Author Topic: ORIGAMI LOGIC, ? Yeah, sure, I'll try that!  (Read 46851 times)

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Offline RJSVTopic starter

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Re: ORIGAMI LOGIC, ? Yeah, sure, I'll try that!
« Reply #50 on: March 04, 2024, 07:00:18 pm »
   Photo shows a particular sample of the potential looks obtained in the various manifestations of packaging.   In my case, I'm seeking, besides raw function, a case or package that has attractive visual qualities, to be used in various school teaching scenarios.

   Obviously just a couple of empty cookie trays at this point; but illustrative of subassemblies that might consist of origami logic or memory arrays.  Here, the clear plastic has 80 separated 'channels' that could contain the levers, etc. used in a multiple word memory array.
   The sample here has the two arrays, at 80 channels by 14, each.  Of course the intent is, also, to have some tiny scales of construction, but many prototypes will be larger, during development.

   This kind of 'Computer on Stage' or theatrical approach is part of the whole teaching thing; where (a teacher) must, firstly, gain the attention and interest of the students, if any hope of them motivated.

I've watched, from sidelines, as a talented clown 'entertained' a crowd.   Every single person there, in the audience was engaged and eagerly watching the clown produce various 'tricks' (with sleight of hand).
   That's what you want.
 

Offline RJSVTopic starter

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Re: ORIGAMI LOGIC, ? Yeah, sure, I'll try that!
« Reply #51 on: April 09, 2024, 07:23:36 pm »
   Today I have a great example, a single bit storage, (or latch), made of folded paper.

   In picture, I show a 3-piece 'sheet', of some packaging material.
The thick sheet can be bended, along those creased folds, with ultimately 2 separate but symmetric shapes.
Meanwhile, as this picture shows, you could be holding the left side section, while pushing with the right hand.
 

Offline RJSVTopic starter

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Re: ORIGAMI LOGIC, ? Yeah, sure, I'll try that!
« Reply #52 on: April 09, 2024, 07:35:47 pm »
   As this next picture shows, the actual shape includes a box shape, as the middle piece; meanwhile each of the two outside pieces are doubled.
The effect is very nearly the same, as just described, until you attempt to 'hold' one of the pairs, as a set.   Thanks means pitching things in adjacent pairs...but that can slide, freely relative to each other
As a plus, this sliding between the pairs is, mechanically like a gear-box in that it amplifies the input arc, into the output linear activator.
   The whole thing will store 1 bit worth of state.
 

Offline RJSVTopic starter

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Re: ORIGAMI LOGIC, ? Yeah, sure, I'll try that!
« Reply #53 on: April 09, 2024, 07:45:58 pm »
    A bit of a closer photo shows the small over lap or displacement between the card paper material.   That will reverse to other card, for the bit 'set' state.
 

Offline RJSVTopic starter

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Re: ORIGAMI LOGIC, ? Yeah, sure, I'll try that!
« Reply #54 on: April 11, 2024, 01:35:53 am »
   A bit of detail, on how the folding actions get a 5 X mechanical advantage.

   I'm considering a CCW (Counter clockwise) folding as when the center box structure folds, to the left from a top view overhead.
 

Offline RJSVTopic starter

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Re: ORIGAMI LOGIC, ? Yeah, sure, I'll try that!
« Reply #55 on: April 11, 2024, 01:42:19 am »
   Next, is shown the positioning with everything brought to maximum travel, (or some climax).
Like I've said; the fold lines have been creased so things almost go 'pancake flat'.
It's full CCW, and you can see the 'pancake' effect; where the walls of the box are offset, by the amount of the small walls.
 

Offline RJSVTopic starter

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Re: ORIGAMI LOGIC, ? Yeah, sure, I'll try that!
« Reply #56 on: April 11, 2024, 01:48:09 am »
For the alternate 'folding' state, (please see picture), that's a CW or clock-wise folded object.
   Mechanical advantage is from activating or pushing an arc about 6 inches, meanwhile the sliding output moves about 3/8 inch, correspondingly.
That's about 16 to 1.
 

Offline RJSVTopic starter

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Re: ORIGAMI LOGIC, ? Yeah, sure, I'll try that!
« Reply #57 on: April 11, 2024, 03:21:00 am »
Imagine now yourself standing, and gently rubbing hands together.   It's the act of withdrawal, or pulling a hand inward, that's the power-move.   With the paper card model discussion, there is a pairing of two flaps, still allowing sliding.
When the card model INPUT is active, there is a section, or strip that is 'folded' over a point, but also that blunt 'point' moves, so the thing is put into tension, causing withdrawal from the play field.
   So, I'm not certain if the 'mechanical advantage' is due to the length of the short wall, (of interior box shape).
 

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Re: ORIGAMI LOGIC, ? Yeah, sure, I'll try that!
« Reply #58 on: April 28, 2024, 07:21:55 pm »
   GOT MY BOOK  !!!
   Hello:
   My (Amazon delivered) Engineering Textbook, written by Bingim Young University Prof. Larry Howell is chock full of mathematics.

   Besides the obvious, helping myself in dealing with 'flexible' mechanisms, (like digital gates and transmission lines operating mechanically),
where I've contemplated a couple of historical trendy technology.   The particle or light 'beam' weapons (1985'ish) and the whole nanotech labled things (1995'ish) as examples.
I think some efforts around the special tech innovations occur quietly, as academia and industry maybe have less interest in sensationalism.
   One related product comes to mind; that is those single-piece plastic lids and bottle closures that closely reflect the discussion in that textbook.   So now I'm wondering at what point did that single example get introduced, present now in various retail candy containers we see on the shelves, as truly improved?

   As a short review, the Mechanical Engineering Textbook;
   Goes into matrix math, and Modulus of Elasticity.
   Solving simultaneous equations and advanced algebra manipulations, as part of the mechanics and physics analysis.
   Navigating between Sines /Cosines / Tangents and imaginary numbers.
   Concepts of virtual displacements and virtual work.

   Appendix containing data on various properties of materials and geometries of fabrication.

---------------------------------
   There are, also, some lectures by Prof Larry Howell, in directly related material (I.E. youtube).

 


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