Author Topic: Ever heard of PERL?  (Read 855 times)

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Offline Ben321

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Ever heard of PERL?
« on: February 27, 2020, 12:57:59 am »
This stands for Photon Emission Resonant Light. It appears to be a quack medical device. The official webpage is at https://www.resonantlight.com/perl-mplus/
Apparently it's supposed to be able to cure almost every health issue a person might have. And it's VERY expensive, almost $6500 for the cheapest version of the device. The online store page for this device is at https://www.resonantlight.com/shop/

They also have a PDF document with more info than the website has. The PDF document is at https://gallery.mailchimp.com/2d3eb4e0094a6612b9f392e75/files/170da85c-8ccc-4075-9526-4f182c0b8a1f/RLTi_eBook_2019_11.pdf
« Last Edit: February 27, 2020, 01:00:44 am by Ben321 »
 

Online greenpossum

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Re: Ever heard of PERL?
« Reply #1 on: February 27, 2020, 02:12:53 am »
Hahaha, give me the programming language Perl over this any day. And Perl is free too.
 

Online Haenk

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Re: Ever heard of PERL?
« Reply #2 on: February 29, 2020, 01:37:13 pm »
"every unit is calibrated for over a 100 Hours"

Come on, this *has* to be good.

Probably calibrated to NF 1,0000000000000. (NF = nonsense factor)
 

Offline Domagoj T

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Re: Ever heard of PERL?
« Reply #3 on: February 29, 2020, 03:07:24 pm »
https://www.resonantlight.com/frequency-101/james-bare/
Quote
I am a Doctor of Chiropractic
That's the first sentence and that's where I stopped reading.
 

Offline DBecker

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Re: Ever heard of PERL?
« Reply #4 on: February 29, 2020, 03:26:36 pm »
https://www.resonantlight.com/frequency-101/james-bare/
Quote
I am a Doctor of Chiropractic
That's the first sentence and that's where I stopped reading.

I think that you are missing out on a key concept most of use every day: Frequency.

From the link
 - Dr. Bare is the father of modern frequency technology

I've never heard of him (perhaps was he the main character in the childhood story 'The Emperor's New Clothes'?), despite him being a self-proclaimed "living legend".  Is that because I usually work in the Time Domain rather than the Frequency Domain?

He does seem to mix the use of the word 'discovery'.  He 'discovered' Morse code, and then goes on describe his other work as discoveries.

His machine works at 27.125 MHz which is conveniently on CB channel 14, the frequency that your childhood walky-talky was on.  I'll gently suggest that you can get the same effect from a yardsale walky-talky held next to a plasma globe.
 

Offline SiliconWizard

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Re: Ever heard of PERL?
« Reply #5 on: February 29, 2020, 06:19:11 pm »
Hahaha, give me the programming language Perl over this any day. And Perl is free too.

Hmm, not sure which of PERL or Perl would be worse to use actually. But yeah, at least Perl is free. :-DD
 

Offline fcb

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Re: Ever heard of PERL?
« Reply #6 on: February 29, 2020, 07:30:39 pm »
There is so much to dislike about this - including gems like "the PERL M+ is so well designed that it is not subject to the Inverse Square Law (ISL)"

And as thunderf00t hasn't (yet..) debunked it I googled 'rife machines'. Our biggest UK cancer charity had a surprising amount to say:
https://www.cancerresearchuk.org/about-cancer/cancer-in-general/treatment/complementary-alternative-therapies/individual-therapies/rife-machine-and-cancer
"One study was on a small number of people with advanced cancer. They had a type of liver cancer called hepatocellular carcinoma. Researchers found that the low frequency waves affected cancer cells. It did not affect normal cells. But this research is still at an experimental stage, and it’s not clear exactly how it could work. And importantly the electromagnetic frequencies used in this research were not the same as those of Rife machines.

Despite the evidence that low energy waves might kill cancer cells, we need more research. Only then can doctors use low energy waves to cure cancer.
"
This peaked my interest, which led to finding this:
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3845545/

So there maybe some legs on this.  I was puzzled by the 'exact' nature of the frequencies researchers found:
"For example, 85% of the frequencies identified in patients with HCC were only found in other patients with HCC. Similarly, 75% of the frequencies identified in patients with breast cancer were only found in patients with the same tumor type[20]. They also discovered that a small number of frequencies, e.g., 1,873.477 Hz, 2,221.323 Hz, 6,350.333 Hz, and 10,456.383 Hz, were found in the majority of patients with breast cancer, HCC, prostate cancer, and pancreatic cancer[20]. Examination of healthy individuals without a diagnosis of cancer did not reveal any biofeedback responses to the frequencies identified in patients with a diagnosis of cancer."

These appear to be mostly bin centre frequencies from an FFT (48KHz sample rate and 1048576 [2^20] points). Would be interesting to see what the actual deviation between frequencies actually was between patients and what the proposed mechanism that generates these spurious biofeedback signals is.
Who knows, perhaps a replacing crystal oscillators and ceramic resonators with cancerous tumour cell oscillators (CTCO's) is a byproduct of this research.

Sadly and possibly a little ironically Don Tunney died of cancer apparently as a result of sitting in an RV whilst it was scanned by an industrial X-ray.
http://www.dissident-net.info/don-tunney/
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Offline chickenHeadKnob

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Re: Ever heard of PERL?
« Reply #7 on: February 29, 2020, 09:53:08 pm »
"This is the last frequency generator you will ever need"

OK, that sounds somewhat ominous,   in a set a man on fire and he will stay warm the rest of his life kind of way.
Besides  I thought my awesome FeelElec 6900 was the last generator I would ever need. Dids FeelElec lied?
 

Offline TomS_

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Re: Ever heard of PERL?
« Reply #8 on: March 03, 2020, 04:32:15 am »
a small number of frequencies, e.g., 1,873.477 Hz, 2,221.323 Hz

Wait. I cant quite figure out if that is suggesting that patients reacted to those frequencies (as in it cured their cancer) or if those with cancers are somehow emitting those frequencies?

Those two frequenceis are reasonably similar to some used in mobile/cellular networks (they were quite common in 3G networks, and 1.8GHz in some 2G). So is that just trying to point more blame at mobile/cellular networks? Otherwise, having more of them around could be a good thing for these people.  :-DD
 

Offline fcb

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Re: Ever heard of PERL?
« Reply #9 on: March 03, 2020, 11:21:21 am »
I think the paper was suggesting that patients with the same type of cancer had the same unique bio-feedback frequencies (?whatever they are?), not present in people without these cancers - and by feeding these frequencies (modulated onto 27.12MHz carrier, presumably AM) back into the patient they were able to reduce/stop tumour growth?

If this was vaguely possible, you'd have thought it would be a great diagnosis tool at the very least.

I remember reading about 'cell cycle oscillators' many moons ago - these are natural processes in humans, but at much lower frequencies. Perhaps there is something similar (an oscillating bio-chemical reaction) in a tumour that is interfered with (hetrodyning?).
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Online mikerj

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Re: Ever heard of PERL?
« Reply #10 on: March 03, 2020, 07:30:39 pm »
a small number of frequencies, e.g., 1,873.477 Hz, 2,221.323 Hz

Wait. I cant quite figure out if that is suggesting that patients reacted to those frequencies (as in it cured their cancer) or if those with cancers are somehow emitting those frequencies?

Those two frequenceis are reasonably similar to some used in mobile/cellular networks (they were quite common in 3G networks, and 1.8GHz in some 2G). So is that just trying to point more blame at mobile/cellular networks? Otherwise, having more of them around could be a good thing for these people.  :-DD

Note the values include a decimal point and a comma i.e. they are ~1.8kHz and ~2.2kHz. 
 

Offline DBecker

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Re: Ever heard of PERL?
« Reply #11 on: March 03, 2020, 07:43:48 pm »

Sadly and possibly a little ironically Don Tunney died of cancer apparently as a result of sitting in an RV whilst it was scanned by an industrial X-ray.
http://www.dissident-net.info/don-tunney/

A quick reading of this hints that it is a bogus claim.

It might be worth investigating further if it happened to a normal person, but not someone with the swirl of conspiracy theories and magic waves surrounding their life.
 

Offline SiliconWizard

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Re: Ever heard of PERL?
« Reply #12 on: March 03, 2020, 08:43:25 pm »
Maybe you could see this as a modern amulet:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Amulet
 


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