Author Topic: Intel Edison Developer Challenge - £1,000 award - Applications close on 31 Aug  (Read 3712 times)

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Offline nuse

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Hi everyone!

Just wanted let you know Intel has launched a competition called “Intel Edison Developer Challenge” and is looking for professional developers / makers to submit product proposals with a view to building a new working IoT prototype using the Intel Edison board.

The competition is completely free to join. The 10 best ideas will receive a free Intel Edison kit to develop their IoT project and will have 8 weeks to build it.
The winner will eventually be rewarded with £1,000 cash and £500 3D printing voucher with 3D Hubs. Applications close on 31 August.

Link competition: http://www.hardwareacademy.io/intel-edison-developer-challenge

Hope some of you will find it interesting :D

Best
Fabiano
 

Online nctnico

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Work 8 weeks for  £1,000? I don't think so! You'd do better working in a supermarket.
There are small lies, big lies and then there is what is on the screen of your oscilloscope.
 
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Online jancumps

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Work 8 weeks for  £1,000? I don't think so! You'd do better working in a supermarket.
Come on, Nico. This is a contest, not a job.
 

Offline Kilrah

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So as big as Intel is, the best they can do to try and market something they never had a clue about is give out a few peanuts for clever people to try and give ideas to their marketing department?
Sad  :palm:
 

Online nctnico

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Work 8 weeks for  £1,000? I don't think so! You'd do better working in a supermarket.
Come on, Nico. This is a contest, not a job.
The possible reward of a contest should outweigh the energy you need to put into it.
There are small lies, big lies and then there is what is on the screen of your oscilloscope.
 
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Offline LabSpokane

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Work 8 weeks for  £1,000? I don't think so! You'd do better working in a supermarket.
Come on, Nico. This is a contest, not a job.
The possible reward of a contest should outweigh the energy you need to put into it.

£1000 is just laughable. It may not be a job but 8 weeks is an ass busting schedule for anything innovative by someone who likely has a job.
 

Online blueskull

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Work 8 weeks for  £1,000? I don't think so! You'd do better working in a supermarket.
Come on, Nico. This is a contest, not a job.
The possible reward of a contest should outweigh the energy you need to put into it.


That's a big money for students, so does the contest. Not for those employed.
 

Online nctnico

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Working in a super market or bar will earn you more in the same amount of time. Working 8 weeks full-time on the minimum wage in the UK (the price is in pounds so the competition is UK based) gets you 2144 pounds if you are between 21 and 24 years.
There are small lies, big lies and then there is what is on the screen of your oscilloscope.
 

Offline AndyC_772

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Work 8 weeks for  £1,000?

Work 8 weeks for a chance of £1000!  :palm:

Intel, listen up: if you want me to ever even consider designing around one of your parts, you need to make full data sheets available within about 3 clicks of your home page - like TI, ST, NXP and just about every other CPU manufacturer manages to do. I want a parametric search that includes pricing, I want block diagrams, and I want evaluation boards, and I want all this to be easy to find, like every other CPU manufacturer.

Until you get this sorted, you're completely irrelevant, and I'll keep using ARM parts.
 
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Online nctnico

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Work 8 weeks for  £1,000?
Work 8 weeks for a chance of £1000!  :palm:
I know. I just didn't want to sound too negative  >:D
There are small lies, big lies and then there is what is on the screen of your oscilloscope.
 

Online blueskull

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Work 8 weeks for  £1,000?
Work 8 weeks for a chance of £1000!  :palm:
I know. I just didn't want to sound too negative  >:D

For a student side project, I do not think it is any bad. Plus it is a good project in resume. An Intel prize in resume worth much more than $1000.
If I had the time, I would participate. Unfortunately I am working for someone else and my visa does not allow me to participate.
If I were in China (so I can legally work without constraints) and I were an undergraduate, I would definitely take this challenge.
When I was an UG, I participated 2 Intel contests and get a third prize. That definitely look good in resume, though I spent more money than the reward.
 

Offline Kilrah

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Again it only looks good on your resume if you're at the top, the chances are pretty low if there's a decent number of participants.

If you don't get there you've just spent time and money to offer free visibility for a multinational company's marketing who should really either be doing that on their own, or reward it properly. Many people understand that and are not stupid enough to fall for it anymore nowadays.
 

Offline AndyC_772

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It does say they're specifically looking for professional developers, though - in which case that £1k prize falls clearly under the heading of "not interesting".

I completely agree that, if you're an engineering student with time on your hands, it's quite a cool thing to get involved with.

Just bear in mind that if you're serious about getting into developing IoT devices, you're about a hundred times as likely to find yourself designing with ARM processors as anything from Intel  :-DD
 
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Offline nuse

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Do you know guys any other websites where I can find IoT related competitions?

Thank you!
 


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