Author Topic: coffee  (Read 5800 times)

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Offline djacobow

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Re: coffee
« Reply #25 on: October 08, 2021, 05:36:17 pm »
Quote
All the water and grounds start out together, but when you "press" you force the column of almost coffee through the grounds
So the paper instead of metal roster is a (minor) change, but how does above description differ from a description of the french press?

A french press is completely an infusion device. The coffee grounds and water hang out together. You wait for it to become coffee, then push down to separate the grounds from the liquor, and you drink that. What the aeropress is doing is a little different, because you are pushing the water through a "puck" of coffee grounds. The water is in contact with the beans for less time. It is the difference between infusion and percolation.

The difference in taste has to do with the different compounds in the beans and how quickly they can be dissolved into the water. With an infusion brew as you wait to dissolve the harder-to-dissolve compounds, you get much more of the easier to dissolve compounds. With the percolation, you get a different profile because you're not waiting for the harder to dissolve compounds at all.

The aeropress isn't really a percolation brewer, though. It's more of a hybrid, where you can sort of decide yourself how much infusion and how much percolation you want, based on how long you wait before pressing and how fast you press.

Another difference with the aeropress is that you generally use finer ground coffee than you would use with a french press, so you are exposing more of the bean surface area, getting a strong cup per unit of beans.

Finally, yeah, the paper filter is different, as paper tends to block the oils from getting into your cup entirely. This makes for a "cleaner" tasting cup, though some will also say "less body."




 

Offline LoveLaika

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Re: coffee
« Reply #26 on: October 15, 2021, 05:20:14 pm »
I thought about getting a Chemex, but after seeing the prices of the filters used for it, I was quickly turned off.
 

Offline AnasMalas

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Re: coffee
« Reply #27 on: October 22, 2021, 08:32:01 pm »
for milk drinks, frothing milk using the microwave and a handheld frother.

I myself have fallen down the rabbit hole of chasing good coffee... but im also a student who cant afford even a basic espresso machine. Instead I use Nespresso and I just cover up its taste with milk, which ive gotten pretty good at foaming (btw, Corto is one of exactly 3 Nespresso capsules I can even swallow, Costa Classic is another one, but I digress)

My secret to perfect frothed milk is this:
https://www.ikea.com/jo/en/p/egentlig-coffee-tea-maker-double-walled-clear-glass-80361823/

This magical thing has no metal once you remove the plunger, so I can place it directly in the microwave at 700 W with 200 ml of full-fat (3.25%) milk for 80 to 100 seconds (depending on what type of foam I want that day. If you want a hotter cup with harder foam, heat the milk up more), and its size is perfect for one large cup (or three small cups if you have company)

When the microwave beeps, the preheated cup already has the shot of espresso in it. Take the plunger and put it in. Do two or three rapid full length plunges to introduce air to the milk. The more full length plunges, the more foam you make and the harder the foam comes out, so dont over do it. After the 2/3 full plunges youll see that the milk has risen in volume, now move the plunger within the milk, being careful not to go too high and add more air into the mix. This now smoothens the air inside the milk giving it a very velvety texture, just like what you expect from good steamed milk. Pull the plunger all the way up and swirl the milk before removing it. If you did all that right, you can even do some poor latte art. The milk doesnt come out very hot, but I like that more anyway. (heat the milk to boiling if you want to create insulation foam out of your milk. Ask me how I know)

Method TL;DR: Heat, plunge fully, plunge partially, swirl, enjoy
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Offline james_s

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Re: coffee
« Reply #28 on: October 23, 2021, 01:18:27 am »
I sometimes wish I liked coffee because I think some of the machines used to make it are fascinating. I worked on a commercial espresso machine once that was imported from Italy and it was a really impressive contraption. Also I live in the greater Seattle area where not liking coffee is practically sacrilege. Alas I cannot stand the stuff, I like the smell, probably because it reminds me of my grandmother's place when I was a kid but the taste is just vile.
 

Offline beanflying

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Re: coffee
« Reply #29 on: October 23, 2021, 01:54:26 am »
Resident addict checking in. To the Left of the Bench is my little 1kg roaster and to the Right is the three Group Lever machine and grinder.

My TEA collection is small by comparison  >:D
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Offline beanflying

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Re: coffee
« Reply #30 on: October 23, 2021, 01:58:11 am »
I thought about getting a Chemex, but after seeing the prices of the filters used for it, I was quickly turned off.

Look at the Hario range as well and in particular the Able Kone range of filters https://ablebrewing.com/products/kone-coffee-filter You will get more oils through these and minimal to zero fines if you get the grind correct for the process.

If you must do paper make sure the filters are unbleached or even rinsed prior to use because paper tastes :P
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Offline djacobow

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Re: coffee
« Reply #31 on: October 23, 2021, 07:39:26 pm »
Resident addict checking in. To the Left of the Bench is my little 1kg roaster and to the Right is the three Group Lever machine and grinder.

My TEA collection is small by comparison  >:D

Wait... three group? How much coffee are you making?! Also, what is the warm-up time on that beast?

I'm really enjoying my new machine, but I just went a bit further down the rabbit hole again: I put in an order for a Niche Zero grinder.  (£499). It's not that my existing hand-grinder was getting bad results, but I was making two espresso for me and one for my wife every morning and I was getting tired of grinding.
 

Online langwadt

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Re: coffee
« Reply #32 on: October 23, 2021, 07:47:48 pm »
I sometimes wish I liked coffee because I think some of the machines used to make it are fascinating. I worked on a commercial espresso machine once that was imported from Italy and it was a really impressive contraption. Also I live in the greater Seattle area where not liking coffee is practically sacrilege. Alas I cannot stand the stuff, I like the smell, probably because it reminds me of my grandmother's place when I was a kid but the taste is just vile.

https://youtu.be/Z-iNAyu-ejo
 

Offline Coordonnée_chromatique

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Re: coffee
« Reply #33 on: October 23, 2021, 08:49:44 pm »
Hello, you should try the very classical and cheap slow pass process because it is the best and the most ancient one and it works for all the avaliable sort of coffees.
Progressively you will be able to detect the horrible "melted plastic" taste of the capsules and when you will be ready, you should buy a porcelain filter support for few dollars in consequence of subtile "hot plastic" taste again.
 

Offline beanflying

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Re: coffee
« Reply #34 on: October 23, 2021, 08:59:48 pm »
Resident addict checking in. To the Left of the Bench is my little 1kg roaster and to the Right is the three Group Lever machine and grinder.

My TEA collection is small by comparison  >:D

Wait... three group? How much coffee are you making?! Also, what is the warm-up time on that beast?

I'm really enjoying my new machine, but I just went a bit further down the rabbit hole again: I put in an order for a Niche Zero grinder.  (£499). It's not that my existing hand-grinder was getting bad results, but I was making two espresso for me and one for my wife every morning and I was getting tired of grinding.

I have made Coffee for $ in one form or another for the last 10 years so the 3 group is a luxury leftover along with a few others and a bunch of grinders 8) Takes about 40 minutes to get the heads up to temperature as I am running it on 3.3kW instead of nearly 5kW  at full power. With a good helper we used to pull 300+ cups in a 5 hour outdoor market on the beast most days it is just me so 2-4.

I was going to ask about a grinder as you didn't reference one. Generally regardless of brew process Grinder is as or more important than the Brewer or Machine. The more modern Hand Grinders for Espresso use can be great but you need to pay particular attention to grind quantity, size and distribution in the basket more than with an electric one.

Most important even when you get the electric is to change only one variable at a time with the grind so grab some accurate scales and weight your shots to check quantity until you can eyeball it better. Then adjust the grind size to set your shot time (the typical 25-30 seconds) for a known shot volume and measure that too initially. Also look at the top surface of your pucks as much as the bottom of your naked to look at you are doing with distribution and tamping. Making a better brew is about improving consistency and reducing/minimizing errors to get the most from the beans you have.

Some of the non Espresso gear no I don't have a problem either  :-DD

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Offline rfclown

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Re: coffee
« Reply #35 on: October 23, 2021, 11:57:55 pm »
nice collection beanflying! In my coffee quest year ago I bought an irbik to make Turkish coffee. Definately not my cup to tea.
 

Offline beanflying

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Re: coffee
« Reply #36 on: October 24, 2021, 12:13:32 am »
Yeah Turkish/Greek (don't anger the Greeks even if they were second ;) is another whole thing and generally not mine either. The Grind is the issue you need more or less a powder (much finer than Espresso) or the grit sticks to your teeth :-- Also need to keep the temperature down while brewing as much as possible or you burn the beans.

Also if anyone uses a Moka Pot fill the lower chamber with boiling water for a better brew or you will burn the beans by the time it heats the water below. When brewed wrap the whole thing in a damp tea towel to properly stop the heating after for the same reasons.
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Offline djacobow

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Re: coffee
« Reply #37 on: October 24, 2021, 02:35:02 am »
I was going to ask about a grinder as you didn't reference one. Generally regardless of brew process Grinder is as or more important than the Brewer or Machine. The more modern Hand Grinders for Espresso use can be great but you need to pay particular attention to grind quantity, size and distribution in the basket more than with an electric one.

My current grinder is an 1Zpresso JX Pro. It's okay, but adjusting it between drip and espresso grinds means counting revolutions, which I get lost and have to restart from "burrs in contact." It also has a static problem. I'm looking forward to the convenience of the Niche, but I will have to wait until December for it to ship. I expect some improvement in grind, but I'm not setting very high expectations, so am improvement will be a pleasant surprise.

I don't think I want an espresso machine that I can see in my utility bill, but I'm sure it's great to use!
 

Online dunkemhigh

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Re: coffee
« Reply #38 on: October 24, 2021, 07:12:18 pm »
Quote
Some of the non Espresso gear

Wow, nice cupboard. Puts my simple gear to shame!

 

Offline AnasMalas

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Re: coffee
« Reply #39 on: October 25, 2021, 06:00:08 am »
I was getting tired of grinding.

Well, that's the point at which you go ahead and attach a battery powered drill/screwdriver to your hand grinder  ;D
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Offline beanflying

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Re: coffee
« Reply #40 on: November 04, 2021, 03:36:45 am »
Latte Artless in the rubble pile that is my bench ::)
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Offline theFarmgineer

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Re: coffee
« Reply #41 on: November 06, 2021, 05:39:16 am »
FYI, for drip coffee, there is a certification: https://sca.coffee/certified-home-brewer

I have not looked into it deeply, but it purports to certify whether a drip coffee maker is using the proper temperature.

Drip gets a bad rap, but it could be because there are so many poorly regulated machines. I would hate for a concept to be held down by its worst implementations.


That being said,
I personally use a Breville BES870XL and make fine espresso. I have the beans roasted and shipped to-order (Peets and Crigler Coffee), so its always freshly roasted. I also change out my gaskets regularly and monitor the pressure on the pour as it goes. Its like riding a racing motorcycle, every time you ride, you tweak it a bit. I think the solenoids are starting to go, however, so I might have to open her up finally and replace them.

PS: Crigler Coffee, although only available in the USA, is very fine coffee.
 

Offline beanflying

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Re: coffee
« Reply #42 on: November 18, 2021, 02:00:37 am »
Drip also got a bad wrap from being made with stale preground coffee that was then left to stew on hotplates for hours after before being served :P Great drip coffee can be made well outside the SCA spec but it is a good ball park to start with.

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Offline beanflying

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Re: coffee
« Reply #43 on: November 18, 2021, 04:01:45 am »
Now sweating in the shack 27 degrees so time to change out the brew a little. Clearly good for you as the label says 'wholesome'  :-DD

Drop the double shot over the Ice-cream for a bit of a sweetness boost from the meltage.

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Offline rfclown

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Re: coffee
« Reply #44 on: November 18, 2021, 05:06:05 am »
...Drop the double shot over the Ice-cream for a bit of a sweetness boost from the meltage. ...

Reminds me of a time when I used to throw two shots of espresso over some good french vanilla ice cream, add milk and a big spoon of Mrs Richardson's butterscotch/carmel topping and shake it up. Soooo good. I then thought that adding chocolate would make it better.. but NO. Espresso, good ice cream, Mrs Richardson's butterscoth and milk. Yum.
 

Online Siwastaja

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Re: coffee
« Reply #45 on: December 05, 2021, 08:33:49 am »
Regarding coffee:

 

Offline vk6zgo

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Re: coffee
« Reply #46 on: December 05, 2021, 09:30:43 am »
This does all sound a bit like "audiophile" levels of enthusiasm! ;D

The first espresso coffee I ever tried was in the late 1950s at a shop in what they now call "Northbridge" in Perth, WA.

It was a Cappuccino, made with a huge machine manufactured by Gaggia in Italy.

Interestingly, their version did not top the coffee with cocoa powder, but with cinnamon sugar, & was delicious!
Mentioning this to others, usually resulted in a "you're dreaming" reaction, but when I had a coffee machine, that's how I made it.

After a while, though, I thought, maybe I had "false memories", but in the early 2000s, we ordered cappuccino in Bali, & on arrival, they were topped with cinnamon sugar, so I was vindicated, at least as far as knowing it was a real option.

A bit further "off topic", that original shop had Cassatas made on the premises, which were the best I ever tasted!
The funny thing, even the factory made ones have disappeared from the market!

If you aren't worried about your weight, (& at 13, I didn't "give a stuff") a good quality Cassata is the perfect accompaniment to a really good coffee! ;D ;D
 
 

Online Siwastaja

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Re: coffee
« Reply #47 on: December 05, 2021, 09:46:47 am »
Finnish coffee culture: quantity over quality. I like that.
 

Offline rfclown

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Re: coffee
« Reply #48 on: February 05, 2022, 05:11:56 pm »
My daughter gave me some coffee for Christmas. It is a light roast, and these days I make espresso drinks and prefer a dark roast for that... So I pulled out the popcorn popper that I used to roast coffee in (modified with a light dimmer in-line with the main heating coil to control the heat) back when I drank mostly drip coffee (for which I prefer a medium roast). I didn't know if you could re-roast coffee, but the experiment was a success. It smelled fantastic roasting it. When roasting green beans, the initial odor (at least in my experience using a popper) isn't that great. I roast outside because of that. With this coffee, from the start it smelled great, and finished smelling awesome. First try was a success, so today I did another batch. Have to give it time to settle before drinking it (out-gassing, or whatever it is. you'd think it would be best right after roasting, but it isn't)
 

Offline beanflying

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Re: coffee
« Reply #49 on: February 05, 2022, 11:55:01 pm »
If anyone wants to play with some roasting then this guide attached below I put together several years ago might help. Ask away if you have other questions.

With the reroasting of beans likely you have baked them and or damaged the lightly roasted bean created in part by the mallard process of the first roast. Depending on how dark you took the reroast (Italian or darker) you will have produced a charcoal like overbearing taste profile damaging or destroying the oils and flavonoids ('should be' the good tasting bits). Warning nerdy science stuff in link :) https://www.baristahustle.com/blog/what-is-the-maillard-reaction-and-why-is-it-important/

Typically pulling a roast of green beans at the first hints of 'second crack' is a good first place while you get a feel for it and before that allowing 3-4 minutes from the 'first crack' to that point. Third wave hipsters will disagree with this and so will old school Italians so I would get a  :horse: depending on the setting. Roasting the beans to the 'correct or best' point for what they are and the intended brew process is important.

My 'typical' commercial Espresso blend is roasted to just on the first part of second crack while my filter or brewed coffee roasted will be well under that.

There is no right or wrong here but if you enjoy the result is all that matters.
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