Author Topic: Brussels Sprouts and Onion  (Read 4812 times)

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Offline DrGTopic starter

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Brussels Sprouts and Onion
« on: May 22, 2021, 01:54:04 am »


About 16 oz. of Brussels sprouts – washed and trim the stalk.

One large onion. Vidalia or other sweet white onion variety (no strong yellow onion varieties). Pearl onions work.

Saute (uncovered) quartered onion and Brussels sprouts with olive oil until the onion pieces become glassy. Add salt and black pepper. I like to add a few splashes of hot oil (see https://www.eevblog.com/forum/cooking/where-do-you-stand-with-heat-(how-hot-is-too-hot)/msg3512044/#msg3512044 )

Add ~ ½ cup water, reduce heat and cover.

When water is nearly gone (taste for consistency and add S & P if needed) liberally sprinkle dill weed over all (not dill seed, dill weed).

Some like to add a splash of balsamic vinegar in the bowl.
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The following users thanked this post: SeanB, xrunner, PlainName

Offline xrunner

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Re: Brussels Sprouts and Onion
« Reply #1 on: May 22, 2021, 01:57:21 am »
Man that looks delicious!  :-+
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Offline sean_monaghan

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Re: Brussels Sprouts and Onion
« Reply #2 on: June 08, 2021, 10:30:31 am »
Oh, this looks amazing! I normally fry my brussels with a rich fat base (like bacon, sausage &c.) but I can imagine onion makes it massively sweet!
 

Offline DrGTopic starter

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Re: Brussels Sprouts and Onion
« Reply #3 on: December 24, 2021, 06:14:16 pm »
I tried this the other day with a twist - I added some salami. Now, there is no question that bacon would have been better, but I had some (what is called here) Genoa salami. Same basic recipe, except the salami, wrapped in a paper towel, is put into a MW for 1-1.5 min to remove the fat and water. Then it is sliced and diced. It was tasty!



Here, you get an idea of sprout:onion proportion that I used.


Here is the onion getting glassy and is the time that I added the salami, and, subsequently, the water for steaming.
« Last Edit: December 24, 2021, 06:15:55 pm by DrG »
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Offline PlainName

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Re: Brussels Sprouts and Onion
« Reply #4 on: December 26, 2021, 03:56:50 pm »
We've been living on sprouts all week (they've been selling for 10p/kg or even less!), but even so I quite fancy a plate of that  :-+
 

Offline DrGTopic starter

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Re: Brussels Sprouts and Onion
« Reply #5 on: December 26, 2021, 03:59:45 pm »
Do you ever roast/bake them? I have tried, but was a little disappointed - too chewy. Others rave about them so I may not be doing it the best way.
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Offline PlainName

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Re: Brussels Sprouts and Onion
« Reply #6 on: December 26, 2021, 06:18:16 pm »
No, always boil. I've done bubble & squeak with them but it hasn't been a success (the sprout part was fine, but getting the patty brown without gluing to the pan never worked so they wound up as mashed potato with sprouts).

I think a lot of it is in the prep. Yesterday I was at Xmas dinner with the inlaws and - horror - someone else prepped them. What seems to be the way to do them is to cut off the stem and that removes some leaves and you're done. By the way I do them is to peel the leaves until there is no shadow of a previous leaf (and in doing this you notice where they are decomposing, which you don't when it's done the other way). Once the main part is OK, cut the stem to suit. Takes three times longer but the results are perfect.

Done my way the prepped sprouts look like your middle photo. Done other's way they look like the other photos. I think the outer layers, the darker green leaves, apart from hiding stuff also taste different.

Cooking: throw them in a pan, cover with water, teaspoon of salt, turn on the heat. Once boiling, leave for 10 mins then test - a fork should go through reasonably easily and consistently. If they are underdone (chewy) you'll feel a bit of extra resistance as you hit the middle. Overdone and there won't  be any resistance at all - use these for bubble & squeak practice.

Done right you can shove any excess in the fridge and they are still good the next day when cold. And the day after. Never had any last longer than that so can't say about third day.

Edit: sorry, got carried away :)

The chewy thing, as you've  probably figured, is when the middle hasn't cooked long enough. There's a pretty short window between the middle being under done and the outer being over done. One way around that for baking and the like is to cut them up, perhaps halving will be sufficient. Or shred them - I've shredded and then stir fried raw sprouts with bacon and they were OK. More or less. Prefer boiled though :)
« Last Edit: December 26, 2021, 06:23:22 pm by dunkemhigh »
 


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