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Spinlaunch... Can it succeed?

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fourfathom:

--- Quote from: DougSpindler on January 01, 2022, 01:52:39 am ---Something is telling me you are are a 20-35 year old.  These snowflakes can only think in binary…. We need to go what’s good for the planet.  As in everyone should be driving EVs.  Everyone should be riding bikes.  Everyone should be eating vegan.  We need to rid the world of plastics.
--- End quote ---

Actually, I recently turned 68.  But emotionally I'm about 14, so on average you're pretty close.

DougSpindler:

--- Quote from: fourfathom on January 01, 2022, 02:17:19 am ---
--- Quote from: DougSpindler on January 01, 2022, 01:52:39 am ---Something is telling me you are are a 20-35 year old.  These snowflakes can only think in binary…. We need to go what’s good for the planet.  As in everyone should be driving EVs.  Everyone should be riding bikes.  Everyone should be eating vegan.  We need to rid the world of plastics.
--- End quote ---

Actually, I recently turned 68.  But emotionally I'm about 14, so on average you're pretty close.

--- End quote ---

So you are an analog person trapped in the body of a binary person.

bdunham7:
https://bgr.com/science/nasa-will-test-spinlaunchs-suborbital-accelerator-which-flings-satellites-into-orbit/

dunkemhigh:
Revisiting this, my second thought on seeing the photo was: shouldn't the tube be at an angle? You don't want the payload to go straight up because it'll come straight down again (or disappear forever).

Then I noticed the discussion of needing less fuel, which implies that they still need some fuel and having rocket fuel slosh around at 10Kg doesn't sound ultra-safe to me (I am not a rocket scientist so happy to be told it's 'normal').

But then I got back to the launch angle. If they go straight up they will need significant fuel to get moving in an orbital direction at speed, so an angled launch would still be beneficial. OTOH, they would encounter more drag (or drag for longer) which may outweigh that benefit.

Perhaps the real thing would be angled and with this one they just don't want to coming down outside their park.

DougSpindler:

--- Quote from: dunkemhigh on April 15, 2022, 09:36:05 am ---Revisiting this, my second thought on seeing the photo was: shouldn't the tube be at an angle? You don't want the payload to go straight up because it'll come straight down again (or disappear forever).

Then I noticed the discussion of needing less fuel, which implies that they still need some fuel and having rocket fuel slosh around at 10Kg doesn't sound ultra-safe to me (I am not a rocket scientist so happy to be told it's 'normal').

But then I got back to the launch angle. If they go straight up they will need significant fuel to get moving in an orbital direction at speed, so an angled launch would still be beneficial. OTOH, they would encounter more drag (or drag for longer) which may outweigh that benefit.

Perhaps the real thing would be angled and with this one they just don't want to coming down outside their park.

--- End quote ---

In reality it doesn’t matter as the people at Spinlaunch “think” the laws of physics do not apply to them.



And if that’s not enough proof,, here’s more.

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