine is only apx 45% .

Nothing is 100% safe.  Life is about avoiding the dumb risks, and taking the good ones...
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: DrG on November 20, 2020, 06:05:55 pm
I guess that I have a bit of a pet peeve with the term, “side effects” when applied to pharmacologics.

IMO, there are drug effects on your body and there are your body’s effects on drugs. It is ok to say “beneficial”, “desirable”, “adverse” and “undesirable” effects, within a context.

The peeve is because I think that the use of “side effects” simplifies the issue, is always relative and, basically, thwarts a better understanding of drug action in general.

Take for example (a mostly archaic example, but one that is easy to understand) dextroamphetamine (speed, upper). When the same dose range was administered for obesity or pregnancy weight gain, the “side effect” was labelled as mania (in this case, increased mood, excitement, hyperactivity). When administered as an antidepressant, the “side effect” was labelled as anorexia (in this case, weight loss from diminished appetite).
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: AlbertL on November 21, 2020, 05:28:27 am
In discussing the competition between AC and DC for power transmission in the early years of the electric utility industry (the "war of the currents"), writers who state that "DC can only be transmitted for short distances" or words to that effect.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: CatalinaWOW on November 21, 2020, 06:02:56 am
In discussing the competition between AC and DC for power transmission in the early years of the electric utility industry (the "war of the currents"), writers who state that "DC can only be transmitted for short distances" or words to that effect.

Give them a break.  It was true at the time.  There was no practical way at that time to step dc up to high voltage so unless your were willing to go broke buying meter squared conductors line losses were immense.  It was forty years before technology made it marginally practical and another forty before it became relatively easy.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: james_s on November 21, 2020, 06:30:46 am
Give them a break.  It was true at the time.  There was no practical way at that time to step dc up to high voltage so unless your were willing to go broke buying meter squared conductors line losses were immense.  It was forty years before technology made it marginally practical and another forty before it became relatively easy.


It's still not practical for distribution, it only really makes sense on large transmission lines where the advantages of DC start to outweigh the additional complexity required. Step down converters of the sort of scale needed to feed residential neighborhoods would be a lot more expensive and likely less reliable than conventional transformers and they're not going to be as robust in terms of surviving lightning strikes and overloads. The process of stepping it up and down still involves converting it to AC in the process.

Without the ability to step the voltage up and down even with unrealistically enormous conductors the voltage is going to be lower the further you are from the power plant. Prior to the 1970s at the earliest DC transmission would have meant rotary converters and it wasn't until probably the 90s that solid state electronics in the required power levels were even close to practical.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: TimFox on November 21, 2020, 02:38:07 pm
As I remember an article in Popular Science in my youth (55 years ago or so), the first trans-Channel underwater transmission lines between England and France ran DC, but huge mercury-vapor tubes were used for rectification and DC-AC conversion at both ends, rather than rotary machines.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: srb1954 on November 21, 2020, 06:35:54 pm
Give them a break.  It was true at the time.  There was no practical way at that time to step dc up to high voltage so unless your were willing to go broke buying meter squared conductors line losses were immense.  It was forty years before technology made it marginally practical and another forty before it became relatively easy.
Without the ability to step the voltage up and down even with unrealistically enormous conductors the voltage is going to be lower the further you are from the power plant. Prior to the 1970s at the earliest DC transmission would have meant rotary converters and it wasn't until probably the 90s that solid state electronics in the required power levels were even close to practical.
There were a few HVDC links were using mercury arc rectifiers prior to the 1970s.

The HVDC link between the 2 main islands of New Zealand was put in to service in 1965. At the time this was one of the largest and most advanced HVDC links in the world and used state-of-the-art mercury arc rectifiers, undersea cables, generators and circuit breakers.

After about 25 years service it became one of the last mercury arc rectifier based systems in the world before it was upgraded to thyristor based convertors.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: CatalinaWOW on November 21, 2020, 07:02:36 pm
The definition of HV has drifted over the years, but Wikipedia credits the first HV DC transmission line to a run in Sweden in 1954.  I believe lower voltage and/or experimental applications occurred in the  1930s.  Little hiccups like a world wide depression followed by a war delayed actual implementation of the technology.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: james_s on November 21, 2020, 07:55:50 pm
How do you use a mercury arc rectifier to turn DC into AC? I didn't realize that was possible.

Either way it was not practical for small scale stuff. It would make no sense to use DC transmission into residential neighborhoods with converters to turn it into AC and step it down for each group of houses.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: SilverSolder on November 21, 2020, 08:51:21 pm
How do you use a mercury arc rectifier to turn DC into AC? [...]

Hold it with both arms - and shake it, like a cocktail!   :D
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: TimFox on November 21, 2020, 09:30:10 pm
How do you use a mercury arc rectifier to turn DC into AC? I didn't realize that was possible.

Either way it was not practical for small scale stuff. It would make no sense to use DC transmission into residential neighborhoods with converters to turn it into AC and step it down for each group of houses.

I said “Mercury-vapor tubes”.  The inverters used thyratrons or ignitions.  Mercury-vapor rectifiers do not use arcs.
I also see no reason to use DC instead of AC with transformers for local distribution.\

Edit:  as caught below, spell-check changed my "ignitrons" into "ignitions".  Microsoft's ignorance is bliss.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: CatalinaWOW on November 21, 2020, 10:09:07 pm
How do you use a mercury arc rectifier to turn DC into AC? I didn't realize that was possible.

Either way it was not practical for small scale stuff. It would make no sense to use DC transmission into residential neighborhoods with converters to turn it into AC and step it down for each group of houses.

It would make no sense to convert the existing installed base.   Starting from scratch with today's components it might make a lot of sense.  No capacitive or inductive loss.  No power factor issues.  Simplified grid sync. 
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: Circlotron on November 22, 2020, 04:44:14 am
The inverters used thyratrons or ignitions.
Ignitrons
Not being pedantic, just fixing the word so those unfamiliar with this olde timey tech can look it up.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: TimFox on November 22, 2020, 02:54:34 pm
Oops!  I typed "ignitron" but Microsoft didn't recognize the word.  I remember a comic strip where the office workers were not allowed to have games on their company computers, so they goofed off by entering their names into spell-check to see what came out.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: Labrat101 on November 22, 2020, 04:21:15 pm
Quote from: Circlotron on Today at 04:44:14 am (https://www.eevblog.com/forum/index.php?topic=252850.msg3337258#msg3337258)>Quote from: TimFox on Yesterday at 09:30:10 pm (https://www.eevblog.com/forum/index.php?topic=252850.msg3336828#msg3336828)
The inverters used thyratrons or ignitions.
Ignitrons
Not being pedantic, just fixing the word so those unfamiliar with this olde timey tech can look it up.


Ignitrons are ignitor-fired mercury pool rectifiers with very high peak and average current handling capability. Low frequency ignitrons were the backbone of the welder control and electroplating industries for years. These low-cost devices are still in use today in large motor speed controls and many welder panels around the world.
 Just A cool home garage project  >:D
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: themadhippy on November 22, 2020, 05:05:36 pm
Quote
office workers were not allowed to have games on their company computers
so instead  microsoft hid them as easter eggs within excel and word
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: radar_macgyver on November 22, 2020, 05:41:07 pm
It would make no sense to convert the existing installed base.   Starting from scratch with today's components it might make a lot of sense.  No capacitive or inductive loss.  No power factor issues.  Simplified grid sync.
It would require very expensive breakers that can deal with the arcs produced when interrupting a DC current. HVDC links (point-to-point) get around this by shutting off the rectifier, this won't work for a one-to-many distribution.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: Labrat101 on November 22, 2020, 06:09:55 pm
Quote from: radar_macgyver on Today at 05:41:07 pm (https://www.eevblog.com/forum/index.php?topic=252850.msg3337984#msg3337984)>Quote from: CatalinaWOW on Yesterday at 10:09:07 pm (https://www.eevblog.com/forum/index.php?topic=252850.msg3336908#msg3336908)
It would make no sense to convert the existing installed base.   Starting from scratch with today's components it might make a lot of sense.  No capacitive or inductive loss.  No power factor issues.  Simplified grid sync.
It would require very expensive breakers that can deal with the arcs produced when interrupting a DC current. HVDC links (point-to-point) get around this by shutting off the rectifier, this won't work for a one-to-many distribution.

These are still in production and shutting the arc off is simple . without a contactor .
 https://www.relltubes.com/products/High-Energy-Transfer-Products/Ignitron.html (https://www.relltubes.com/products/High-Energy-Transfer-Products/Ignitron.html)
 
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: srb1954 on November 22, 2020, 08:42:46 pm

I said “Mercury-vapor tubes”.  The inverters used thyratrons or ignitions.  Mercury-vapor rectifiers do not use arcs.

There are mercury arc rectifiers that certainly do seem to contain arcs when operating.

I have seen a demonstration mercury arc rectifier operating. It looked like a glass octopus with a large bulbous head about 800mm high in total. From each of the arms lightning bolts appeared to travel in a jagged arc to a spot on the surface of the mercury pool. The spot where the arcs terminated seemed to dance around randomly on the surface of the pool.

The whole assembly was enclosed in a explosion containment box made of a a thick, very dark tint plastic to filter out the prodigious UV emissions from the arcs.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: TimFox on November 22, 2020, 08:58:32 pm
There is some confusion in nomenclature.
Mercury-arc rectifiers indeed have arcs into a pool of liquid mercury.
The mercury-vapor rectifiers to which I referred (e.g. 872 and 866) have hot cathodes emitting electrons, and the mercury ions inhibit space charge, allowing a much lower anode-cathode voltage when forward biased.  The 872A could withstand 10 kV reverse voltage, with only 10 V forward drop at several amperes forward conduction (much lower than a high-vacuum rectifier).
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: mag_therm on November 22, 2020, 09:23:12 pm
Mercury Arc DC to AC inverters were in use probably before WW2.
They used 3 phase half wave (triple anode, 1 cathode, grid controlled)
glass bulb  mercury arc devices.

Probably used by rail-road and heavy industry eg steel rolling mill etc.

I have a reference here:
Robert Wells: "Static Power Converters" published 1962
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: Circlotron on November 22, 2020, 10:03:56 pm
Oops!  I typed "ignitron" but Microsoft didn't recognize the word.  I remember a comic strip where the office workers were not allowed to have games on their company computers, so they goofed off by entering their names into spell-check to see what came out.
That’s like MS Word 97. You would type in the name of former Australian prime minister Paul Keating and it would substitute the word “cheating”.  :-DD
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: TimFox on November 22, 2020, 10:11:35 pm
In a different arc discussion here, I referred to the “Poulsen arc” (later known as the “Federal arc”), and spell-check changed it to “Poulenc”.  When typing this, it did it again, but I was ready for it.  At least it was a high-class cultural error, instead of, say, “poultry”.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: NiHaoMike on November 22, 2020, 10:59:47 pm
That’s like MS Word 97. You would type in the name of former Australian prime minister Paul Keating and it would substitute the word “cheating”.  :-DD
On some old version of OS X, entering "bill gates" into the terminal gives the response "kill gates?".
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: Siwastaja on November 29, 2020, 03:55:40 pm
Saying "LDO" when you definitely mean "linear regulator".
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: DimitriP on November 30, 2020, 08:03:31 pm
Entering a conversation with:
"I'm a noob"
"I'm new to all this"
"All this is new to me"
"I just got this xyz and I know nothing"

and last but not least ....
"I'm a new ham"

Or "a ham radio license is "a license to learn" "

Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: SilverSolder on November 30, 2020, 08:40:38 pm
Entering a conversation with:
"I'm a noob"
"I'm new to all this"
"All this is new to me"
"I just got this xyz and I know nothing"

and last but not least ....
"I'm a new ham"

Or "a ham radio license is "a license to learn" "

I don't know, it seems kind of useful to state up front what your level of experience is?   

E.g. if someone starts the conversation "I have used oscilloscopes for years, but this measurement is driving me crazy..." you might respond differently than if someone says "I'm a complete n00b and this is my first 'scope, how would you...."

No?
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: E-Design on November 30, 2020, 08:49:47 pm
Entering a conversation with:
"I'm a noob"
"I'm new to all this"
"All this is new to me"
"I just got this xyz and I know nothing"

and last but not least ....
"I'm a new ham"

Or "a ham radio license is "a license to learn" "

I don't know, it seems kind of useful to state up front what your level of experience is?   

E.g. if someone starts the conversation "I have used oscilloscopes for years, but this measurement is driving me crazy..." you might respond differently than if someone says "I'm a complete n00b and this is my first 'scope, how would you...."

No?

Agreed.. level of experience can be useful in creating responses. So a free pass this time. But dont use the word n00b. Makes you sound like a b00b.

Speaking of scopes.. how about this GEM of a thread starter
"Help a woman choose here first oscilloscope" - like being a woman has ANYTHING to do with it. geez, geat real.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: Ed.Kloonk on November 30, 2020, 09:11:09 pm
They are better off making sandwiches.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: james_s on November 30, 2020, 09:12:42 pm
Entering a conversation with:
"I'm a noob"
"I'm new to all this"
"All this is new to me"
"I just got this xyz and I know nothing"

and last but not least ....
"I'm a new ham"

Or "a ham radio license is "a license to learn" "

I don't know, it seems kind of useful to state up front what your level of experience is?   

E.g. if someone starts the conversation "I have used oscilloscopes for years, but this measurement is driving me crazy..." you might respond differently than if someone says "I'm a complete n00b and this is my first 'scope, how would you...."

No?

I find it useful. It saves me from trying to explain Ohms law to an experienced EE, or making the assumption that someone already knows such basics and jumping straight to more complicated things.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: Bud on November 30, 2020, 09:30:27 pm
"I am designing thing X but I have no clue how to do it".

Really?

You are "designing" ?
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: DimitriP on November 30, 2020, 09:33:51 pm
"I am designing thing X but I have no clue how to do it".

Really?

You are "designing" ?

:-+

You forgot to add "noob" in the sentence :)   
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: SilverSolder on November 30, 2020, 11:02:03 pm
Entering a conversation with:
"I'm a noob"
"I'm new to all this"
"All this is new to me"
"I just got this xyz and I know nothing"

and last but not least ....
"I'm a new ham"

Or "a ham radio license is "a license to learn" "

I don't know, it seems kind of useful to state up front what your level of experience is?   

E.g. if someone starts the conversation "I have used oscilloscopes for years, but this measurement is driving me crazy..." you might respond differently than if someone says "I'm a complete n00b and this is my first 'scope, how would you...."

No?

Agreed.. level of experience can be useful in creating responses. So a free pass this time. But dont use the word n00b. Makes you sound like a b00b.

Speaking of scopes.. how about this GEM of a thread starter
"Help a woman choose here first oscilloscope" - like being a woman has ANYTHING to do with it. geez, geat real.

Sure it has something to do with it...  like attracting hundreds of men to help her!  Probably the best framing of a question ever!   :D
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: Labrat101 on November 30, 2020, 11:48:13 pm
Entering a conversation with:
"I'm a noob"
"I'm new to all this"
"All this is new to me"
"I just got this xyz and I know nothing"

and last but not least ....
"I'm a new ham"

Or "a ham radio license is "a license to learn" "

I don't know, it seems kind of useful to state up front what your level of experience is?   

E.g. if someone starts the conversation "I have used oscilloscopes for years, but this measurement is driving me crazy..." you might respond differently than if someone says "I'm a complete n00b and this is my first 'scope, how would you...."

No?

Agreed.. level of experience can be useful in creating responses. So a free pass this time. But dont use the word n00b. Makes you sound like a b00b.

Speaking of scopes.. how about this GEM of a thread starter
"Help a woman choose here first oscilloscope" - like being a woman has ANYTHING to do with it. geez, geat real.

Sure it has something to do with it...  like attracting hundreds of men to help her!  Probably the best framing of a question ever!   :D

That has really got to me that Post  :palm: 
    Its like putting the sweets near the checkout  .  ;D :P
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: HobGoblyn on December 01, 2020, 09:14:43 am
Nothing at all against charity and helping those in need,

BUT

I’ve had a bad week, we’ve also got the pandemic, I want to switch off from reality for a couple of hours, have a few beers and watch a comedy on the COMEDY channel and hopefully make myself laugh.

There was about 10 different charities advertising during that film, everything from children going blind to crippled donkeys. I’ve got all the sympathy in the world for their plight, but lately in the UK the charity tv adds are in overload. Imo I should be able to turn on the Comedy channel without seeing this sort of thing every 15 mins.

Hope no one misinterprets what I’m saying 
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: Labrat101 on December 01, 2020, 12:43:08 pm
I know how you feel .
Charity for the Dogs Cats , Donkey etc & children OK They need .

        And
     Then the next Advert is a Donkey advertising Mouth Wash   :palm:
 
     
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: Nominal Animal on December 01, 2020, 01:10:24 pm
I’ve had a bad week, we’ve also got the pandemic, I want to switch off from reality for a couple of hours, have a few beers and watch a comedy on the COMEDY channel and hopefully make myself laugh.
Exactly!  Heck, I've had to consciously stop looking at news, to stop getting infuriated at peoples (especially politicians – on all sides!) stupidity and sheer short-sighted self-destructivity.

When I need a bit of humor or cheering up, showing me the plight of others is not going to make me redouble my efforts: it just depresses me and makes me even more passive.

(And I'm much less forgiving than you are, being very critical about what proportion of donations goes to the actual cause, and what is spent for wages and e.g. three-star accommodation for the workers in the third world countries.. but that is a completely different thing.)

I have seen some not-advertisements on Youtube that work better than advertisements: it's the success stories, like rescued animals and so on.  I wonder why they can't make adverts like that, with a small text bar at the bottom basically saying that if you'd like to make more of this happen, here's a way.  Feels good for everyone.

(Well, I don't wonder, actually: most advertising people are crafty and sometimes very good at what they do, but hardly intelligent.  Often clever, but never wise.)
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: Labrat101 on December 01, 2020, 01:59:44 pm
 All those adverts are not free .. They pay thousands for prime air time .
 I would guess the money spent on running these Adds don;t out way the money
received .  or maybe I am missing something .
  Maybe I am the donkey on the Listern Mouth wash Add  ;D :D
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: james_s on December 01, 2020, 06:16:32 pm
If they didn't make more profit from running the ads than they spend to run the ads (or at least think they did) then they wouldn't run the ads, simple as that.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: dunkemhigh on December 01, 2020, 06:41:56 pm
Barclays.

Santander is no better, but Barclays have really got up my nose tonight.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: Sredni on December 02, 2020, 04:19:37 am

I have seen some not-advertisements on Youtube that work better than advertisements: it's the success stories, like rescued animals and so on.

A word of caution on some (not all!) of those animal rescue channels: some are made by <insert preferred insult here> who put animals in danger or worse, harm them, to produce revenue from the views and likes. A notable offender was located in Vietnam and had/has several channels with the same poor animals that were either drugged, half drowned, tossed into pits with snakes or onto a dumpster fire to show the 'hero' saving them.
The more people reports these assholes to YT, the better. (unfortunately as soon as a channel is shut down, another one springs up with the same people behind).

Of course there are real animal care institutions and shelters that really do good. But the world is a wicked place.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: Nominal Animal on December 02, 2020, 09:13:19 am
I have seen some not-advertisements on Youtube that work better than advertisements: it's the success stories, like rescued animals and so on.

A word of caution on some (not all!) of those animal rescue channels: some are made by <insert preferred insult here> who put animals in danger or worse, harm them, to produce revenue from the views and likes. A notable offender was located in Vietnam and had/has several channels with the same poor animals that were either drugged, half drowned, tossed into pits with snakes or onto a dumpster fire to show the 'hero' saving them.
The more people reports these assholes to YT, the better. (unfortunately as soon as a channel is shut down, another one springs up with the same people behind).

Of course there are real animal care institutions and shelters that really do good. But the world is a wicked place.
Absolutely true!  I'm sorry I didn't mention that myself.

My typical morning starts with looking at I Can Has Cheesburger? (https://icanhas.cheezburger.com/), except that my ad blocker and browser settings block posts/images from Instagram etc.  Some of the Youtube channels I was referring to are Howl Of A Dog (https://www.youtube.com/c/HowlOfADog/videos), Flatbush Cats (https://www.youtube.com/c/FlatbushCats/videos), Vet Ranch (https://www.youtube.com/user/VetRanch/videos), and Walter Santi (https://www.youtube.com/c/waltersanti/videos) (just taking care of a backyard cat colony).
Remembering there are good people and good things, no matter how small, being done all around the world, is IMO a good way to start ones mornings.

There are others, but me being so suspicious/paranoid, I prefer channels where the most cases are ordinary, i.e. just neglected and scared, as opposed to abused; and who emphasize the need of good vet care and neutering/spaying.  (The vet channels are the ones that have the real special/hard cases, and they may not be morning-coffee/breakfast viewing material.)

If a channel constantly focuses on abused animals "just found by accident", you can be pretty sure there is a reason for that, and it unfortunately usually is financial incentive, no matter where the channel is from.

I also like channels like the box cat Maru (https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCRVruzlQF5cqpw9jQgIgNdw/videos); that cat is amazingly calm even when washed or nails being clipped, constantly giving everyone the "I'm happy with you here" eye squints, even when his tail swishes around like he was really mad.
Right now he's dealing with a new kitten, Miri, in a delightfully playful and friendly manner, for a 13-year old male cat.  ^-^
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: Circlotron on December 02, 2020, 12:17:34 pm
And then there's things like this:

Quote
RABBIT-Free Australia says the State Government owes Victorians an explanation after spending $70,000 on saving rabbits — despite Australia facing the worst rabbit plague since 1995.

This comes after an Olinda rabbit orphanage — which has divided readers after spending $1500 on fixing one rabbit’s teeth and another $1500 on a hernia operation - was given a $50,000 government grant to improve its shelter for sick and stray rabbits.

-> https://www.heraldsun.com.au/leader/east/orphaned-olinda-rabbits-chew-through-up-to-3000-in-dental-and-medical-bills-at-nokill-shelter/news-story/55a4f39728a32441a3d3c657bb87742a (https://www.heraldsun.com.au/leader/east/orphaned-olinda-rabbits-chew-through-up-to-3000-in-dental-and-medical-bills-at-nokill-shelter/news-story/55a4f39728a32441a3d3c657bb87742a)
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: SilverSolder on December 02, 2020, 02:47:05 pm
And then there's things like this:

Quote
RABBIT-Free Australia says the State Government owes Victorians an explanation after spending $70,000 on saving rabbits — despite Australia facing the worst rabbit plague since 1995.

This comes after an Olinda rabbit orphanage — which has divided readers after spending $1500 on fixing one rabbit’s teeth and another $1500 on a hernia operation - was given a $50,000 government grant to improve its shelter for sick and stray rabbits.

-> https://www.heraldsun.com.au/leader/east/orphaned-olinda-rabbits-chew-through-up-to-3000-in-dental-and-medical-bills-at-nokill-shelter/news-story/55a4f39728a32441a3d3c657bb87742a (https://www.heraldsun.com.au/leader/east/orphaned-olinda-rabbits-chew-through-up-to-3000-in-dental-and-medical-bills-at-nokill-shelter/news-story/55a4f39728a32441a3d3c657bb87742a)

This kind of thing should be done by charities etc., it doesn't immediately seem logical to have government involved in financing it!
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: Nominal Animal on December 02, 2020, 02:59:27 pm
A related pet peeve:

Old ladies who regularly feed "pigeons" in cities.

Even when told that only a small fraction of what they spread is eaten by pigeons, and the rest goes into helping the local disease-spreading rat population to grow, they insist they are just doing good by feeding the nice little pigeons, and rely on peoples' reluctance to get little old ladies fined for breaking the local ordnance.

Little old selfish ignorant fuckers, I say.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: SilverSolder on December 02, 2020, 03:03:13 pm
[...]
Little old selfish ignorant fuckers, I say.

The pigeons like them, though!  :D
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: Labrat101 on December 02, 2020, 06:06:26 pm
A related pet peeve:

Little old selfish ignorant fuckers, I say.

 Look on the bright side . one Day you will also be old , and doing stupid things is a privilege
     If any one asks .. ''What I can't remember doing that  ... where am I "  :-//   :-+
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: Circlotron on December 02, 2020, 09:00:56 pm
And then there's things like this:

Quote
RABBIT-Free Australia says the State Government owes Victorians an explanation after spending $70,000 on saving rabbits — despite Australia facing the worst rabbit plague since 1995.

This comes after an Olinda rabbit orphanage — which has divided readers after spending $1500 on fixing one rabbit’s teeth and another $1500 on a hernia operation - was given a $50,000 government grant to improve its shelter for sick and stray rabbits.
-> https://www.heraldsun.com.au/leader/east/orphaned-olinda-rabbits-chew-through-up-to-3000-in-dental-and-medical-bills-at-nokill-shelter/news-story/55a4f39728a32441a3d3c657bb87742a (https://www.heraldsun.com.au/leader/east/orphaned-olinda-rabbits-chew-through-up-to-3000-in-dental-and-medical-bills-at-nokill-shelter/news-story/55a4f39728a32441a3d3c657bb87742a)

This kind of thing should be done by charities etc., it doesn't immediately seem logical to have government involved in financing it!
Pets are one thing. Rabbits in the wild are quite another. They have absolutely no place in Australia. They are an introduced species and are an ecological and financial disaster. The harm they cause to other species of living things is huge. Why a government would finance the making of this problem worse is ridiculous.
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rabbits_in_Australia (https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rabbits_in_Australia)
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: SilverSolder on December 02, 2020, 09:20:06 pm
And then there's things like this:

Quote
RABBIT-Free Australia says the State Government owes Victorians an explanation after spending $70,000 on saving rabbits — despite Australia facing the worst rabbit plague since 1995.

This comes after an Olinda rabbit orphanage — which has divided readers after spending $1500 on fixing one rabbit’s teeth and another $1500 on a hernia operation - was given a $50,000 government grant to improve its shelter for sick and stray rabbits.
-> https://www.heraldsun.com.au/leader/east/orphaned-olinda-rabbits-chew-through-up-to-3000-in-dental-and-medical-bills-at-nokill-shelter/news-story/55a4f39728a32441a3d3c657bb87742a (https://www.heraldsun.com.au/leader/east/orphaned-olinda-rabbits-chew-through-up-to-3000-in-dental-and-medical-bills-at-nokill-shelter/news-story/55a4f39728a32441a3d3c657bb87742a)

This kind of thing should be done by charities etc., it doesn't immediately seem logical to have government involved in financing it!
Pets are one thing. Rabbits in the wild are quite another. They have absolutely no place in Australia. They are an introduced species and are an ecological and financial disaster. The harm they cause to other species of living things is huge. Why a government would finance the making of this problem worse is ridiculous.
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rabbits_in_Australia (https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rabbits_in_Australia)

Ah, I did not know that...  so Bugs Bunny not welcome down under, it seems.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: TimFox on December 02, 2020, 09:30:15 pm
I don't mean to imply that my wife, the gardener, is anti-rabbit, but she always roots for Elmer Fudd in the cartoons.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: dunkemhigh on December 02, 2020, 09:50:40 pm
Confusing terms, made because the M-word is no longer acceptable, as the S-word isn't either, and who gives a shit about context because fake racism scores 110 out of 100.

Currently looking at a multi-drop protocol where the master once interrogated each slave. Now the client is the master, the slave is a server, and who knows what the function names or comments refer to any more.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: Sal Ammoniac on December 02, 2020, 10:29:28 pm
Entering a conversation with:
"I just got this xyz and I know nothing"

and last but not least ....
"I'm a new ham"

Or if you're a ham, you can combine the two:
"I just got this XYL and I know nothing"
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: Ed.Kloonk on December 02, 2020, 10:35:50 pm
Entering a conversation with:
"I just got this xyz and I know nothing"

and last but not least ....
"I'm a new ham"

Or if you're a ham, you can combine the two:
"I just got this XYL and I know nothing"

There isn't much about hams that I've got to be peeved about. Why, just yesterday a ham showed up in my refrigerator with a tea towel wrapped around it.

Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: vk6zgo on December 02, 2020, 11:14:15 pm
A related pet peeve:

Little old selfish ignorant fuckers, I say.

 Look on the bright side . one Day you will also be old , and doing stupid things is a privilege
     If any one asks .. ''What I can't remember doing that  ... where am I "  :-//   :-+

I had hoped it would work that way, & I would be well on my way to learning how to sit in front of the TV, drooling down my cardigan.

Sadly, I not only still remember dumb arse things I recently did, but also those I did half a century ago!
(there were many more back then, as although you don't get smarter with age, you do get more cunning!)

I also know where I am, & it's not in the middle of a lake from following spoken travel instructions given by an "App" on a smartphone.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: Labrat101 on December 03, 2020, 11:25:32 am
A related pet peeve:

Little old selfish ignorant fuckers, I say.

 Look on the bright side . one Day you will also be old , and doing stupid things is a privilege
     If any one asks .. ''What I can't remember doing that  ... where am I "  :-//   :-+

I had hoped it would work that way, & I would be well on my way to learning how to sit in front of the TV, drooling down my cardigan.

Sadly, I not only still remember dumb arse things I recently did, but also those I did half a century ago!
(there were many more back then, as although you don't get smarter with age, you do get more cunning!)

I also know where I am, & it's not in the middle of a lake from following spoken travel instructions given by an "App" on a smartphone.
That's Good to Hear that . I only use the Dumb old thing when I get stop by the Police .
 for driving to fast .. I just say Sorry, I was in a Hurry before I will forget were I am Going  :-DD
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: dunkemhigh on December 04, 2020, 02:54:04 am
Online documentation. You never know if it's going to be there next time you need it or, if it is, if it will say the same thing as last time you looked.

Similarly, open source projects that have great documentation but online only. Wouldn't hurt them to just zip up all the html pages for download but, no, to have it offline you need to install their favoured weirdo language plus all the compilations support tools plus some unknowable (until afterwards when it's too late) installation gotchas. Wouldn't be so bad, but still annoying, if they all used the same thing, but you'll likely end up with this system pollution just for this one project.

Guys, if zip is too hard for you, tgz is ok to use!
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: Ed.Kloonk on December 04, 2020, 04:26:19 am
Online documentation. You never know if it's going to be there next time you need it or, if it is, if it will say the same thing as last time you looked.

Similarly, open source projects that have great documentation but online only. Wouldn't hurt them to just zip up all the html pages for download but, no, to have it offline you need to install their favoured weirdo language plus all the compilations support tools plus some unknowable (until afterwards when it's too late) installation gotchas. Wouldn't be so bad, but still annoying, if they all used the same thing, but you'll likely end up with this system pollution just for this one project.

Guys, if zip is too hard for you, tgz is ok to use!

What I've been doing fairly recently is in the browser, print the page, when the dialog comes up for the printer, choose print to PDF file. Save.

 :-+
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: dunkemhigh on December 04, 2020, 05:04:35 am
For a single page that's sometimes OK (except when they use web3.0 stuff so it never prints how it looks, if it even prints what you can see in the first place). But for a multi-page manual it's not going to work well, and you lose all the inter-page links, etc.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: Ed.Kloonk on December 04, 2020, 05:15:15 am
For a single page that's sometimes OK (except when they use web3.0 stuff so it never prints how it looks, if it even prints what you can see in the first place). But for a multi-page manual it's not going to work well, and you lose all the inter-page links, etc.

Lucky for me, after about the second page the ADHD kicks in and I've moved on to something else.

Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: dunkemhigh on December 04, 2020, 05:54:53 am
Yeah, that's why I like an offline copy so I can come back when I've got bored of whatever distracted me :)
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: GlennSprigg on December 04, 2020, 12:42:42 pm
And then there's things like this:

Quote
RABBIT-Free Australia says the State Government owes Victorians an explanation after spending $70,000 on saving rabbits — despite Australia facing the worst rabbit plague since 1995.

This comes after an Olinda rabbit orphanage — which has divided readers after spending $1500 on fixing one rabbit’s teeth and another $1500 on a hernia operation - was given a $50,000 government grant to improve its shelter for sick and stray rabbits.
-> https://www.heraldsun.com.au/leader/east/orphaned-olinda-rabbits-chew-through-up-to-3000-in-dental-and-medical-bills-at-nokill-shelter/news-story/55a4f39728a32441a3d3c657bb87742a (https://www.heraldsun.com.au/leader/east/orphaned-olinda-rabbits-chew-through-up-to-3000-in-dental-and-medical-bills-at-nokill-shelter/news-story/55a4f39728a32441a3d3c657bb87742a)

This kind of thing should be done by charities etc., it doesn't immediately seem logical to have government involved in financing it!
Pets are one thing. Rabbits in the wild are quite another. They have absolutely no place in Australia. They are an introduced species and are an ecological and financial disaster. The harm they cause to other species of living things is huge. Why a government would finance the making of this problem worse is ridiculous.
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rabbits_in_Australia (https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rabbits_in_Australia)

Ah, I did not know that...  so Bugs Bunny not welcome down under, it seems.

It's funny, that here in Australia, (where rabbits are classed as vermin), that the 'Do-Gooders' here tried to have "Easter-Bunny"
changed to an Aussie critter called a 'Bilby'. A 'few' companies initially made some Chocolate Confectioneries to that effect at
Easter time a few years back, but they were HOWLED DOWN and immediately disappeared there-after!!!   8)
Don't MUCK with what our children/parents/grandparents know & love!!!   :-DD
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: GlennSprigg on December 04, 2020, 12:52:09 pm
Our new/old 'Pet-Peeve' for the majority of Australians???...
Having other Countries tell US how to behave in our own Country!!!
Grand-Kids (school) "Not Allowed" to have sandwiches containing 'ham' in case it 'offends' some people here??!!!
This will probably be deleted, but is a REAL problem here!!! (Could list 100 other examples off my head).  >:D

Edit...
Look, I don't care how any individual/group cares to personally live. Pray to their own gods, dress how they choose,
make pilgrimages, bow down in certain directions, or stuff 'notes' into a brick wall, drink or don't drink, believe what
ever you want... But just don't demand from the country that 'accepts' you to change their attitudes & laws just to
accommodate YOU!! That is the ULTIMATE insult.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: SilverSolder on December 04, 2020, 02:31:48 pm
[...] Grand-Kids (school) "Not Allowed" to have sandwiches containing 'ham' [...]

That cannot possibly be true...  can it  ????

Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: eugenenine on December 05, 2020, 10:49:18 pm
It is, and its not just Aus it happens to, those things happen here as well.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: AlfBaz on December 06, 2020, 12:35:05 am
Christmas Holidays being called December Holidays. If you want to be "all inclusive" leave the traditional name and give us a public holiday for all the other special religious days of the year.
I for one, am all for a month off during Ramadan  :-+
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: Circlotron on December 06, 2020, 03:54:55 am
Organisations and workplaces that blather on about "diversity" and inclusiveness" and yet when you express a point of view that is different to theirs, they are the first ones to jump down your throat. If they were true to their principles they would actually include an idea that diverges from their own.  :palm:
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: james_s on December 06, 2020, 04:12:38 am
Fritzing diagrams. I can't stand them! I cringe every time I see an interesting looking project only to find that instead of a proper easy to read schematic it has a stupid Fritzing diagram and usually not even one that is neatly drawn. It just looks like a rats nest of wires that is difficult and error prone to follow. Some may argue that it's good for beginners and to some extent I can agree, it's appropriate maybe for the first few circuits in a child's first electronic experimenters kit but that's it. Beyond that it serves as a crutch that delays the mandatory skill of learning to read a schematic diagram which holds people back.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: vk6zgo on December 07, 2020, 07:33:45 am
Our new/old 'Pet-Peeve' for the majority of Australians???...
Having other Countries tell US how to behave in our own Country!!!
Grand-Kids (school) "Not Allowed" to have sandwiches containing 'ham' in case it 'offends' some people here??!!!
This will probably be deleted, but is a REAL problem here!!! (Could list 100 other examples off my head).  >:D

Edit...
Look, I don't care how any individual/group cares to personally live. Pray to their own gods, dress how they choose,
make pilgrimages, bow down in certain directions, or stuff 'notes' into a brick wall, drink or don't drink, believe what
ever you want... But just don't demand from the country that 'accepts' you to change their attitudes & laws just to
accommodate YOU!! That is the ULTIMATE insult.

It may not be anything to do with upsetting "some people". (nudge, nudge, wink, wink)

It is not unusual for people to be allergic to pork, ham, bacon & other similar products
My Mum used to get violently sick if she ate some---she would cook it for us, though.

I'm a bit allergic to pork if it is cooked rare (so it is pretty much still oinking)-------no problem with well cooked pork, or processed stuff, like ham, bacon, salami, etc.

Other people are allergic to peanuts (common), or as in my Son's case, mushrooms.
Schools are paranoid about being responsible for anyone having any sort of attack due to food they allow.

Anything with nuts in it is commonly banned.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: Nominal Animal on December 07, 2020, 10:11:18 am
It is not unusual for people to be allergic to pork, ham, bacon & other similar products
People need to get hookworms, then.  (A recent study showed that at least half of people who believed they had food allergies, did not.  Hookworms are known to alleviate (even completely get rid of) allergies, and although icky, aren't dangerous if one monitors ones blood and hemoglobin levels regularly.)

The race to the bottom, to the lowest common denominator, will transform humans into eusocial hive-beings.  The line must be drawn somewhere.  I draw it here.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: vk6zgo on December 08, 2020, 05:24:11 am
It is not unusual for people to be allergic to pork, ham, bacon & other similar products
People need to get hookworms, then.  (A recent study showed that at least half of people who believed they had food allergies, did not.  Hookworms are known to alleviate (even completely get rid of) allergies, and although icky, aren't dangerous if one monitors ones blood and hemoglobin levels regularly.)

The race to the bottom, to the lowest common denominator, will transform humans into eusocial hive-beings.  The line must be drawn somewhere.  I draw it here.

Sorry, but your "recent study" sounds like nonsense.
People have had allergies since there have been people--- they just learn to avoid food or other things  that affect them.
Hookworms have also been around, but people still had allergies.

I will give you that  in earlier years, the standard allergy tests often gave false positives.
I was supposed to be allergic to peanuts, but it turns out I'm not!

As a kid, I was very allergic to pollen from Australia's national flower, the Golden Wattle, & many of its close relatives, so I avoided them.
I was also allergic to the smoke which emanated from Superphosphate factories, & to the finished product, both of which it was hard to avoid.

At the time, it was fashionable amongst some to attribute Asthma to psychological causes, which turned out to be bollocks, when diagnostic & treatment technology advanced enough that an attack could be detected early & allieviated  or suppressed.

Psychobabble never had the slightest effect!

Of course, nowadays, things have gone full circle--- the reaction to someone revealing they suffer from Asthma is "Oh my God, don't die on me!"

The received wisdom is now that you don't grow out of Asthma, but myself, & many Old Farts are here to say you do, at least, effectively.


Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: james_s on December 08, 2020, 07:51:20 am
Allergies can also change over time, as far as I know it isn't really known what actually causes them. Starting from about the age of 10 I was horribly allergic to grass and many tree pollens, my nose was always runny and for several months out of the summer even taking medication for it I would open the door and could just feel my sinuses swell up to where I could barely breath through my nose at all. Itchy eyes, sneezing, the whole mess. In recent years it's been a lot better, I still take antihistamine if I'm camping or mowing the lawn or something but most of the time I don't need it. My partner has the opposite problem, she used to love peanut butter but has gradually developed an allergy to peanuts and nuts in general. We're not even sure how serious it is now because nut allergies are something you don't want to mess around with but last year I ate a few handfuls of mixed nuts at my mom's place and then when I touched her arm it made a red itchy spot. 
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: Nominal Animal on December 08, 2020, 02:10:27 pm
It is not unusual for people to be allergic to pork, ham, bacon & other similar products
People need to get hookworms, then.  (A recent study showed that at least half of people who believed they had food allergies, did not.  Hookworms are known to alleviate (even completely get rid of) allergies, and although icky, aren't dangerous if one monitors ones blood and hemoglobin levels regularly.)

The race to the bottom, to the lowest common denominator, will transform humans into eusocial hive-beings.  The line must be drawn somewhere.  I draw it here.

Sorry, but your "recent study" sounds like nonsense.
Sure, and you sound like an idiot stuck in his beliefs, but that does not make it so.

Wherever hookworms are endemic, severe food allergies are almost nonexistent. Look it up (https://emedicine.medscape.com/article/218805-overview).  They do not affect lactose intolerance or pre-existing asthma, but they do statistically almost eliminate food allergies – including celiac's disease and Crohn's disease, and the emergence of asthma.

If we consider human evolution, this all makes sense.  Humans have evolved to be able to handle a parasitic load, especially hookworms (since even today, almost 500 million people are infected with them).  These parasites suppress the immune system in specific ways.  When completely absent, immune system response is way too strong, leading to allergies, Crohn's disease, and so on.

Non-food allergies, like being allergic to animal dandruff, can be effectively treated with intolerance therapy: very controlled exposeure to the irritant to reduce the immune system response.

(Because it is more commercially viable to sell people antihistamines than actually examine the almost endemic parasitic load to see their effects on the human immune system and produce proper modulants, thus far drug companies have only investigated how to eradicate helminths, instead of their positive effects.  All helminth (hookworm) therapy studies have been done by universities.  David Pritchard at University of Nottingham, UK, is probably the leading expert on the matter right now.)

(I am not saying I hope lots of people get infected with hookworms; I am saying their effect on human immune systems should be duplicated by safe supplements.  In the mean time, anyone with really severe food allergies, really need to try intolerance therapy.  If they cannot, then helminth therapy is a possibility.)

Banning ham because some people are allergic to it is sheer idiocy.  (Nuts, and all powdery substances I can understand; those are non-contact effects, and would interfere with intolerance therapy and so on.  But not fish, eggs, meat, etc.  If you're that sick, you need to isolate.)

Like Mark Twain said, "Censorship is telling a man he can't have a steak just because a baby can't chew it."
Instead of censoring others, we should control ourselves.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: dunkemhigh on December 08, 2020, 02:37:18 pm
Quote
Like Mark Twain said, "Censorship is telling a man he can't have a steak just because a baby can't chew it."

1. That's not censorship.

2. Mark Twain never said it. In fact, no-one ever said it. It's a misquote of "It’s like demanding that grown men live on skim milk because the baby can’t eat steak", from Robert Heinlein's The Man Who Sold the Moon.

You're welcome :)
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: Nominal Animal on December 08, 2020, 03:45:17 pm
You're welcome :)
:palm:

You're very good at picking at the deficiencies of the expression, rather than considering the content of the expression, aren't you?  You'd make a very good politician or a corporate lackey, I think.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: AkiTaiyo on December 08, 2020, 03:50:54 pm
Animated turn-signals on cars bug me. They feel very gimmicky whilst (imo) being less visible.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: basinstreetdesign on December 08, 2020, 05:41:45 pm
Animated turn-signals on cars bug me. They feel very gimmicky whilst (imo) being less visible.

I tend to agree.
But also, I believe that all turn signals should be made to blink no less than 3 times even if the turn signal lever is barely touched.  This cures those who give only a half-blink when turning or changing lanes.  Why has no car maker done this?
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: andy3055 on December 08, 2020, 06:12:17 pm
Animated turn-signals on cars bug me. They feel very gimmicky whilst (imo) being less visible.

I tend to agree.
But also, I believe that all turn signals should be made to blink no less than 3 times even if the turn signal lever is barely touched.  This cures those who give only a half-blink when turning or changing lanes.  Why has no car maker done this?

Subaru has this feature. The Crosstrek XV 2015 has it. So, this is not old.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: SilverSolder on December 08, 2020, 07:08:16 pm
[...]
But also, I believe that all turn signals should be made to blink no less than 3 times even if the turn signal lever is barely touched.  This cures those who give only a half-blink when turning or changing lanes.  Why has no car maker done this?

This is actually present in a lot of cars today.

And I think the animated blinkers look cool, especially on old American cars!
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: Labrat101 on December 08, 2020, 08:19:43 pm
Animated turn-signals on cars bug me. They feel very gimmicky whilst (imo) being less visible.

I tend to agree.
But also, I believe that all turn signals should be made to blink no less than 3 times even if the turn signal lever is barely touched.  This cures those who give only a half-blink when turning or changing lanes.  Why has no car maker done this?
There is nothing more annoying when the car in front indicates in one direction and then goes the
opposite way   :palm:
  They need a third indicate for those people that can't make up their Minds   :-//
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: eugenenine on December 08, 2020, 08:40:45 pm
Most cars have the lane changer where a quick push of the lever blinks three times, I can never hit it just right to make it work though.

I hate the new animated brake lights that flash, I see the brake light come on and apply my brakes then it goes off so I release mine then it comes on again so I apply mine again, etc.  So now when I see a brake light I have to wait to see if its going to stay on or not.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: Circlotron on December 08, 2020, 10:04:33 pm
I think it would be cool to have bar graph type brake lights that start at the edge and grow towards the centre. The harder you brake the more they come on. As it is now, you don’t know whether the driver in front is just taking a few k’s off or trying to stop running under the back of a stationary truck.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: dunkemhigh on December 09, 2020, 12:22:52 am
Quote
You're very good at picking at the deficiencies of the expression, rather than considering the content of the expression, aren't you?

Trying to be helpful. A non-sequitur doesn't illustrate whatever point you're trying to make and just confuses things.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: Nominal Animal on December 09, 2020, 12:26:22 am
Quote
You're very good at picking at the deficiencies of the expression, rather than considering the content of the expression, aren't you?
Trying to be helpful. A non-sequitur doesn't illustrate whatever point you're trying to make and just confuses things.
You're failing, badly, at being helpful.  You might consider some completely different approach, for better results.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: vk6zgo on December 09, 2020, 01:59:00 am
Quote
You're very good at picking at the deficiencies of the expression, rather than considering the content of the expression, aren't you?
Trying to be helpful. A non-sequitur doesn't illustrate whatever point you're trying to make and just confuses things.
You're failing, badly, at being helpful.  You might consider some completely different approach, for better results.

Yeah, maybe call you an "idiot" or a "lackey", but then again, most people don't become "all bent out of shape" if their comments are disputed. ;D
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: eugenenine on December 09, 2020, 02:23:30 am
I forgot about these new crappy Kias and Hundays that are putting the turn signals as low on the bumper as possible to hide them from other cars.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: Circlotron on December 09, 2020, 03:04:23 am
I forgot about these new crappy Kias and Hundays that are putting the turn signals as low on the bumper as possible to hide them from other cars.
That reminds me, in Australia, in the state of Victoria at least, with vehicles like Toyota Land Cruiser and Nissan Patrol and similar you can get a rear bumper bar with tail, brake and indicator lights built in. If you fit one of these, the normal lights that are much higher up and more easily visible must be disconnected! That’s the law! How stupid is that???
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: E-Design on December 09, 2020, 03:28:37 am
Animated turn-signals on cars bug me. They feel very gimmicky whilst (imo) being less visible.

I tend to agree.
But also, I believe that all turn signals should be made to blink no less than 3 times even if the turn signal lever is barely touched.  This cures those who give only a half-blink when turning or changing lanes.  Why has no car maker done this?
There is nothing more annoying when the car in front indicates in one direction and then goes the
opposite way   :palm:
  They need a third indicate for those people that can't make up their Minds   :-//

Yes, this one reminds me of another peeve of mine.. the driver who puts on the turn signal like 1 second before actually making the turn. Why bother at all at that point.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: cliffyk on December 09, 2020, 06:34:44 am
So called "journalists" with zero, zilch, nada command of the English language:

Most recently, this from a local newspaper's coverage of the latest Hyundai recalls:

(http://www.paladinmicro.com/TestEquipment/ElegooMars/HyundaiRecall.jpg)

How does one determine the necessity of replacing a leak? I'm sure the owners will be delighted to have new leaks instead of the bad old ones.

I showed this to my wife and she said it means "They will replace the engine."

I told her "I know what they meant, but that's not what they said."
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: Labrat101 on December 09, 2020, 07:47:46 am
So called "journalists" with zero, zilch, nada command of the English language:

Most recently, this from a local newspaper's coverage of the latest Hyundai recalls:

(http://www.paladinmicro.com/TestEquipment/ElegooMars/HyundaiRecall.jpg)

How does one determine the necessity of replacing a leak? I'm sure the owners will be delighted to have new leaks instead of the bad old ones.

I showed this to my wife and she said it means "They will replace the engine."

I told her "I know what they meant, but that's not what they said."
Or it could mean replacing the engine
That has a fresh oil leak . Only drips on the road an not on ur driveway.
Whats  a knock sensor.. ?
Knock knock who's there . Oil ..
Oil who . ?
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: cliffyk on December 09, 2020, 10:59:40 am
Or it could mean replacing the engine
That has a fresh oil leak . Only drips on the road an not on ur driveway.
Whats  a knock sensor.. ?
Knock knock who's there . Oil ..
Oil who . ?

As written it means they will replace any leaks revealed by their inspection. They certainly meant it to mean they will replace the engine, but that's not what it says--that's my peeve, pathetically poor sentence structure and/or just not reading what they wrote.


Sometimes it's just funny:

(http://www.paladinmicro.com/TestEquipment/ElegooMars/DfxeW5fUwAAN2Mz.jpg)

Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: dunkemhigh on December 09, 2020, 11:23:39 am
How would you rephrase it?
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: cliffyk on December 09, 2020, 11:58:20 am
Dealers will inspect the engines for fuel or oil leaks and, if necessary, replace the engine.

Though a single semi-colon would improve it by indicating the second clause is missing essential words provided by the first.

Dealers will inspect the engines for fuel or oil leaks; and replace them if necessary.

(I spent 5 years creating and editing technical documents for Lockheed Martin Astronautics; mostly for their EELV project)
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: Gromitt on December 09, 2020, 12:45:45 pm
Animated turn-signals on cars bug me. They feel very gimmicky whilst (imo) being less visible.

I tend to agree.
But also, I believe that all turn signals should be made to blink no less than 3 times even if the turn signal lever is barely touched.  This cures those who give only a half-blink when turning or changing lanes.  Why has no car maker done this?

My eleven year old VW Golf does this.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: E-Design on December 09, 2020, 01:05:28 pm
Dealers will inspect the engines for fuel or oil leaks and, if necessary, replace the engine.

Though a single semi-colon would improve it by indicating the second clause is missing essential words provided by the first.

Dealers will inspect the engines for fuel or oil leaks; and replace them if necessary.

(I spent 5 years creating and editing technical documents for Lockheed Martin Astronautics; mostly for their EELV project)

Yes much better wording - clear and concise.
I guess the original phrasing  might be considered slang / lazy? Not quite written correctly, but everybody understands the meaning.


LOL on the students first hand job experience. Those crazy high school kids..
.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: CatalinaWOW on December 09, 2020, 01:36:45 pm
While it is possible that replacing the engines was the intention, I'd put long odds on it being a spell check error and that repairing the leaks was the real intended sentence.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: cliffyk on December 09, 2020, 04:05:03 pm
While it is possible that replacing the engines was the intention, I'd put long odds on it being a spell check error and that repairing the leaks was the real intended sentence.

Most of the people writing these blurbs have no technical expertise and limited reading comprehension. The recall notice states they will inspect for fuel and/or oil leaks and replace parts as indicated--including engine replacement if con-rod bearing damage is found.  If you dig deep enough it appears the foundational issue is failure of seals in the camshaft driven high-pressure fuel pump (2500 psi) used in the direct injection fuel system. The seals fail and raw gas contaminates the engine oil.

DFI on other brands has similarly failed (along with gummed up intake valves)--overall it is a piss-poor design, trading engine life to meet absurd EPA fuel economy regulations...
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: eugenenine on December 09, 2020, 05:30:27 pm

My eleven year old VW Golf does this.

Our 1992 Plemon (Plymouth Lemon) has this as well.  The only vehicle that I've ever had that didn't was my 1988 s10 and that was because the steering column had been bent when the previous owner put on a body lift and most of the steering column parts had been bashed when it was stolen.  It didn't even turn off the turn signals after a turn because that part was broken.  Dad got it cheap from an auction for my first vehicle.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: eugenenine on December 09, 2020, 05:32:47 pm
I forgot about these new crappy Kias and Hundays that are putting the turn signals as low on the bumper as possible to hide them from other cars.
That reminds me, in Australia, in the state of Victoria at least, with vehicles like Toyota Land Cruiser and Nissan Patrol and similar you can get a rear bumper bar with tail, brake and indicator lights built in. If you fit one of these, the normal lights that are much higher up and more easily visible must be disconnected! That’s the law! How stupid is that???
These crappy cars have all the lights up high where you can see them except for the turn signals, and those are on the very lowest portion of the bumper, which being a minivan/cuv is pretty low.  Those are going to cause a lot of accidents.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: Sal Ammoniac on December 09, 2020, 06:25:16 pm
I hate the new animated brake lights that flash, I see the brake light come on and apply my brakes then it goes off so I release mine then it comes on again so I apply mine again, etc.

Your internal PID control loop needs tuning.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: james_s on December 09, 2020, 09:07:31 pm
So called "journalists" with zero, zilch, nada command of the English language:

Most recently, this from a local newspaper's coverage of the latest Hyundai recalls:

(http://www.paladinmicro.com/TestEquipment/ElegooMars/HyundaiRecall.jpg)

How does one determine the necessity of replacing a leak? I'm sure the owners will be delighted to have new leaks instead of the bad old ones.

I showed this to my wife and she said it means "They will replace the engine."

I told her "I know what they meant, but that's not what they said."

To me it seems obvious that this is what they mean. IE "if the leak cannot be corrected through less drastic measures, the engine will be replaced."
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: james_s on December 09, 2020, 09:18:34 pm
Animated turn-signals on cars bug me. They feel very gimmicky whilst (imo) being less visible.

I tend to agree.
But also, I believe that all turn signals should be made to blink no less than 3 times even if the turn signal lever is barely touched.  This cures those who give only a half-blink when turning or changing lanes.  Why has no car maker done this?

My eleven year old VW Golf does this.

That sounds extremely annoying, I don't want it to automatically blink 3 times every time I accidentally bump the signal lever or start to signal one direction and then decide I want to go the other way instead. I want my car to do precisely what I command it to do, period. If I want the signal to blink at least 3 times, I'll let it blink 3 times before I cancel it.

That brings up another peeve of mine, when things do stuff automatically for me, trying to guess what I want in an effort to be helpful. I find that they invariably get it wrong at least as often as they correctly guess my intentions and it creates additional work and gets in my way rather than helping. Software is the worst offender of this, I *HATE* IDEs that automatically add a matching quotation mark, parem, bracket, etc, it drives me absolutely crazy! I often go to add parentheses after I've already typed something and I have to move the mouse, click, delete the unwanted character, then go to where I want the closing character, type it, click, backspace to delete the extra one it adds there. It's absolutely infuriating and creates the impression that the software is actively trying to fight me and make my life harder. The worst part of all this is that it's often excessively difficult to disable this stupid behavior.

Autocorrect on my phone is just as bad, sometimes it's helpful but I loathe the way it second guesses me constantly and changes correctly spelled words to completely different words that it thinks I wanted to use instead. I'd like it to correct misspelled words but it should never change a word that is spelled correctly.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: aargee on December 09, 2020, 10:04:18 pm
Sounds like this thread is rapidly heading towards the need for lots of paper and boxes of crayons but I'll add my beef anyway (sorry if it's already been said)...

New cars need a 'Dumbass' switch.

'Dumbass' on - the car will ping, ring, buzz, vibrate, fart for every little transgression of deviation from 'normal' operation, according to the manufacturer.
'Dumbass' off - only mission critical issues will be forcibly alerted. You know, no oil, for example.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: Gromitt on December 10, 2020, 07:16:21 am
Animated turn-signals on cars bug me. They feel very gimmicky whilst (imo) being less visible.

I tend to agree.
But also, I believe that all turn signals should be made to blink no less than 3 times even if the turn signal lever is barely touched.  This cures those who give only a half-blink when turning or changing lanes.  Why has no car maker done this?

My eleven year old VW Golf does this.

That sounds extremely annoying, I don't want it to automatically blink 3 times every time I accidentally bump the signal lever or start to signal one direction and then decide I want to go the other way instead. I want my car to do precisely what I command it to do, period. If I want the signal to blink at least 3 times, I'll let it blink 3 times before I cancel it.

You can turn it off if you want, I have done that so it only blink once.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: opabob on December 10, 2020, 06:52:06 pm
AMPERAGE.  I hate it when people use the word AMPERAGE!  It's CURRENT and it is measured in AMPERES!


And I also hate traffic lights that are timed so that, driving exactly the speed limit, you catch each and every one red and they turn red so that you have to brake harder than you normally would.  And you have to do this three to five times every mile!     On the other hand you can set your cruise control five to seven miles an hour north of the speed limit and get all those lights green, mile after mile after mile.  All that STTOOPPP go SSTTOOOOPPPP go SSSTTTOOOPPPP go driving wastes gas, causes air pollution, and contributes to glow-bull warming.  Quite often driving just a little bit faster saves gas and is actually safer.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: Bud on December 10, 2020, 07:36:26 pm
Dealers will inspect the engines for fuel or oil leaks and, if necessary, replace the engine.

Though a single semi-colon would improve it by indicating the second clause is missing essential words provided by the first.

Dealers will inspect the engines for fuel or oil leaks; and replace them if necessary.

(I spent 5 years creating and editing technical documents for Lockheed Martin Astronautics; mostly for their EELV project)
This may be the case when the audience is familiar with dry technical language and the topic, but for an average Joe the original construction would work better, since it clearly says which component will be replaced. Otherwise a non-savvy reader may think they will replace fuel or oil leaks found during inspection.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: TimFox on December 10, 2020, 10:27:36 pm
AMPERAGE.  I hate it when people use the word AMPERAGE!  It's CURRENT and it is measured in AMPERES!

It is a back-formation analogous to "Voltage" for "Potential".  I have never seen a "Danger! High Potential" sign in an English-speaking country.
In German, I believe it is "Hochspannung lebensgefahr" for danger, high voltage.  "Spannung" translates into voltage, tension, or stress.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: TimFox on December 10, 2020, 10:33:01 pm
My pet peeve, typically found in audio contexts, is when one measures the RMS voltage V across a load resistor R to measure the power applied to the resistor and refers to the result as "RMS power", when the correct answer is "mean power" or "average power".  The RMS power exists mathematically, but is never useful for a sine wave.  Comparing the RMS power to the mean power for a sine wave, we find that the RMS power is 1.225 = (3/2)1/2 times the mean power.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: dunkemhigh on December 10, 2020, 10:58:03 pm
Dealers will inspect the engines for fuel or oil leaks and, if necessary, replace the engine.

Though a single semi-colon would improve it by indicating the second clause is missing essential words provided by the first.

Dealers will inspect the engines for fuel or oil leaks; and replace them if necessary.

(I spent 5 years creating and editing technical documents for Lockheed Martin Astronautics; mostly for their EELV project)

Sorry for the delay on this one. I asked for your version because I couldn't think of a simple and easy-fitting alternative. Your first suggestion is fine, but rather artificial in the way it circumvents the problem.

The second suggestion, with the semicolon, made no sense to me at all. So I bounced this off my partner who is an editor (hence the delay) and she says the semicolon contributes nothing. It's a separator, and could be treated as a full stop. The comma alternative doesn't contribute anything either.

OK, that's her bit said (and she agrees with you that the original is very iffy). My view is that it may be wrong but everyone knows what it means, and that's pretty much how you'd say it, so it comes over as natural (at least to the non-cognoscenti). I think that's why it wasn't simple for me to think of a better alternative (and why I asked for yours).
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: andy3055 on December 11, 2020, 01:07:25 am
People using  "your" in place of "you are."
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: SilverSolder on December 11, 2020, 02:16:31 am
People using  "your" in place of "you are."

"break" instead of "brake"
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: Ed.Kloonk on December 11, 2020, 03:23:18 am
People using  "your" in place of "you are."

"break" instead of "brake"

There are lots moar examples of this.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: dunkemhigh on December 11, 2020, 04:05:33 am
Your right - a break needs to be put on those with immediate affect.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: vk6zgo on December 11, 2020, 04:08:03 am
My pet peeve, typically found in audio contexts, is when one measures the RMS voltage V across a load resistor R to measure the power applied to the resistor and refers to the result as "RMS power", when the correct answer is "mean power" or "average power".  The RMS power exists mathematically, but is never useful for a sine wave.  Comparing the RMS power to the mean power for a sine wave, we find that the RMS power is 1.225 = (3/2)1/2 times the mean power.
:-+   
My very pet peeve!
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: opabob on December 11, 2020, 08:06:41 pm
AMPERAGE.  I hate it when people use the word AMPERAGE!  It's CURRENT and it is measured in AMPERES!

It is a back-formation analogous to "Voltage" for "Potential".  I have never seen a "Danger! High Potential" sign in an English-speaking country.
In German, I believe it is "Hochspannung lebensgefahr" for danger, high voltage.  "Spannung" translates into voltage, tension, or stress.
Electromotive Force is measured in Volts.  Voltage is easier to say that Electromotive Forceage.  But I,too, have never seen a sign that says, "Danger!  LOTS of Electromotive Force."
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: TimFox on December 11, 2020, 08:27:41 pm
A related term, found in safety codes for wiring, is “ampacity”.  The NEC defines it as the maximum continuous current in a conductor that will not exceed the temperature rating.
Should we say “currentability” instead?
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: AlfBaz on December 11, 2020, 08:28:45 pm
I wonder what the metric version of mileage is... kilometerage :scared:
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: E-Design on December 11, 2020, 08:38:43 pm
My pet peeve, typically found in audio contexts, is when one measures the RMS voltage V across a load resistor R to measure the power applied to the resistor and refers to the result as "RMS power", when the correct answer is "mean power" or "average power".  The RMS power exists mathematically, but is never useful for a sine wave.  Comparing the RMS power to the mean power for a sine wave, we find that the RMS power is 1.225 = (3/2)1/2 times the mean power.
:-+   
My very pet peeve!

So your not likely to be  a fan of "Peak Music Power Output" PMPO either... :-DD
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: TimFox on December 11, 2020, 08:51:42 pm
I remember the greatest scam of that era, when manufacturers started quoting power "+/- 1 dB", thus increasing all their amplifiers by 26%.  After that fraud, the authorities tried to clamp down on advertising, but somebody mis-informed them about RMS vs. mean power.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: Ed.Kloonk on December 11, 2020, 11:30:54 pm
I wonder what the metric version of mileage is... kilometerage :scared:
I know heaps of ppl that would still use the term mileage even though they are otherwise all metric.

Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: Circlotron on December 12, 2020, 02:09:28 am
I wonder what the metric version of mileage is... kilometerage :scared:
I know heaps of ppl that would still use the term mileage even though they are otherwise all metric.
YMMV  :P
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: Ed.Kloonk on December 12, 2020, 07:57:55 am
I wonder what the metric version of mileage is... kilometerage :scared:
I know heaps of ppl that would still use the term mileage even though they are otherwise all metric.
YMMV  :P
;D

There ya go!
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: Nominal Animal on December 12, 2020, 12:03:01 pm
I wonder what the metric version of mileage is... kilometerage :scared:
I know heaps of ppl that would still use the term mileage even though they are otherwise all metric.
YMMV  :P
;D

There ya go!
Excactus!

I'm not bothered by those, though.  If I were, I'd be really annoyed by those who express fuel consumption in miles per gallon.  It's like using minutes per mile for speed.  Perhaps that's where mile-age comes from?  As in how much older you get, when you travel a mile?  (:palm: No, I am not serious!)
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: Circlotron on December 12, 2020, 12:54:57 pm
Miles per gallon = what you can do with what you've got.
Litres per 100km = what you need for what you want.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: SilverSolder on December 12, 2020, 04:25:25 pm

Android (v6) has a notification area where apps can post messages to the user, and the user then clears the messages when read.

Here's my pet peeve about that:  Some app writers think their application is so important and wonderful, that it deserves a permanent entry on the Notification list.  As more and more of these important and wonderful apps with "permanent notifications" get installed, the actual notifications from other apps drop further and further down the list, so you have to scroll down to see them...


Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: KL27x on December 12, 2020, 07:05:37 pm
People using  "your" in place of "you are."

"break" instead of "brake"

There are lots moar examples of this.

You're/your is so common. But they sound the same, at least. It's/its is one that I actually have to think about as I write it, every time. I can give a pass on those.

But why do so many people spell quiet as "quite?"

And how do so many people "weight" things on a scale?

I recall trying to petition a test question, "which of A/B/C/D can you alternate with X?"

In his head, the professor used "alternate" to mean substitute rather than switch back and forth. If you try to explain this only works as a noun, not a verb, to an East Indian professor? You will be shitcanned for the rest of the class.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: james_s on December 12, 2020, 07:39:28 pm
You're/your is so common. But they sound the same, at least. It's/its is one that I actually have to think about as I write it, every time. I can give a pass on those.

It's so simple though. It's = "it is", you're = "you are", all you have to do is consider whether it makes sense to say it is, or you are in the sentence and if it doesn't then the contractions it's and you're are not the correct word. What they sound like spoken is irrelevant. I admit I have difficulty understanding how that one can be difficult for so many people when it's one simple rule to remember.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: KL27x on December 16, 2020, 07:07:12 am
Quote
It's = "it is"
From that direction it seems easy.
But when you actually need the word "its" is where I got hung up when I learned this in school.

"The bear scratched at its paw."

"Its" is a plainly weird word to me to this day. It sounds like a possessive. "It" being the bear.

"The bear scratched the bear's paw."
"The bear scratched it's paw."

5 yr old me found "its" to be strange. I still find it strange.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: Ed.Kloonk on December 16, 2020, 07:27:14 am
Quote
It's = "it is"
From that direction it seems easy.
But when you actually need the word "its" is where I got hung up when I learned this in school.

"The bear scratched at its paw."

"Its" is a plainly weird word to me to this day. It sounds like a possessive. "It" being the bear.

"The bear scratched the bear's paw."
"The bear scratched it's paw."

5 yr old me found "its" to be strange. I still find it strange.

Its -->  It's

 :-+
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: Non-Abelian on December 16, 2020, 09:30:56 am
My biggest pet peeves are:

(1) People who want me to explain what I'm doing, but who don't have the attention span to listen.
(2) Doing projects for family members and friends. Doing things for free gives people the idea your skills aren't really worth much, they expect more than they would ever think of asking a professional to do or would never question a "professional who charged them an arm and a leg." (I'm not an electrician, but I do make sure I follow the NEC when I do "charity" work for relatives).
(3) People who ask for advice and then want to argue about the advice, because they don't like the answer, so, it's like, "Why did you bother asking me? Go find someone who will tell you what you want to hear even if it's wrong."

Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: Calambres on December 16, 2020, 12:26:33 pm
I wonder what the metric version of mileage is... kilometerage :scared:
In spanish: Kilometraje.

So basically, yes, you're close  :)
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: JohnnyMalaria on December 16, 2020, 02:51:54 pm
Data are (not data is).

The verb "to gift".

The BBC for changing the capitalization (or capitalisation) of abbreviations. e.g., Nasa.

American English rules of punctuation. See my first two peeves for how it should be done :)
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: DrG on December 16, 2020, 02:56:46 pm
Data are (not data is).

You are 100% correct. I long ago tired of correcting that. "Datum" is singular, "data" is plural. These data, not this data. Sadly, "data" is sometimes used as a shorthand bastardization of "data set", thus fueling its constant misuse.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: dunkemhigh on December 16, 2020, 03:53:38 pm
"Data" is actually a mass noun. And the ODE says:

Quote
usage: In Latin, data is the plural of datum and, historically and in specialized scientific fields, it is also treated as a plural in English, taking a plural verb, as in the data were collected and classified. In modern non-scientific use, however, it is generally not treated as a plural. Instead, it is treated as a mass noun, similar to a word like information, which takes a singular verb. Sentences such as data was collected over a number of years are now widely accepted in standard English.

So data is. Sorry :)
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: BravoV on December 16, 2020, 04:00:14 pm
(https://media1.giphy.com/media/FAwZnWT4opRKg/giphy.gif?cid=ecf05e47ffe662baf2896214ca0a8aca97beb1b4221e7388&rid=giphy.gif)
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: Tomorokoshi on December 16, 2020, 06:30:52 pm
"Data" is actually a mass noun. And the ODE says:

Quote
usage: In Latin, data is the plural of datum and, historically and in specialized scientific fields, it is also treated as a plural in English, taking a plural verb, as in the data were collected and classified. In modern non-scientific use, however, it is generally not treated as a plural. Instead, it is treated as a mass noun, similar to a word like information, which takes a singular verb. Sentences such as data was collected over a number of years are now widely accepted in standard English.

So data is. Sorry :)

Yes, I use, "This data is..." even though I'm fully aware that grammarian and scientist pedants will use, endorse, and cajole the use of, "These data are...".

However, imagine this situation:

1. A scientist collects a large volume of data points into a spreadsheet.
2. At this point is it referred to as "This data is..." or as "These data are..."?
3. The spreadsheet is encrypted using a very secure algorithm.
4. At this point is it referred to as "This data is..." or as "These data are..."?
5. Somewhere in the middle of the file one byte is changed. Now the spreadsheet can't be decrypted.
6. At this point is it referred to as "This data is..." or as "These data are..."? No data points are available, as all the data points were formed into a unitary item.
7. Working backwards, apply the same reasoning to all versions of the spreadsheet.

Using the term, "These data are..." carries an implication that some aspect of the data could be removed, yielding much the same result.

For instance, I poll 1000 people about the use of, "These data are..." compared to "This data is...". The results are collected into a spreadsheet, and sorted by response with the first 500 endorsing "This data is...", and the second 500 endorsing "These data are...". The spreadsheet gets corrupted, losing the second half. A statistical review of the spreadsheet would then reveal that 100% of respondents endorsed, "This data is...".

The point being that the data set is a unitary collection, otherwise one is corrupting the data set. Therefore, "This data is...".
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: Labrat101 on December 16, 2020, 06:47:38 pm
"Data" is actually a mass noun. And the ODE says:

Quote
usage: In Latin, data is the plural of datum and, historically and in specialized scientific fields, it is also treated as a plural in English, taking a plural verb, as in the data were collected and classified. In modern non-scientific use, however, it is generally not treated as a plural. Instead, it is treated as a mass noun, similar to a word like information, which takes a singular verb. Sentences such as data was collected over a number of years are now widely accepted in standard English.

So data is. Sorry :)

Yes, I use, "This data is..." even though I'm fully aware that grammarian and scientist pedants will use, endorse, and cajole the use of, "These data are...".

However, imagine this situation:

1. A scientist collects a large volume of data points into a spreadsheet.
2. At this point is it referred to as "This data is..." or as "These data are..."?
3. The spreadsheet is encrypted using a very secure algorithm.
4. At this point is it referred to as "This data is..." or as "These data are..."?
5. Somewhere in the middle of the file one byte is changed. Now the spreadsheet can't be decrypted.
6. At this point is it referred to as "This data is..." or as "These data are..."? No data points are available, as all the data points were formed into a unitary item.
7. Working backwards, apply the same reasoning to all versions of the spreadsheet.

Using the term, "These data are..." carries an implication that some aspect of the data could be removed, yielding much the same result.

For instance, I poll 1000 people about the use of, "These data are..." compared to "This data is...". The results are collected into a spreadsheet, and sorted by response with the first 500 endorsing "This data is...", and the second 500 endorsing "These data are...". The spreadsheet gets corrupted, losing the second half. A statistical review of the spreadsheet would then reveal that 100% of respondents endorsed, "This data is...".

The point being that the data set is a unitary collection, otherwise one is corrupting the data set. Therefore, "This data is...".

WOW  That was A mind Boggling  OverLoad  of  DATA
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: Fixpoint on December 16, 2020, 06:56:45 pm
Yes, I use, "This data is..." even though I'm fully aware that grammarian and scientist pedants will use, endorse, and cajole the use of, "These data are...".

However, imagine this situation:

1. A scientist collects a large volume of data points into a spreadsheet.
2. At this point is it referred to as "This data is..." or as "These data are..."?
3. The spreadsheet is encrypted using a very secure algorithm.
4. At this point is it referred to as "This data is..." or as "These data are..."?
5. Somewhere in the middle of the file one byte is changed. Now the spreadsheet can't be decrypted.
6. At this point is it referred to as "This data is..." or as "These data are..."? No data points are available, as all the data points were formed into a unitary item.
7. Working backwards, apply the same reasoning to all versions of the spreadsheet.

Using the term, "These data are..." carries an implication that some aspect of the data could be removed, yielding much the same result.

For instance, I poll 1000 people about the use of, "These data are..." compared to "This data is...". The results are collected into a spreadsheet, and sorted by response with the first 500 endorsing "This data is...", and the second 500 endorsing "These data are...". The spreadsheet gets corrupted, losing the second half. A statistical review of the spreadsheet would then reveal that 100% of respondents endorsed, "This data is...".

The point being that the data set is a unitary collection, otherwise one is corrupting the data set. Therefore, "This data is...".

This analogy isn't right. The fact that you can take a whole set of records and view it as a single record has nothing to do with the discussion because then you are talking about a different data set than before -- a data set with only one record.

Put differently: You are using many words just for saying that you can change perspective, i.e. just declare something else to be the data that interest you. Of course you can do that, but it has nothing to do with the grammatical/linguistical question.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: TimFox on December 16, 2020, 07:46:00 pm
I maintain the distinction between the singular datum (for one element of the set) and the plural data (for the complete set).  If the words were native English, and not Latin, would one say “The datums shows...”?
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: Labrat101 on December 16, 2020, 08:14:10 pm
Data is . Just a word that Humans use for the jumble of info.
That we have no idea where exactly where to put it .  :-//
Stick it into a Graph it looks impressive and no one has the courage to say  :wtf: is it .
A computer will convert it to Binary .  8)
 etc etc.   
There is insignificant data to complete this task !!
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: TimFox on December 16, 2020, 08:17:57 pm
This all relates to my prime peeve about the evolution of language.
1.  Neologism, e.g., coining the word "transistor" to describe something new, is a sign of progress.
2.  Laziness, e.g., neglecting the difference between "infer" and "imply", is pernicious, since thereafter one cannot choose one of the two words carefully to make a distinction.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: Labrat101 on December 16, 2020, 08:27:22 pm
I have another peeve that always make me laugh .
 Waze GPS . while driving  . A female voice saying .
" Police spotted a  Head " 
I always say to the wife Look out there's a head  on the road .  :o
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: TimFox on December 16, 2020, 08:33:07 pm
I once knew a rabbit who wanted to get ahead, so he traded his head for a head of lettuce.  However, he ate the head of lettuce, so he really didn't get ahead, did he?
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: KL27x on December 16, 2020, 09:15:37 pm
Quote
It's = "it is"
From that direction it seems easy.
But when you actually need the word "its" is where I got hung up when I learned this in school.

"The bear scratched at its paw."

"Its" is a plainly weird word to me to this day. It sounds like a possessive. "It" being the bear.

"The bear scratched the bear's paw."
"The bear scratched it's paw."

5 yr old me found "its" to be strange. I still find it strange.

Its -->  It's

 :-+

I thought of an even better example.

Person 1: How's the kitten you rescued?

Person 2: It's drinking its/it's milk.

If "it" has milk, can "it" not drink "it's" milk, as in the milk that belongs to "it?"


Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: JohnnyMalaria on December 17, 2020, 12:14:36 am
Data is . Just a word that Humans use for the jumble of info.
That we have no idea where exactly where to put it .  :-//
Stick it into a Graph it looks impressive and no one has the courage to say  :wtf: is it .
A computer will convert it to Binary .  8)
 etc etc.   
There is insignificant data to complete this task !!

It's only mass ignorance that has led "data" to become a "mass noun". I am pedantic and I am a scientist. But it isn't the combination of the two that leads me to use "data" exclusively as a plural noun and "datum" as the singular. It's because it is the right thing to do scientifically. So, I will correct people in a scientific setting. Outside of that, I just accept people are ignorant and play along.

"Resistor, transistor. Whatever. I'm just a hobbyist so I'll just start using the wrong terms. One day, at least one dictionary will give in."
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: eugenenine on December 17, 2020, 12:43:12 am
Then there are those who pronounce it data instead of data.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: Non-Abelian on December 17, 2020, 02:12:57 am
I maintain the distinction between the singular datum (for one element of the set) and the plural data (for the complete set).  If the words were native English, and not Latin, would one say “The datums shows...”?
Actually, as the old joke goes, the singular of data is anecdote.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: dunkemhigh on December 17, 2020, 02:46:04 am
Quote
However, imagine this situation:

1. A scientist collects a large volume of data points into a spreadsheet.
2. At this point is it referred to as "This data is..." or as "These data are..."?
3. The spreadsheet is encrypted using a very secure algorithm.
4. At this point is it referred to as "This data is..." or as "These data are..."?
5. Somewhere in the middle of the file one byte is changed. Now the spreadsheet can't be decrypted.
6. At this point is it referred to as "This data is..." or as "These data are..."? No data points are available, as all the data points were formed into a unitary item.
7. Working backwards, apply the same reasoning to all versions of the spreadsheet.

Good examples of relevant questions. I would suggest that data is treated as singular or plural depending on context. If you are talking many individual points, for instance, then 'are' would be appropriate. But if you're talking a bunch of points en bloc then 'is' would make more sense. Which is how mass nouns are normally dealt with: we might catch a fish or land a whole load of fish, for example. The fish is, and the fish are.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: Tomorokoshi on December 17, 2020, 03:09:40 am
Quote
However, imagine this situation:

1. A scientist collects a large volume of data points into a spreadsheet.
2. At this point is it referred to as "This data is..." or as "These data are..."?
3. The spreadsheet is encrypted using a very secure algorithm.
4. At this point is it referred to as "This data is..." or as "These data are..."?
5. Somewhere in the middle of the file one byte is changed. Now the spreadsheet can't be decrypted.
6. At this point is it referred to as "This data is..." or as "These data are..."? No data points are available, as all the data points were formed into a unitary item.
7. Working backwards, apply the same reasoning to all versions of the spreadsheet.

Good examples of relevant questions. I would suggest that data is treated as singular or plural depending on context. If you are talking many individual points, for instance, then 'are' would be appropriate. But if you're talking a bunch of points en bloc then 'is' would make more sense. Which is how mass nouns are normally dealt with: we might catch a fish or land a whole load of fish, for example. The fish is, and the fish are.

Recently, on a television report regarding Covid, the reporter said something like, "The amount of people with Covid has increased dramatically...", as opposed to, "The number of people with Covid has increased dramatically...".
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: dunkemhigh on December 17, 2020, 04:13:17 am
Yeah, like confusing fewer with less and similar. I'd forgive a live TV interviewer though - thinking about what they're saying probably comes quite a way down the list of attention grabbers :)
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: Fixpoint on December 17, 2020, 09:49:42 am
Quote
However, imagine this situation:
[...]

Good examples of relevant questions. I would suggest that data is treated as singular or plural depending on context. If you are talking many individual points, for instance, then 'are' would be appropriate. But if you're talking a bunch of points en bloc then 'is' would make more sense.

Well, you draw the right conclusion from a wrong premise. (See also my earlier reply above).

Tomorokoshi presented a wrong argument that stems from a logical fallacy. I shall present it in a more formal way so that it is clearer.

Let D = {d_1, ... d_n} be the data set we are talking about. Tomorokoshi's argument first talks about the individual d_i's and concludes that it is ok to say "these data are" because there are many of them (items 1 and 2 of the argument). So far, so good.

Then, in item 3, his argument shifts the subject of discussion from the individual d_i's to the set D. D is, of course, distinct from the individual d_i's; this follows from the mathematical definition of sets. Now, the error follows: The argument implies that it is ok to call the individual d_i's "this data is" because there is only exactly one D. That conclusion is wrong.

Because not all people are interested in mathematical arguments, let me use a non-mathematical analogy (but please note that it is only an analogy for illustration): I cannot say "there is 100 apple on this tree" just because there is only one tree. I have to say "there are 100 apples on this tree". Of course, it would be correct to say "there is a tree", it would be wrong to say "there are tree". You see, we just have to be clear what we are talking about: either the individual apples or the tree itself. The rest follows from that.

It's the same with data: Are we talking about D (the data set itself) or the individual records, the d_i's? It's that simple. The rest follows from that decision -- at least logically. Of course, you may choose to think non-logical.

In item 5 and item 6, complete and utter confusion follows. What is stated there has nothing to do whatsoever with the subject matter.

There is no clarity in the argument, everything gets mixed up. The fact that it is wrong is actually not the problem, but it throws multiple smoke grenades, and *that* is a problem. Talking about encryption using "a very secure algorithm", polls and losing half of a spreadsheet has nothing to do with the subject, it only obscures the matter and bedazzles the reader. If the argument had used plain logic instead of talking about spreadsheets, polls, and fancy encryption, everything would have been in plain sight and maybe the error would have not even be made because it would have been so simple to see it.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: DrG on December 17, 2020, 03:48:08 pm
Dictionary dumfukery.

The word peruse means to examine carefully, to study, to read thoroughly. It was decided (by whom I do not know) that we should have a secondary meaning; to browse, to look over in a cursory manner. Clearly, chronic misuse, no matter how ridiculous, leads to an acceptable new definition.

We then invent a new class of word, a contronym, a word having two meanings that contradict one another. This to legitimize the madness.

Therefore, dumfukery also means brilliance.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: TimFox on December 17, 2020, 04:33:02 pm
And, as a result, when a careful writer intends one of those meanings and not the other, he cannot  use the single word and is forced to use the whole definition, e.g. “I carefully studied the data sheet”, to make his meaning clear.  Whereafter, we may as well delete the simpler word from our vocabulary.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: eugenenine on December 17, 2020, 06:15:16 pm
I'm on calls with people from the .uk so I get to hear about dater all the time.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: SilverSolder on December 17, 2020, 09:37:04 pm
Dictionary dumfukery.

The word peruse means to examine carefully, to study, to read thoroughly. It was decided (by whom I do not know) that we should have a secondary meaning; to browse, to look over in a cursory manner. Clearly, chronic misuse, no matter how ridiculous, leads to an acceptable new definition.

We then invent a new class of word, a contronym, a word having two meanings that contradict one another. This to legitimize the madness.

Therefore, dumfukery also means brilliance.

Doublethink -  embrace it, be happy!
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: Ed.Kloonk on December 18, 2020, 05:45:05 am
The silly season.

No, really.
 >:(
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: DrG on December 24, 2020, 04:25:00 pm
Holiday Music.

They start in November and by now I am even sick of substituting the lyrics with pornographic versions. I think the Victorian Era folks had the right idea.

(https://usaartnews.com/wp-content/uploads/4teg.jpg)

Bah Humbug  ;D
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: jfitzgerald on December 24, 2020, 05:17:13 pm
When your computer time zone  is set to UTC, and the web site displays the time with AM and PM.   I am looking at you EEVBlog!
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: Nominal Animal on December 24, 2020, 10:05:43 pm
When your computer time zone  is set to UTC, and the web site displays the time with AM and PM.   I am looking at you EEVBlog!
Hey, it's only a default.  Use Profile > Summary, then Modify Profile > Look and Layout, and pick your preferred Time Format there.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: dunkemhigh on December 25, 2020, 05:29:34 am
Nowt like that for me.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: DrG on December 25, 2020, 05:39:20 am
Nowt like that for me.
It's there. Modify Profile - pull down menu - Look and Feel Layout
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: james_s on December 25, 2020, 06:42:04 am
I was reminded of another peeve recently, entry forms that put every country on the planet in alphabetical order instead of guessing my location by my IP address and defaulting to where it thinks I am, or at least letting me type US in a search.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: dunkemhigh on December 25, 2020, 11:09:58 am
Ah! Thank you!

I thought the highlight on 'Modify profile' denoted the page I'm looking at, not that it's a button to press  :palm:
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: Labrat101 on December 25, 2020, 02:45:43 pm
Ah! Thank you!

I thought the highlight on 'Modify profile' denoted the page I'm looking at, not that it's a button to press  :palm:
That Fine, Only 8 years it took . 2013 to 2021 (almost)
It could have been worse  ;D 
Press 'B" for money refund
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: jfitzgerald on December 25, 2020, 03:24:34 pm
When your computer time zone  is set to UTC, and the web site displays the time with AM and PM.   I am looking at you EEVBlog!
Hey, it's only a default.  Use Profile > Summary, then Modify Profile > Look and Layout, and pick your preferred Time Format there.

You made my point ... defaulting to 12 hour time display for UTC is a terrible default.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: dunkemhigh on December 25, 2020, 07:26:06 pm
Quote
defaulting to 12 hour time display for UTC is a terrible default

I am intrigued - is it different for any other time zone (i.e. less terrible)? If so, what's the difference?
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: BravoV on December 26, 2020, 12:16:24 pm
I was reminded of another peeve recently, entry forms that put every country on the planet in alphabetical order instead of guessing my location by my IP address and defaulting to where it thinks I am, or at least letting me type US in a search.

Some programmers these days, thought once they've mastered an IF THEN ELSE statement in programming, then they're so confident that they become computer AI expert.  :palm:
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: CatalinaWOW on December 26, 2020, 03:10:57 pm
This may be US specific, but why do so many forms require entering city, state and ZIP code (mail code).  Once you enter mail code the other two are defined.  And to the prior posters comment it pretty much nails the country, though this is not worldwide unique.  Easily could be though.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: SilverSolder on December 26, 2020, 03:42:52 pm
This may be US specific, but why do so many forms require entering city, state and ZIP code (mail code).  Once you enter mail code the other two are defined.  And to the prior posters comment it pretty much nails the country, though this is not worldwide unique.  Easily could be though.

World ZIP codes are long overdue...
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: Circlotron on December 26, 2020, 10:06:05 pm
This may be US specific, but why do so many forms require entering city, state and ZIP code (mail code).  Once you enter mail code the other two are defined.  And to the prior posters comment it pretty much nails the country, though this is not worldwide unique.  Easily could be though.

World ZIP codes are long overdue...
Internet country code + ZIP code = problem solved!
Nothing new to be formulated.
Two things people are already familiar with.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: vk6zgo on December 27, 2020, 01:01:16 am
This may be US specific, but why do so many forms require entering city, state and ZIP code (mail code).  Once you enter mail code the other two are defined.  And to the prior posters comment it pretty much nails the country, though this is not worldwide unique.  Easily could be though.

World ZIP codes are long overdue...

Since AFAIK only the USA calls Postcodes "zipcodes", the easy way is to just prefix the US ones with a "Z".

Australian Postcodes narrow things down to a State City, & Postal area,but are just numeric, so the number combinations are probably not unique to this country.
British ones are alpha-numeric & pretty much take you down to the street level.
They are far more likely to be unique.

Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: james_s on December 27, 2020, 01:21:23 am
A postal code and a zip code are exactly the same thing, there's no need to prefix the US ones, they could just all be called postal codes and everyone would know what it meant, or change the label to zip code when US is selected as the country.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: CatalinaWOW on December 27, 2020, 01:36:12 am
This may be US specific, but why do so many forms require entering city, state and ZIP code (mail code).  Once you enter mail code the other two are defined.  And to the prior posters comment it pretty much nails the country, though this is not worldwide unique.  Easily could be though.

World ZIP codes are long overdue...
Internet country code + ZIP code = problem solved!
Nothing new to be formulated.
Two things people are already familiar with.

I like this approach.  Might take some doing to get widely used.

No reason for anyone to get tied up on names.  Zip or mail code it is all the same idea.  US ZIP+4 is much like British code.  I think it comes close to unique code for each dwelling unit.

The number of digits used and the character set varies world wide so it will take more than a few minutes to do all the coding.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: james_s on December 27, 2020, 01:51:25 am
There are quite a few countries that use the same or very similar format. I had to test something with postal codes at work a couple years ago so I wrote a script that would spit out all valid postal codes for about a dozen countries we were supporting, it didn't take very long, seems like there were 3 or 4 distinct formats among all of the countries I looked at.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: vk6zgo on December 27, 2020, 08:23:24 am
All of the above said, most of the time, the websites I use have no difficulty in accepting Australian Postcodes where it says "Zipcode".
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: CatalinaWOW on December 27, 2020, 09:25:49 am
All of the above said, most of the time, the websites I use have no difficulty in accepting Australian Postcodes where it says "Zipcode".

That is because all those websites are just treating it as a lump of text, not trying to process it.

I never meant that the data processing was an intellectually challenging task.  Biggest job is probably generating the data base which ties code to the administrative units (city and state in the US case).  Some more code to deal with the people who don't include the country code.  A bit more to figure out how not to be too annoying to the customer.  Deciding how to allocate those three tasks between callable units.  Still something measured in man days or weeks, not minutes or years.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: TimFox on December 27, 2020, 10:43:00 pm
People who can't keep their metaphors straight:  "Cast in stone" should be "cast in concrete" or "carved in stone".  How would one cast something in stone (I don't think lava is castable).
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: Ed.Kloonk on December 28, 2020, 02:08:26 am
(I don't think lava is castable).

Tell that to the 35000 residents of Pompeii.

Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: TimFox on December 28, 2020, 03:50:57 am
Pompeii was buried in volcanic ash.  Herculaneum was buried under ash and pumice.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: Nominal Animal on December 28, 2020, 03:48:51 pm
People who can't keep their metaphors straight:  "Cast in stone" should be "cast in concrete" or "carved in stone".  How would one cast something in stone (I don't think lava is castable).
:(  Intentionally mixing metaphors to confuse people is one of my favourite pastimes.

My favourite one is "Joka toiselle kuoppaa kaivaa, parhaiten nauraa".  It's a mash-up of two:
"Joka toiselle kuoppaa kaivaa, siihen itse lankeaa" – He who digs a pit for another will fall into it himself
"Joka viimeksi nauraa, se parhaiten nauraa" – He who laughs last laughs best

Besides, certain types of lava is actually castable.  Felsic lava, for example, produces obsidian, which is semi-castable.

It is also important to realize that "casting in stone" does not necessarily require high temperatures; only that the material is initially liquid, then turns into stone.  This is how sedimentary rocks like sandstone are formed, after all.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: dunkemhigh on December 28, 2020, 04:00:04 pm
It doesn't necessarily literally mean cast in stone - it's saying it is as if cast in stone, to imply it's not going to change easily. There is something of the hyperbolics about it to make the point, just as when we say "tastes like cat's piss" about a beer, we don't literally mean that but you perfectly get the idea that it's not very nice.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: DrG on December 28, 2020, 04:26:28 pm
Obnoxious Forced Choice Options!

Just the other day, on software that I purchased (actually rented for a year). Basically the popup asks me if I want to install ANOTHER one of their products OR remind me later to install another one of their products. There is no other option - it is either install more of our crap that you did not ask for now, or we will annoy you later. Not even an 'x' to close the popup. So, to close the popup, I have "consented" to the later reminder.

It represents the discontinuation of the "don't remind me again" or "stop seeing this annoying spam message from us". WTF am I supposed to do - spent 4 hours figuring out where this is in the registry or finding someone who has written about it and presents a registry fix that is outdated and they (the software folks) have already decided to use another tactic.

I HAVE changed software (when it is convenient) for exactly these reasons.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: TimFox on December 28, 2020, 04:27:17 pm
Roman Emperors used to propagate their legislation by carving it in stone for public display.  That made sense.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: Nominal Animal on December 28, 2020, 07:00:53 pm
I HAVE changed software (when it is convenient) for exactly these reasons.
In the noughties, I rented a LOT of DVDs, until I got too fed up with the unskippable "Don't be a criminal", "FBI will talk to you if..." ads.  Told my friendly local rental place manager why, and never rented a single DVD or BluRay since then.

They, too, reminded me of the old "Have you stopped beating your wife yet?" question.

(That is, in both the software case and the above question, the question is deliberately phrased so that you, the answerer, must submit to the role the asker designated, with no true choice presented or question asked.  It is particularly annoying when they claim the question/answer as a proof [of anything].)

Roman Emperors used to propagate their legislation by carving it in stone for public display.  That made sense.
I think next summer I need to find a nice rounded river stone, and carve "Nothing" on it.  So that I can have nothing carved in stone always with me.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: TimFox on December 28, 2020, 07:06:41 pm
And then you can skip the stone...
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: Nominal Animal on December 29, 2020, 01:17:38 am
And then you can skip the stone...
Yeah!  "I'm skipping nothing!", or, to confuse, "No, I prefer skipping nothing carved in stone instead."  It's not unlike avoiding underutilisation of multiple negations.

I recall an episode of TruTV's World's Dumbest, where Tonya Harding says, "What comes around, goes around".  Easy to miss, but darn funny nonsensical mistake if you really think about it.

I can see why these can be a pet peeve for some, though.  It's not the same doing it deliberately, and doing it accidentally just because you don't care.
Missing the possessive suffix in Finnish is one of mine; common in speech, but stings like a bad pirate accent in written text. Arr.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: Ed.Kloonk on January 02, 2021, 05:59:08 am
Eddie Vedder's song Say Hi.

 :=\
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: eugenenine on January 07, 2021, 12:40:58 am
People who spell cord chord.  They are two very different things
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: Muttley Snickers on January 07, 2021, 05:05:52 am
My pet peeve are flashing banner adds, they are terribly distracting and actually make me feel sick. (Inserts vomit emoticon).  :blah:

Furthermore, I would never purchase a product or service from any company who uses such annoying marketing techniques.   :rant:
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: jonovid on January 07, 2021, 01:01:24 pm
My pet peeve are flashing banner adds, they are terribly distracting and actually make me feel sick. (Inserts vomit emoticon).  :blah:

Furthermore, I would never purchase a product or service from any company who uses such annoying marketing techniques.   :rant:

their was this web 1.0 video game forum. were it was ok to post animated gif's as past of your user profile.
including personal animated banner designs that show on every post. 
hy I sell t shirts other stuff too! flashing banner!
pages of this forum looked like time square, as user's tried to outdo each other.  :o
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: Labrat101 on January 07, 2021, 05:20:18 pm
Interesting but what has animated banners and tee shirts have in common. 🤔
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: jonovid on January 09, 2021, 05:27:51 pm
Interesting but what has animated banners and tee shirts have in common. 🤔
animated banners promoting merchandise on the old game maker forum.    YoYo Games from 2007
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: SilverSolder on January 09, 2021, 06:29:44 pm
My pet peeve are flashing banner adds, they are terribly distracting and actually make me feel sick. (Inserts vomit emoticon).  :blah:

Furthermore, I would never purchase a product or service from any company who uses such annoying marketing techniques.   :rant:

My browser can be set to only play an animation once...   one "play" is OK with me, but not a looping distraction!
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: Ed.Kloonk on January 11, 2021, 11:17:08 pm
Telcos that require a reason for the change before they will submit your request.

Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: james_s on January 13, 2021, 12:41:52 am
Telcos that require a reason for the change before they will submit your request.

"I want to" is not reason enough?

I suppose you could embellish and say something like "I've been sentenced to 10 years in prison and have no further need for phone service."
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: GlennSprigg on January 15, 2021, 01:14:00 pm
(I'm just here for the 'Electronics' but... )
I love watching the shows on TV about Crime & Police Chases etc etc...
And without fail, (especially the English shows), they say something like....
"We got this 'Gentleman' on the 'Floor'...  (OK, i'ts called the 'Ground' !!!  8) )
I don't mean one has to say "this dickhead" or this "druggie asshole" etc etc, but maybe...
"this guy", "man", "bloke", "suspect etc etc... but "Gentleman"!!  Argh...   :P
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: Nominal Animal on January 15, 2021, 01:51:51 pm
"We got this 'Gentleman' on the 'Floor'...  (OK, i'ts called the 'Ground' !!!  8) )
Bri'ish English is Bri'ish English, my Aussie mate.

Because of the era we live in, translated from Finnish that would be "We got this Customer on the ground..."
Now that, everyone being "a customer", gets my goat.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: dunkemhigh on January 15, 2021, 04:22:51 pm
Cyclists who expect me, a pedestrian, to step into the road so they can ride past on the footpath.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: Sal Ammoniac on January 15, 2021, 04:34:48 pm
(I'm just here for the 'Electronics' but... )
I love watching the shows on TV about Crime & Police Chases etc etc...
And without fail, (especially the English shows), they say something like....
"We got this 'Gentleman' on the 'Floor'...  (OK, i'ts called the 'Ground' !!!  8) )
I don't mean one has to say "this dickhead" or this "druggie asshole" etc etc, but maybe...
"this guy", "man", "bloke", "suspect etc etc... but "Gentleman"!!  Argh...   :P

In these shows, how come the bad guy, when he runs out of ammunition, always throws his gun at the good guy?
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: Circlotron on January 15, 2021, 10:59:14 pm
When in movies like Star Wars they have all this unimaginably super duper technology but they still can’t shoot straight at each other with their laser beams or whatever. They take at least 50,000 shots to get one single hit.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: Sal Ammoniac on January 15, 2021, 11:22:41 pm
When in movies like Star Wars they have all this unimaginably super duper technology but they still can’t shoot straight at each other with their laser beams or whatever. They take at least 50,000 shots to get one single hit.

That only applies to the bad guys. The good guys almost always hit what they're aiming at, usually with the first shot.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: Ed.Kloonk on January 16, 2021, 03:35:04 am
When in movies like Star Wars they have all this unimaginably super duper technology but they still can’t shoot straight at each other with their laser beams or whatever. They take at least 50,000 shots to get one single hit.

That only applies to the bad guys. The good guys almost always hit what they're aiming at, usually with the first shot.

Han shot first.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: vk6zgo on January 16, 2021, 04:01:37 am
When in movies like Star Wars they have all this unimaginably super duper technology but they still can’t shoot straight at each other with their laser beams or whatever. They take at least 50,000 shots to get one single hit.
And their radios sound like WW2 AM with carbon microphones!
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: Alex Eisenhut on January 16, 2021, 04:06:53 am
Apostrophe plural's.
(runs away)
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: vk6zgo on January 16, 2021, 04:13:13 am
(I'm just here for the 'Electronics' but... )
I love watching the shows on TV about Crime & Police Chases etc etc...
And without fail, (especially the English shows), they say something like....
"We got this 'Gentleman' on the 'Floor'...  (OK, i'ts called the 'Ground' !!!  8) )
I don't mean one has to say "this dickhead" or this "druggie asshole" etc etc, but maybe...
"this guy", "man", "bloke", "suspect etc etc... but "Gentleman"!!  Argh...   :P

How about in "Midsomer Murders", where the baddy sets up some elaborate trap, like a falling bookcase, & the victim, instead of jumping out of the way, just stands there & gets squished.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: Labrat101 on January 16, 2021, 08:40:51 am
And why do people when chased by a car run down the middle of the road . .🤔. and the scene lasts about 5 minutes.. who can run that fast.  ..
Most cars can do in excess of 40 Mph in first gear . .. new guiness book of records .🤪
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: srb1954 on January 16, 2021, 11:28:20 am
When in movies like Star Wars they have all this unimaginably super duper technology but they still can’t shoot straight at each other with their laser beams or whatever. They take at least 50,000 shots to get one single hit.

That only applies to the bad guys. The good guys almost always hit what they're aiming at, usually with the first shot.
Quite often the good guys seem to hit 2 or 3 of the bad guys with the one shot.
Title: Re: Your pet peeve, technical or otherwise.
Post by: Labrat101 on January 16, 2021, 12:26:35 pm
When in movies like Star Wars they have all this unimaginably super duper technology but they still can’t shoot straight at each other with their laser beams or whatever. They take at least 50,000 shots to get one single hit.

That only applies to the bad guys. The good guys almost always hit what they're aiming at, usually with the first shot.
Quite often the good guys seem to hit 2 or 3 of the bad guys with the one shot.
The other thing is That the aliens always have the cool weapons shooting some Green plasma  .
 After finery killing the Bad Alien They never pick up the better weapon   :palm:  ..
 Hell if that was me in a real life scenario I would take the better technology .
 An post it to Dave for a tear Down  :-DD