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Forgotten phrases about cooking

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tggzzz:
When I was young the everyday meats were beef, lamb and pork. Chicken was a rare treat for a Sunday lunch.

What's forgotten that if you were served chicken, it was quite reasonable to complement your host by telling them it was a "good bird". I doubt anybody has said that in decades, and youngsters couldn't comprehend why you might say it - or might not.

That's probably A Good Thing, but the sameness does preclude being pleasantly surprised.

abquke:
I was reading one of my Grandma's recipes and an instruction was "bake in a moderate oven". That's it.

It was later explained to me that it means "350F for 1 hour".

Ian.M:
It was a specific oven in an Aga (or similar) stove.  The 'Baking' oven would be at an intermediate temperature between the roasting and simmering ovens, hence 'moderate'.
https://www.blakeandbull.co.uk/pages/what-each-part-of-your-aga-range-cooker-is-called-and-what-its-for

Zenith:
As I recall chicken was a luxury, but that tailed off in the 60s with highly tuned factory farming methods, plucking machines and refrigeration, leading to oven ready chickens being a commonplace by the 70s.

The world's become more squeamish. The modern miss will readily devour pheasant in the Normandy style, casseroled with apples, cream and Calvados and served with pomme dauphinoise and carefully steamed vegetables. Should she ask you where it came from, just say "Sainsburys". Do not say, "It went high with the setting sun on it and I had it out of the left. It was hung for three weeks. Could have done with a week longer to bring out the flavour". Just lie and say "Sainsburys". This is "lived experience" as they say these days.

tggzzz:

--- Quote from: Zenith on August 13, 2022, 09:05:36 pm ---As I recall chicken was a luxury, but that tailed off in the 60s with highly tuned factory farming methods, plucking machines and refrigeration, leading to oven ready chickens being a commonplace by the 70s.

The world's become more squeamish. The modern miss will readily devour pheasant in the Normandy style, casseroled with apples, cream and Calvados and served with pomme dauphinoise and carefully steamed vegetables. Should she ask you where it came from, just say "Sainsburys". Do not say, "It went high with the setting sun on it and I had it out of the left. It was hung for three weeks. Could have done with a week longer to bring out the flavour". Just lie and say "Sainsburys". This is "lived experience" as they say these days.

--- End quote ---

Pretty much.

Try getting an unprepared pheasant nowadays; not easy. The traditional technique was to hang a pheasant by its neck, and when the body hit the floor it was ready for eating. That's a little too far gone for my taste, though.

I think everyone should have plucked and drawn a pheasant at least once in their life, so as to have a visceral (ho ho) appreciation of what's what. Ditto cooked and eaten winkles.

The netter at Stolford used to have a Belfast sink full of live eels. Once you had tried to handle one, you knew the origin of the phrase "slippery as an eel". Daughter had great fun doing that quarter of a century ago.

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