Electronics > DIPtrace

Considering the unthinkable

(1/8) > >>

NivagSwerdna:
I'm WFH so have some time to progress a project which has been on the back burner for a while.  The design has quite a lot of repeated components and this has just pushed me over the 500 pin boundary of my current Non-Profit licence.  I think ultimately it will be around 800 pins.

Now... I could pay to upgrade to the 1000 pin version... or I could use this as excuse to try KiCad!

(It's a bit annoying since I have quite a lot of the design in DipTrace already and I'm not sure it is easy to go DipTrace-> KiCad?)

What do you think?


jeremy:
I have tried to do this several times. My main pain point is that making footprints in kicad is a lot slower than in diptrace. However kicad has push and shove, which the diptrace guys have been “working on” for longer than I can remember. If you haven’t used it before, I suggest you try designing a board from scratch with new footprints in kicad to see how it works for you.

NivagSwerdna:
DipTrace gave me a trial 1000 pin licence for a few months which was very considerate of them.... but I'm going to try it anyway... just for one board in the first instance.

It's quite painful changing tools especially for routing... but I have some time... so the time is now.

JPortici:
This is what i thought when i had to make a big ass board that required at least the 2000 pin license..
A few months ago, it was probably the fifth time that i tried kicad.
Granted it has improven but god the user interface is still so incredibly retarded. Shut up and take my money

NivagSwerdna:
I am finding the manual routing very challenging (and getting a bit sad remaking patterns/footprints) but I am going to try and stick with it for at least this one board since otherwise I will be in a situation where I have a big board that I cannot amend without a forced upgrade.

Navigation

[0] Message Index

[#] Next page

There was an error while thanking
Thanking...
Go to full version