Author Topic: electronic door lock design flaw  (Read 4838 times)

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Offline strawberryTopic starter

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electronic door lock design flaw
« on: February 15, 2023, 09:37:45 pm »
 
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Online tszaboo

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Re: electronic door lock design flaw
« Reply #1 on: February 15, 2023, 10:27:22 pm »
Oh this channel is a guilty pleasure of mine. I find it hilarious when he opens up a lock in 2 seconds with a twig or a lego astronaut.
But yeah, from what I've seen all these smart locks have very basic backup keys that can be opened by anyone with the right tool.
 
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Offline pcprogrammer

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Re: electronic door lock design flaw
« Reply #2 on: February 16, 2023, 07:00:46 am »
It is indeed fun to see how he opens all sorts of locks with not to much effort, but this one is to easy. You might just as well leave your door open and have a sign inviting burglars to come in and have their pick  :-DD

Offline JohanH

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Re: electronic door lock design flaw
« Reply #3 on: February 16, 2023, 07:34:44 am »
I don't understand. If you are in the business and go to the length of designing a new lock, why not even get the most basic things right.
 

Offline Haenk

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Re: electronic door lock design flaw
« Reply #4 on: February 16, 2023, 08:24:23 am »
Honestly, I consider all door locks to be novelty items.
It might stop Joe Random from entering your home, but it will not stop any burglar - they will not even try to open the lock. The good old prybar or a screwdriver will do the job most of the time. A tilted window (european style) can be considered "wide open" in 2 seconds (requires some acrobatic skills though). Electric saws are also used at times, especially on larger objects like supermarkets.

My front door is reinforced, drill safe lock and cover plate, the whole door is locking itself into the frame at 20 points or so. Sounds great, but is pointless, since all the other doors around the house probably just require one kick to be opened. Fortunately, theft and intrusion are really rare here, so it's not even a risk to leave your car or bike unlocked.
 

Offline JohanH

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Re: electronic door lock design flaw
« Reply #5 on: February 16, 2023, 08:35:46 am »
Same thing over here, theft is very rare. We have the most basic locks and the door is mostly kept unlocked.
 

Offline strawberryTopic starter

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Re: electronic door lock design flaw
« Reply #6 on: February 16, 2023, 04:15:55 pm »
in Japan they say you can leave your wallet and in worst case it will appear in lost items storage.

when money is first and only objective. no thought put in designing it. companies learn from china on how to design things or it is designed in china
 

Online Tens

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Re: electronic door lock design flaw
« Reply #7 on: February 17, 2023, 12:10:34 am »
We live on a Scottish Island where nobody locks doors or cars. When we were having the house built we looked around for good quality external doors. Because the house is in an exposed position we get battered by rain and strong winds. In 2 or 3 hours the forecast is close to 60 mph gusts. And the house is 70 metres from the sea.
Everyone we spoke to tried to sell us their doors by extolling their security - so many interlocking bolts, 3 mm thick plating, etc etc. They seemed confused when we said we wouldn't even be locking them, but please tell us how wind and water tight they are. Actually, not that good in the most extreme of weather, but we have tiled floors throughout which mop up just fine :)
 
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Offline HobGoblyn

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Re: electronic door lock design flaw
« Reply #8 on: February 17, 2023, 10:46:44 pm »

My front door is reinforced, drill safe lock and cover plate, the whole door is locking itself into the frame at 20 points or so. Sounds great, but is pointless, since all the other doors around the house probably just require one kick to be opened. Fortunately, theft and intrusion are really rare here, so it's not even a risk to leave your car or bike unlocked.

My concern if all my windows or doors were as secure as your front one, what if there’s an emergency, say a fire and I’m passed out and fire brigade can’t easily break the door down.

 
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Offline IanB

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Re: electronic door lock design flaw
« Reply #9 on: February 17, 2023, 11:06:28 pm »
My concern if all my windows or doors were as secure as your front one, what if there’s an emergency, say a fire and I’m passed out and fire brigade can’t easily break the door down.

With American houses the walls are often so thin that you can just saw a hole in the wall and bypass the door altogether  :-\
 

Offline MrMobodies

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Re: electronic door lock design flaw
« Reply #10 on: February 18, 2023, 06:49:23 am »
I wonder how that will stand up in court:

He/she gained unauthorized entry using a magnetic.
 

Online PlainName

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Re: electronic door lock design flaw
« Reply #11 on: February 18, 2023, 11:46:30 am »
It's unauthorized. That's enough - the means isn't important.
 
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Offline AVGresponding

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Re: electronic door lock design flaw
« Reply #12 on: February 18, 2023, 12:08:35 pm »
It's only important for insurance purposes.

Insurer: You secured your house with locks that can be opened with a cheap magnet from ebay? Sorry, we don't pay claims in this circumstance.
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Offline TomS_

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Re: electronic door lock design flaw
« Reply #13 on: April 02, 2023, 07:29:14 am »
Locks keep honest people honest. That's about all there is to the story.
 

Offline RJSV

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Re: electronic door lock design flaw
« Reply #14 on: April 02, 2023, 06:37:59 pm »
   In SF Bay area the homeless, mentally ill, I have encountered;  Some equipped with steel toe boots, the boots were used to 'kick' damage an older door.  (Perpetrator apparently kicks right at the lower hinge area, for best damage.). But that's more like a vandalism / rage type of crime.
The 'real', motivated burgaler is likely going to, as stated by Haenk, above, likely carries a crow-bar, for all out attack on door and frame.  Frame then is even better target, than a 'hardened' door.

   For cover, these persons very often have a 'network', able to confront any attempts to pursue actions (identifying / arresting purps).  Very dangerous, as those folks don't feel fear, there.
« Last Edit: April 02, 2023, 06:39:54 pm by RJHayward »
 

Offline Halcyon

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Re: electronic door lock design flaw
« Reply #15 on: April 05, 2023, 03:55:59 am »
It's unauthorized. That's enough - the means isn't important.

Correct. Any decent insurer won't be bothered by the quality of the lock. As long as the dwelling is "capable of being locked up" and you took reasonable care to protect your home and contents against loss or damage. Even personal contents that are located "within the open air" of your property are generally covered, even if they weren't secured.

Of course each insurer/policy is different and some limits do apply. Take the time to actually read the policy you purchased.
 

Offline 5U4GB

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Re: electronic door lock design flaw
« Reply #16 on: May 02, 2023, 01:57:29 pm »
LockPickingLawyer video

In defence of any locks LPL goes after, any lock that can hold him up for more than about a minute will be almost impregnable to a normal human.  In one video he picks a BiLock in something like four minutes, which I thought would be an impossible feat.

 

Online TimFox

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Re: electronic door lock design flaw
« Reply #17 on: May 02, 2023, 04:12:14 pm »

My front door is reinforced, drill safe lock and cover plate, the whole door is locking itself into the frame at 20 points or so. Sounds great, but is pointless, since all the other doors around the house probably just require one kick to be opened. Fortunately, theft and intrusion are really rare here, so it's not even a risk to leave your car or bike unlocked.

My concern if all my windows or doors were as secure as your front one, what if there’s an emergency, say a fire and I’m passed out and fire brigade can’t easily break the door down.

A few years ago, my elderly neighbor passed out on the floor behind his locked door, and neither I nor his other neighbor had a key.
I called 911 when I saw him through the window.
The Chicago Fire Department ambulance crew arrived promptly, and they had a good tool that opened his door without doing permanent damage.
 

Offline 5U4GB

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Re: electronic door lock design flaw
« Reply #18 on: May 03, 2023, 10:35:37 am »
My concern if all my windows or doors were as secure as your front one, what if there’s an emergency, say a fire and I’m passed out and fire brigade can’t easily break the door down.

It's not even that, if they're inside the house with smoke filling the corridors and impeding movement and the ability to breathe there's almost no way they'll be able to get out, and by the time the fire brigade arrives it could be too late.  We have an elderly neighbour whose house is a fortress, locking screens on all the windows, multiple locks on the doors, locks on internal doors, you'd think she was living in Johannesburg or something.  Just trying to get through there while looking after the house for her, with all the necessary keys at hand, can take several minutes.  If there's ever a fire there's pretty much no way she'll get out of there... we haven't been able to convince her that the ability to get out in an emergency vastly outweighs any danger in the essentially zero-crime area she lives in.
 


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