Author Topic: Omelette  (Read 7424 times)

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Online PlainNameTopic starter

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Omelette
« on: August 19, 2023, 11:05:26 am »
Dunno why but I decided I was going to make the omelette recipe from The Bear (which I have never seen). Easy peasy, lemon thingamabob. So first job is to run off a French omelette, as opposed an American omelette which is what I would previously have done. A week and literally two dozen eggs later I am still pondering where it's going wrong...

FYI, experts in the field:





(Edit: found an English version of Jacques Pépin's video)
« Last Edit: August 19, 2023, 11:16:14 am by PlainName »
 

Offline helius

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Re: Omelette
« Reply #1 on: August 22, 2023, 07:12:38 pm »
The type of omelette usually demonstrated on cooking shows is thin and folded over the contents, somewhat like a crèpe. The technique to make it requires the skillet to be constantly shook back and forth to prevent the batter from sticking. While this is a great arm exercise, the work-to-reward ratio is incredibly high (something that could equally be said for most cooking shows in general).

If you are not too particular about the omelette having a smooth and unbroken appearance, it can be prepared somewhat more like a scramble by simply letting the mixture set and then turning it over in several parts to cook the other side. With this method shaking the skillet is unnecessary.

5-egg omelette

5 large eggs
6 oz heavy cream
1/2 tsp salt

blend on low setting until frothy and pour over a hot 10" skillet containing 1 oz of olive or coconut oil. Pour the mixture slowly so the oil remains on the bottom of the pan.

4 oz double-crème brie
2 oz dry salame
1 small white onion
half of a bell pepper
1 medium tomato
1 Tbsp capers
eight lovage leaves

Dice the ingredients and add to the omelette mixture before it sets. No need to stir. Season with ground black peppercorns, nutmeg is also good. Cook on low heat for approx. 15 minutes or until the mixture no longer jiggles. Reduce heat and turn upside down in sections, with a spatula. Another 5 minutes should fully cook the omelette.

Serve with a half litre of hefeweizen.
 

Online IanB

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Re: Omelette
« Reply #2 on: August 22, 2023, 07:21:53 pm »
Dunno why but I decided I was going to make the omelette recipe from The Bear (which I have never seen). Easy peasy, lemon thingamabob. So first job is to run off a French omelette, as opposed an American omelette which is what I would previously have done. A week and literally two dozen eggs later I am still pondering where it's going wrong...

I can't tell you what's going wrong, but I can point you to another French omelette video from a very good teacher. Maybe it will help:


 

Offline themadhippy

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Re: Omelette
« Reply #3 on: August 22, 2023, 07:35:06 pm »
all that messing about,get the bottom nearly  cooked  and stick the pan under the grill to finish the top,plus the thing shrinks slightly and just drops out the pan
 

Online PlainNameTopic starter

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Re: Omelette
« Reply #4 on: August 22, 2023, 07:59:42 pm »
I can't tell you what's going wrong, but I can point you to another French omelette video from a very good teacher. Maybe it will help:


Ah, interesting, thanks! Only snag there is that it's a bit brown - the timing needs to be between my too runny one and his too done one.

Not sure about that fizzy water, though...

Quote from: helius
If you are not too particular about the omelette having a smooth and unbroken appearance

Unfortunately, that's the point of this one. Left to my own devices I would be making scrambled egg using fried cream as the fat content. Your recipe looks scrumptious, but I think a weeks worth of fasting should be include :)
 

Offline jpanhalt

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Re: Omelette
« Reply #5 on: August 22, 2023, 09:25:25 pm »
Finally, an omelette as I learned what that means.  That is, ham, cheese, onion, asparagus, whatever, plus eggs. Some call that a "Denver' omelette. Those other examples are what I call scrambled eggs, but not thoroughly scrambled.  I enjoy scrambled eggs made with milk/cream and served with a little ketchup on top.
 

Online PlainNameTopic starter

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Re: Omelette
« Reply #6 on: August 22, 2023, 09:28:55 pm »
You were doing OK until 'ketchup'!  :o
 
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Offline helius

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Re: Omelette
« Reply #7 on: September 05, 2023, 06:40:28 pm »
From the Somerset Club cookbook:

 

Online PlainNameTopic starter

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Re: Omelette
« Reply #8 on: September 05, 2023, 08:49:51 pm »
Another one that uses water. Wonder what its purpose is.

I think I've got the hang of this now - I was using tubed cheese (as prep for the real thing, which is much more expensive) and it seems that was making the inside too runny. Left it out and they are pretty much perfect now - can even fold them by banging the pan like a pro!

Partner, who is my testbed, has settled on garlic and dried chillies for flavour. I think after I've tried The Recipe I might have a go at banana omelette. Just kind of took my fancy today.
 

Offline dobsonr741

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Re: Omelette
« Reply #9 on: September 05, 2023, 11:22:53 pm »
The butter vs. EVO question: is there a way to make French omelette with EVO? All of my EVO attempts ended up spots sticking down in the non-stick pan, preventing rolling. Same pan, butter - no issue. I’m open to any techniques that makes me look good when I visit the cardiologist next time.
 

Offline coppice

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Re: Omelette
« Reply #10 on: September 05, 2023, 11:30:54 pm »
The best omelettes are the Chinese/Japanese style ones, but they take too much work for most of us to bother at home.
 

Online PlainNameTopic starter

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Re: Omelette
« Reply #11 on: September 06, 2023, 07:43:26 am »
Quote
The butter vs. EVO question: is there a way to make French omelette with EVO?

I didn't know what EVO is, but a quick Google suggest Extra-Virgin Olive oil?

I might try. I did do a butter/oil mix at the start to prevent the butter burning, but can't recall whether things stuck to the pan. Was a bit, er, oily so didn't try again.
 

Online IanB

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Re: Omelette
« Reply #12 on: September 06, 2023, 08:45:49 am »
Another one that uses water. Wonder what its purpose is.

Adding a dash of water to the egg is a standard part of an omelette recipe. As to the purpose, one could be to help dissolve the salt added as seasoning, and one could be to lighten the texture a little.

The butter vs. EVO question: is there a way to make French omelette with EVO? All of my EVO attempts ended up spots sticking down in the non-stick pan, preventing rolling. Same pan, butter - no issue. I’m open to any techniques that makes me look good when I visit the cardiologist next time.

There is nothing wrong with butter. It no worse than any other kind of fat and better than some. Use butter in your cooking and be happy.



https://time.com/4386248/fat-butter-nutrition-health/

On the other hand, I have had no issues using olive oil to make omelettes. Maybe the problem is with your pan? Also, make sure the pan is the right temperature. Food sticks to pans which are too cold, and also to pans which are too hot.
 

Online PlainNameTopic starter

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Re: Omelette
« Reply #13 on: September 06, 2023, 12:52:07 pm »
Quote
Adding a dash of water to the egg is a standard part of an omelette recipe.

I don't think it is, and I see more classic ones that don't than do. Seems to be like using vinegar to poach eggs - people do it because people do it, and it's tradition. But it's not necessary and poaching works just as well without (and doesn't carry the flavour). There is apparently a real reason for poaching but I don't think it actually makes a difference.

For water in omelette... the only thing I can think of is that it reduces the pan temperature and possibly adds a bit of fluffiness due to the steam. Don't think that's a thing with French omelette, though, because you're stirring it continuously.
 

Online PlainNameTopic starter

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Re: Omelette
« Reply #14 on: September 10, 2023, 01:16:31 pm »
Quote
I might have a go at banana omelette.

Just tried it. Ripe banana (not mushy but certainly not hard) sliced and diced, fried in butter. Then the classic French omelette with the banana added as filling at the end. Salted butter used throughout, and it is... well worth another go :)
 

Offline simon75

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Re: Omelette
« Reply #15 on: October 12, 2023, 10:29:09 am »
I have childhood trauma over fried eggs. It took me probably 10 years after I moved out from my parents to start eating them again sometimes. Honestly, the only egg dish I can safely eat is scrambled eggs.
 

Online PlainNameTopic starter

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Re: Omelette
« Reply #16 on: October 12, 2023, 12:49:28 pm »
Those look nice :)

I'm not a fan of fried egg either, although I recall some very tasty fried egg sandwiches for breakfast in a previous life.
 

Online coppercone2

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Re: Omelette
« Reply #17 on: December 30, 2023, 03:33:35 am »
yes get sick from eggs and you wish you could run off solar power instead of food when your on the crapper
 

Online coppercone2

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Re: Omelette
« Reply #18 on: December 30, 2023, 11:13:42 pm »
tried a brie omlette (really fromager) with shitaki mushroom and some shallot.

no idea how to make a omlette (its fucking hard) but it was OK. I blended the eggs with heavy cream so they dont get rubbery even if you over cook it.

Had to scrape it off the pan at the end in a place and it ripped but it was alright at least I don't think it got rubbery. that cheese melts really nicely on omlettes it had me confused that the egg was still runny

i think its because i put the heat up high for the last second to get some color on it. maybe came out more like a cassarole lol


anyone think the pale omlette is kinda unappetizing? I want more like a tortila


because if there is soft brie in there you want that thing to have some texture because that cheese is goo


but in general man its better to just put scrambled eggs in a tortilla and crisp that up. if there is tortilla around I don't wanna settle for a omlette I guess you an put a omlette in a tortilla  :-// it reminds me of a breakfast burrito, that ran into the predator and got skinned.

« Last Edit: December 30, 2023, 11:31:45 pm by coppercone2 »
 

Online PlainNameTopic starter

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Re: Omelette
« Reply #19 on: December 31, 2023, 12:15:25 am »
Quote
no idea how to make a omlette (its fucking hard) but it was OK. I blended the eggs with heavy cream so they dont get rubbery even if you over cook it.

That was probably a bad move - you'd more likely end up with scrambled egg, and if you like colour in them it would be hard to achieve. Eggs (scrambled) cooked in cream are a thing, but omelette isn't.

The omlette is easy to do, but you really need a non-stick pan. If you're sure your pan is non-stick and the omelette is sticking, it's not been done long enough. Which would also be suggested by the pale look.

As you'll have seen above, my particular requirement was a French omelette, and those are meant to be not browned. But American omelettes are a bit different and easier. Start with your eggs (three are good, two if you're experimenting in a small pan) and blitz them. I have an electric cocktail stirrer I use - it's possible to do by hand with a fork or whisk, but 10krpm with a small beater is better. Salt and pepper to taste. Nothing else - no cream, milk, water (although, if you must, half a teaspoon is OK). If you're intending to throw in chillies, ham, or similar, don't - just get to making the omelette before screwing it up with additions :)

Next, blob of butter (lightly salted is good, but whatever your taste is) in the pan which should be hot enough to have the butter bubbling but not browning. At that point, pure in the eggs and give them a good stir. Leave to stand for 30 seconds so the base forms, then use a spatula (or fork) to drag in the sides so you build up cooked egg in the middle and runny egg takes its place around the sides. Once the new stuff is set, repeat until you have no more running egg. Almost done.

If you lift the edge of the omelette all the way around, the entire thing should move if you shake the pan. You can peak underneath to see if it's brown enough for you, and when done just flip one side over on top of the other. Slide onto place. Eat.

For cheese and stuff you want as a filling (as opposed to mixed in), plonk it in what will be the bottom half when the egg is set but it's not met your colour preference yet. If you want you can cover the half a bit early, then when the bottom is done flip it all over so the new bottom (which was the top) now gets finished. That will give the filling time to really melt.

Lots of video on Youtube for reference, but if one is saying to add milk, cream, water or anything except more eggs to the eggs, ignore it and move on.
 

Online coppercone2

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Re: Omelette
« Reply #20 on: December 31, 2023, 12:28:29 am »
but I still want to wrap it in a tortilla and grill it!

i think american have association between that shape and burrito wraps. I feel like my stomach is expecting the burrito wrap to be there and its missing.

Do the french eat it with a baguette?

I might be trying to make a more plain ommletee when I get more eggs

I know if you do it right you get that egg flavor that is not to cooked and its good. I also did not stir mine, probobly a problem... i see they tell you to stir it for a while now.
« Last Edit: December 31, 2023, 12:30:53 am by coppercone2 »
 

Online PlainNameTopic starter

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Re: Omelette
« Reply #21 on: December 31, 2023, 12:44:16 am »
Quote
Do the french eat it with a baguette?

Shouldn't think so. It's not really something you'd put in something else. I've attached an image from a random French menu which demonstrates the proper usage  :-+
 

Online coppercone2

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Re: Omelette
« Reply #22 on: December 31, 2023, 12:53:01 am »
well they got the potato or fry there that kinda makes it like a breakfast burito

Even with fillings I find it not really too satisfying. Maybe raw pepper with seasonings might be OK too to give it some crunch
 

Online PlainNameTopic starter

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Re: Omelette
« Reply #23 on: December 31, 2023, 09:52:42 am »
Yes, I find them not that filling, whereas my partner thinks they are just right.
 


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