Products > Dodgy Technology

Dyson V15 Vacuum Cleaner

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cemelec:
I have a lot of respect for James Dyson, but one of his latest creations, the V15 Vacuum Cleaner, is pushing my credibility a bit far.

It claims to use a "Laser Technology" to detect, size and count dust particles, and display them on a mini histogram on a display mounted on the cleaner.



I'm into anything high tech, but this seems a bit of a stretch even for me.  Like most people, I like clean floors and carpets, but is this for suckers with more money than sense?

Raj:

--- Quote from: cemelec on July 22, 2021, 04:46:42 pm ---I have a lot of respect for James Dyson, but one of his latest creations, the V15 Vacuum Cleaner, is pushing my credibility a bit far.

It claims to use a "Laser Technology" to detect, size and count dust particles, and display them on a mini histogram on a display mounted on the cleaner.



I'm into anything high tech, but this seems a bit of a stretch even for me.  Like most people, I like clean floors and carpets, but is this for suckers with more money than sense?

--- End quote ---
It's true that it isn't high tech, but it's possible...
Your take is wrong too.
What it is, a laser moving from left to right (or the opposite direction) at high speed. Maybe achieved using rotating mirror or galvo, similar to how bar code readers used to project a line by using a point laser. Or maybe even a simple fixed lens to have a simple flat line projection

Why laser? cause it's a point source of light, the smaller the light source, the clearer the shadows. you can probably make the projector yourself.
OFC your floor needs to be reasonably flat for it to work :-DD
But I bet the computer will fail in 5 years, and they'll blame it on something like eeprom with too many writes or failing lcd glue or the acoustic sensor getting sucked along with stuff or something, and you won't be able to fix it, cause they don't provide spares anymore.

Gyro:
Why would anyone deliberately design something with bearings running at 125k rpm?  ::)

SiliconWizard:
Particle sensors are nothing new and used in many applications including estimating air quality.
Now claiming to be able to distinguish particle size in any relevant way sounds a bit too much. It's likely close to bullshit. Or maybe it can roughly distinguish between two ranges of particle size, I'd doubt something more subtle than this. A histogram? Yeah right. ;D

But giving you a particle count per unit of volume, sure. Now people sensitive/allergic to dust had better invest in a proper air quality sensor rather than wait for their vacuum cleaner to tell them. Just a thought.

Cyberdragon:
What is the point? Why do we need to care how dirty the floor is before we clean it? A vacuum cleaner is meant to clean the surface, IDC how dirty it was before the machine should do it's job and get it clean. What is it going to do, tell you that it isn't clean yet? Well that's the machine's fault, if it's meant to gauge cleaning performance, there are far easier ways like airflow sensors which are not rare on vacuums these days. As long as it's operating correctly, and you know how to use a vacuum cleaner, there is no reason to scan the surface.

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