Author Topic: Quiet Fan Technology for Deep Space Missions ???  (Read 3578 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline HDRW

  • Newbie
  • Posts: 2
  • Country: gb
Re: Quiet Fan Technology for Deep Space Missions ???
« Reply #25 on: May 10, 2018, 12:55:34 pm »
Would heat pipes work in zero gravity?

I thought the vapour floated up to the cold end, condensed, and ran back down to the hot end.  Does that work withough gravity?
 

Offline frozenfrogz

  • Frequent Contributor
  • **
  • Posts: 895
  • Country: de
  • Having fun with Arduino and Raspberry Pi
Re: Quiet Fan Technology for Deep Space Missions ???
« Reply #26 on: May 10, 2018, 01:17:49 pm »
As far as I understood how heat pipes work, the fluid transport takes place through capillary action. That’s why you can mount them in any orientation on your CPU.

In the middle of the pipe there is some mesh / wick that holds the fluid coolant which is released into the surrounding cavity when phase changing due to energy absorption. The motion and heat transfer to the cold end occurs due to the thermal gradient and liquid phase coolant flowing from the cool end to the hot end from capillary action.

But maybe we have some expert on the subject to clear things up some more. :)
He’s like a trained ape. Without the training.
 

Offline rs20

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 2151
  • Country: au
Re: Quiet Fan Technology for Deep Space Missions ???
« Reply #27 on: May 11, 2018, 02:14:11 am »
I thought the vapour floated up to the cold end, condensed, and ran back down to the hot end.

As far as I understood how heat pipes work, the fluid transport takes place through capillary action. That’s why you can mount them in any orientation on your CPU.

You're both right. Both types exist. Capillary ones (filled with newspaper or whatever) work in all orientations, gravity-fed ones (plain hollow tubes) have higher performance but only work in certain orientations.
 

Offline IanMacdonald

  • Frequent Contributor
  • **
  • Posts: 944
  • Country: gb
    • IWR Consultancy
Re: Quiet Fan Technology for Deep Space Missions ???
« Reply #28 on: May 11, 2018, 07:00:48 am »
Space probe approaching Pluto. Suddenly, over the data link..

EEEEEEeeeeeEEEEEEEeeeeeeeEEEEEEEeeeeeEEEEEE

"Damn. We should have used a Thermaltake instead of that cheap crap!"

"Enter Noun 25, Verb 42, Execute."

"Never seen that one before. -What does it do?

"WD-40 Activate."
 

Offline Wirehead

  • Regular Contributor
  • *
  • Posts: 166
  • Country: be
    • Wirehead.be
Re: Quiet Fan Technology for Deep Space Missions ???
« Reply #29 on: May 11, 2018, 11:58:29 am »
Why axial fans?.. Radial fans are MUCH more quiet, especially if you have to put some pressure behind it to get it to go through ducts...   :-//
"to remain static is to lose ground"
 

Offline wraper

  • Supporter
  • ****
  • Posts: 10208
  • Country: lv
Re: Quiet Fan Technology for Deep Space Missions ???
« Reply #30 on: May 11, 2018, 12:41:52 pm »
Why axial fans?.. Radial fans are MUCH more quiet, especially if you have to put some pressure behind it to get it to go through ducts...   :-//
Radial fans are quieter, really? Then compare noise of same model graphics card with radial reference fan and non reference axial fans. Radial fans provide high static pressure, axial fans more airflow at low static pressure. What is best suited depends on the task.
 

Offline schmitt trigger

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 1332
  • Country: mx
Re: Quiet Fan Technology for Deep Space Missions ???
« Reply #31 on: May 11, 2018, 01:04:48 pm »
In the mid to late 1990s, after the Soviet Union had broken up and funding for military and science projects had significantly diminished, there were many top-notch scientists available for lectures and research. For a very affordable fee.

My company was intent on designing a very high density PSU, where heat removal is one primary concern.
They brought this Russian thermal expert, who among other things had been involved in space borne equipment.

I could not attend, but those who did found the lectures fascinating. Some of the comments that I recall are similar to comments made by previous posters: Namely that everything one takes for granted on the earth's surface, is no longer a straightforward solution in space.

Uncommon solutions to common problems were the norm.
 

Offline Jeroen3

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 3279
  • Country: nl
  • Embedded Engineer
    • jeroen3.nl
Re: Quiet Fan Technology for Deep Space Missions ???
« Reply #32 on: May 28, 2018, 08:16:44 pm »
Namely that everything one takes for granted on the earth's surface, is no longer a straightforward solution in space.
When they dock the dragon capsule, they pressurize it, but they still enter with oxygen masks since the materials will make the air hazardous. Both from outgassing and debris separated by vibration. Then they ventilate it for some time to ensure there are not pockets of unbreathable air left.

Astronouts also require fresh air in their sleeping cabin, since otherwise they would suffocate from their own breath. Air is also weightless, and won't disperse as it does on earth by the classical though of "hot air moving upwards".

Recently a new type of wind turbine went up on Neeltje Jans, it has some strange fins at the end of the blades. This significantly reduces the "whoosh" sound. Fluid dynamics is strange.
« Last Edit: May 28, 2018, 08:18:30 pm by Jeroen3 »
 


Share me

Digg  Facebook  SlashDot  Delicious  Technorati  Twitter  Google  Yahoo
Smf