Author Topic: Knife Sharpening  (Read 3554 times)

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Online bob91343

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Re: Knife Sharpening
« Reply #25 on: August 14, 2021, 12:04:39 am »
What is white polish?
 

Offline AntiProtonBoy

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Re: Knife Sharpening
« Reply #26 on: August 15, 2021, 08:57:10 am »
I believe it a waxy polishing substance used in metal working to buff metal surfaces to a nice sheen.
 

Offline tanveerriaz

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Re: Knife Sharpening
« Reply #27 on: August 15, 2021, 05:04:14 pm »
 
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Offline Vtile

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Re: Knife Sharpening
« Reply #28 on: August 23, 2021, 09:55:48 pm »
Freehand sharpening .. Isn't everyone doing it like that? Below 1500 grit I use any cheap flat stone. Then old mystery approx. 2000 grit oilstone (not arkansas stone) and leather strap to hone ... or 5000 grit japanese waterstone.

Most used in kitchen is however a regular plastic knife sharpener from grocery store, as for Aisi-416 or what ever decent ($€10 each) inox knifes are it is waste to go with stones..  >:D 
 

Offline WattsThat

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Re: Knife Sharpening
« Reply #29 on: August 24, 2021, 01:12:17 am »
This YouTuber does some great reviews, this one of several he has done on knife sharpeners.

 

Offline dunkemhigh

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Re: Knife Sharpening
« Reply #30 on: August 24, 2021, 11:13:13 am »
Now that's a Tube vid worth watching. Thanks for posting  :-+

A brief takeaway seems to be that some of the better sharpeners take much longer on a dull blade, and that might be why they get mixed reviews compared to the not-so-good ones that put a so-so edge on quickly.
 

Offline TimNJ

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Re: Knife Sharpening
« Reply #31 on: September 23, 2021, 04:39:23 pm »


To me, this seems like a nice way to get repeatable results, without requiring the finesse of using a honing rod or free-handing with a bench-stone. I don't know how it compares with the more typical kitchen tabletop sharpeners above.

Looks like a fun project atleast.
 

Offline antenna

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Re: Knife Sharpening
« Reply #32 on: September 23, 2021, 09:30:43 pm »
I made this one when my green Lansky stone snapped and I got tired of spending 2-3 hours on a knife. This one can do anything from little pocket knives and thin fillet knives to machetes and swords. I am too unsteady to freehand a constant angle so this really helps. Whatever stone I want, I just tape to the board. I spaced the guide holes so that if I go to one of those cheap thin diamond stones (I use junk coarse ones when the edge is rounded and there is a lot of metal to move), I just move down a hole and the angle remains constant. I tried velcro for the stones but it got weak. I plan to use dual-lock tape to hold the stones eventually.
 

Offline helius

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Re: Knife Sharpening
« Reply #33 on: September 28, 2021, 02:12:21 pm »
To me, this seems like a nice way to get repeatable results, without requiring the finesse of using a honing rod or free-handing with a bench-stone. I don't know how it compares with the more typical kitchen tabletop sharpeners above.
A honing rod somehow needs "finesse"?
Honing rods are incredibly simple to use and are applied daily to knives in professional kitchens. A home cook should use a hone once a week.
Sharpening is a different process from honing and is only required very rarely on quality knives (with steel hard enough to hold a good edge). Instead of bothering with stones, sharpening systems, and other toys, you can simply have your knives sharpened by a cutlery service once a year (if that) for very little cost.
The key fact to remember, if you remember anything, is that honing and stropping only correct bending of the blade edge. Sharpening is a metal removal process that puts the edge on the blade. A blade can only be sharpened a limited number of times because each sharpening procedure removes metal, but it can be honed or stropped forever.
 

Offline TimNJ

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Re: Knife Sharpening
« Reply #34 on: September 28, 2021, 03:38:22 pm »
To me, this seems like a nice way to get repeatable results, without requiring the finesse of using a honing rod or free-handing with a bench-stone. I don't know how it compares with the more typical kitchen tabletop sharpeners above.
A honing rod somehow needs "finesse"?
Honing rods are incredibly simple to use and are applied daily to knives in professional kitchens. A home cook should use a hone once a week.
Sharpening is a different process from honing and is only required very rarely on quality knives (with steel hard enough to hold a good edge). Instead of bothering with stones, sharpening systems, and other toys, you can simply have your knives sharpened by a cutlery service once a year (if that) for very little cost.
The key fact to remember, if you remember anything, is that honing and stropping only correct bending of the blade edge. Sharpening is a metal removal process that puts the edge on the blade. A blade can only be sharpened a limited number of times because each sharpening procedure removes metal, but it can be honed or stropped forever.

To some degree, yes I find the technique a little tricky based on the infrequency in which I do it. If you find honing a knife a simple procedure, then that's great.

In fact, I do have my knives sharpened at a local shop that's been in business for 75+ years. The cost is reasonable, but it's still something like $25-30/year for 5-6 knives. No real problem there, but a simple sharpening jig is probably <$50 with a good quality stone.

Thanks for the explanation of honing vs sharpening though.
« Last Edit: September 28, 2021, 03:44:39 pm by TimNJ »
 

Online BrokenYugo

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Re: Knife Sharpening
« Reply #35 on: September 29, 2021, 04:13:50 am »
I've probably honed a knife a thousand times and I'd certainly say it requires some degree of finesse and knowing what you're doing to not merely roll the edge over all one way. To do it in a few light swipes without checking anything before or after isn't realistic if the knife has been abused as most are in home kitchens.
 


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