Author Topic: IRL Glasses  (Read 989 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline bandgap

  • Contributor
  • Posts: 46
  • Country: us
  • .: no electrons here :.
    • Bandgap.net
IRL Glasses
« on: October 11, 2018, 01:11:13 pm »
https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/ivancash/irl-glasses-glasses-that-block-screens

Ok, while technically not dodgy, I like how they made it sound like they put a bunch of R&D into these when they really just put polarizing filters in some glasses frames.  :-DD   :clap:

 

Offline Muttley Snickers

  • Supporter
  • ****
  • Posts: 1800
  • Country: au
Re: IRL Glasses
« Reply #1 on: October 11, 2018, 02:58:10 pm »
Some vehicles use screens to display potential hazards like reversing cameras and such so these could do more harm than anything else. Anyway, they appear to be just another one of those let's dream up a bullshit problem and then fabricate and market a ridiculous solution type affair. I might wait for IRL 5.0 which is rumoured to block out everything that is surrounded in bullshit.   
One smart cookie, better make that two for good measure.
 

Online rrinker

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 1690
  • Country: us
Re: IRL Glasses
« Reply #2 on: October 12, 2018, 02:03:45 am »
 It's not even just backup cameras (I'm not even going to go there on what I think about this), but so many newer cars use electronically generated gauges. Not those horrible 80's "digital dashes" but analog-looking dials that are actually graphics generated on a screen. Yeah, let's wear something that blocks that. At least you could then honestly tell the officer you had no idea how fast you were going.  :-DD
I'm lucky, my car still has actual physical needle on a dial gauges (still electronically driven of course), but if I wear my prescription polarized sunglasses, the information display area between the speedometer and tachometer pretty much disappears, as does the display on the radio (I also still have a traditional style radio, not a giant stupid LCD screen jutting out. Two knobs, and some buttons.).
 
 

Offline Cyberdragon

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 1726
  • Country: us
Re: IRL Glasses
« Reply #3 on: October 12, 2018, 02:30:10 am »
And when stuff starts using proper AMQQLED displays? Then what? You're hippie BS won't work anymore that's right. 
 8) = :bullshit:

EDIT: And they don't work on CRTs, so I could still watch TV. >:D
*BZZZZZZAAAAAP*
Voltamort strikes again!
Explodingus - someone who frequently causes accidental explosions
 

Online Mr. Scram

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 4875
  • Country: 00
  • Display aficionado
Re: IRL Glasses
« Reply #4 on: October 12, 2018, 02:36:09 am »
They're not working on my OLED phone, LED wall display and ereader. I think I may have been scammed!
 
The following users thanked this post: Cyberdragon

Offline StillTrying

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 1416
  • Country: gb
  • 100% Brand New and High Quality, in theory.
Re: IRL Glasses
« Reply #5 on: October 12, 2018, 03:03:35 am »
$94,286
pledged of $25,000 goal
1,396
backers

:palm:

Online SiliconWizard

  • Frequent Contributor
  • **
  • Posts: 826
  • Country: fr
Re: IRL Glasses
« Reply #6 on: October 12, 2018, 11:22:27 am »
I guess not quite all kinds of LCDs would be blocked by just one-direction polarization. Would they?

Actually polarized sunglasses have been existing for a long time. I happen to have a Ray-Ban pair. They are great for color preservation.
Anyway, with those on, only *some* types of LCD screens become invisible, but not all. (For the record, they tend to render TN-LCDs invisible, such as the ones used in gas stations - which bites btw when you're filling your tank, it's sunny and you can't see the screen :D - but active matrix ones tend to remain fully visible, particularly IPS panels.)

What would make their project different and what's the added technology?
 

Online Mr. Scram

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 4875
  • Country: 00
  • Display aficionado
Re: IRL Glasses
« Reply #7 on: October 12, 2018, 11:29:59 am »
I guess not quite all kinds of LCDs would be blocked by just one-direction polarization. Would they?

Actually polarized sunglasses have been existing for a long time. I happen to have a Ray-Ban pair. They are great for color preservation.
Anyway, with those on, only *some* types of LCD screens become invisible, but not all. (For the record, they tend to render TN-LCDs invisible, such as the ones used in gas stations - which bites btw when you're filling your tank, it's sunny and you can't see the screen :D - but active matrix ones tend to remain fully visible, particularly IPS panels.)

What would make their project different and what's the added technology?
The trick is to use multiple polarisation layers in different directions. You'd be able to block almost any polarised screen with two or three layers. Conversely, sunglasses are typically designed with the polarisation layer in a direction least likely to cause issues, which I think might be diagonal.
 

Offline ebastler

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 1911
  • Country: de
Re: IRL Glasses
« Reply #8 on: October 12, 2018, 12:05:21 pm »
Gotta love the fact that this project is proudly brought to us by “Ivan Cash”.
I assume that’s pronounced “Iwant Cash”??  :palm:
 

Online SiliconWizard

  • Frequent Contributor
  • **
  • Posts: 826
  • Country: fr
Re: IRL Glasses
« Reply #9 on: October 12, 2018, 12:07:24 pm »
The trick WOULD be. But is it? I'm certainly no specialist in optics, but they clearly state: "IRL Glasses block LCD/LED screens through horizontal polarized optics". Which sounds like just one direction to me. What have I missed? 8)

Additionally, if multiple directions would cause issues in sunglasses as you stated (and as seems relevant), what would it make not having these issues in this project's case? Those are still glasses that are claimed to be for daily use as far as I got it.

What's the big secret sauce of the unidirectional multidirectional polarizing miracle? >:D
« Last Edit: October 12, 2018, 12:14:29 pm by SiliconWizard »
 

Offline Brad O

  • Contributor
  • Posts: 34
  • Country: us
  • Keithley Apps Engineer
    • Keithley homepage at Tektronix
Re: IRL Glasses
« Reply #10 on: October 13, 2018, 07:36:04 am »
The trick is to use multiple polarisation layers in different directions. You'd be able to block almost any polarised screen with two or three layers. Conversely, sunglasses are typically designed with the polarisation layer in a direction least likely to cause issues, which I think might be diagonal.
I think many use vertical polarizers to block reflections from car hoods and lakes and such that create horizontally polarized light.
 

Offline IanMacdonald

  • Frequent Contributor
  • **
  • Posts: 774
  • Country: gb
    • IWR Consultancy
Re: IRL Glasses
« Reply #11 on: October 17, 2018, 01:55:58 am »
A well known problem in aviation where sunshades are pretty-much a must at high altitude, but some LCD displays go dark when viewed through them.
 

Offline texaspyro

  • Frequent Contributor
  • **
  • Posts: 891
Re: IRL Glasses
« Reply #12 on: October 17, 2018, 02:50:16 pm »
I think that I will do a Kickfarter campaign for "Amazing X-Ray Spectacles".   You used to find them in ads in comic books, but I haven't seen them available (or read any comic books) in ages. 
 

Offline EEVblog

  • Administrator
  • *****
  • Posts: 26843
  • Country: au
    • EEVblog
Re: IRL Glasses
« Reply #13 on: October 17, 2018, 03:36:40 pm »
Stretch Goal - Matching LCD watch  ::)
 

Offline EEVblog

  • Administrator
  • *****
  • Posts: 26843
  • Country: au
    • EEVblog
Re: IRL Glasses
« Reply #14 on: October 17, 2018, 03:47:14 pm »
Best KS founder names ever! :-DD

 
The following users thanked this post: MK14, Brad O

Offline EEVblog

  • Administrator
  • *****
  • Posts: 26843
  • Country: au
    • EEVblog
Re: IRL Glasses
« Reply #15 on: October 17, 2018, 04:01:45 pm »
The founder is an ad agency guy:

http://www.cashstudios.co/#home
 

Offline Berni

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 1434
  • Country: si
Re: IRL Glasses
« Reply #16 on: October 17, 2018, 04:49:00 pm »
I guess not quite all kinds of LCDs would be blocked by just one-direction polarization. Would they?

Actually polarized sunglasses have been existing for a long time. I happen to have a Ray-Ban pair. They are great for color preservation.
Anyway, with those on, only *some* types of LCD screens become invisible, but not all. (For the record, they tend to render TN-LCDs invisible, such as the ones used in gas stations - which bites btw when you're filling your tank, it's sunny and you can't see the screen :D - but active matrix ones tend to remain fully visible, particularly IPS panels.)

What would make their project different and what's the added technology?
The trick is to use multiple polarisation layers in different directions. You'd be able to block almost any polarised screen with two or three layers. Conversely, sunglasses are typically designed with the polarisation layer in a direction least likely to cause issues, which I think might be diagonal.

I can explain how this works.

Yes sunglasses are vertically polarized because when light bounces from a shallow angle off a level surface it preferably bounces off horizontally polarized. Since the polarization of the light is 90 degrees to what the polarizer on sunglasses wants means that all of that light is blocked while the rest makes it trough. This means that the glasses attenuate glare significantly more than randomly polarized light.

But a lot of LCD displays are also horizontally polarized (likely to provide a better viewing angle in the horizontal plane), so this sunglasses trick stops working once you tilt the LCD in portrait mode. So what if you use both horizontal and vertical polarizes in the sunglasses to block both? That would indeed block the screen, but it would block everything else too, making the glasses completely black. The reason for that is that the first polarizer forces even randomly polarized light to align so when you put a extra 90 degree offset polarizer behind it then it blocks 100% of the light because all the light coming trough the first polarizer is the exact polarization that it blocks. Interestingly if you add a third polarizer at 45 degrees between the two you once again have light coming trough (This is a nice demonstration of wave behavior of light, you can see it demonstrated on youtube and explained why it works)

But as some have noticed this doesn't work perfectly on all displays. This is because some materials can scramble the polarization of light. If you place objects made of certain kinds of transparent plastic between the display and your sunglasses you can see the picture on the screen again. Some displays are covered by such materials that scramble polarized light coming off the LCD panel, not sure if this is intentional or just a coincidence of the materials they happen to use. But it still doesn't result in a perfect image, it usually makes it a dark image with weird rainbow patterns in it.

This trick is actually used for inspecting such polarization scrambling materials. Because this effect has to do with the tangled long polymer chains in plastics means that if you look carefully you can see how the plastic has flowed into the mold and can be used to see stress concentrations in the object.

 
The following users thanked this post: NF6X, newbrain, Mr. Scram, Brad O

Offline ebastler

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 1911
  • Country: de
Re: IRL Glasses
« Reply #17 on: October 18, 2018, 12:26:17 am »
The founder is an ad agency guy:
http://www.cashstudios.co/#home

Petty; I had hoped it would be this guy:
https://www.linkedin.com/in/ivan-cash-99215687/

"Design and creation of magical effects"  :)
 

Offline CCitizenTO

  • Contributor
  • Posts: 33
  • Country: ca
  • What's your favorite element?
Re: IRL Glasses
« Reply #18 on: October 18, 2018, 03:29:09 am »
Hey at least these actually work... Unlike Solar Freaking Roadways or Batterizer.  :-DD
 

Online Mr. Scram

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 4875
  • Country: 00
  • Display aficionado
Re: IRL Glasses
« Reply #19 on: October 18, 2018, 03:50:36 am »
I can explain how this works.

Yes sunglasses are vertically polarized because when light bounces from a shallow angle off a level surface it preferably bounces off horizontally polarized. Since the polarization of the light is 90 degrees to what the polarizer on sunglasses wants means that all of that light is blocked while the rest makes it trough. This means that the glasses attenuate glare significantly more than randomly polarized light.

But a lot of LCD displays are also horizontally polarized (likely to provide a better viewing angle in the horizontal plane), so this sunglasses trick stops working once you tilt the LCD in portrait mode. So what if you use both horizontal and vertical polarizes in the sunglasses to block both? That would indeed block the screen, but it would block everything else too, making the glasses completely black. The reason for that is that the first polarizer forces even randomly polarized light to align so when you put a extra 90 degree offset polarizer behind it then it blocks 100% of the light because all the light coming trough the first polarizer is the exact polarization that it blocks. Interestingly if you add a third polarizer at 45 degrees between the two you once again have light coming trough (This is a nice demonstration of wave behavior of light, you can see it demonstrated on youtube and explained why it works)

But as some have noticed this doesn't work perfectly on all displays. This is because some materials can scramble the polarization of light. If you place objects made of certain kinds of transparent plastic between the display and your sunglasses you can see the picture on the screen again. Some displays are covered by such materials that scramble polarized light coming off the LCD panel, not sure if this is intentional or just a coincidence of the materials they happen to use. But it still doesn't result in a perfect image, it usually makes it a dark image with weird rainbow patterns in it.

This trick is actually used for inspecting such polarization scrambling materials. Because this effect has to do with the tangled long polymer chains in plastics means that if you look carefully you can see how the plastic has flowed into the mold and can be used to see stress concentrations in the object.


I was aware that polarisation is used to see stresses in molded plastics, but your explanation casts a little more light on the how and why. It makes a lot of sense, but I simply hadn't considered it enough. Thanks!
 


Share me

Digg  Facebook  SlashDot  Delicious  Technorati  Twitter  Google  Yahoo
Smf