Author Topic: Creamy  (Read 981 times)

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Offline PlainNameTopic starter

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Creamy
« on: April 20, 2022, 06:28:09 am »
This is not my idea, just something I picked up when floating around t'web, and they nicked it off someone else:

Cream Eggs

So, looked interesting and the theory is sound(ish) - you use the fat in the cream to fry the eggs (or carrots or whatever in the original source). You can see from the photo that the cream is going brown round the edges, and the eggs will be brown underneath, so that's what I tried to replicate.

I have to sadly report that doing it like that was not a success. It was OK if you hadn't tried the alternative, but the cream taste was mostly absent. Perhaps I didn't do the egg long enough, though. On my first try I used a quite low heat (mis-reading the recipe) so the yolk eventually went solid. With this try, over a much higher heat to get the browning, the yolk was runny, but perhaps too runny.

After a couple more tries (provoked by my volunteer tester demanding 'maybe another go') I've settled on doing it the wrong way: medium low heat and sod the browning, just take your time to get it nice and bubbly and, well, creamy. I guess it is basically poached rather than fried. On the right bread (not even toast) it is to die for.
 
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Offline MrMobodies

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Re: Creamy
« Reply #1 on: April 21, 2022, 07:46:01 pm »
Orange yolks.

Someone said to me once the reason you see bright yellow eggs is because the hens that laid them were most likely fed what he referred to as "fat pellets".

I wonder if that is true.

Looks very nice though.
 

Offline PlainNameTopic starter

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Re: Creamy
« Reply #2 on: April 21, 2022, 08:10:37 pm »
Probably touched up in Photoshop :)

But, as it happens, my partner came home with some hard boiled eggs from some Easter thing she went to, and she remarked on how anemic the yolk looked compared to our home grown eggs. Don't think we give the hens anything special though - usual pellets supplemented by pretty much anything that will compost (they know where the heap is).
 

Online Halcyon

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Re: Creamy
« Reply #3 on: April 22, 2022, 01:21:00 am »
My next door neighbour had chickens (until the foxes got to them) but I was always getting eggs from them. The yolk colour tends to change depending on diet, which can also depend on the time of year and what bugs and foliage is in abundance. For example, hens fed with mainly with corn will have darker orange yolks than those fed with mostly wheat grains. Levels of various vitamins also have an impact.

But diet isn't the only thing that can impact yolk colour, even things like exposing chickens to natural sunlight which impacts their metabolism can darken the pigmentation in the yolks.

Ultimately, regardless of the colour of the yolk, I only buy eggs that are certified "free-range" and organic. In Australia, those terms are strictly enforced and have specific meanings under the standards. For example, you can't label eggs as being "organic" if the hens were raised in a barn or cage.

https://www.australianeggs.org.au/farming/free-range-eggs
 


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