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Knife Sharpening

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PlainName:
Now that's a Tube vid worth watching. Thanks for posting  :-+

A brief takeaway seems to be that some of the better sharpeners take much longer on a dull blade, and that might be why they get mixed reviews compared to the not-so-good ones that put a so-so edge on quickly.

TimNJ:


To me, this seems like a nice way to get repeatable results, without requiring the finesse of using a honing rod or free-handing with a bench-stone. I don't know how it compares with the more typical kitchen tabletop sharpeners above.

Looks like a fun project atleast.

antenna:
I made this one when my green Lansky stone snapped and I got tired of spending 2-3 hours on a knife. This one can do anything from little pocket knives and thin fillet knives to machetes and swords. I am too unsteady to freehand a constant angle so this really helps. Whatever stone I want, I just tape to the board. I spaced the guide holes so that if I go to one of those cheap thin diamond stones (I use junk coarse ones when the edge is rounded and there is a lot of metal to move), I just move down a hole and the angle remains constant. I tried velcro for the stones but it got weak. I plan to use dual-lock tape to hold the stones eventually.

helius:

--- Quote from: TimNJ on September 23, 2021, 04:39:23 pm ---To me, this seems like a nice way to get repeatable results, without requiring the finesse of using a honing rod or free-handing with a bench-stone. I don't know how it compares with the more typical kitchen tabletop sharpeners above.
--- End quote ---
A honing rod somehow needs "finesse"?
Honing rods are incredibly simple to use and are applied daily to knives in professional kitchens. A home cook should use a hone once a week.
Sharpening is a different process from honing and is only required very rarely on quality knives (with steel hard enough to hold a good edge). Instead of bothering with stones, sharpening systems, and other toys, you can simply have your knives sharpened by a cutlery service once a year (if that) for very little cost.
The key fact to remember, if you remember anything, is that honing and stropping only correct bending of the blade edge. Sharpening is a metal removal process that puts the edge on the blade. A blade can only be sharpened a limited number of times because each sharpening procedure removes metal, but it can be honed or stropped forever.

TimNJ:

--- Quote from: helius on September 28, 2021, 02:12:21 pm ---
--- Quote from: TimNJ on September 23, 2021, 04:39:23 pm ---To me, this seems like a nice way to get repeatable results, without requiring the finesse of using a honing rod or free-handing with a bench-stone. I don't know how it compares with the more typical kitchen tabletop sharpeners above.
--- End quote ---
A honing rod somehow needs "finesse"?
Honing rods are incredibly simple to use and are applied daily to knives in professional kitchens. A home cook should use a hone once a week.
Sharpening is a different process from honing and is only required very rarely on quality knives (with steel hard enough to hold a good edge). Instead of bothering with stones, sharpening systems, and other toys, you can simply have your knives sharpened by a cutlery service once a year (if that) for very little cost.
The key fact to remember, if you remember anything, is that honing and stropping only correct bending of the blade edge. Sharpening is a metal removal process that puts the edge on the blade. A blade can only be sharpened a limited number of times because each sharpening procedure removes metal, but it can be honed or stropped forever.

--- End quote ---

To some degree, yes I find the technique a little tricky based on the infrequency in which I do it. If you find honing a knife a simple procedure, then that's great.

In fact, I do have my knives sharpened at a local shop that's been in business for 75+ years. The cost is reasonable, but it's still something like $25-30/year for 5-6 knives. No real problem there, but a simple sharpening jig is probably <$50 with a good quality stone.

Thanks for the explanation of honing vs sharpening though.

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