Author Topic: 5G streetlight teardown  (Read 985 times)

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Offline htm

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5G streetlight teardown
« on: August 26, 2021, 09:44:49 am »
This guy shows circuitry in a 5G street lamp.
He goes on to say the power being delivered to the 5G unit is ridiculously high.
Can someone do some discernment for me.

https://odysee.com/5G-LED-STREET-LIGHT-TECH-BREAK-DOWN-gyAi8HXgFR8:2
 

Offline Andy Watson

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Re: 5G streetlight teardown
« Reply #1 on: August 26, 2021, 10:04:27 am »
Can't see the odysee content :(

Who is "this guy" ? If it's Mark Steel it is certainly not worth wasting any time watching it.
 

Offline Haenk

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Re: 5G streetlight teardown
« Reply #2 on: August 26, 2021, 10:56:58 am »
That's just an industrial grade powersupply, those tend to be larger than a wall wart. It likely *can* deliver more power than needed for the remote control board, but the demand is set by the board.
Simple explanation: While your home mains can deliver e.g. 3000W to a plugged in device, your phone charger plugged into it will only use 20W.
Btw. the mobile device (the control board) adjusts the transmission power to a minimum level required to keep the connection stable, as does your mobile phone. The energy output (sender) is also very strictly limited (legally) and is certified to act within those power limits. Otherwise hefty fines will have to be paid for using an illegal device. Very unlikely, as that could be easily discovered.
 

Offline Kean

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Re: 5G streetlight teardown
« Reply #3 on: August 26, 2021, 12:36:02 pm »
Yes, it is Mark Steele - although it is an anonymous repost of one of his videos

Here is a response video which I think relates to the same teardown (I'm not watching them again to confirm)


He is an absolute nutter, and spouts constant BS.  Best to ignore him.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mark_Steele_(conspiracy_theorist)
 
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Offline Gyro

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Re: 5G streetlight teardown
« Reply #4 on: August 26, 2021, 01:06:37 pm »
A previous thread on the subject...

https://www.eevblog.com/forum/chat/lunatic-claims-5g-streetlighting-uses-nazi-weapon-technologies/

Thankfully those particular videos have been taken down, but the comments are still relevant.
Regards, Chris

"Victor Meldrew, the Crimson Avenger!"
 

Offline htm

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Re: 5G streetlight teardown
« Reply #5 on: August 26, 2021, 01:44:11 pm »
Many thanks y'all
 

Online SiliconWizard

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Re: 5G streetlight teardown
« Reply #6 on: August 26, 2021, 06:14:35 pm »
Yeah this "teardown" is not recent either. I think it has been discussed before on this forum.
It's obvious the guy doesn't understand basic electricity.

Now whether the power supply inside the lamp for the 5G unit is really oversized remains to be checked. But if it is, it may just be for cost reasons: might just have been cheaper than a lower power one, especially if the company uses it in many different products. Just a numbers problem.

If that's the case, one could still make the point that a largely oversized power supply is likely not to be as efficient as a properly sized one for a given power draw. If you use say a 100W mains power supply for powering a 1W circuit, its efficiency is not going to be spectacularly high, which in itself would be a bad engineering decision. Just an additional thought: whereas the guy says BS, his teardown may still show an engineering issue related to power efficiency.

 

Offline Haenk

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Re: 5G streetlight teardown
« Reply #7 on: August 27, 2021, 08:45:11 am »
engineering issue related to power efficiency.

I don't think an extra Watt of loss does matter in the context - those lamps need to be constructed to the lowest requirement of service possible, so they most likely use a PSU designed for 10-20 years MTBF, running at a low percentage of load to increase lifetime even more. If you are using 100W or 105W does not make a huge difference in operating costs; however a PSU replacement every two years would do (labor-wise and maybe in very inconvenient places).
 


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