Author Topic: AirBuddy  (Read 1905 times)

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Offline ondreji

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AirBuddy
« on: May 27, 2016, 08:14:08 am »
Friend of mine is running Kickstarter with his "invention": https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/divingeasier/airbuddy-the-ultimate-tankless-dive-system He improved traditional hookah system a lot: smaller and easier to transport (fits into carry-on luggage) and cheaper

Not that much electronic inside (charger + alarm) but definitely more feasible than "Triton, Worlds First Artificial Gills Re-breather" ;)
« Last Edit: May 27, 2016, 11:13:47 am by ondreji »
 

Offline m98

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Re: AirBuddy
« Reply #1 on: May 27, 2016, 09:55:12 am »
You've got a dot too much in that link.
 

Offline Kalidor

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Re: AirBuddy
« Reply #2 on: May 28, 2016, 02:58:46 pm »
Already exists, 80-90 feet possible with electric or gasoline engine.
http://www.browniesmarinegroup.com/third-lung-diving/
http://www.ebay.com/bhp/brownies-third-lung

Yours can do only 40 feet but is not even half the price
PADI open water still strongly recommended, 40 feet for more than 104 minutes...   :( after 140 x(   (if you do it wrong)

In questions of science, the authority of a thousand is not worth the humble reasoning of a single individual.
 

Offline kaz911

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Re: AirBuddy
« Reply #3 on: June 06, 2016, 08:04:00 am »
and as a diver since I was 16 (so about 30 years... and for about 10 years in the Middle East - 4-5 dives / month) - who owned a variety of dive gear incl a brownies - you do NOT want to dive with a curled hose. It screws up your buoyancy completely when you get to where the hose starts to resist.

 It is also a lot easier for the curled hose to get entangled in things underwater like propeller shafts etc. There are a couple of 12v powered devices for $150'ish with curled hoses and they are a PAIN to use. Fine for surface stuff and where there is no entanglement risk - but close to items that protrude - forget it... Hose is full of air so wants to float - usually (Murphy's law) and it WILL get entangled where there is just the slightest opportunity.

I looked at it and thought - those guys have never dived a lot "attached" ... and went away.
 


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