Author Topic: EVGA PSU pinout change  (Read 27306 times)

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Offline NiHaoMikeTopic starter

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EVGA PSU pinout change
« on: March 25, 2024, 12:41:24 pm »
https://www.tomshardware.com/pc-components/power-supplies/evga-power-supply-allegedly-blows-up-22tb-of-customer-storage-revised-model-from-rma-had-a-different-pin-layout-and-killed-all-sata-powered-devices
Quote
TLDR : EVGA decided to change their SATA power cable pin layout on the GQ power supply and you'd have no way of knowing without checking the pins with a multimeter. And they can, and do fry hard drives.
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Offline PlainName

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Re: EVGA PSU pinout change
« Reply #1 on: March 25, 2024, 12:47:21 pm »
Wow. That's particularly braindead to not just change the pin functions (which is bad enough in itself) but to then ship a unit requiring the new cables when they know full well it's replacing an old one where he still has those cables, and not then shipping the right ones with it (along with a WARNING note)... it's almost deliberate.
 

Offline Ranayna

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Re: EVGA PSU pinout change
« Reply #2 on: March 25, 2024, 12:57:57 pm »
Ooof. I have heard about different pinouts for different models in the same series of power supplies.
But changing it within the same model? That is bad.
 

Online BrokenYugo

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Re: EVGA PSU pinout change
« Reply #3 on: March 25, 2024, 01:15:37 pm »
Typical gamer pc stuff more concerned with appearance than function meets modern corporate cheapassery. Pretty impressive screw up* but I'm not surprised.

*They missed the opportunity to also change the connector slightly to force sales of a bunch more cable assemblies that don't break things. Major failure in the quest for more money.
 
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Offline amyk

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Re: EVGA PSU pinout change
« Reply #4 on: March 27, 2024, 01:51:58 am »
Never was a fan of PSUs with detachable cables anyway... except those with standard Molex connectors of the opposite gender, and the expected correct pinout.
 

Online AVGresponding

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Re: EVGA PSU pinout change
« Reply #5 on: March 27, 2024, 08:21:22 am »
Detachable cables for PC PSUs are a great idea, for reducing the clutter inside the box. I use one myself, though not an EVGA. Molex connectors are dogshit.
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Offline MrMobodies

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Re: EVGA PSU pinout change ATX psu ALL BLACK STUPIDITY!
« Reply #6 on: April 01, 2024, 02:58:15 am »
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EVGA power supply allegedly kills 22TB of customer storage — revised model from RMA had a different pin layout and killed all SATA-powered devices
 
By Aaron Klotz published 23 March 2024
The vendor changed the SATA pin layout on the EVGA GQ 1000W, which isn't compatible with previous power cables.

Reddit user u/sgircys on the DataHoarder subreddit reports that EVGA accidentally destroyed 22TB of storage in his work PC. After RMAing his EVGA power supply for coil whine issues, EVGA sent him a newly revised version of the same unit he bought featuring an upgraded pin layout. Unfortunately, EVGA forgot to send sgircys updated power supply cables to account for the changes. So when sgircys went to plug everything in, the power supply sent too much voltage to the wrong wires, frying all his storage devices.

The story starts with Sgircy contacting EVGA regarding a coil whine issue with his shiny new EVGA GQ 1000W Gold power supply. After contacting EVGA, he sent the unit (at his own expense) to EVGA to get the problem resolved. But in typical fashion, EVGA told the Reddit post to keep all his accessories and power supply cables as they wouldn't be returned if shipped. This is not an unusual practice for most power supply manufacturers. After getting the unit back, he plugged the unit back into his machine, only to find that the PC was not working. Worse, he heard a click indicating an OCP mechanism was being triggered. After troubleshooting, he found he could power on the system, but only after he unplugged all his SATA-powered devices.

When he contacted EVGA again, an EVGA rep informed him that “at some point, the pin layout of these power supplies was changed,” confirming why the power supply wasn’t working. The EVGA rep sent him a new batch of cables compatible with the newly rewired version of his power supply for him to use. However, this is where the story hits rock bottom. After plugging in the new cables, Sgircys discovered that all of his drives—22TB worth—were fried. The old cables he used previously fried all of his SATA-powered storage due to the improper voltages flowing through the incorrect wires.

Contacting EVGA again, the Reddit poster reported that EVGA did not want to replace his storage devices, saying the following: “I’ve never encountered a warranty that offers to cover loss of data or the costs related to the recovery of data and to the letter of our warranty terms, we technically don’t cover any loss or damages incurred by our products either.” EVGA also encouraged the Reddit poster to make a warranty claim from the drive manufacturer(s) themselves to get his storage drives replaced.



So they colour all of the wires black and change the pinout making it difficult to identify. When I saw this practice starting out some years ago I always thought that was a very stupid idea asking for trouble and avoided them like that. I always want to know the colours associated with the voltages so I can see what I am doing, easily identify, trace and measure the outputs if I suspect something isn't right.

If the colours were different between the modular wires that he had and a picture of the power supply with the correct leads that would have said something wasn't correct.

If they are going to start messing about with the colours and pinouts better not buy a modular on. Then at least you know that the connectors that are fixed will always be the same if it had to go back and no accidentally plugging the wrong connector in as manufacturers who do this can no longer be trusted to detail pinouts, colour code the cables and keep track of what they changed when handling RMA's for older models.
« Last Edit: April 01, 2024, 03:38:37 am by MrMobodies »
 

Offline PlainName

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Re: EVGA PSU pinout change
« Reply #7 on: April 01, 2024, 06:51:41 am »
Quote
If the colours were different between the modular wires that he had and a picture of the power supply with the correct leads that would have said something wasn't correct

It may have given a clue, but he could easily put it down as a change due to aesthetic fad. What should have been done is to change the connector so incompatible cables could not be connected regardless of colour.

It would be bad enough if it were a different model of PSU, but for them to do it with the same model is just gob-smacking.
 
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Offline MrMobodies

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Re: EVGA PSU pinout change
« Reply #8 on: April 01, 2024, 12:23:20 pm »
That has got to be the least they could do then the customer knows straight away when they find it doesn't fit rather than damage their kit.

I had in the past brought some off different manufacturers (when I couldn't find from the same manufacturer) with the same plug and fitting and changed the wires around and they worked without a problem.

One of them was for a second hand Enermax Revolution 87+ 850 Watt Power Supply and it had this 5 inline connector for the SATA connectors and found I needed some more but couldn't find that exact same one selling for Enermax so I found one from OCZ with the same connector and just needed to change the wires around.



« Last Edit: April 01, 2024, 01:31:14 pm by MrMobodies »
 

Offline MrMobodies

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Re: EVGA PSU pinout change
« Reply #9 on: April 01, 2024, 02:53:02 pm »
I just found this:
https://gadgetmates.com/are-modular-power-supply-cables-universal-interchangeable#:~:text=Stick With Your Brand/Model,looks like it would fit).
Quote
Are Modular Power Supply Cables Universal & Interchangeable?
By Eric Chan Posted on October 31, 2023 Updated on November 5, 2023

The answer is a resounding: NO! Modular cabling is NOT universal and the cables themselves are NOT interchangeable. In fact, the cables are very specific to the make/model/manufacturer of the particular modular power supply. You should also NEVER mix modular cabling – especially cables from different manufacturers. There can be tremendous consequences to this – anywhere from burning out components on your PC to creating a fire hazard.

Let’s look more into this.

3 Types of PSUs
There are three main types of PSUs: modular, non-modular, and semi-modular.

Modular PSUs allow you to detach and replace all of their cables. This flexibility means you can customize your setup, only using the cables you need, which can help reduce clutter inside your PC case.
Non-modular PSUs have all their cables permanently attached. You can’t remove or replace them, which can sometimes lead to excess cables inside your case. Semi-modular PSUs are a mix of the two. They have some permanently attached cables, usually the essential ones like the motherboard power, with the rest being detachable. Understanding Modular PSUs
Modular power supplies and their cables have revolutionized the world of PC building. :bullshit: These cables, unlike their non-modular counterparts, allow users to connect only what they need. This leads to cleaner and more efficient builds. With how popular cable management has gotten these days, this is a big deal. Additionally, with modular PSUs you choose your connections. This gives you optionality as far as the number of devices of a certain type you want to have power for. You’re no longer stuck with whatever pre-determined setup the manufacturer gives you.

Power supplies have undergone significant transformations from bulky units with non-detachable cables to the sleek, modular designs we see today. The journey has been marked by innovation and user-centric improvements. Modular PSUs in particular have gained popularity as people showcase the look inside their PC case. Getting better airflow is also a huge plus.


What are Modular Power Supply Cables?
Modular cables are the detachable cables that you plug into ports on your modular power supply to then let you plug in all of your devices, motherboard connections, GPU, etc.. With a fully modular power supply, you won’t see any cables coming off of it – that’s where the modular cabling comes in. This means that you can customize your power supply unit (PSU) based on the specific needs of your system. This flexibility has made them a favorite among tech enthusiasts and professionals alike.

Because a modular power supply allows you to detach and attach the cables as needed, this gives users flexibility over what they want to do. This differs from non-modular (or fixed) power supply designs that had all the cables fixed and connected coming from the factory with no customizability.

The main downside to having all of these cables loose and accessible is the fact that people lose them, misplace them, break them, or misplace them.

Are Modular Power Supply Cables Universal?
The burning question on everyone’s mind: are these cables truly universal? No, they are not. There is no universal standard for modular PSU output cables. While manufacturers will deliver the proper output voltages & current depending on your cable type to the end-point, how they get there is completely up to them. So, for example, if you have a modular cable that terminates to a SATA connector – you can comfortably plug that connector into a SATA device and expect the levels to be accurate. However, how the power supply goes from point A to point B in getting the proper power to that SATA connector will vary greatly between manufacturers and designs.

The Concept of Universality in Electronics Universality implies that a product can be used across various devices or setups without compatibility issues. In the realm of electronics, this is a gold standard that manufacturers strive for but is often challenging to achieve.
Factors Determining the Universality of Cables Several factors come into play, from the type of connectors used to the voltage and current specifications. While some cables might fit multiple PSUs, they might not necessarily be safe or efficient for use.
Benefits of Universal Modular Cables Imagine a world where one cable fits all! It would mean reduced electronic waste, cost savings, and a more straightforward user experience. Universal cables could be a game-changer for the industry.
Drawbacks of Non-Universal Cables On the flip side, non-universal cables can be a hassle. They lead to clutter, increased expenses (as you need different cables for different devices), and the ever-present risk of damaging your devices by using an incompatible cable.
Are Modular PSU Cables Interchageable?
In short, no. While it might be tempting to reuse cables from an old PSU, especially if they’re already neatly routed in your case, it’s not always safe. There’s no universal standard for modular PSU cables, which means that cables from one brand or model might not be compatible with another.

Different PSUs can have varying pinouts, even if the connectors look identical. Using the wrong cable can lead to short circuits, damaged components, or even fires.

While some connectors, like the 24-pin motherboard connector, SATA, 4-pin Power, etc. might seem universal, the other end that plugs into the PSU might not be. It’s always best to use the cables provided with your PSU.

Interchangeability Concerns
So we know the cables aren’t interchangeable – but why?

Different Pin Configurations: Each PSU brand or even model can have its own unique pin configuration. This means that while a cable might physically fit into a connector, the arrangement of the pins might be different. Using the wrong cable can result in sending the wrong voltage to components, which can damage or destroy them.
Voltage Polarity Concerns: Even if two cables from different PSUs fit perfectly, their voltage polarities might differ. This can be hazardous, as connecting a cable with the wrong voltage polarity can fry your components.
Socket Locks and Connector Sizes: PSU power cables have specific socket locks depending on the connector size. This further complicates the idea of using cables interchangeably.
The Importance of Compatibility in Power Supply Cables
It’s not just about fitting; it’s about fitting right. Using modular cables that aren’t designed for your particular PSU can can cause parts to burn out or even worse – your components may catch on fire. Different manufacturers will use different pinouts and adhere to different layouts for their cabling. There is no standard for modular cabling on PSUs so you can’t use them freely.

Risks of Using Incompatible Cables Using the wrong cable can lead to a myriad of problems, from short circuits and reduced efficiency to potential fire hazards. It’s a risk that’s simply not worth taking.
How to Ensure Cable Compatibility Always check the specifications, consult the manufacturer’s guidelines, and when in doubt, seek expert advice. It’s better to be safe than sorry.
Different Types of Power Supply Cables Not all cables are created equal.

Standardized vs. Proprietary Cables While standardized cables follow universal norms, proprietary ones :bullshit: are unique to specific brands or devices. Knowing the difference can save you a lot of trouble.
The Role of Cable Connectors Connectors play a pivotal role in determining compatibility. From pin arrangements to the shape and size of connectors, these little components hold the key to the universality puzzle.
Practical Insights: Personal Experiences with Modular Cables Real stories from the trenches.

When Universal Cables Saved the Day I recall a time when I was setting up a complex rig for a client. Thanks to universal cables, the setup was a breeze, and the client was over the moon with the clean and efficient result.
The Nightmare of a Mismatched Cable A friend once used a non-compatible cable, thinking it would work. The result? A fried motherboard and a hefty repair bill.
How to Choose the Right Modular Power Supply Cable
Your guide to making informed decisions.

Reading Cable Specifications Always pay attention to the fine print. Voltage, current, and connector type are just a few of the critical specifications to consider.
Trusted Brands in the Market Brands like Corsair, EVGA, and Cooler Master have earned their reputation for a reason. Stick to trusted names to ensure quality and compatibility.
Stick With Your Brand/Model Never EVER mix brands on modular cables. And if you aren’t sure, don’t mix cables across models in those brands as well. If you have an EVGA Supernova PSU, you would never use the cabling on a Corsair RM series (even if the plug looks like it would fit).
The Future of Modular Power Supply Cables
Innovations on the Horizon With advancements in technology, we can expect even more user-friendly and universal cable designs in the future.
The Push for Universal Standards As the demand for universality grows, there’s a strong push for establishing universal standards in the industry.
Manufacturer Guidelines
Some manufacturers provide guidance on cable compatibility. For instance, EVGA has a support page detailing which of their PSUs have interchangeable cables. Corsair offers a compatibility table, and Be quiet! provides a product-specific approach. However, these guidelines are typically limited to products within the same brand. Mixing cables from different brands, even if they seem compatible, is not recommended.

Real-World Consequences
Many users have shared their unfortunate experiences online. One user recounted how they used old modular cables with a new PSU, thinking they were universal. The result was catastrophic, damaging multiple components, including fans, an AIO cooler, and hard drives. This isn’t even close to the worst thing that can happen to you. Because you’re dealing with electricity, the risk of fire with improper setups is very high. You can burn down your entire home with just this one mistake. That’s why we always say – don’t risk it with modular PSUs.

Conclusion
While modular PSUs offer a lot of conveniences, their cables are not universal. Interchanging cables without ensuring compatibility can lead to severe damage to your PC components. Always use the cables provided with your PSU, and if you need replacements, ensure they are compatible with your specific PSU model. When in doubt, consult the manufacturer’s guidelines or seek advice from knowledgeable sources. Can you use cables from another brand? No. Are the cables universal and interchangeable? No. Can I use cables from the same manufacturer that are intended for a different model? Maybe but check with the manufacturer’s website first.

While the dream of entirely universal modular power supply cables is yet to be realized, understanding the nuances of these cables can save users from potential pitfalls. Always prioritize compatibility and safety over convenience (or sometimes laziness).

Again, if you lose a cable or need a replacement, contact the manufacturer or buy a certified replacement. It’s not worth risking your components or safety to save a few minutes of cable management or a few dollars on a certified replacement cable. The risk of something catastrophic occurring is too great.

FAQs
Are all modular power supply cables interchangeable? No, not all cables are interchangeable. Always check compatibility before using a cable.
Can I use cables from one PSU brand with another brand’s PSU? It’s not advisable unless explicitly stated by the manufacturers.
What happens if I use an incompatible cable? Using incompatible cables can damage your devices and pose safety risks.
Are there adapters available for non-universal cables? Yes, adapters are available, but it’s essential to ensure they match the required specifications.
How can I identify a universal modular cable? Universal cables typically have standardized connectors and are labeled as “universal” by the manufacturer.
Why aren’t all cables made universal? Proprietary :bullshit: designs and brand-specific requirements are among the reasons.
Are all 24-pin motherboard connectors the same? – While the connector might be standard, the pinout on the PSU side might differ.
What’s the difference between gold and bronze PSUs? – It refers to their energy efficiency, not cable compatibility.
Can using the wrong cable damage my PC? – Yes, it can lead to short circuits, damaged components, or fires.
Why aren’t PSU cables standardized? – Different brands have different designs and specifications, leading to varying pinouts.
Can I buy replacement cables? – Yes, but ensure they are certified for your PSU model.
Is it safe to use third-party cable extensions? – Extensions are generally safe, but always buy from reputable brands.
Do all PSUs come with the same number of cables? – No, it varies based on the model and its capacity.
Are non-modular PSUs safer? – Not necessarily. The safety depends on the PSU’s quality, not its modularity.
Can I customize my PSU cables? – Yes, but always ensure you’re using the correct pinout and high-quality materials. This is usually something that should only be done by an advanced builder or experienced electrician who can assess the fire hazards / risks with modifying electrical cabling.

Can I use cables from a different PSU brand with my modular PSU? – No, it’s risky and can damage your components. Always use cables designed for your specific PSU model.

Are there any tools to check cable compatibility? – Some users utilize digital multimeters to check voltage polarities and pin configurations. However, for most users, it’s safer to rely on manufacturer guidelines.
I’ve mixed cables before and had no issues. Why? – It’s possible that the cables you mixed had the same pin configuration and voltage polarity. However, this was a risky move, and you were fortunate. It’s not advisable to rely on luck when it comes to PSU cables.

Reading this and I thinking I need a sanity check. It is a frigging cable with a standard pin and connector. Colour codes to help identify what voltage it is for (until they made them black) and thickness or size of cable to take in consideration for things with high power draw like GPU's.

Quote
anywhere from burning out components on your PC to creating a fire hazard.... It’s not advisable to rely on luck when it comes to PSU cables. Different PSUs can have varying pinouts, even if the connectors look identical.... Using the wrong cable can lead to short circuits, damaged components, or even fires...
That's because they made them like that, all black or to one colour to make it difficult to identify.
I see high end/high wattage OEM ATX power supplies still using colours so I might consider those and even though they may not be braided at least I have the benefit of identifying what colour cable is for.

I can't tell if this is out of stupidity, requests from consumers (below) or deliberately done which also sounds to me like the case with the way that author was writing about it. I see the majority are all like that with all black cables.

https://forums.tomshardware.com/threads/power-supplies-with-black-cables.2297442/
Quote
w84u2cy May 27, 2015
Hi, I'm looking for a cheap ($50-90) psu that uses black cables instead of the ugly coloured ones.
Do you know any good options?
Thanks

Those ugly coloured ones are coloured for a reason did it not occur to them.


I also noticed they make them flat all the way instead of putting a braid around them. What if they get caught and pinched as on the door or metal in the case as opposed to a loose lot in a braid.

Quote
Why aren’t PSU cables standardized?[– Different brands have different designs and specifications, leading to varying pinouts.

I didn't think the manufacturers would care whether the pin out was standardized or not and this is when they colour coded the cables as any cable that may fit may show a different colour arrangement and if the fitter happened to be paying attention, noticed it and they'd have that benefit to investigate further instead of blindy or no possibility to see where they'd have to think about getting a volt meter out. I am surprised when they cared to colour the cables to one colour and not bother to make their own "proprietary" connector to go with it so it don't fit on others as PlainName pointed out.
« Last Edit: April 01, 2024, 03:03:56 pm by MrMobodies »
 

Offline MrMobodies

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Re: EVGA PSU pinout change
« Reply #10 on: April 10, 2024, 03:21:43 am »

HW News - EVGA Responds, Apple Sued by US, ASUS ROG Ally Price Drop, RTX 50 Rumors
Gamers Nexus 2.17M subscribers 355,183 views  27 Mar 2024

Quote
6:04 in this instance uh it was not escalated EVGA said that it's in contact with the customer and it expects quote an amicable resolution to take care of his case uh Senior Management told us that it has reviewed the points

6:15 at which the policy fell apart internally for this and that it was uh reviewing those with customer service teams to make sure it doesn't happen again we also sent an email to the viewer the viewer said this quote thank you very much for getting a hold of EVGA about this I did actually hear from a product manager there yesterday and he seemed genuinely apologetic and wanted to make the situation right I forwarded him receipts showing the replacement cost of the two drives and his latest response yesterday afternoon was thank you for providing the extra information

6:45 please allow me a little more time to work on this case and follow up with you the viewer is restoring those backups
will be as soon as they have new drives and uh is still finalizing the details

7:15 ... I just got word back from the viewer and the viewer says that EVGA has resolved the issue to their satisfaction replace the drives they worked everything out now for some quick commentary so a few things here first of

7:27 all just with this specific issue this is clearly extremely negligent on part of the company it's great to have policy it's very important if if we take that comment at face value that basically they're  policies but due to a process error they weren't followed which to me sounds like maybe a uh I don't know they've had a lot of turnover they've lost most of their staff anyone who's still there not really sure how overwork they are how experienced they are uh it's a skeleton crew and so whatever the case may be it's sounds like if we believe there was

8:01 a policy it just wasn't followed and the best way to solve that is to not need the policy and if you have something like the the pinout changes and you're aware of it to me at least the sort of most uh anxiety reducing solution to this problem would be to say okay the policy is if a customer has this power supply any serial range any year of production you replace the whole thing the cables you tell them they have to replace the cables it really seems like the best solution would be you know sorry for the inconvenience we need you to replace all of it unfortunately again

Looks like they explained the issue and compensated the customer.
« Last Edit: April 12, 2024, 01:47:19 pm by MrMobodies »
 

Offline PlainName

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Re: EVGA PSU pinout change
« Reply #11 on: April 10, 2024, 07:36:03 am »
Looks to me like they noticed the shit hitting the fan and got out some wet wipes.
 

Offline Ranayna

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Re: EVGA PSU pinout change
« Reply #12 on: April 10, 2024, 11:57:53 am »
Yes, at least they did the minimum required to reimburse the customer.
And i hope they have had a *very* stern talk to their OEM.

All the color coding of cables and keying of connectors will not help if someone down the line changes the design without notification.
 

Offline PlainName

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Re: EVGA PSU pinout change
« Reply #13 on: April 10, 2024, 12:53:36 pm »
Quote
at least they did the minimum required to reimburse the customer

Thinking about it, that's probably the legal minimum - I am sure they could be sued for damages in this kind of case, so they are lucky the customer complained to the media rather than going down that route first.
 

Offline MrMobodies

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Re: EVGA PSU pinout change
« Reply #14 on: April 12, 2024, 01:53:52 pm »
All the color coding of cables and keying of connectors will not help if someone down the line changes the design without notification.

I see so they changed the pinouts in a way where they didn't take enough care and wouldn't have checked to assign the correct pin outs if they were colour coded. The staff working there at the time might not have known about this change and could have sent that power supply with an older set of colour coded cables if the customer happened to notice no change and nothing would look amiss.

Louise Rossman said something about that it would be unreasonable to expect their customers to check their stuff using a volt meter.
« Last Edit: April 12, 2024, 02:20:11 pm by MrMobodies »
 

Offline Ranayna

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Re: EVGA PSU pinout change
« Reply #15 on: April 15, 2024, 09:34:58 am »
All the color coding of cables and keying of connectors will not help if someone down the line changes the design without notification.

I see so they changed the pinouts in a way where they didn't take enough care and wouldn't have checked to assign the correct pin outs if they were colour coded. The staff working there at the time might not have known about this change and could have sent that power supply with an older set of colour coded cables if the customer happened to notice no change and nothing would look amiss.

Louise Rossman said something about that it would be unreasonable to expect their customers to check their stuff using a volt meter.
EVGA didn't even send a new set of cables.
In the standard RMA process, the customer does not send the cables back. Saves on shipping cost, and the cables are almost never an issue, unless connectors melted or something.
So without new cables, with the explicit instruction by the manufacturer to keep the existing cables, would anyone check voltages?

That is why this issue was obviously EVGAs fault.
 
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